how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc : Convert pdf image to text online software SDK project winforms windows .net UWP mechanics8-part765

Simple Harmonic Motion
.
Read sections 0.2 0.7 7 0.9
Why have a whole chapter devoted to the simple harmonic oscillator? Just because it is easy
maybe? No, in fact some of the developments in this one subject will take some hard thought to
understand. The reason for the emphasis on this one problem is that it is ubiquitous. Every time that
you lookat a new problem there’s probably a harmonic oscillator hidden somewhere in it. Certainly any
time thatyou’re lookingat a question aboutequilibriumthere’s an oscillator lurking in the background.
The second reason is of course: because itis simple. It doesn’t have all the complexities that
occur in other problems, but it does require using many of the tools that these other, more complex
problems entail.
x
Fig. 3.1
3.1 Simplest Case
The rst instance of an oscillator is a mass attached to the end of a spring. Assume that the mass is
sliding on a horizontal table and that there’s no friction. The force that a spring applies is, to a good
approximation and for small distances,
F
x
kx
,where the coordinate
x
is measured from the point
of equilibrium.
F
x
kx
=
ma
x
=
m
d
2
x
dt
2
(3
:
1)
Thisis a simple dierentialequationfor
x
(
t
)and there are several waystosolve it. The rstand easiest
is to guess the solution. You can’t do this very often, so take advantage of it when you can. What
functions do you know whose second derivative is proportional to themselves? A moment’s thought
and you can easily come up with sines, cosines, exponentials, and that’s about it.
The way to nd out if a guess is right is to try it. Does it satisfy the equation? cos
t
doesn’t
work. sin
t
doesn’t work.
e
t
doesn’t work. Try the cosine.
k
cos
t
?
=
m
d
2
cos
t
dt
2
m
cos
t
No.
It has the right form of function. It has the right sign. It doesn’t have the right constants. You can
see even before plugging it into the dierential equation that it’s wrong; it doesn’t even have the right
dimensions.Whatisthecosineofaday? Also,theoutputofthecosineisdimensionless,butthis
x
(
t
)
isn’t. You need to sprinkle some constants around to take care of the units if nothing else.
Try
x
(
t
)=
A
cos
!
0
t
instead.
kA
cos
!
0
t?
=
m
d
2
A
cos
!
0
t
dt
2
mA!
2
0
cos
!
0
t
The cosines match. The signs match. All that’s left are the constants, and
A
better not be zero or
you have a trivial solution, where nothing is happening.
kA
=
mA!
2
0
implies
!
2
0
=
k=m
or
!
0
=
q
k=m
77
Convert pdf image to text online - software SDK project:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf image to text online - software SDK project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
3|Simple Harmonic Motion
78
For this value of the constant
!
0
you have a solution. It says nothing about
A
. Will
x
(
t
)=
A
sin
!
0
t
work too? Yes, just try it. How about
x
(
t
)=
Ae
t
? Try this and you have
kAe
t
?
=
m
d
2
Ae
t
dt
2
=
mA
2
e
t
;
which implies
2
k=m
or
=
q
k=m
=
i
q
k=m
=
i!
0
(3
:
2)
All of these are correct, and there’s more about the last one in a few pages.
For a second orderdierentialequationthereare twoarbitraryconstantsinthecomplete solution.
You’re undoing two derivatives and each gives a constant of integration. Also, you need two constants
in order to be able to specify an initial position and an initial velocity. You can put the solutions in
several dierent forms, noting specically that for this equation the sum of two solutions is a solution.
k
x
1
(
t
)+
x
2
(
t
)
=
m
d
2
(
x
1
+
x
2
)
dt
2
If
x
1
and
x
2
satisfy this equation separately then their sum does.
x
(
t
)=
A
cos
!
0
t
+
B
sin
!
0
t
=
Ce
i!
0
t
+
De
i!
0
t
(3
:
3)
Other equivalent forms are
x
(
t
)=
F
cos(
!
0
t
+
1
)=
G
sin(
!
0
t
+
2
)
(3
:
4)
These arealldierent formsofthe solutionand they all equal each other ifthe coecientsare arranged
appropriately. This means that you can use whichever of these is the most useful for a particular
problem: most often, one or the other of Eq. (3.3). For example, to see if the rst and the fourth of
these agree,
A
cos
!
0
t
+
B
sin
!
0
t
=
G
sin(
!
0
t
+
)=
G
sin
!
0
t
cos
+cos
!
0
t
sin
(3
:
5)
which requires
A
=
G
sin
;
B
=
G
cos
That laststepis simply the observationthat Eq. (3.5) has to becorrectforallvalues of
t
.That’s really
an innite number of equations, so the respective coecients of cos
!
0
t
and of sin
!
0
t
must match.
Now you have two equations for the two unknowns
G
and
,and to solve them, take the square root
of the sum of the squares of the two equations and also take the quotient of the equations.
G
=
p
A
2+
B
2
and
tan
=
A=B
(3
:
6)
The relations between the other forms of solution in (3.3) and (3.4) also follow with a little algebra,
problem3.1.
Is guessing the solution somehow unsatisfactory? Maybe there’s another way to get the answer,
one that’s more dicult and that will make you feel that you’ve done enough real work that you can
be comfortable using the result. Yes, start from the dening equation and integrate it with respect to
x
,getting the energy integral as in sections1.3 and2.3. An abbreviated form of those sections is
m
dv
x
dt
kx
=)
m
Z
dx
dv
x
dt
=
m
Z
v
x
dv
x
=
Z
kxdx
=)
1
2
mv
2
x
1
2
kx
2
+
E
software SDK project:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
image. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components and online C# class source code. A powerful
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File: Merge PDF; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write
www.rasteredge.com
3|Simple Harmonic Motion
79
where
E
is an arbitrary constant of integration. This equation, which is Eq. (2.22), can be rearranged
in order to apply the method of separation of variables as in section0.8. Solve for
v
x
v
x
=
dx
dt
=
r
2
E
m
k
m
x
2
This equation separates; move all the
x
’s to one side and all the
t
’s to the other.
dx
q
2
E
m
k
m
x
2
=
dt
and this is a standard integral, easily done by a trigonometric substitution:
x
=
A
sin
then
dx
=
A
cos
d
Z
A
cos
d
q
2
E
m
k
m
A
2sin
2
=
t
t
0
Now choose
A
so that the denominator simplies. Make the factors in the two terms match:
A
2
=
2
E=k
,and the integral is now
p
2
E=k
p
2
E=m
Z
cos
d
p
1 sin
2
=
t
t
0
!
=
r
k
m
(
t
t
0
)
t
0
is another integration constant, and when you put
back into the equation
x
=
A
cos
you have
x
(
t
)=
A
sin
=
r
2
E
k
sin
!
0
(
t
t
0
)
;
where
E
and
t
0
are arbitrary constants
(3
:
7)
This matches the fourth of the four forms in Eqs. (3.3) and (3.4).
Example
Amass moves along the
x
-axis in a potential energy function
U
(
x
)=
U
0
a
2
a
2+
x
2
(3
:
8)
What are the equations of motion and their solution? Atleastintheapproximationthatthemotionis
small enough to be harmonic.
Acouple of ways to do this: First compute the force directly from the energy function.
F
x
dU
dx
d
dx
U
0
a
2
a
2+
x
2
=
U
0
a
2
2
x
(
a
2+
x
2)2
This force is zero at
x
=0 as you can also see from the graph of
U
,which has zero slope there. Near
to this point the denominator is mostly (
a
2
)
2
=
a
4
because
x
is small. In this approximation
~
F
=
m~a
is
F
x
=
2
U
0
x
a
2
=
m
d
2
x
dt
2
and this is a harmonic oscillator as in Eq. (3.1), and whose oscillation frequency is
!
0
=
p
2
U
0
=ma
2.
software SDK project:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File: Merge PDF; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write
www.rasteredge.com
3|Simple Harmonic Motion
80
Is this the \frequency" or is this the \angular frequency"? That’s a choice of units. Do you
measure an angle in degrees, radians, or cycles? They’re all correct, and it’s a matter of convenience
which you choose. 2
radians =1cycle, so 2
radians/second =1cycle/second = 1Hertz. For reasons
of both history and convenience itis
!
ifitis in radians per second and
f
or
in Hertz. The important
point to note however is that these manipulations with derivatives are validonly in radians.
You can dothis calculation another way with a geometric series as in Eq. (0.1)(h). Equivalently,
use the binomial series (0.1)(e) with
n
= 1.
U
(
x
)=
U
0
a
2
a
2
(1+
x
2
=a
2
)
U
0
x
2
a
2
+
 
dU
dx
U
0
2
x
a
2
+
and this again gives the harmonic oscillator dierential equation
mx
U
0
2
x=a
2
.This series manip-
ulation is a very common technique. Get used to it. Remember when using the binomial expansion
that you need to put it in the form of (1+something small)
n
.
Whichever way you do this, you neglect a higher order term in an innite series. This applies to
both methods, except that it is explicit in the second one, soyou can use that series to estimate either
how good the approximation is or the range over which it makes sense. Inthe geometric series the next
term appears as (1 
x
2
=a
2
+
x
4
=a
4
), so you need
x
4
=a
4
x
2
=a
2
,or j
x
j
a
. Andwhere in
the graph at Eq. (3.8) are the points j
x
j=
a
?
Example
In the rst gure in this chapter, suppose now that a bullet is red from the right, hitting
m
and
becoming embedded in it. The bullet has mass
m
0
and speed
v
0
. What is the motion of the mass
afterwards? Use conservation of momentum to nd the initial velocity of the combined mass:
(
m
+
m
0
)
v
1
m
0
v
0
Now
v
1
is the initial velocity of the combined mass, and this mass starts from the equilibrium position
x
=0. The most convenient form for the solution is sines and cosines as in Eq. (3.3).
x
(
t
)=
A
cos
!
0
t
+
B
sin
!
0
t;
then
x
(0) =0=
A;
and _
x
(0) =
!
0
B
=
v
1
The solution is then
x
(
t
)=  
m
0
v
0
(
m
+
m
0
)
!
0
sin
!
0
t
First, the dimensions are right, because these are lengths. For small time, the power series expansion
of the sine is sin
!
0
t
=
!
0
t
1
6
!
3
0
t
3
+, so this starts as
x
(
t
) 
m
0
v
0
t=
(
m
+
m
0
). If
m
0
m
(a
big bullet), this is close to  
v
0
t
.Both of these match the expected behavior of the solution.
Example
Andhere is where you need to know everything in section0.1.
What happens in a potential energy such as you saw on page61? Between points a and A or between
points c and C or g and G you have oscillations. Is the motion simple harmonic? No, but as in the
exampleEq. (3.8) itis approximately simpleharmonicfor smalloscillationsabouttheequilibrium. Ihave
no equation available to describe these graphs because they were just drawn at random, so computing
with them is dicult. Instead, make a new function to illustrate the ideas.
U
(
x
)=
2
x
2
x
x
1
(
x
1
>
0)
(3
:
9)
First you must sketch this function,andImeanyou.Now! The procedure to do this sketch is:
software SDK project:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
provides text extraction from PDF images and image files. Best VB.NET PDF text extraction SDK library and Online Visual Basic .NET class source code for quick
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Supports text extraction from scanned PDF by using XDoc.PDF for .NET Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
www.rasteredge.com
3|Simple Harmonic Motion
81
1. Sketch
U
for
x
close to
x
=0.
2. Sketch
U
for
x
close to
x
=
x
1
.
3. Sketch
U
for
x
large and positive (butnotinnite). [Arbitrarily pick
>
.]
4. Sketch
U
for
x
large and negative (butnotinnite).
5. Now ll in the gaps.
The next step: where is the minimum energy?
dU
dx
2
x
2
+
2
(
x
x
1
)2
=0
This is a quadratic equation in
x
,so it’s not hard to nd the roots. From the sketch that you just
drew, you can easily see that one of the roots corresponds to a minimum of
U
,and with somewhat
more eort you will be able to verify that the other root is at a maximum.
2
(
x
x
1
)
2
=
2
x
2
!
(
x
x
1
)=
x
! (
)
x
=
x
1
The root
x
0
=
x
1
=
(
+
)lies between 0and
x
1
and is the stable equilibrium point, as you see from
the graph of
U
that you just sketched.
There are (at least) four ways to proceed from here:
1. Expand the potential energy about
x
0
using the general Taylor expansion Eq. (0.4).
2. Expand the potential energy about
x
0
using the binomial (or other standard) series expansion in
Eq. (0.1).
3. Expand the force about
x
0
using the general Taylor expansion.
4. Expand the force about
x
0
using the binomial (or other) expansion.
When applicable, three and four are usually the easier methods. Start with number three:
The Taylor series is
F
x
(
x
)=
F
x
(
x
0
)+
F
0
x
(
x
0
)(
x
x
0
)+
so compute
F
0
x
(
x
0
)
F
x
dU
dx
=+
2
x
2
2
(
x
x
1
)2
dF
x
dx
= 2
2
x
3
+2
2
(
x
x
1
)3
at
x
0
this = 2
2
x
3
0
+2
2
(
x
0
x
1
)3
= 2
2
x
1
=
(
+
)
3
+2
2
x
1
=
(
+
x
1
3
=
2
x
3
1
2
(
+
)
3
3
+
2
(
+
)
3
)3
2
x
3
1
(
+
)
3
1
+
1
2
x
3
1
(
+
)
4

(3
:
10)
The force near the equilibrium point is now a Taylor series. See also problem3.29.
F
x
(
x
)=
F
x
(
x
0
)+
F
0
x
(
x
0
)(
x
x
0
)+ =0 
2
x
3
1
(
+
)
4

z
=
m
d
2
z
dt
2
software SDK project:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File: Merge PDF; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write
www.rasteredge.com
3|Simple Harmonic Motion
82
where
z
=
x
x
0
,and of course
d
2
z=dt
2
=
d
2
x=dt
2
. This is a simple harmonic oscillator equation
with solution
z
(
t
)=
A
cos(
!
0
t
+
)
and
!
2
0
=
2
x
3
1
(
+
)
4
m
x
(
t
)=
x
0
+
A
cos(
!
0
t
+
)
(3
:
11)
What is the behavior ofthis solution? The rst point to notice is thatas
x
1
!0, this frequency ! 1.
Why? The potential energy is singular at the origin, and when
x
1
becomes smaller the point of
minimum potential is squeezed between 0 and
x
1
. The potential energy curve that you sketched right
after Eq. (3.9) then rises ever more steeply and as a result the frequency of oscillation becomes larger,
exactly as Eq. (3.11) says. What happens if
or
moves toward zero?
In this example, method three is easier than four, but that’s not always so. You need to know
all these ways to handle problems.
3.2 Complex Exponentials
The complex exponential that appears as one of the forms of these solutions in Eq. (3.3) isn’t essential
for anything up to this point, but for the next steps you can’t really do without it. It is time to stop
and go over that bit of mathematics to be sure that you can manipulate it. First, go back and read
section0.7. That is a review of the basic arithmetic of complex numbers, and it is essential for what
follows. Do all the problems0.42 through0.47.
For a complex number
z
=
x
+
iy
,what is
e
z
=
e
x
+
iy
? The rst step is to use the property
of exponentials that this is the same as
e
x
e
iy
. You already know what the rst factor
e
x
is. What
then is
e
iy
? The answer was stated in Eq. (0.46), and one way to derive it is to use the innite series
expansion of the exponential.
e
iy
=1+
iy
+
1
2
(
iy
)
2
+
1
3!
(
iy
)
3
+
1
4!
(
iy
)
4
+ =
=
1
2!
y
2
+
1
4!
y
4
1
6!
y
6
+
+
i
y
1
3!
y
3
+
1
5!
y
5

=cos
y
+
i
sin
y
The last line comes from recognizing the known series expansions of the sine and cosine, Eq. (0.1).
This formula, Euler’s, is the single most useful equation involving complex numbers. You will see it
everywhere. Complex numbers can be represented graphically as points in the
x
-
y
plane|rectangular
coordinates. The polar coordinates,
r
and
,in the same plane represent the complex exponential.
x
+
iy
=
r
cos
+
ir
sin
=
re
i
y
x
r
r
cos
r
sin
re
i
=
x
+
iy
e
i
1
Fig. 3.2
How does a graph of
e
i
=cos
+
i
sin
appear in the complex plane? It’s a circle. The radius
of the circleis one andthe angle
is theanglebetween theradial line and the +
x
-axis. The magnitude
software SDK project:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET library to batch convert PDF files to jpg image files. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
www.rasteredge.com
3|Simple Harmonic Motion
83
of a complex number is dened in terms of the Pythagorean Theorem as the length of this radial line,
so this is
e
i
=
q
cos2
+sin
2
=1
The exponential is periodic,
e
i
(
+2
)
=
e
i
e
2
i
=
e
i
(cos2
+
i
sin2
)=
e
i
and this is clear in the picture because as phi increases, the point representing the complex number
keeps wrapping around the circle counterclockwise. The special case
=
is notable:
e
i
= 1.
Example
What is the square of
e
i
?
e
i
2
=
e
2
i
=cos2
+
i
sin2
=(cos
+
i
sin
)
2
=cos
2
sin
2
+2
i
cos
sin
(3
:
12)
Compare thethird andfth expressions and you have an instantderivationofthe double angle formulas
of trigonometry becausethe respective real and imaginary parts heremustmatch. Ifyouwant the triple
angle formulas (not so well known), cube the exponential, problem3.3.
When youaddandsubtractcomplexnumbers, itisusuallymoreconvenienttouse the rectangular
form, as
x
+
iy
. When you multiply them the polar form has advantages, because
r
1
e
i
1
r
2
e
i
2
=
r
1
r
2
e
i
(
1
+
2
)
(3
:
13)
The radii multiply as ordinary positive numbers, and the angles add. What happens if you use Euler’s
formula on the left side of this equation?
r
1
(cos
1
+
i
sin
1
)
r
2
(cos
2
+
i
sin
2
)=
r
1
r
2
e
i
(
1
+
2
)
The factors
r
1
r
2
cancel, andyou can multiply the remaining binomials. Also useEuler’s formula on the
right side.
(cos
1
cos
2
sin
1
sin
2
)+
i
(cos
1
sin
2
+sin
1
cos
2
)
=cos(
1
+
2
)+
i
sin(
1
+
2
)
The real and imaginary parts must match, so this provides an immediate derivation of the sine and
cosine of the sum of two angles.
When you dierentiate complex exponentials such as
e
i!
0
t
,the manipulations are exactly the
same as with real exponentials.
d
dt
e
i!
0
t
=
i!
0
e
i!
0
t
That the derivative results in a multiple of the original function is what makes complex exponentials
so easy to use when you’re trying to describe oscillations. Take another derivative of
e
i!
0
t
and you get
!
2
0
e
i!
0
t
,showing again that this exponential satises the harmonic oscillator dierential equation.
3|Simple Harmonic Motion
84
3.3 Damped Oscillators
When you say that friction is present in a system, you still don’t know what the force is. Friction is
complicatedandyouhaveto makesomesimplifyingassumptions aboutit inorder tomake any headway
in solving the resulting mathematics. The sort of friction that you’ve seen in introductory texts is dry
friction, using an equation for the magnitude of the force that looks like
F
=
k
F
N
,where
k
is the
coecient of friction,
F
N
is the component of the force perpendicular to the sliding surfaces, and the
resulting force is then independent of the magnitude of the velocity, depending only on its direction.
This is a decent approximation for dry surfaces over a range of speeds and normal forces, but it isn’t
exact.
When the surfaces are lubricated (wet friction) the frictional force is dependent not only on the
direction of the relative velocity of the surfaces, but on its magnitude. When a golf ball is  ying the air
resistance depends in a complicated way on its velocity, though a decent rst approximation assumes
that the resistance is proportional to the square of the speed.
Allthis leadstothefactthatI havetomakesome assumptions, andas muchas anythingI’llmake
the assumptions for convenience, not for the best possible representation of physical reality. Having
said that, I’ll start by picking the frictional force to be linear in the velocity. I do this not because it is
the best approximation, but because it’s mathematically the simplest. In some applications, such as in
electrical circuits, this approximation can be a very good one. It enters as the resistance in the circuit.
I’ll spend a little time on one of the other models, but any serious treatment of it will require some of
the tools that won’t appear until another chapter, though this linear approximation is actually a pretty
good representation for an object moving slowly through a  uid.
With thisviscousdamping the equation (3.1) become
F
x
kx
bv
x
kx
b
dx
dt
=
ma
x
=
m
d
2
x
dt
2
(3
:
14)
Sines and cosines are not enough here, because the rst derivative changes one into the other. This
dierential equation falls into a class of equations that appear repeatedly. They are
linear, homogeneous, constant coecient
dierential equations of the sort described in section 0.9. That is, The dependent variable,
x
,or its
derivatives appear just to the rst power, and the coecients are all constants. Such equations are
easy tosolve because of the special property of exponentials. The derivative of an exponential is itself.
That doesn’tmean that
e
t
is a solution (much less
e
x
). It doesn’tevenhavethe right dimensions. (For
the linear,inhomogeneous case, see section3.5.)
Use
x
(
t
)=
Ae
t
;
then
m
d
2
x
dt
2
+
b
dx
dt
+
kx
=0
is
m
2
Ae
t
+
bAe
t
+
kAe
t
=0=
Ae
t
m
2
+
b
+
k
The exponential is not zero, and
A
6=0, so you’re left with a quadratic equation for
.
=
b
p
b
4
km
2
m
b
2
m
r
b
2
4
m
2
k
m
(3
:
15)
The general solution to
F
x
=
ma
x
is the sum,
x
(
t
)=
A
1
e
1
t
+
A
2
e
2
t
(3
:
16)
where
A
1
and
A
2
are arbitrary constants and the two
’s are the ones that I just found.
3|Simple Harmonic Motion
85
In the commoncasethat thedamping is not toolarge (the underdampedcase), the argument of
thesquare rootisnegative, soEq. (3.15) becomes (introducingthe parameters
and
!
0
in theprocess)
b
2
m
i
r
k
m
b
2
4
m
2
i!
0
;
!
0
=
q
!
2
0
2
(3
:
17)
and this
i
is where the oscillations come from. Try initial conditions specifying that at time
t
=0 the
position is
x
=0 and the velocity is
v
x
=
v
0
.The general solution in Eq. (3.16) produces
x
(0) =
A
1
+
A
2
=0
;
and
_
x
(0) =
1
A
1
+
2
A
2
=
v
0
Solve these for the coecients and put them into the equation for
x
(
t
).
x
(
t
)=
v
0
1
2
h
e
1
t
e
2
t
i
(3
:
18)
In the underdamped case it’s easier to interpret if you switch to the explicitly complex form, in which
1
;
2
i!
0
.
x
(
t
)=
v
0
+
i!
(
i!
0)
e
t
h
e
i!0t
e
i!0t
i
=
v
0
2
i!
0
e
t
cos
!
0
t
+
i
sin
!
0
t
cos
!
0
t
+
i
sin
!
0
t
=
v
0
!
0
e
t
sin
!
0
t
(3
:
19)
In the end this is real, and it has to be because everything in the dierential equation is real and the
initial conditions are real, so if this hadn’t come out real I would then have to go back and nd my
mistake. The oscillation frequency
!
0
=
p
!
2
0
islessthantheundampedfrequency
!
0
=
p
k=m
.
The damping slows the oscillations.
Does it make sense? First check the dimensions. [Do so.] What is the behavior for small time?
The power series expansion for the exponential starts o as
e
x
= 1 +
x
+ and for the sine as
sin
x
=
x
x
3
=
6+. The rst terms are then
x
(
t
)=
v
0
!
0
[1 
t
+][
!
0
t
!
03
t
3
=
6+] =
v
0
t
bv
0
t
2
2
m
+
and this is easy tointerpret. The rst term,
v
0
t
,says that the mass starts with velocity
v
0
as specied.
The second terms is in theform
at
2
=
2, and shows the initial acceleration to be  
bv
0
=m
,which in turn
says thatthe initial force is  
bv
0
.That is the initial viscous force because the spring hasn’t yet started
to act (
x
=0). Atthe other extreme, for large times the motiondies out exponentially as the damping
removes the energy. See Figure3.3 for some graphs.
Overdamped Oscillations
If the damping is large, so that
b
2
=
4
m
2
>k=m
(or
>!
0
), then the
’s are real and negative (the
overdamped case), and equation (3.18) is all you need to write. Whatsign do these
’s have?
1
;
2
b
2
m
r
b
2
4
m
2
k
m
and
b
2
4
m
2
k
m
<
b
2
4
m
2
which makes the square root smaller in magnitude than the  
b=
2
m
term. This implies that both
’s
are negative, and that both terms in the solution are decaying exponentials. If you put a mass on the
end of a spring and then immerse everything in a vat of honey you don’t get any oscillations and in
time the mass will approach
x
=0.
3|Simple Harmonic Motion
86
If you now start a mass at
t
=0 at the origin with velocity
v
x
=
v
0
you get precisely Eq. (3.18)
for the answer. You don’t have to doit again. All that changes is thatboth
’s are now real. Take
1
as the
with the plus sign, then letting
=
q
b2
4
m2
k
m
x
(
t
)=
v
0
2
q
b2
4
m2
k
m
e
bt=
2
m
e
t
e
t
=
v
0
e
bt=
2
m
sinh
t
(3
:
20)
and since
<b=
2
m
thedecaying exponential wins over the growinghyperbolic sineandthe coordinate
approaches zero for large time.
Critical Damping
There is one further case, though it is sort of a special instance of either of the rst two. What if the
discriminant of the quadratic equation inside the square root in Eq. (3.15), is zero? The two
’s are
then the same and you have only one solution to the dierential equation. When you want to specify
thetwoinitial conditions, position and velocity, you don’thaveenough arbitraryconstantstogo around
and you cannot get a solution. The answer is that you already have the solution Eq. (3.18) in front
of you for the case that the damping does not have this special value. If the two
’s are almost, but
not quite the same, maybe diering by 10
20
or so, then does it matter? The solution can’t change
much if you change
by a tiny amount. Put in mathematical language, start with the solution for the
under- or overdamped case and take the limit of Eq. (3.18) as
1
!
2
.
x
(
t
)= lim
1
!
2
v
0
1
2
h
e
1
t
e
2
t
i
=
v
0
d
d
e
t
=
v
0
te
t
=
v
0
te
bt=
2
m
(3
:
21)
This limit is nothing more than the denition of the derivative* with respect to
. One point that’s
easy to miss is that in evaluating this special limiting case you mustapply the initial conditions rst
and only after that can you take the limit. Just try it in the other order and you will see that nothing
works. Is the small
t
behavior of Eq. (3.21) correct?
=0
=0
:
1
!
0
=0
:
25
!
0
!
critical,
=
!
0
!
x
t
Fig. 3.3
These four graphs show the motion for values of the damping from zero through critical damping, all
with the same initial velocity: Eqs. (3.19) and (3.21).
The shock absorbers in an automobile are strongly damped because you do not want the car to
keep oscillating up and down after you go over a bump. (If that happens, then it’s time to replace
them.) If the damping is too large however, the ride becomes uncomfortably sti, so the standard
choice it to make the damping parameter very close to critical.
Energy
How does the energy behave in a damped oscillator? The power by the frictional force, the time
* These sort of limits are not always just a derivative. Usually you have to apply a little eort, as
in problem3.12
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested