how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc : Convert pdf to word for editing text Library application class asp.net windows wpf ajax mechanics29-part730

8|Rigid Body Motion
287
13 Fourpointmasses
m
are at the four corners of a square in the
z
=0 plane and with (
x; y
)=
(
a;a
)
;
(
a;
a
)
;
a;
a
)
;
a;a
). Compute the components of the tensor of inertia with the basis
^
x
,^
y
,^
z
.
14 Forthesamefourmassesasintheprecedingexercise,computeallthecomponentsusingtherotated
basis ^
x
0
=(^
x
+^
y
)
=
p
2and^
y
0
=( ^
x
+^
y
)
=
p
2. ^
z
0
=^
z
.
15 Intheprecedingtwoexercises,youcomparedresultsintwobases,oneofwhichisrotated45
with
respect to the other. What would the answer be if the basis is rotated by the angle 20
:
14
instead?
16 Ifarigidbodyisbothspinningandmovingwithnoexternalforces,youexpectitskineticenergy
to stay constant. In Eq. (8.34) however the rst two terms are constant, but the center of mass is
moving, so the last term is always changing. What’s wrong?
17 IntheanalysisoffreerotationleadingtoEq.(8.47),whathappensifthereiszerorotationabout
the
z
-axis?
18 A pointmass
m
is at coordinates specied by the vector
~r
and it is rotating about the axis
~!
.
What is its velocity
~v
? What then is its angular momentum
~r
m~v
?This is
~
L
=
I
(
~!
), so what are
the components of
I
?That is, compute
I
(^
x
),etc.
Convert pdf to word for editing text - application control tool:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to word for editing text - application control tool:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
288
Problems
8.1 ExplicitlywriteoutthederivationleadingtoEqs.(8.2)and(8.3)forthecaseoftwomasses.
8.2 ComputethevolumeofasolidhemisphereofradiusR.(a)cylindricalcoordinates. (b)spherical
coordinates. (c) Find the center of mass of a solid hemisphere with uniform mass density.
8.3 WriteouttheproofinEq.(8.4)forthespecialcaseof4=2+2massestoverifythecalculation.
8.4 Findthecenterofmassoftheparabolic-shapedplaneobjectinproblem2.54(b).
8.5 SupposetherodinFigure8.3isnotalongthe
x
-axis, but is at an angle
above it, still starting
from the origin. Now calculate the angular momentum for the same
~!
.
8.6 Does
f
(
~v
)=
~v
+
~c
dene a tensor
f
,where
~c
is a constant vector?
What about
f
(
~v
)=
~c
.
~v
?
What about
f
(
~v
)=^
z
~v
?
What about
f
(
~v
)=
c~v
?
What about
f
(
~v
)=^
x^x
.
~v
?
What about
f
(
~v
)=^
y
^
x
.
~v
?
What about
f
(
~v
)=
v
2
~v
?
What about
f
(
~v
)=^
v
?
In each case, draw pictures that explain what the function does.
8.7 Theforceonachargemovinginamagneticelddependsonitsvelocityas
~
F
=
q~v
~
B
. Show
that this function of velocity,
f
(
~v
)=
~v
~
B
,denes a tensor and compute its components in terms of
the components of
~
B
. Write the result as a matrix. Pick a simple, special
~v
and
~
B
,to verify that your
result works.
8.8 Intwodimensionsrotatingvectorsbyaxedangle
denes a tensor. Use the usual^
x
-^
y
basis to
compute the components of this tensor:
~u
=
f
(
~v
). Ans: in part,
f
21
=+ sin
.
8.9 If an n object is s pivoted about t some point and d the e only y other forces s on it are from m a uniform
gravitational eld, show that the torque about the pivot is the same as if all the mass were concentrated
at the center of mass. If the gravitational eld is not uniform, show by a counterexample that this is
false.
8.10 A meterstickis hanging, , pivoted about its s end, , and youstarttoaccelerate thesupport(the
pivot) horizontally at
a
0
. Find the initial angular acceleration of the stick and nd the initial linear
acceleration of the other end of the stick. Ans:
=3
a
0
=
2
8.11 Showthatthemomentofinertiaaboutany axisis
~!
.
I
(
~!
)
=!
2
=
R
r
2
?
dm
,where the origin for
the tensor of inertia is on the axis and
~!
is in the direction along the axis. No components. Just use
vector manipulation and the denition Eq. (8.7). And you will need a vector identity for the triple cross
product.
8.12 TaketheexampleinFigure8.5andrepeatitinthelanguageoftensorcomponentsinorderto
be certain that the results are the same.
8.13 Deriveallthecomponentsintheequation(8.28).
application control tool:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
multiple file formats or export PDF to Word, Tiff and RasterEdge provide HTML5 PDF Viewer and Editor to help C# users to view, annotate, convert and edit
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Why do we need to convert PDF to Word file in VB.NET class PDF to Word conversion lies in the fact that compared to PDF document format, Word file is
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
289
8.14 Forauniformrigidrodrotatingaboutanaxisperpendiculartotherod,butpassingthrougha
point on the line with the rod, compute the rotational kinetic energy. The rotation axis can intersect
the line of the rod anywhere. For xed
!
,nd the position of the axis for which this kinetic energy is
aminimum.
8.15 Derivethecomponent
I
xx
=
R
dmy
2
in Eq. (8.31) by direct integration.
8.16 Forthefunctionsinproblem8.6thatdodenetensors,whichonesaresymmetricasdenedin
Eq. (8.39)? I.e.
~v
1
.
f
(
~v
2
)=
f
(
~v
1
)
.
~v
2
.
8.17 Forthe functions inproblem 8.6thatdodenetensors,ndtheircomponentswithrespectto
some (clearly stated) basis of your choice. Ans:e.g.
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8.18 StartwiththerectangularplatewhosecomponentswerecomputedinEq.(8.26). Movetheplate
up a distance
c
so that its corner is at the coordinates (0
;
0
;c
), though still parallel to the
x
-
y
plane.
Now what are the components of its tensor of inertia?
8.19 Computethecomponentsofthetensorofinertiaofathin,uniformsphericalshell,mass
m
and
radius
R
,about an axis through its center. Note: you must do this in your head! No complicated
integrals allowed.
8.20 Computethemomentofinertiaofaballofuniformvolumemassdensityaboutanaxisthrough
its center. Mass =
M
and radius =
R
. Do this two ways.
(a) Straight-forward integration of
R
dmr
2
?
=
R
dm
(
x
2
+
y
2
)in your choice of coordinates, probably
cylindrical but maybe spherical or (least likely) rectangular.
(b) Compute
R
dmr
2
,wherethis
r
is the spherical coordinate. Then use this result to get the moment
of inertia of part (a). Ans:
2
5
MR
2
.
8.21_Auniformballisrollingdownhillwithoutslippingandstartingfromrest.(a)Computeitskinetic
energy as a function of the distance travelled by using the result of Eq. (8.34) with the origin at the
center of the ball. (b) Compute its kinetic energy by noting that the point of contact is not moving, so
that it is at any instant moving with pure rotation about that point. Find the moment of inertia about
this new axis of rotation in order to get the kinetic energy with this origin. It will be nice if the answers
agree.
8.22 In the exampleleadingtoEq.(8.8),whattorqueisneededtomaintain theangularvelocitya
constant? Ans:
~
=
1
24
ma
2
!^x
sin2
8.23 AtwhatpointinthedevelopmentfromEq.(8.14)to(8.19)didIusethefactthat
^x, ^y,
etc.are
orthonormal?
8.24 Thereisnothinginthischapterthatrequiredyoutomultiplytwomatrices,thoughIhopeyou’ve
seen the method before.Wheredid that rule for multiplication come from? It follows from the denition
of components as summarized in Eq. (8.20). Let
f
and
g
be tensors so that their components are dened
as
f
(
~e
i
)=
P
j
f
ji
~e
j
and
g
(
~e
i
)=
P
j
g
ji
~e
j
. The composition of two functions is dened:
h
=
f
g
means
h
(
~v
)=
f
g
(
~v
)
. (This is just like Eq. (0.32), though here you’re not doing calculus.) (a) Show
that
h
is linear, satisfying Eqs. (8.9). (b) Compute
h
(
~e
i
)using the equations (8.20) and (8.9) to express
h
mn
in terms of the components of
f
and of
g
. Ans:
h
mn
=
P
k
f
mk
g
kn
8.25 Twoequalmassesareplacedatcoordinates(
a;
0
;a
)and (0
;a; a
). Find the components of the
tensor of inertia about the origin in terms of the basis ^
x
,^
y;
^
z
in this coordinate system.
application control tool:VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
VB.NET programmers can convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint Tiff, Jpeg Conversely, conversion from PDF to Word (.docx) and paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
C# programmers can convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint Tiff, Jpeg, Bmp Conversely, conversion from PDF to Word (.docx) and paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
290
8.26 Derivetheanglebetween
~
L
and
~!
for the spinning disk, Eq. (8.32). The picture there implies
that
~
L
is closer to the
z
-axis than
~!
. Show that this equation agrees with that statement.
x
y
z
a
a
8.27 (a)Findthecomponentsoftheinertiatensorforatriangularplateasshownin
the sketch. The plate is in the
x
-
y
plane. (b) Find the eigenvectors and eigenvalues
of the tensor. Ans: (a)
I
zz
=
4
12
Ma
2
8.28_(a)Evaluatethecomponentsofthetensorofinertiaofauniformcubeofmass
m
and side
. The origin is at one corner. (b) What is
~
L
if
~!
is through the origin
and along the main diagonal of the cube? (c) What is the moment of inertia of the
cube about the main diagonal? Ans: (c)
ma
2
=
6
8.29 Find the components oftheinertiatensorforathinrodof mass
m
and length
. One end is
at the origin and the other is at the point (
‘; ; 
) of the spherical coordinate system. Ans:
I
xx
=
1
3
m‘
2
(sin
2
sin
2
+cos
2
)
8.30 Asolid,uniform,rectangularblockof mass
m
has sides
a
,
b
,
c
. The moment of
inertia about the long axis from one corner to its opposite is (perhaps)
(
m=
6)
a
2
b
2
+
b
2
c
2
+
c
2
a
2
=
a
2
+
b
2
+
c
2
.Analyze this proposed answer, trying to show
that it is wrong. If you fail, then maybe it’s right.
8.31_Derivetheexpressionstatedintheprecedingproblem.
8.32 Generalizetheparallelaxistheoremtondarelationshipbetweentwoinertiatensors,neitherof
which is about the center of mass. This theorem is not so useful.
8.33 Applytheequation(8.40)toallthecombinationsofbasisvectors ^
x
,^
y
,and^
z
to determine what
it says about the components of the inertia tensor in this basis. Do this without using the computed
form of the tensor in terms of
m
’s and
~r
’s. Just Eq. (8.40) itself.
8.34 Inpreviouschaptersyouhavesometimesstartedwithenergyinsteadofforceequa-
tions, knowing that you can dierentiate the former to get the latter. There is an easy,
elementary derivation of
=
I
in the same spirit. You know that
K
=
1
2
I!
2
for rotation
in the special case of a symmetric body about an axis. Attach it to an axle through its
center and wrap a string around it. Now pull with constant force
F
for a distance
x
,and as a function
of this distance pulled, get the work done. This work is the rotational kinetic energy: dierentiate this
equation with respect to time. Ans:
=
I
8.35 ParalleltotheresultinEq.(8.40),takethetensor
f
,where
f
(
~v
)=
~v
~
B
for xed
~
B
,only there
are no integrals this time. What is the relation between
~v
1
.
f
(
~v
2
) and
f
(
~v
1
)
.
~v
2
? Repeat problem
8.33forthiscasetodeterminewhatitsaysaboutthecomponentsofthistensor.
a
a
b
b
8.36_This gure is a a plane sheet of metal of mass
M
and dimensions as
shown. A coordinate system is set up in the lower left corner. (a) Compute
the components of the tensor of inertia in this coordinate system. Find the
eigenvectors of this tensor. (b) By how much would the coordinate system
as given have to be rotated in order that the matrix of components be in
diagonal form? You will of course check your result in all the special cases.
Ans:
I
zz
=
2
3
M
b
3
+
ba
2
a
3
=
(2
b
a
)
8.37Tossadiskintotheair,sothatitishorizontalandspinningitaboutits
axis as it  ies. Not exactly on axis though because unless you toss it perfectly
application control tool:C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
Convert Tiff file to bmp, gif, png, jpeg, and scanned PDF with high fidelity in C#. 2. Render text to text, PDF, or Word file. Tiff Metadata Editing in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Able to render and convert PDF document to/from to integrate and perform PDF text extraction feature in offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
291
you will see that it wobbles. Find the rate of wobbling and compare it to the rate of rotation of the
disk itself. First, what is the relationship between
!
z
and
!
0
? Which rotates faster, the plate or the
wobble? That is,interpret the equations and describe exactly what you will see when you watch such
athin plate tossed into the air and wobbling about its axis. Try it; make sure that there is some sort
of pattern imprinted on the disk so that you can see its rotation.
8.38 Athin,uniformrectangularplatehasmass
m
,sides 2
a
and 2
b
.Take the origin at the center of
the plate.
(a) Find the components of the inertia tensor of the plate.
(b) If the rectangular plate is rotating about a diagonal with an angular speed
!
nd the angular
momentum and the kinetic energy of the system.
8.39_Threeequalmasses
m
are placed at coordinates (0
;a; a
), (
a;
0
;a
), and (
a; a;
0).
(a) Find the components of the tensor of inertia about the origin in terms of the basis ^
x
,^
y
,^
z
in this
coordinate system.
(b) If the system is rotating as a rigid body about the
z
-axis through the origin, what is the angular
momentum? Draw a picture of the vectors
~!
and
~
L
in this system. If it’s hard to do the drawing, then
add somewordsto say what the directions are. In fact, put some words in anyway.
(c) Find any one eigenvector of
I
, and its corresponding eigenvalue. You may either derive it by
computing it or you may guess an answer and demonstrate that it is correct.
(c) Having found one eigenvector and eigenvalue, nd the other two. At worst, you have started with
acubic equation and know one root. Now factor it and then get the others. Or, you can try to nd a
more clever way.
2
1
~!
8.40_Asolidcylinderhasmass
m
,radius
R
,and moment of inertia
I
. It is set spinning
clockwise about its axis with an angular speed
!
0
and placed on the  oor next to a wall
as shown. The coecient of kinetic friction between the  oor and the cylinder is
1
and between the wall and the cylinder it is
2
. The angular deceleration of the cylinder
is claimed to be
=
mgR
1
(1+
2
)
 
(1+
1
2
)
I
=2
1
g
(1+
2
)
 
(1+
1
2
)
R
.
Is this plausible?
8.41_Derivetheangulardecelerationasstatedintheprecedingproblem. Perhapsrereadsection1.4?
8.42Aplanehomogeneousplateofsurfacemassdensity
is bounded by the logarithmic spiral
r
=
ke

and the radii
=0 and
=
. (a) Find the components of the inertia tensor about the origin.
The plate is in the
x
-
y
plane. (b) Find the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of this tensor. Any special
cases to check the validity of your solution?
8.43 Eightpointmasses
m
are placed at the eight corners of a cube of side
a
. The origin is at one
corner of the cube and the
x
,
y
,and
z
axes run along edges of the cube. (a) Compute the components
of the tensor of inertia in this coordinate system. (b) What is the moment of inertia about the long
diagonal of the cube?
8.44 Findalleigenvectorsandeigenvaluesofatensorwithcomponents
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
.Apply this result to
the result of problem8.7. Ans:^
x
i
^
y
,^
z
8.45_Generalizeproblem8.14toanarbitrarybodyrotatingaboutanarbitraryaxis. Amongthesetof
all axes parallel to some given one, derive the axis that presents the smallest kinetic energy for a xed
~!
. Use the parallel axis theorem and Eq. (8.33). When you want to simplify this,drawpictures.
application control tool:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
MS Word 2003, 2007 and above versions are supported For how to convert PDF to HTML document in VB.NET application, a simple and easy VB Conversion of PDF to Text.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. mature library SDK which adds powerful Portable Document Format (PDF) editing solutions and
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
292
8.46 InFig.8.12andassumingthatthediskisthin,pictureyourselfasthepersonholdingontothe
z
-axis. Where will you have to look to see the angular momentum vector? With respect to you, what
is the motion of
~!
and of
~
L
? What are these motions with respect to a pedestrian?
8.47 TheiceinAntarcticaisuptoafewkilometersthickinspots,averagingabout1.6km.Ifitmelts
and spreads out over the surface of the Earth, estimate its eect on the number of seconds in a day
and the cumulative eect for a year. Also, what would it do to sea level? Don’t plug in any numbers
until you’ve simplied all the algebra and so that you aren’t subtracting two large numbers to get a
small number.
Ans:
5
3
Tm=M
:
5s or so per day. This answer assumes the Earth is a uniform ball. It isn’t, so in
which direction does that fact change the answer? Bigger or smaller?
8.48 TheSunrotatesonceinalittlelessthatoneEarthmonth. IftheSuncollapsestoaradius s of
10 km while conserving angular momentum, what would its rotation period be? This is about the size
of a neutron star, the remnant of an explosive stellar collapse. What would the speed of a point on
its equator be? What would the collapsed star’s density be? And of course not just a number. Find
something to compare it to.
8.49 _Compute thecomponentsofthe inertiatensorfor r asolidconeofuniform m mass density. . The
origin is the vertex. Mass:
M
,height:
h
,radius of base,
R
. What is its kinetic energy if it is rotating
about its axis of symmetry with angular speed
!
?
Ans: Diagonal:
I
zz
=
3
10
MR
2
,
I
xx
=
I
yy
=
3
5
Mh
2
+
3
20
MR
2
,
K
=
3
20
MR
2
!
2
8.50_Theconeintheprecedingproblemislyingonatableandfreetorollwithoutslipping. Itsvertex
stays xed, and the line of contact with the table is instantaneously at rest, so that denes the axis of
rotation. What is its kinetic energy, expressed in terms of the given information and
!
?
Ans:
1
2
M!
2
3
10
R
2
+
3
5
h
2
+
3
20
R
2
R=h
=
(1 +
R
2
=h
2
)
8.51 UseEq.(8.34)tondthetotalkineticenergyofasolidcylinderrollingdownhillwithoutslipping.
(a) Do this using an origin at the center of the cylinder. (b) Do this using an origin at the (moving)
point of contact of the cylinder with the surface.
8.52 The equation (8.50)(1) usually has no o solution. . Pick k one of f the e eigenvectors s of
I
0
and its
corresponding eigenvalue, perhaps
!
0
1
0
0
,or another. Plug this
~!
0
into the right side of (8.50)(1) and
see what happens when you try to solve for
~!
1
.
8.53_(a)RepeatthecalculationsofEqs.(8.52)-(8.54)foroneoftheothertwoeigenvectors,getting
both the correction to the eigenvalue and for the eigenvector. (b) Take the scalar product of the
~!
0
+
~!
1
that you nd with the
~!
0
+
~!
1
of the example, the one that started with
!
0
^
x
.This dot product should
be zero, at least to the order that you’ve calculated the vectors. That is, the product should be zero
out to order
m=M
,but don’t expect it to be any better than that unless you decide to compute the
second order corrections and to include them.
8.54 TheEarthhasabulgeattheequatorsothatitsdiameterisabout41kmlargerthanitisfrom
pole to pole. Model the Earth’s tensor of inertia by estimating this as a fat cylinder of thickness 20
:
5km
and height perhaps 1/3 of Earth’s diameter. Add this to the rest of the Earth, assumed to be a sphere,
to get the total tensor of inertia. The Earth’s rotational axis does not align perfectly with the polar axis,
so this will cause a wobble. Compute it, and see how this simple model compares to the experimental
value of about a 400 day period. The results will of course depend on your choice of density for this
bulge.
application control tool:C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Free online C# class source code for editing PDF hyperlink in Visual Studio .NET Keep Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint links in PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET TIFF: Read, Edit & Process TIFF with VB.NET Image Document
Windows and mobile viewers establishing; text & graphics Started with VB.NET TIFF Editing, VB.NET powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
293
8.55 UsetheboxexampleofFigure8.14(butwithouttheextramass)andforceittospinwithangular
speed
!
about its long axis. What torque does it take to do this?
8.56 Arighttrianglehassides
a
,
b
,and
c
,and it has a uniform area mass density. What is the moment
of inertia about an axis perpendicular to the plane and through its center of mass. I suggest that you
start by computing its moment about an axis through a corner rst. Ans:
1
36
m
a
2
+
b
2
+
c
2
Special Relativity
.
Read sections 0.2 0.5
The history of special relativity is fascinating: lled with partial answers, clever ideas, false starts,
intellectual barriers, and some smart people who, given enough additional time, would have gured it
all out. Einstein got there rst. He cut through the complexities that had slowed or stalled other work
and he found the underlying simplicity. That is where I will start.
Galileo was really the rst to articulate one of the foundational concepts, and he did it three and
ahalf centuries before Einstein was born. In hisDialogontheTwoChiefWorldSystems he made the
idea concrete by describing what you would see if you are in the main cabin below decks on some large
ship, rst when it is standing still, and then when you
...have the ship proceed with any speed you like, so long as the motion is uniform
and not  uctuating this way and that. You will discover not the least change in
all the eects named, nor could you tell from any of them whether the ship was
moving or standing still.*
Put in modern terms,
1. Without looking outside the room, you can’t tell how fast you’re moving.
or 2. Onlyrelativevelocitiesaremeasurable,notabsolutevelocities.
or 3. TheResultsofMeasurementdependonlyupontherelativevelocity y ofobserver
and observed and not upon their absolute velocities.
(And the third one is also Galileo’s phrasing |surprisingly modern.)
Chapter ve started with the Galilean transformation, which is the mathematical codication of
the change to a moving coordinate system.
x
0
=
x
v
0
t;
y
0
=
y;
z
0
=
z;
t
0
=
t
Eq. (5.1)
As you saw there, as long as forces depend on at most the relative velocity of interacting objects,
Newton’s equations remain the same when switching to a moving observer.
~
F
=
d~p=dt
no matter how
fast you move. The problem is that Newtonian Mechanics is not all. Maxwell found a set of equations
that describe electromagnetism extraordinarily well, and they do not transform properly under the
Galilean transformation. That means that something has to give: Newton, Galileo, or Maxwell.
When these diculties arose in the late 1800’s the natural response was to go with the familiar,
keeping Newton and Galileo, but modifying Maxwell. The most famous approach was to say that
Maxwell’s electromagnetic equations are valid in onlyone coordinate system and no other: the \ether"
theory.
That didn’t work, and Einstein’s approach kept Galileo and Maxwell, while forcing Newton to
change. It all sounds so simple doesn’t it? When one choice doesn’t work, try another. This caricature
of the history as I’ve sketched it in these few paragraphs has lled, and will further ll, whole books
putting  esh on the details.
What is it about Maxwell’s theory that caused a problem? The simple and most profound fact
is that it produces a unique value for the speed of light in a vacuum. Not speed relative to something,
just speed. The simplicity of the theory of special relativity is that you start from two assumptions:
* Translation: Stillman Drake
294
9|Special Relativity
295
1. Only relative velocities are measurable
2. The speed of light in a vacuum is the same for everyone.
This assumes that Maxwell is right and that Galileo’s verbal statement of the principle of relativity
is right, but not the transformation equations written above. In particular the fourth one,
t
0
=
t
,
will be sacriced, and that is the most startling and perplexing aspect of this theory. The concepts
\simultaneity", or \at the same time", or \now" will become puzzles to be sorted out. In Galileo’s day,
or Maxwell’s, and all the way up to Einstein’s, this equation stating that time is the same for everyone
was so obvious that it wasn’t even stated. It was just wrong.
What will replace the Galilean transformation of Eq. (5.1)? The answer is
x
0
=
x
v
0
t
p
v
2
0
=c
2
;
y
0
=
y;
z
0
=
z;
t
0
=
t
v
0
x=c
2
p
v
2
0
=c
2
These are called the Lorentz transformation, but developing them will take some eort, concluding at
Eq. (9.10).
A matter of typography: Most of the time I have tried to be careful about how I write the
mathematics, sometimes probably to the point of being annoying. In this chapter there are so many
velocities that I won’t bother with the distinctions such as those between
v
(speed) and
v
x
(velocity).
Iwill leave it to you to gure out which is which from context, otherwise there would be too many
sub-
x
’s lling the pages, and by now you should be able to handle such abuse of notation.
9.1 Time Dilation, Length Contraction
The rst step is to show that an immediate implication of the assumptions of special relativity is that
moving clocks run slow, which means that measurements of time must be handled very carefully. There
is a simple way to demonstrate this, one that is fairly standard in texts on relativity. It involves using
aspecial kind of clock to analyze the eects of velocity. Because light in a vacuum is at the center
of one of the assumptions of the theory, this clock is built precisely from light in a vacuum. Build an
evacuated box with mirrors at the top and bottom and a source of light inside.
L
0
=
cT
0
your view
vT
cT
your friend’s view
Fig. 9.1
In the sketch on the left, the light source starts a pulse of light moving straight up the tube
until it hits the (perfect) mirror at the top. It bounces (straight) back down and hits the bottom (also
perfect). The light keeps bouncing up and down as long as you want it to, and that bouncing is the
ticking of the clock. Any real clock will have imperfections of course, but the analysis of this idealized
version is where to start. What is the time between ticks? The length is
L
0
and the speed of light is
c
=299792458 m/s, so
T
0
=
L
0
=c
is the time for the light to go bottom to top or back.
9|Special Relativity
296
As you observe the light pulse repeatedly hit the bottom and the top mirrors, a friend of yours is
driving toward the left at (very) high speed
v
.He has no doubt that the light is hitting the mirrors, but
says that the clock is moving right at high speed, so that during the time that the light pulse went from
the bottom to the top, the clock itself has travelled some distance. If you say that he is moving left
then he will say that the clock is moving right. That in turn implies that the light pulse will, according
to your friend, be travelling along a diagonal path up and another diagonal path down. The second
drawing shows three images of the clock as it moves right. When the light left the bottom mirror, when
it hit the top one, and nally when it returns to the bottom.
If this were a discussion of Newtonian mechanics, and Maxwell hadn’t been born yet, this would
be easy to analyze. In the rst picture the light pulse is moving at speed
c
. In the second picture, the
clockandthelight are moving right with a horizontal component of velocity
v
. The light has a vertical
component of velocity
c
,so the total speed of the light according to your friend is
p
c
2+
v
2. Allvery
simple, but that’s not the way the universe is built. Instead, the speed of light is the same for everyone,
and that is taken to be one of the fundamental assumptions of special relativity:
c
,not
p
c
2+
v
2.
What changes is the time measurements themselves. The previous paragraph tacitly assumed
that both people measured velocities by the same methods and that the clocks each used to measure
the time-of- ight of the light behaved the same way. That assumption has to go. In the original
calculation of the ticking of the clock,
T
0
=
L
0
=c
. For the other person looking at the clock you can’t
assume that the time to tick is the same; call it
T
instead (to be determined).
cT
vT
L
0
In the time of one tick, the clock moves a distance
vT
horizontally, and the light
moves a distance
cT
along the diagonal. Remember the second assumption of the theory:
light moves at the speed of light. There’s a right triangle in this picture, and you can apply
the Pythagorean Theorem to solve for
T
.
(
vT
)
2
+
L
2
0
=(
cT
)
2
! (
vT
)
2
+(
cT
0
)
2
=(
cT
)
2
!
c
2
T
2
0
=(
c
2
v
2
)
T
2
!
T
2
=
c
2
T
2
0
c
2
v
2
!
T
=
T
0
p
v
2
=c
2
=
T
0
(9
:
1)
and
is a standard abbreviation for 1
=
p
v
2
=c
2
.
This is time dilation. The moving clock takes longer to tick. The moving clock runs slow. Wait
aminute. Isn’t it your friend who’s moving? Not the clock? Remember the rst assumption of the
theory: Galileo’s idea that only relative velocities are measurable. That means that everyone is entitled
to claim \I am standing still." \I am not moving; it is the rest of the universe that is moving." Everyone
is right, including your friend, who says that the clock is moving right at speed v.
This is the rst indication that these two innocuous-sounding assumptions can lead to surprising
and puzzling consequences. When time has become slippery can space be far behind?
Point of Confusion
If your friend’s clock is running slow by a factor 2, you see that it takes a longer-than-expected time
between his ticks. If you see two events that occur 10 seconds apart, does he say that they occurred
5s apart or 20 s? If these are the only two choices, then the answer is either, depending onwherethe
two events took place. See problem9.9. After the whole Lorentz Transformation is available in a few
more pages, then I hope this question and its semi-mysterious answer will be clearer.
Lengths
If clocks run slow so that you have to be careful how you measure time, then what about lengths? If
you have stopped at a train crossing and a long train passes in front of you, is the length of the train
according to you the same as the length of the train according to a passenger on the train? No. To
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested