9|Special Relativity
297
measure the length of the train, measure the time it takes to move past and multiply it by the speed:
L
=
vT
0
. (
T
0
is the time thatyou read onyour clock.) The question is now to nd the length as
measured by a passenger. Call the length and the time that the passenger measures
L
0
and
T
instead
of
L
and
T
.(
L
0
is the length the passenger observes for the [to him, stationary] train.) The passenger
doesn’t need another clock to measure
T
,all that’s needed is to be able to readyour clock. If yours
recorded
T
0
,and according to the passenger you are moving at speed
v
,then (again according to the
passenger) your clock is running slow. The passenger then says that the time
T
for you to have moved
from one end of the train to the other is greater than your measured
T
0
. The calibration factor between
the clocks is
p
v
2
=c
2
,so the passenger says that the time in which you go from one end of the
train to the other is longer than the
T
0
that you read on your slow clock. It is
T
0
=
p
v
2
=c
2. Thisis
the passenger’s
T
and the length as measured by the passenger is
L
0
=
vT
. (Reread the above Point
of Confusion.)
your view
v
T
0
passenger’s view
v
T
0
Fig. 9.2
you:
L
=
vT
0
passenger:
L
0
=
vT
=
vT
0
q
v
2
=c
2=
L
q
v
2
=c
2
length change:
L
=
L
0
q
v
2
=c
=
L
0
=
(9
:
2)
You see the train as shorter than the passenger does. This length contraction is a second peculiar
feature of special relativity.
This derivation of length contraction (also called the Lorentz contraction) involves only the
simplest algebra, but it requires careful attention to the details of who’s looking at what and when.
There is another way to get to this result, one that reverses these two diculties. This concepts are
easy, but the algebra is more involved. The idea is simply to take the light clock of the previous two
pages and turn it on its side, so that the light is going left-to-right and right-to-left as the clock moves
right. It should read the same time as it did when it was upright, and that will let you gure out what
its length is. See problem9.6 for some suggestions about how to do this calculation (or better, you can
try it on your own rst).
It’s easy to mix up the applications of these dilation and contraction equations, so before applying
either of Eqs. (9.1) or (9.2) you should think about the qualitative behavior of the time and distance
measurements. If a clock takes two seconds to mark o a second, its owner will think that someone
just did the 100 meter dash in ve seconds. This means that you can’t simply plug into formulas. The
qualitative analysis should come rst.
Amoving clock runs slow.
The calibration factor between clocks is
=1
=
p
v
2
=c
2
.
That factor is greater than one.
So, does the factor go in the numerator or in the denominator?
Terminology: Properlength is the length of an object as measured by someone who says it is
not moving. Proper time is the time interval between two events as measured by someone who says
Convert pdf to text c# - control application platform:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to text c# - control application platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
9|Special Relativity
298
the occurred at the same place*|the clock is standing still. For the train example,
L
0
is the proper
length of the train, and
T
0
is the proper time on my clock. There is no universal convention about how
you place subscripts here, so don’t assume that a sub-0 will always be proper. Forproperacceleration
see equation (9.22). [What would \proper velocity" be?]
If length contracts, shouldn’t the
L
0
in the original clock contract? Should the
L
0
in Eq. (9.1)
be a variable too? No, but it is not only a legitimate question, it’s an important one. In that derivation
Iassumed that both you and your friend used the same value for that number, the length perpendicular
to the motion. Is that valid? The answer is yes, but now you have to test it to be certain.
The proof is by contradiction. Assume the statement is false and show that it doesn’t work.
Take the light clock, supposedly length
L
0
. Your friend wants to measure it to see if it remains
L
0
even when it moves past, so he uses a ruler of length
L
0
and holds it up so the ruler and the clock just
miss each other. To be certain of his measurement he attaches a pair of paint brushes to the two tips
of the ruler, set so that they will mark the ends of the clock as it passes. If the clock shrinks because of
its motion then the paint brush on one end of the ruler will mark the clock while the other end misses.
The trouble is that paint leaves a permanent mark on the clock. You and your friend can get together
over a beer after the experiment in order to compare data. If your clock has only one paint mark, then
there is a lateral length contraction andyouweremoving. If it has two paint marks that arenot at
the ends, then he was moving. Either way you have violated the rst axiom of the theory, that only
relative velocities can be measured. What if lateral lengths expanded instead of contracting? You get
into exactly the same contradiction, but interchanging who is moving.
Another way to picture this: If a railroad train is entering a tunnel through a mountain, and if
the tunnel is just barely large enough to accommodate the width of the train when the train is moving
slowly, what will happen when the train is moving rapidly? If there is either a lateral contraction or
expansion because of the speed then someone, either the train engineer or the person who built the
tunnel, will think that the train will still t while the other will expect a crash. That is a qualitative
dierence, so they can’t both be right.
Paradoxes
Under normal circumstances,i.e. before you started to study relativity, you may have an occasion to
think that your watch keeps good time and that your friend’s is running slow. Your friend, who thinks
just as highly of his timepiece, would think that your watch is running fast. The calculation of time
dilation leading to Eq. (9.1) says that your friend’s clock runs slow because it’s moving. If the rst
assumption of relativity is correct, that you can’t tell which of you is moving, then both of you will
believe that the other’s clock is running slow|and both be right. How can that happen?
The same paradox applies to lengths. If the moving train contracts, a passenger on that train
can look out and say that another train you think to be standing still has shrunk. How can both be
true? Resolving both of these problems will have to wait a few pages until the Lorentz transformation
appears.
If you drive a long car and have a short garage, can you t your car within the garage by driving
extra fast? Someone standing outside and watching you try to do this would say yes; your car has
shrunk, so it now ts inside. You, as the driver, see the garage approaching you, only it is now even
shorter than it was before. You’re never going to t inside now. Who’s right?
If two people are approaching each other, one at
3
4
c
from the left and the other at
3
4
c
from the
right, and you ask one of them how fast the other is moving, the answer will not be
3
2
c
,but
24
25
c
. A
derivation of this will appear in Eq. (9.13).
* There is an obscure word for this: collocal is the spatial analog of simultaneous.
control application platform:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Feel Free Best C#.NET PDF text extraction library and component for free download. XDoc.PDF
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
9|Special Relativity
299
Example
Before going into some more analytical problems with relativity, a few elementary examples are useful.
Cosmic rays are (mostly) very high energy protons that come from outer space and hit the Earth’s
atmosphere. When such an energetic proton collides with an oxygen or nitrogen nucleus it simply blasts
the nucleus apart and in the process creates many thousands or millions of other new particles. A
major component of the resulting debris is the muon. These are particles that are basically massive,
but unstable, electrons;
m
=207
m
e
,and the mean lifetime of these particles is 2.2 microseconds. In
this short time, even moving at nearly the speed of light, the mean distance such a particle goes before
decaying is about
c
=(3  10
8
m
=
s)(2
:
2
s) = (300 m
=
s)(2
:
2
s) = 660 m = 0
:
66 km
What does \mean life" mean? Radioactive decay follows statistical laws, and starting with a
population of particles at time zero, the fraction of them left at time
t
is
e
t=
,or expressed in terms
of the total population,
N
(
t
)=
N
0
e
t=
. To nd the average value of the decay time, let
dN
be the
change in this number in time
dt
,so that  
dN
is the number that decayed between time
t
and
t
+
dt
.
The mean time to decay is then a sum over all these times divided by the total number of particles:
1
N
0
Z
t
dN
)=
1
N
0
Z
1
0
t
dN
dt
dt
=
Z
1
0
1
te
t=
dt
=
Starting from an altitude of 20 km and moving straight down, the fraction of these particles that
would reach the Earth’s surface is
e
20
=
0
:
66
10
13
.Despite this, so many reach the surface that you
will have a thousand or more of them passing through you each minute. This is not because there are
so many cosmic rays that hit the Earth, but because of time dilation. The muons are moving so fast
that the time dilation eect is large, and their lifetime is far longer than the two microseconds that
they have when at rest. A factor of 1
=
p
v
2
=c
=10istypical,andyoumightguessthatsucha
factor would lead to a change in the number reaching the surface by about a factor of 10. Not so. This
exponential changes the fraction hitting the surface from
e
ct=c
=
e
20km
=
0
:
66km
=7  10
14
to
e
20
=
6
:
6
=0
:
05
(9
:
3)
That is a factor of about 10
12
,and this is a major part of the background radiation that you live with
all your life.
Iused the \mean lifetime" to describe this and you may be more familiar with the \half-life". They
are proportional. See problem9.3 to understand the relation between these two ideas:
t
1
=
2
=0
:
693
.
Also, not all muons will have the same speed, so they won’t all have the same time dilation factor.
How do you handle that? See problem9.8.
Example
The Global Positioning System is so commonly used that it is standard equipment in some cars,
and is available for personal use almost everywhere. It depends on precisely measuring the signals from
several satellites in orbit at a radius of 26600 km (measured from the Earth’s center). The orbital period
is about half a day; its orbital speed is about 3.8km/s. At this speed the time dilation eect is
=
1
p
v
2
=c
2
1 +
v
2
2
c
2
;
with
v
2
2
c
2
=
1
2
3
:
8
300 000
2
=8  10
11
control application platform:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
it extremely easy for C# developers to convert and transform a have original formatting and interrelation of text and graphical elements of the PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to TIFF in C#.NET. Use C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code to Convert PDF to Tiff in C#.NET Program. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
9|Special Relativity
300
In one day = 86400 s, the clock error would be 86400 s  8  10
11
=7
s. At the speed of light,
the distance error from this is then 7
s
.
300 000 km
=
s= 2km. If no correction had been made for this
eect the GPS would have been worthless. The eects from general relativity have the opposite sign
but are even larger, giving a combined drift that, if uncorrected for these relativistic eects, would be
about 10 km/day.
9.2 Space-Time Diagrams
As with almost everything else in physics, the ability to draw a sketch of your problem is invaluable.
Sometimes it’s a drawing and sometimes it’s a graph. Here, the goal is to turn conceptually dicult
questions about measurements with clocks and rulers into conceptually simpler problems in analytic
geometry. When you describe the motion of a particle, you can give its position as a function of time
and graph that. For now, one dimension of space (
x
)will be enough. The
y
and
z
coordinates will
come along later.
Dealing with objects that move near or at the speed of light makes it necessary to choose
convenient units. The speed of light is 3  10
8
m
=
s= 300 m
=
s= 1ft
=n
s. The trick to make this
easy is to measure time in microseconds and measure space in units of 300 meters. In other words,
pick the units so that
c
has the numerical value one. If you prefer light-years and years or feet and
nanoseconds, that’s o.k. too. Choose the time axis up* and the
x
-axis left and right and the pictures
will look like these:
t
x
t
x
t
x
t
x
stationary
x
=
x
0
simultaneous
t
=
t
0
x
=
ct
x
=
vt; v < c
The second one represents a set of events that occur at the same time, the equation is
t
=
t
0
.
The rst and fourth graphs present constant velocity motion of a particle, one of them with
v
=0 and
the other with
v
=300 m
=
4
s=
c=
4.
The third is a graph of the motion of a photon,
v
=
c
.
The
t
and
x
coordinate axes have equations that are respectively
x
=0 and
t
=0.
The two points in the third graph represent events at (
x;t
)= (2
:
5
;
0
:
5) and (1
:
5
;
2
:
5) in the units of
300 m, 1
s.
But First:
When you are dealing with ordinary two-dimensional rectangular coordinate
x
and
y
,sometimes
you need to switch to a rotated coordinate system. If you’re doing an elementary mechanics problem
and
~g
is down, you may choose
x
horizontal and
y
vertical, or you may not. Perhaps some other aspect
of the problem, maybe a hill, suggests a dierent coordinate system with
x
0
along the incline of the hill
and
y
0
perpendicular to it. What it the relationship between these coordinates? Just express each pair
of coordinates in terms of
r
and the angles. The angle the hill makes with the horizontal is
,and the
* Why is time up and space left and right? For the same reason that people in the U.S. drive on
the right and those in the U.K. drive on the left. That’s the custom. Besides, if you have
x
,
y
,and
t
,
then laying out the
x
-
y
plane sort-of horizontally seems better.
control application platform:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components for batch converting PDF documents in C#.NET program. Convert PDF
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
situations, it is quite necessary to convert PDF document into images are defined in XML text lines, they Therefore, in C#.NET web document viewing applications
www.rasteredge.com
9|Special Relativity
301
single point P has coordinates
x
x
0
y
y
0
r
P
x
=
r
cos
y
=
r
sin
x
0
=
r
cos(
)
y
0
=
r
sin(
)
(9
:
4)
=)
x
0
=
r
cos
cos
+
r
sin
sin
=
x
cos
+
y
sin
y
0
=
r
sin
cos
r
cos
sin
x
sin
+
y
cos
(9
:
5)
These equations show how to relate the coordinates that two dierent people use to describe the same
point, and all that you needed was a couple of standard trig identities. [Look at the exercises at the
end of this chapter, page325.]
Atrivial-sounding question: What are the equations for the various axes? A simple answer: the
x
-axis equation is
y
=0 and the
y
-axis equation is
x
=0. Similarly, the
x
0
-and
y
0
-axes have equations
y
0
=0 and
x
0
=0. If this seems trivial, just wait.
The reason for looking at these rotated coordinate systems is that something very much like this
can be done with space-time coordinate systems. The transformations will not be rotations, but they
will have many properties analogous to them. For space and time, the key step is to realize that you
have to provide a precise statement of what these coordinatesmean.You’ve already seen that times and
lengths are no longer such simple concepts, so the coordinates that build on them have to be dened
with care.
One method to dene these coordinates uses tools that are conceptually very simple: a clock
and a radar set. The radar set sends out electromagnetic pulses that can bounce from a distance object
and a clock times the re ected signal, telling how far away the object is.
Let
t
1
be the time the radar pulse is sent and
t
2
the time it returns. The total travel time of the
pulse is
t
2
t
1
,half in each direction, so the time at which the pulse hits the object is
t
1
+
1
2
(
t
2
t
1
)=
1
2
(
t
1
+
t
2
)
;
and the distance to it is
c
2
(
t
2
t
1
)
Translate this into the analytic geometry of space-time diagrams. The light travels at constant speed,
so that going out it is a straight line in the picture. Returning, it’s another straight line.
x
c
(
t
t
2
)
x
=
c
(
t
t
1
)
t
x
t
1
t
2
E
x
E
=
c
2
(
t
2
t
1
)
t
E
=
1
2
(
t
2
+
t
1
)
(9
:
6)
The event at which the radar pulse hits the object is labeled E. Perhaps it is a police radar hitting a
speeding car. In any case, the space-time coordinates of the event are dened by the two measurements
of time back at the radar set.
control application platform:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. C#.NET Project DLLs: Insert Text Content to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Search and Find PDF Text in C#.NET. C# application. Able to find and get PDF text position details in C#.NET application.
www.rasteredge.com
9|Special Relativity
302
Now comes the interesting part: Bring your friend back into the picture, moving at velocity
v
.
Using the same denitions to do the computation, what coordinates does your friend nd for this same
event? For now, make the velocity
v
aconstant because it makes the mathematics far easier, and the
motion is a straight line in the picture,
x
=
vt
. Instead of having a separate radar and clock, which
would have to be calibrated, simply use the same set for both. Then it is a question of computing what
measurements the moving observer will get.
The outgoing and the returning radar pulses pass your friend at two points labeled a and b. The
times at which they pass are
t
a
and
t
b
. Computing each of those times is now nding the intersection
of two lines, solving the two pairs of simultaneous equations on the left.
b:
x
c
(
t
t
2
)
x
=
vt
a:
x
=
c
(
t
t
1
)
x
=
vt
t
x
a
b
t
a
t
b
x
=
vt
E
t
b
=
ct
2
=
(
c
+
v
)=
t
2
=
(1 +
v=c
)
t
a
=
ct
1
=
(
c
v
)=
t
1
=
(1  
v=c
)
(9
:
7)
These times are when you think the radar pulse passed the moving observer when it goes out and
returns. They are not the times the moving clock will read. That clock is running slow, remember, by
afactor
p
v
2
=c
2,sotheactualtimesthatheseestheradarpulsepassbyarethesmallertimes
t
0
1
and
t
0
2
:
t
0
1
=
t
a
q
v
2
=c
2
=
t
1
(1  
v=c
)
q
v
2
=c
2
t
0
2
=
t
b
q
v
2
=c
=
t
2
(1 +
v=c
)
q
v
2
=c
2
(9
:
8)
Now all that’s left is algebra, eliminating all the unwanted variables, (
t
1
,
t
2
,
t
a
,
t
b
,
t
0
1
,
t
0
2
). The
new coordinates of the event are
x
0
E
=
c
2
(
t
0
2
t
0
1
)
t
0
E
=
1
2
(
t
0
2
+
t
0
1
)
and solving Eqs. (9.6) for
t
1
and
t
2
!
t
1
=
t
E
x
E
=c
t
2
=
t
E
+
x
E
=c
(9
:
9)
x
0
E
=
c
2
t
2
(1 +
v=c
)
t
1
(1  
v=c
)
q
v
2
=c
2
=
c
2
t
E
+
x
E
=c
1+
v=c
t
E
x
E
=c
v=c
p
=
1
2
(
ct
E
+
x
E
)(1  
v=c
)
v
2
=c
2
(
ct
E
x
E
)(1 +
v=c
)
v
2
=c
2
p
=
x
E
vt
E
p
v
2
=c
2
t
0
E
=
1
2
t
2
(1 +
v=c
)
+
t
1
(1  
v=c
)
q
v
2
=c
2
=
1
2
t
E
+
x
E
=c
1+
v=c
+
t
E
x
E
=c
v=c
p
=
1
2
(
t
E
+
x
E
=c
)(1  
v=c
)
v
2
=c
2
(
t
E
x
E
=c
)(1 +
v=c
)
v
2
=c
2
p
=
t
E
vx
E
=c
2
p
v
2
=c
2
9|Special Relativity
303
Just as Eq. (9.5) referred to the point P without writing the letter, these look neater as
x
0
=
x
vt
p
v
2
=c
2
=
(
x
vt
)
t
0
=
t
vx=c
2
p
v
2
=c
2
=
(
t
vx=c
2
)
y
0
=
y
z
0
=
z
(9
:
10)
These Lorentz transformation equations are an algebraic codication of the two axioms written on the
rst page of this chapter.
=1
=
p
v
2
=c
asbefore,and
=
v=c
is often used too.
What about the other coordinates,
y
and
z
?They don’t change, and the reason is nothing but
the argument on page298, showing that there is no contraction in the lateral direction.
This was a fair amount of algebra to arrive at these rather simple-looking equations, and if you
look at other introductory texts on relativity you will nd other, far less complicated derivations of
the same two equations. Why then did I choose such an involved way to get to a result that another
author may choose to do in a few lines? The rst reason is that this method may be algebraically
more complex, but it uses only the simple concept of determining how you measure
x
and
t
.A second
reason is that this method is not restricted to motion at constant velocity; after all, if an observer can’t
make measurements while undergoing an acceleration even as small as
g
,then it’s an awfully limited
theory. There’s no conceptual change in having an accelerated reference frame, just a big change in
the quantity of mathematics.* See problems9.44 and9.45.
As with the coordinate change Eq. (9.5) and the accompanying diagram, the picture of this
transformation is important. As you can easily see, it isnot a rotation, and the new axes don’t look
like those on page301.
x
-axis:
t
=0
t
-axis:
x
=0
x
0
-axis:
t
0
=
(
t
vx=c
2
)= 0
t
0
-axis:
x
0
=
(
x
vt
)= 0
x
t
x
0
t
0
simultaneous
0
simultaneous
The dashed lines ll in the coordinates as dened by the equations
x
0
=constant and
t
0
=constant.
The picture has
v
=
c=
2.
Simultaneity
The phrase \at the same time" refers to events that occurred at the same value of
t
. The moving
observer however uses dierent coordinates, so \at the same time" refers to the same values of
t
0
,the
dashed lines parallel to the
x
0
-axis in the above drawing. That simultaneity depends on the motion
of the observer is the central radical departure in special relativity. It is this departure from common
intuition that allows the paradoxes in the theory to be resolved.
How big is the eect? For an astronomical example, the Earth orbits the sun at a speed of about
30 km/s. This is 10
4
c
. At the distance of the star nearest the sun, about four light-years, how big a
discrepancy does this make?
t
0
=0 =
t
vx=c
2
;
!
t
=
vx=c
2
=10
4
c
.
4lt-yr
=c
2
=4
.
10
4
yr
.
10
7
s
1yr
=12000s  3
:
5hr
This appears insignicant, but under some circumstances a much smaller speed can produce a
very large eect. The current in an ordinary electric wire consists of electrons in motion. The average
* and despite what you may see in some books, this has nothing to do with general relativity.
9|Special Relativity
304
drift velocity of those electrons is surprisingly small, and in home wiring its magnitude is commonly
less than 0.1millimeters per second. How can such a small speed account for a large electric current?
There are alot of electrons.
Come back to the question of current in a moment. First, look further at simultaneity and use
the Lorentz transformation to rederive length contraction. It’s a consistency check, and it better give
the same answer as before. Someone is moving past at a speed
v
and he claims to have an object of
length
L
0
. Notice: He says that it isn’t moving, so he gets to say that its proper length is
L
0
. What
are the algebraic equations describing the front and back end of this object?
x
0
=0
;
x
0
=
L
0
for all
t
0
|what could be simpler?
(9
:
11)
Itook the left end at zero to save algebra. The two lines of constant
x
0
produce two parallel lines in the
x
-
t
coordinate system. Simply combine the Lorentz equations, Eq. (9.10) with the equation
x
0
=
L
0
and nd the intersection of that line with the line
t
=0. That is the dot in the gure.
x
0
=
L
0
t
=0
x
0
=
(
x
vt
)
9
>
=
>
;
!
L
0
=
x
x
=
L
0
q
v
2
=c
2
x
t t
0
x
0
x
0
=
L
0
The direct application of the transformation equations then reproduces the length contraction equation
correctly. Can you do the same sort of analysis for time instead of length? Yes,you can, see problem
9.5.
If you happen to have a ruler (stationary according to you) that is exactly this length
L
=
L
0
p
v
2
=c
thenwhatdoesyourmovingfriendsee?(Youwouldcallthis
L
aproper length, but the
symbol
L
0
is already taken.) The equation for the right-hand end of your ruler is
x
=
L
,the dashed
line in the next picture. What is the value of
x
0
at the time
t
0
=0?Whatdoyouexpectittobe? That
is the dot in this picture. Again, the Lorentz transformation appears.
x
t t
0
x
0
x
0
=
L
0
x
=
L
t
0
=0
x
=
L
and
t
0
=
(
t
vx=c
2
)
x
0
=
(
x
vt
)
Eliminate
x
and
t
to get
x
0
=
(
L
v
.
vL=c
2
)=
L
q
v
2
=c
2
and the Lorentz contraction appears again! Each person says that the other’s rulers have shrunk.
Current
An ordinary copper wire carrying a current
I
has two parts: the stationary positive charges and the
moving negative ones. There are cases such as  uorescent lights where both types of charge move, but
that’s an unneeded complication. In fact it doesn’t matter whether the positive charges are moving
right or the negative charges are moving left. Both represent a current to the right.* If it’s convenient
to simplify the explanations by assuming that the positive charges are moving right and the negative
charges are stationary, that’s o.k. It matters not which. The wire has no net charge, so the distance
between the positive charges is on average the same as the distance between the negative ones. At
* It wasn’t until 1879, when Edwin Hall discovered the Hall eect, that it was possible to tell the
dierence, and the electron itself wasn’t discovered until the late 1890s.
9|Special Relativity
305
t
=0, the
x
-axis, for every positive charge there is a negative one. In this picture the positive charges
are moving right (
x
=const. +
vt
)and the negative ones are stationary (
x
=const.)
x
t
x
0
t
0
{
+
{
+
Fig. 9.3
Positive and negative charges in a wire
Dashed lines are the charges.
Without solving a single equation, you can look at this picture and see that the
moving observer, who says that the
x
0
-axis is represents simultaneous points,
concludes that the positivecharges are farther apart than the negative ones. That
implies that the moving observer sees a net negative charge density on the wire.
If the \moving observer" is a charge, it will feel a force because of the net charge on the wire.
If that moving charge moves faster it will see more charge on the wire and will feel a larger force. You
will notice that this force is perpendicular to the velocity vector. This velocity dependent force is there
even though you, as a stationary observer, say that there is nothing to push the charge; the wire is
neutral. Instead you call the eect a \magnetic eld", and conclude that its eect is proportional to
velocity. This is how you derive magnetism from the combination of electric elds and relativity.
There are a few details to ll in to get the familiar \
q~v
~
B
"expression, but the essential ideas
are already here. The consequence of the analysis is that just as space and time become intertwined in
relativity, so do electric and magnetic elds. What is an
~
E
to me will be a combination of
~
E
and
~
B
to you. Similarly, my
~
B
will be your mixture of
~
B
and
~
E
. The relevant equations arenot the Lorentz
transformation this time. They’re quite dierent.
Future and Past
If simultaneity has become malleable, what happens to the meaning of the words future and past? Are
they aected? Yes. According to a stationary observer, us, the future is dened by the inequality
t>
0.
The past is
t<
0. Someone in motion uses the same concept, but it becomes
t
0
>
0and
t
0
<
0
instead, and these are indicated by the various shaded regions in the drawings.
t<
0
t>
0
t
0
<
0
t
0
>
0
x
t
x
0
v>
0
Fig. 9.4
The familiar part is dened by the horizontal line, the
x
-axis that separates our past from our
future. The unfamiliar part is the past and future for the moving observer.
t
0
>
0is tilted because
t
0
=
(
t
xv=c
2
), so the demarcation between past and future is the line
t
=
vx=c
2
. Remember the
units I’m using to draw the pictures:
c
=300 m
=
s, the line
x
=
ct
is at 45
.
c
=1 in units of 300 m
and 1
s, so the boundary between past and future will not get any steeper than 45
. If the motion
is in the opposite direction,
v<
0, the tilt is reversed and goes from upper left to lower right.
9|Special Relativity
306
This picture implies that what is in the future for me may be in the past for you and vice versa.
The two dots in the preceding Figure9.4 represent events doing that. Notice that the dot on the left is
an event that occurredbefore the one on the right according to us, but it occursafter the one on the
right for the moving observer. Their time-order is reversed. Does this mean that cause and eect can
be reversed? No, because signals can’t travel faster than light, and that implies that these two dots are
far enough apart that light can’t get from one to the other in the time between them.
There are two types of future and two types of past: relative and absolute. Absolute future
is something that everybody agrees on. Relative future will mean dierent things to dierent people,
depending on their relative velocities. The two dots above represent a case where future and past are
relative to the observer, but remember that the
x
0
-axis can tilt only up to 45
and no farther. There
is a limit on just how far the relative future and past can be pushed.
absolute past
absolute future
relative past
relative future
t
x
x
y
t
Fig. 9.5
The events in the absolute future are in the future according to everyone, and they are also events
that can be reached by a signal that starts at the origin. Such a signal has the equation
x
=
vt
with
j
v
j
c
,and it can pass through any point within the absolute future. In the next picture, jumping up
adimension so that there are two spacial coordinates
x
and
y
to go along with
t
,the absolute future
is within the upper part of the cone. This cone is the \light cone",
r
=
p
x
2+
y
=
c
j
t
j.
The concepts of cause and eect involve the order of time. A cause precedes an eect. If the
past and the future can become muddled because of relativity, then it puts some constraints on the
way that things can interact. Something can cause an eect only if the eect is in the future of the
causeaccordingtoeveryone. This means that something that happens at the origin (
x
=0
;t
=0) can
only cause something on or within the future light cone, at a distance
r
ct
. Outside that cone, the
past and future become relative concepts, and the relative past and future there are perhaps best called
\elsewhere".
9.3 Relative Velocity
You are at rest; there is another person, a moving observer with velocity
v
;some other and dierent
object has velocity
u
.What istheir relative velocity? This question will have dierent answersdepending
on just how you dene the phrase \relative velocity". For one possible denition you can ask how you
would measure their distance apart and how fast that distance is changing. In your time interval 
t
the
moving observer goes a distance
v
t
. The object goes a distance
u
t
. The distance between those
two has changed by the amount
u
t
v
t
.You then say that the relative velocity is
u
t
v
t
t
=
u
v
What could be simpler? This is exactly what you get if you know nothing about relativity, and it is not
wrong. It is just not the denition of relative velocity needed here; there is a subtle dierence in how
it is stated.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested