Impediments to Intra-Regional Trade in Sub-Saharan Africa - Prepared for the Commonwealth Secretariat 
17 
Table 11: Trade complementarities index in SADC 
Botswana
Lesotho
Mad
agascar
Malawi
Mauritius
Mozambique
Namibia
Seychelles
Swaziland
South Africa
Tanzania
Zambia
Zimbabwe
Botswana 
-56 
-35 
-61 
-46 
-53 
-43 
-52 
-50 
-59 
-55 
-53 
-50 
Lesotho 
-50 
19 
-36 
-5 
15 
-18 
-66 
-34 
12 
-36 
Madagascar 
-35 
-60 
-59 
-41 
-18 
-21 
-78 
-43 
-78 
-17 
-3 
-7 
Malawi 
-61 
-74 
-41 
-56 
-9 
-21 
-79 
-2 
22 
-2 
-37 
-16 
Mauritius 
-46 
-59 
-4 
-48 
16 
-55 
-36 
32 
14 
32 
-4 
Mozambique 
-53 
-74 
-30 
-57 
-54 
-8 
-76 
-49 
43 
-32 
Namibia 
-43 
-64 
-28 
-59 
-36 
-70 
-31 
40 
-4 
-25 
-6 
Seychelles 
-52 
-76 
-19 
-66 
-45 
16 
11 
-48 
37 
-5 
-24 
-17 
Swaziland 
-50 
-61 
-9 
-37 
-32 
22 
-8 
-69 
29 
13 
-30 
-25 
South Africa 
-59 
-70 
-45 
-72 
-52 
-16 
-81 
-44 
-14 
-35 
-31 
Tanzania 
-55 
-77 
-48 
-71 
-59 
-13 
-82 
-52 
46 
-31 
-24 
Zambia 
-53 
-79 
-54 
-78 
-62 
-8 
-83 
-35 
39 
-23 
-26 
Zimbabwe 
-50 
-77 
-25 
-51 
-51 
11 
-12 
-70 
-39 
36 
-6 
-23 
Source: Derived from data obtained from UN COMTRADE database. 
Note: Data for Lesotho are 2004; Swaziland, 2006; Malawi, Namibia and Seychelles, 2008, all others are 2009. 
It is important to note the limitations of using such a high level of aggregation (HS 2-digit level) to assess 
RCAs and how these are similar or differ across economies in each region. In addition to the constraints 
analysis at such a high level of aggregation imposes on analysis of trade complementarities: it means that 
differences between production structures at a much lower level of aggregation are not captured, when 
analysis at such levels may be needed to better assess the potential or not for intra-industry trade. Both 
indicators assume that all other variables remain constant, such as demand in world markets, and related 
policy. Even though a country may have a high (low) revealed comparative advantage index compared to 
the rest of the world, this should not be automatically interpreted as being beneficial (weak) without more 
in-depth, country and industry specific analysis. As the earlier discussion on theory suggested, it may be 
more beneficial for countries to seek to trade against their comparative advantages rather than with it.
.Net extract text from pdf - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to editable text; convert pdf to word searchable text
.Net extract text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
best pdf to text converter; convert pdf file to text document
Impediments to Intra-Regional Trade in Sub-Saharan Africa - Prepared for the Commonwealth Secretariat 
18 
The impact of non-tariff barriers on intra-
regional trade 
Section 1 presented and discussed recent trends and the structure of trade in SSA in general, and within 
ECOWAS and SADC, in particular. For these selected regions it explored what these patterns suggest in 
terms of the potential for intra-regional trade.  This section sets out to identify the extent to which intra-
regional trade flows within these regions are constrained by NTBs.  It first introduces the different types of 
NTBs. It makes a clear distinction between NTBs and NTMs, the former is defined as an unnecessarily 
restrictive non-tariff measure (NTM) which affects trade in goods; the latter may affect trade in goods, but 
may be reflective of legitimate public policy purposes. It argues that key to making this distinction is an 
understanding of both the intent of the measure and resultant impacts on trade. The following sub-section 
introduces our methodological approach to quantitatively assessing the impact of reported NTBs on intra-
regional trade for the selected regions. 
2.1 
Types and potential trade impacts of non-tariff barrier 
Non-tariff barriers to trade may have similar effects to tariffs: they can increase domestic prices and 
impede trade to protect selected producers at the expense of other economic agents; they may also tax 
exports. Bhagwati (1965) has shown how both tariffs and NTBs can have equivalent effects when markets 
are competitive and therefore how the removal or reduction of NTBs can have similar effects to that of 
tariff reduction. Tariffs increase the costs for foreign suppliers while quotas and other types of NTBs serve 
to restrict the quantity of foreign-supplied goods in domestic markets; both may cause prices to increase in 
the domestic market. This in turn results in a decrease in economic welfare because of the distortion or 
wedge created between domestic and world market prices.  
It therefore follows that the removal or reduction of NTBs on imports could, as in the case of tariff 
liberalisation, increase imports and therefore impact welfare through effects on local producers, domestic 
consumers and government revenues. These effects can be summarised as follows: 
 
Increased imports may displace domestic producers by foreign suppliers, depending on the 
assumed elasticity of substitution between imported and domestically produced goods; 
 
Consumers (and producers using imported inputs) may benefit from cheaper product prices; 
and 
 
Governments may lose revenues for the product liberalised, e.g. revenues from quota auctions 
or licences. 
Deardorff (1987) notes that NTBs are preferred by policy makers because their effects are are more certain, 
direct and predictable than the effects of tariffs – competitors cannot overcome them easily. NTBs are 
usually held steady whilst market conditions change and are therefore rigid control measures. 
26
Quotas are 
more palatable for voters given that they are not directly associated with a price increase. Governments 
may choose to exercise considerable discretionary power through the allocation of quotas, with divergent 
outcomes on the welfare of consumers and producers. These discretionary powers are kept in check 
through membership of multilateral institutions such as the WTO as well as other regional and bilateral 
trade regimes. 
26
The impact of a specific import duty compared to an ad valorem tariff can be vastly different if import prices fluctuate. It is also 
important to make the distinction between free on board (FOB) and cost, insurance and freight (CIF) values.
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
convert pdf file to text online; convert pdf to text
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File. Advanced Visual
convert pdf to openoffice text; convert pdf to word to edit text
Impediments to Intra-Regional Trade in Sub-Saharan Africa - Prepared for the Commonwealth Secretariat 
19 
Based on the General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs (GATT), the definition of NTBs used by all WTO 
members includes export restraints, production and export subsidies, or measures with similar effect, not 
just import restraints. Other definitions of NTBs include any measure, public or private, that causes 
internationally traded goods and services, or resources devoted to the production of these goods and 
services, to be allocated in such a way as to reduce potential and real world income (Baldwin, 1970). This is 
clearly an extremely broad definition and obscures the fact that some NTMs may be used for legitimate 
public policy objectives, for example, in relation to health and safety concerns (SPS) and other technical 
regulations (TBT).  Making the distinction between the intent and impact of a NTM is therefore crucial to 
determining the extent to which legitimate measures may serve as unnecessarily restrictive barriers to 
trade. That is, when a NTM serves to be a NTB. 
2.1.1
Types of non-tariff barrier 
Five types of policy barriers may be identified from the literature.
27
 
The first consists of quantitative restrictions (QRs) such as quotas and licences, which limit the 
volume or value of goods allowed across borders.  
 
The second consists of non-tariff charges on imports, such as variable levies, border tax 
adjustments or countervailing duties.  
 
The third includes government participation in trade, such as the use of subsidies, 
procurement policies and competition policy.  
 
Fourth are customs procedures, clearance, and classification procedures.  
 
The last category includes technical barriers to trade (TBT), such as packaging and labelling and 
health and sanitary regulations. 
These barriers may be generic or product specific. For example, the former category could include NTMs 
that all goods must adhere to, such as customs, administrative entry and passage procedures, but which 
are implemented in a way that makes them unnecessarily trade restrictive. In comparison product specific 
barriers may result from the application of technical quality standards which on application tend to be 
more trade restrictive than facilitative.  
Even though measures may be generic, or product specific, in terms of their application, the consequent 
impact of them on trade flows, and as a result economic welfare, may differ markedly. For example, a 
direct quantitative restriction (QR) which covers whole industry will cause the import demand curve to 
become vertical at the permitted quantity. In comparison, an industrial standard which adds a fixed cost to 
each unit of a good imported may cause the demand curve to turn downward and become steeper.
28
This means that in addition to the consideration of price and quantity effects, the responsiveness of 
demand  and supply as indicated by product and income elasticities becomes important: the extent of 
responsiveness may differ across markets, producers and consumers,  even if the reported NTB is the same 
in each. This is because NTBs may have much more uncertain as well as highly variable impacts on prices 
and quantities and therefore what is demanded as well as supplied. Additional uncertainty results from the 
very nature of the imposition of NTBs: how does one know when an import surge may result which 
warrants the use of an NTB?
29
Because of these variable affects, some authors prefer to classify NTBs 
27
The following categories are used in the UNCTAD TRAINS database.
28
See Deardorff and Stern (1998),
29
This is known as the endogeneity problem, which we try to address in the empirical analysis we undertake.
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. VB.NET: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
convert pdf to word editable text; convert pdf to txt online
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File. You VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Overwrite the Original PDF File. Instead
convert pdf to plain text online; change pdf to txt file
Impediments to Intra-Regional Trade in Sub-Saharan Africa - Prepared for the Commonwealth Secretariat 
20 
according to their intent and impact.
30
This means that once NTBs have been identified by traders and 
defined, the challenge is to measure their impact on trade so as to analyse the welfare impact of their 
removal, reduction or harmonisation. 
2.1.2
Measures of non-tariff barriers 
Approaches to measuring NTBs range from: frequency-type inventories, based on counts of observed NTMs 
in particular countries, sectors, and types of trade; price comparison measures (tariff equivalents); and 
quantity impact measures based on estimation of trade flows in the absence of the measure.
31 
Each 
approach has its own drawbacks.
32
Here we briefly summarise the pros and cons of using different 
frequency type inventories of NTBs in the analysis of welfare impacts.
33 
Measures of frequency  
UN TAD͛s TRAINS database uses a classification of over 100 trade measures, including those with a 
discretionary or variable component. It contains NTBs reported for over 150 countries from 1988 to 2001. 
Since 2006 it has included data on anti-dumping measures. The incidence of reported NTBs, either as a 
count or as a percentage of coverage of specific product lines (HS or Standard International Trade 
Classification (SITC)), is categorised as follows: 
 
Price control measures, such as multiple exchange rates, or foreign exchange allocation;  
 
Finance control measures, such as anti-dumping or countervailing measures, relating to credit 
allocations;  
 
Quantity restrictions, such as non-automatic licensing, quotas;  
 
Monopolistic measures;  
 
Technical Measures, such as regulations and customs procedures; and 
 
Miscellaneous, such as subsidies. 
The database does not include any measures related to:  
 
Corruption; 
 
Export related measures; 
 
Government procurement;  
 
Intellectual property rights; or 
 
Other investment related measures. 
This database which is country as well as commodity specific is one of the most detailed available.  
However, like most inventories, it is only as good as the data that are provided to it.
The main source of 
information used in the database is taken from GATT notifications and other government publications, as 
30
See Laird and Vossenaar (1991).
31
Deardorff and Stern (1998) also make reference to measures of equivalent nominal rates of assistance.
32
See Bora et al. (2002) for a more detailed overview of these.  
33
Box 1 Appendix summarises some of the other approaches.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document. C#.NET extract image from multiple page adobe PDF file library for Visual Studio .NET.
converting image pdf to text; convert pdf table to text
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as field data from PDF and how to extract and get field data from PDF in VB.NET project.
best pdf to text; convert pdf file to text
Impediments to Intra-Regional Trade in Sub-Saharan Africa - Prepared for the Commonwealth Secretariat 
21 
well as WTO TPRs. Although it is able to register a fairly wide range of NTBs, most of those listed fall within 
the Technical Measures category
34
Other sources similar to UNCTAD TRAINS, which also take an ͚inventory͛ or frequency approach to 
measuring the extent of NT T s, include the World ank͛s Trade Restrictiveness Index (TRI), which seeks to 
measure the effectiveness of protection. It is constructed based on UNCTAD TRAINS data and includes four 
types of NTBs: 1. Quantitative Restrictions (QRs); 2.Voluntary Export Restraints (VERs); 3.Enforcement of 
decreased prices; and 4.Tariff quotas.  
The difficulty with using frequency measures is that although they provide coverage on a range of 
restrictions, they are not able to capture their impacts or show differences in the intensity of their 
application. They c1an therefore only be used as a measure of the extent to which products (or countries) 
are subject to NTBs. They cannot be used to capture scale and/or growth effects. These limitations will 
obviously play out in our empirical analysis, which tries to quantify the impact of NTBs using TRAINS data. 
Bearing these caveats in mind, these data still allow us to analyse systematically the impact of NTBs on 
imports. More importantly, by comparing the effect of the same measure on different exporting countries 
we can largely avoid the problem of heterogeneity across measures and sectors. 
2.1.3
Approaches to analysis of welfare impacts of NTBs 
As the previous discussion has highlighted, NTBs may consist of several parameters, information about 
them is hard to collect and they are not straightforwardly quantifiable. This means that their economic 
impact is not easy to model (see Fugazza and Maur, 2008), and creates a number of methodological 
challenges for an empirical exercise which seeks to measure their trade impact. Despite these challenges, 
estimates as to the potential welfare impacts of NTBs can still help to provide information to policy makers 
to act to reduce or mitigate any negative impacts on producers or consumers that may result from their 
imposition. How do NTBs interact with intra-regional trade? Is there any differential impact of NTBs on 
regional partners vis-à-vis third parties? This information is particularly relevant for those regions seeking 
to foster deeper economic integration and enhance intra-regional trade flows.  
According to Deardorff and Stern (1998), the one method of empirical analysis applicable to any kind of 
NTB is time-series analysis of the periods in which the NTB is in place, combined with observation of 
changes in prices or quantities of imports at the time of implementation. However, they also note that 
unless the implementation of the NTB comes as a complete surprise to the public, it is likely to have effects 
– perhaps perverse ones – long before it is put formally in place. Moreover, if some other event happens to 
affect trade simultaneously with the NTB, then this approach may give misleading information unless the 
importance of that other event is correctly diagnosed. We try to take account of some of these 
methodological concerns in the empirical analysis which follows in the next section which seeks to 
quantitatively assess the extent to which reported NTBs to UNCTAD TRAINs actually impact intra-regional 
trade. 
2.2 
Quantitative assessment of the effects of NTBs on intra-regional SSA 
trade flows: SADC 
While NTBs are widely perceived to be an important constraint to trade in SSA, there have been limited 
attempts so far to systematically quantify their actual trade impact. For example, Kee et al. (2008) use 
UNCTAD TRAINS data to compute indices of trade restrictiveness for NTBs across countries. However as 
these indices are computed on the basis of the actual effects that these measures have on trade on one 
year for each country (which differs across countries), using them to estimate the effects of NTBs on trade 
34
In particular, the use of such indices would make the estimation endogenous.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract PDF pages and save changes to original PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET.
change pdf to text file; convert pdf to text online
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
C#.NET PDF DLLs for Finding Text in PDF Document. Add necessary references: C#.NET PDF Demo Code: Search Text From PDF File in C#.NET.
convert pdf to word for editing text; converting pdf to editable text for
Impediments to Intra-Regional Trade in Sub-Saharan Africa - Prepared for the Commonwealth Secretariat 
22 
would lead to biased estimations.
35 
We take a different route and undertake a systematic evaluation of the 
actual impact of NTBs on the imports of selected SADC countries (HS 6-digit level) over a number of recent 
years. However, data limitations mean that our analysis is limited to the SADC region.  
The idea is to perform a direct test by matching the NTBs recorded by UNCTAD, with corresponding import 
data. Because the NTBs reported to UNCTAD TRAINS have not actually been assessed in terms of their 
trade restrictiveness, and the evidence on the extent to which they actually constrain trade is not available, 
we use the term NTM to refer to them, until such time as we have the data to classify them as actual 
barriers to trade - NTBs. 
We test whether imports in a sector where one or more NTMs are imposed at year t perform worse than 
those in sectors which do not experience an increase in NTMs, as well as whether they perform worse than 
in those periods when the NTM was not applied. It is worth noting that NTMs in our dataset are applied on 
products from all sources. That is due to the nature of NTMs, whose objective for instance is to protect 
consumers from possible animal diseases, thus making the selective application of an NTM according to the 
source of imports uncommon. More formally, we employ the following expression: 
ijst
ist
t
ijs
ijst
ntm
I
 
(1)  
Where ΔI is the percentage change in imports of country i from exporting country j in sector s at time t; α is 
importer-sector-exporter fixed effects and λ is time effects; and ntm is a variable that captures non tariff 
measures (see below). The basic hypothesis we are testing is that β<0 in (1). As our interest lies mainly in 
the impact of NTMs on intra-regional trade, we test (1) separately for exporting countries belonging to 
SADC (i.e. 
in (1)) and for the others (i.e. 
in (1)). In this way we examine whether 
NTMs are more or less of a constraint for intra-regional relative to extra-regional trade.  
Importer-sector-exporter fixed effects allow control for time invariant characteristics that may influence 
imports, so as to focus on the determinants of the variation of these imports over time. Time effects 
capture any common (across sectors and countries) shock over time. Finally, imports over time can 
arguably be influenced by various time varying characteristics of the exporter country, such as: economic 
performance, other policies including tariff rates, cost of labour and so on. Part of what we are testing is 
exactly the extent to which NTMs are eventually binding for different exporters due to their different 
characteristics. Therefore we do not control for such features in our preferred specifications. However we 
do test the robustness of our results to the inclusion of exporter-time specific effects (the term σ below) 
which captures these characteristics by running the following augmented specification: 
ijst
ist
jt
t
ijs
ijst
ntm
I
 
 
(2)  
We undertake the analysis using the use the Generalised Methods of Moments (GMM) estimator.
36
As 
NTMs in our data are applied to all exporting countries indiscriminately, the potential differential impact in 
NTMs effects across countries can come either from traders different abilities to cope with the change in 
NTMs or to the sectoral composition of their exports to the importing country i. For example if country j͛s 
exports to country i are particularly concentrated in product lines where the introduction of NTMs has a 
disproportionately negative impact on country i͛s imports, then country j͛s exports could be particularly 
negatively affected by NTMs even keeping traders  abilities to cope with NTMs constant. 
35
In particular, the use of such indices would make the estimation endogenous.
36
This is because one issue with estimating (1) and (2) is the likely endogeneity of the ntm variable. This could arise for instance if 
the decision to impose an NTM is driven by past trends in imports in that sector, or if it is related to the domestic performance in 
that sector. In such cases estimation via fixed effects would generate a biased coefficient. 
Impediments to Intra-Regional Trade in Sub-Saharan Africa - Prepared for the Commonwealth Secretariat 
23 
2.2.1
Data 
We use two sources of data: UNCTAD TRAINS for data on NTBs and UN COMTRADE for import data. We are 
limited by a lack of data availability for both ECOWAS and SADC regions, and countries within them, and 
years we are able to consider. In particular, only a handful of countries in SSA, mainly from Southern Africa, 
have relatively recent systematic data on NTBs. UNCTAD reviewed NTBs in four such countries (Botswana, 
Namibia, South Africa and Swaziland) in 2006. We gather the data for SADC from TRAINS and produce time-
varying country-specific datasets on NTBs at the HS 6-digit sectoral level. NTM data on two further SSA 
countries (Nigeria and Senegal) are available for the year 2001 which means we are unable to undertake 
further analysis for ECOWAS.  
Due to the nature of the NTB reporting, sometimes it is not known whether a measure applies to each 6-
digit sector or not. For instance a measure can be listed as applying to HS 02 but with a ͚partial coverage 
indicator͛, implying that the measure does not cover every 6-digit code within the 2-digit chapter (see 
Table 12 for an example of such recording in the case of South Africa). We therefore include that particular 
measure in the ͚NTM partial coverage͛ variable. The rest of the measures shown in the example in Table 12 
are included in the ͚NTM full coverage͛ variable. The sum of the two is the ͚NTM any coverage͛ variable.  
For each of these coverage types, we generate in turn two different variables: a dummy with a value of 
zero for any sector-year in which there was no NTB in place (and one otherwise), and a continuous 
numerical variable with the number of measures affecting the sector in every year. We consider the 
measure recorded in each line as starting in the year indicated if its application started within the first six 
months of the year (such as in the case of the ͚labelling requirements to protect human health͛ measure in 
Table 12), or in the following year if otherwise (e.g. the third measure ͚Product characteristics 
requirements͛ in Table 12). By summing all the measures in each 6-digit sector in each year, we are thus 
able to generate time-varying sector-specific NTM variables for each of the four reporting countries in 
SADC. 
Table 12: Example of the recording of NTMs from UNCTAD TRAINS 
Product 
code 
Measure 
name 
NTM 
code 
Start year 
Start month 
Partial coverage 
indicator 
02 
Labelling requirements to protect human health 
8131 
2004 
NO 
02 
Prior authorization to protect human health 
6171 
2003 
NO 
02 
Product characteristics requirements 
8110 
1997 
10 
YES 
02 
Seasonal prohibition 
6330 
2003 
NO 
Source: UNCTAD TRAINS. 
The NTM data are recorded only once by UNCTAD in 2006.Thus the measures reported are those which 
were still in place in 2006 (regardless of the starting year), but not those that may have been applied for a 
period of time and expired before 2006. For instance a measure may have been applied only between 1998 
and 2002. If we considered the period 2000-6, we would not have captured that measure although it would 
have affected imports in 2000-2. By constructing the dataset for 2003-6 only, we minimise the extent to 
which this potential missing information is present in the data.
37
We then match the NTM data with bilateral import data (in current thousands of US dollars) at the HS 6-
digit sector level.
38
One interesting question to explore is to what extent SADC and non-SADC exporters to 
these four countries are differently exposed to NTMs. As we said, NTMs are applied at the product level to 
37
Our data are still subject to a potential bias to the extent that measures were in place during part of that period and then ended 
before 2006. Given the pattern of application of NTMs, this is however likely to be a minimal bias.
38
A further note of caution with the data concerns the fact that some of the NTMs are recorded at the 8-digit level thus making the 
matching with import data imprecise in some cases. 
Impediments to Intra-Regional Trade in Sub-Saharan Africa - Prepared for the Commonwealth Secretariat 
24 
all exporter countries indiscriminately, so the eventual difference in the exposure by exporter would come 
from the sectoral composition of its exports to the four countries considered. The evolution in the average 
number of NTMs per HS 6-digit sector suggests that non-SADC exporters have been exposed to a higher 
level of NTMs, but in relative terms the average number of NTMs has grown faster for SADC than for non-
SADC exporters (Figure 8).
39
Figure 8: Average number of full coverage NTMs per H6-sector, SADC vs other 
exporters 
SourceAuthors͛ elaboration on UN N TAD TRAINS and UN OMTRADE. 
2.2.2
Results 
Table 13 presents summary statistics for the main variables used in the quantitative analysis for SADC. The 
information on the NTM variables shows that there can be as many as ten different NTM-related trade 
restrictions applying to a specific sector. 
Table 13: Summary statistics of the main variables used in quantitative analysis for 
SADC 
Mean 
Std. Dev. 
Min 
Max 
Obs 
SADC 
0.169 
0.375 
843,808 
NTM (any coverage) 
1.277 
1.626 
10 
843,808 
NTM (full coverage) 
0.421 
0.591 
843,808 
NTM dummy (full cov.) 
0.379 
0.485 
843,808 
Bilateral Imports 
257 
8,414 
3,256,453 
843,808 
Ln(Bil. Imp. + 1) 
1.551 
2.232 
14.996 
843,808 
Ln(Bil. Imp.) 
3.222 
2.337 
14.996 
385,808 
Δ Imports (%) 
0.073 
1.403 
-13.240 
12.734 
636,008 
Table 14 presents the results of running (1) using the NTM variable with full coverage across three different 
samples, according to the trading partner considered:  
 
full;  
 
SADC only; and  
 
non-SADC. 
39
Figure I Appendix presents bound and applied tariffs across SADC members. It is beyond the scope of this study to analyse the 
relationship between reductions in tariffs and frequency of reported non-tariff barriers in SADC. 
0.00
0.10
0.20
0.30
0.40
0.50
0.60
2003
2004
2005
2006
others
SADC
Impediments to Intra-Regional Trade in Sub-Saharan Africa - Prepared for the Commonwealth Secretariat 
25 
The results from the GMM estimation strategy are summarised in Table 14. The NTM coefficient for the 
entire sample is negative although not significant (column 4). This is a somewhat a surprising finding. In 
contrast to the conventional wisdom, we do not find that NTMs significantly constrain imports in the four 
countries included in the sample. On the other hand, the NTM dummy is negative and highly significant for 
the SADC sample (column 5), while it is positive and significant for the non-SADC regression (column 6).  
This suggests that the introduction of one or more NTMs in a sector severely penalises imports from other 
SADC countries in that sector (intra-regional trade) to the benefit of non-SADC countries, whose exports to 
the reporter increase.
40
The coefficients indicate that when a Southern African country included in the 
sample imposes at least one measure on a sector, the growth rate of its imports from other SADC countries 
drops on average by 200%, while the growth rate of its imports from non-SADC countries rises on average 
by 23%. In other words, to the extent that NTMs divert imports away from regional towards non-regional 
partners, their establishment seems to stifle intra-regional trade.  
As the NTMs we are analysing are applied at the product level irrespective of the source country, this 
differential impact of NTBs can be due to two main causes: first, SADC countries could be on average much 
less able to adjust to NTBs than the other exporters to the Southern African region; second, SADC exports 
could be concentrated in product lines where NTMs are particularly effective in constraining imports. We 
test the latter hypothesis by introducing in the GMM regression a series of interaction terms between the 
NTM variable and dummies for the major sectoral groupings.
41
We present the results in columns (7) and 
(8) in Table 14. The negative and insignificant coefficient for non-SADC countries suggests that the 
differential impact of NTMs across sectors is compensated by the entire positive effect of NTMs on imports 
from non SADC countries.  
Further analysis suggests that around 43% of the differential impact of NTMs between SADC and non-SADC 
countries is accounted for by a composition effect, i.e. exports of SADC countries are concentrated in 
sectors which are relatively more affected by NTMs.
42
This is particularly the case for agro-industrial 
sectors, where the NTMs have a more negative impact than in the other sectors. These results suggest that 
the majority of the NTMs͛ differential impact between SAD  and non-SADC countries (i.e. 57%) is 
accounted for by the different ability of exporters to adapt to the introduction of a NTM. In order to check 
the robustness of these results we undertook a number of further tests. These are summarised in Box 2 
Appendix. 
Table 14: The impact of NTM on imports in Southern Africa, 2003–6 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
(7) 
(8) 
All 
SADC 
Non 
SADC 
SADC 
Non 
SADC 
NTM dummy (full 
coverage) 
-0.055 
-2.099*** 0.236*** 
-1.523* 
-0.162 
NTM dummy (full 
coverage) 
(0.078) 
(0.268) 
(0.081) 
(0.897) 
(0.292) 
Year effects 
YES 
YES 
YES 
YES 
YES 
40
The results seem to be sound as confirmed by the results of a Sargan over-identification test.
41
In particular we create six main groups of sectors which should represent similar aggregation to 1-digit type of sectors, but the 
results are similar for slightly different HS aggregations (see Table H, Appendix 5 fore results and Table I for the sectoral 
classifications used). One caveat is in order in that other more precise aggregations, such as two-digit ones, could yield different 
results. However such aggregations would imply a much larger number of additional interaction terms, thus making the 
computation of the results problematic.
42
Using point estimates to compute the difference in NTMs͛ impact between SADC and non-SADC countries.
Impediments to Intra-Regional Trade in Sub-Saharan Africa - Prepared for the Commonwealth Secretariat 
26 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
(7) 
(8) 
All 
SADC 
Non 
SADC 
SADC 
Non 
SADC 
Importer-product-
exporter effects 
YES 
YES 
YES 
YES 
YES 
NTM x Sector dummies 
NO 
NO 
NO 
YES 
YES 
Observations 
428,208 
76,500 
351,708 
76,500 
351,708 
Nr. of groups 
207,800 
33,122 
174,678 
33,122 
174,678 
Wald test 
310.32 
370.66 
185.68 
278.79 
142.03 
Sargan overid. Test 
4.24 
2.68 
2.85 
46.12 
16.20 
Note: Robust standard errors in parentheses; * significant at 10%; ** significant at 5%; *** significant at 1%. 
Dependent variable is the percentage growth of imports over the previous year. Importing countries are Botswana, 
Namibia, South Africa and Swaziland. Endogenous variable in GMM estimations are the NTM variable and the NTM-
sectoral interaction terms. 
Finally, we perform estimations separately by importing country again using the dummy variable NTM 
variable with full coverage for Botswana, Namibia and South Africa given data limitations for Swaziland. 
Results reported in Table 15 show a large heterogeneity across countries, with negative impacts on 
Botswana and SADC but with significant positive impacts on non-SADC countries (columns 1-2). The 
magnitude of the coefficient is more than double that for the pooled regression in column 5 Table 14. In 
comparison, when we employ the continuous numerical NTM variable there is no discernible effect on 
otswana͛s import growth (columns 3-4). The NTM coefficients in Namibia and South Africa for the SADC 
have a similar magnitude to that in the pooled regression, although the coefficient for Namibia is not 
significant.  
Overall, these estimates suggest that when South Africa imposes at least one NTM on a sector its imports 
from other SADC countries drop on average by 60%, while its imports from non-SADC countries rise on 
average by 6%. The fact that South Africa has the most significant coefficients for the SADC sample, while 
Botswana and Namibia have less significant coefficients, suggest that economically smaller SADC members 
face difficulties in tackling NTMs. Regarding Namibia and Botswana  whose imports are mainly from South 
Africa, the NTM coefficient is less significant (especially in the case of the continuous NTM variable), which 
is consistent with the hypothesis that South Africa is better able to tackle NTMs than other SADC countries. 
In sum, this analysis undertaken confirms the hypothesis that the NTBs reported to TRAINS are indeed 
barriers to intra-regional trade for SADC countries. 
Table 15: The impact of NTMs on imports in Southern Africa by country 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
Sample 
SADC 
Non SADC 
SADC 
Non SADC 
Dependent variable 
Δ Imp 
Δ Imp 
Δ Imp 
Δ Imp 
Botswana 
NTM dummy (full coverage) 
-5.186** 
5.676 
(2.381) 
(6.530) 
Ln NTM (full coverage) 
0.185 
-0.560 
0.447 
0.520 
Namibia 
NTM dummy (full coverage) 
-0.585 
-0.021 
(0.456) 
(0.523) 
Ln NTM (full coverage) 
-1.379 
0.082 
(1.181) 
(1.197) 
South Africa 
NTM dummy (full coverage) 
-0.601*** 
0.064 
(0.168) 
(0.068) 
Ln NTM (full coverage) 
-0.689*** 
0.100 
(0.207) 
(0.087) 
Note: Robust standard errors in parentheses; * significant at 10%; ** significant at 5%; *** significant at 1%. 
Dependent variable is the percentage growth of imports over the previous year. Endogenous variable in GMM 
estimations 
is 
the 
NTM 
variable.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested