view pdf in asp net mvc : Convert scanned pdf to word text application SDK cloud windows winforms html class 96041-part821

The data revolution – Finding the missing millions 11  
Introduction
About this paper
This paper starts by making the case for why a data 
revolution is needed, highlighting the parlous case of data 
globally, nationally and locally, focusing on social data, 
and stating why the gaps matter and how they should be 
plugged (Sections 1 to 3). Next, it discusses the innovative 
ways in which data are already being produced and used 
(Section 4). Finally we set out a vision for a fully-fledged 
revolution, with an examination of outstanding challenges 
(Sections 5 and 6). 
Throughout, the paper highlights examples of a range of 
different uses for big and small data that are being piloted 
around the world. Some projects are already improving 
people’s lives, while others are still works in progress. But they 
demonstrate that the data revolution is already underway. 
Key terms
Household surveys 
A household survey uses a questionnaire to gather 
information on households and their members from a 
sample of the population of interest, carefully selected so 
that the findings will be representative of the whole of that 
population (but with margins of error).
The major internationally comparable household 
surveys are the Macro International’s Demographic Health 
Survey, UNICEF’s Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 
and the World Bank’s Living Standards Measurement 
Surveys. These are usually conducted every 3-5 years. Most 
countries also implement national household surveys, 
which can be more or less frequent.
Census 
A census is the complete enumeration of a population 
or groups at one time with respect to well-defined 
characteristics, for example: population, production, traffic 
on particular roads. Because it should cover the whole 
of a population, it can be used as a sampling frame for 
household surveys.
Administrative data 
Administrative data come from one or more government 
sources such as hospital or school records. They are 
cheaper to collect than survey data, and should be more 
frequent and aspire to greater population coverage, but 
at present coverage in many countries is incomplete and 
quality of the data can be problematic.
An important type of administrative data is from civil 
registration systems – the governmental machinery set up 
in a country, state or province for legal recording of vital 
events (such as birth, death or marriage) of the population 
on a continuous basis.
Convert scanned pdf to word text - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to txt format online; convert pdf to searchable text online
Convert scanned pdf to word text - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
convert pdf to text vb; best pdf to text
For the past 15 years, the international community has 
focused on a coordinated effort to transform the lives of 
poor people. The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 
were designed to revolutionise relations between donors 
and poor-country governments, galvanising action in 
developing countries, catalysing finance and other assistance 
where it was most needed, and celebrating improvements as 
and where they happened.
But, however worthwhile the aim, assessing whether 
the target has been achieved has too often depended on 
an illusion: that we really know the scale of the problems 
we are trying to solve, and that we can therefore tell what 
change looks like, and what has caused it. To put it starkly, 
we know a lot less about crucial facets of development than 
we think (see Box 1, page 15). We illustrate this here by 
showing data gaps and their impacts across several MDGs.
1.1 Data and the Millennium Development Goals 
MDG 1: poverty figures and the missing millions
MDG 1 aimed to halve the number of people living in 
extreme poverty. But we do not know how many people 
in the world are poor. Attempts to measure consumption 
consistently and to arrive at an international definition 
of poverty are controversial (Chandy, 2013; Chandy and 
Kharas, 2014). 
Sources of error are numerous, both in how the data 
are collected and when the World Bank aggregates these 
numbers to derive global poverty numbers (see Chandy, 
2013). The problems are more acute for the poorest 
countries, where surveys are less frequent, and therefore 
estimates are necessarily based on a number of assumptions. 
For instance, just 28 of 49 countries in sub-Saharan 
Africa had reported household survey data on income or 
consumption between 2006 and 2013 as of that latter year 
– meaning, at the time ‘a quarter of the 414 million people 
12 Development Progress Research Report
1. What we do and don’t 
know
Statisticians in Turkmenistan entering data into the database for further processing and analysis. Photo: © World Bank.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF to Word in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET webpage. Create high quality Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without losing
convert pdf to word text document; convert pdf file to text online
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Convert Word to PDF file with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast.
pdf to text converter; convert pdf table to text
who (were) estimated to live on under US$1.25 a day in 
the region according to the most recent official poverty 
estimate’ were derived from earlier surveys (Chandy 2013, 
p. 14). For instance, in the case of Algeria, current poverty 
estimates are based on the 1995 household survey.
10
The aggregation of country poverty into a global poverty 
figure introduces additional complications. One illustration 
of how these issues matter is in the dramatic revisions to 
global poverty numbers whenever a new global estimate 
is made – every 3 to 4 years. For example, in 2005, the 
estimation of 931 million poor people was revised upwards 
by a third to 1.4 billion, following revisions to price 
estimates and to the poverty line to account for inflation 
(Chen and Ravallion, 2010). Now the most up-to-date 
estimated number of people living below $1.25 a day is 
1.01 billion, for 2011, nearly four years out of date, and 
there will no doubt be big changes (likely, reductions) this 
October, once a new set of figures are released based on 
updated data on prices (see Dykstra et al., 2014; Chandy 
and Kharas, 2014).
There is yet another complication: in poor countries, 
assessment of progress towards development goals is based 
primarily on household surveys, which generally omit by 
design the homeless, people in institutions, and mobile, 
nomadic or pastoralist populations (Carr-Hill, 2013). In 
practice, household surveys also typically under-represent 
people living in urban slums (because of the difficulty of 
identifying and interviewing), dangerous places and fragile 
or transient households. In other words, the very people 
that the Sustainable Development Goals are aiming to reach 
– with their emphasis on leaving no one behind – literally 
don’t count. As many as 350 million people could be missed 
worldwide from these surveys and from many censuses 
according to work by the health economist Carr-Hill. He 
estimates that 250 million people are in groups the surveys 
are not designed to cover, such as migrants or pastoralists, 
while an additional 100 million may be under-represented 
because they live in areas which are difficult to survey. 
Considering the demographic they represent, it is likely 
that a substantial number of the estimated 350 million will 
be living on less than $1.25 a day. In other words poverty 
figures could be understated by at least one-quarter (Carr-
Hill, 2013; PovcalNet.org). As Carr-Hill says, this systemic 
void makes a mockery of monitoring development progress 
because neither the baseline nor the current estimates are 
secure.
MDG 1 also aimed at eradicating hunger, but these 
numbers too have been subject to recent scrutiny. Notably, 
in 2012, the FAO revised its claim that the number of 
undernourished people in the world had climbed to over 1 
billion in 2009, following food-price hikes, to suggest instead 
a figure of around 870 million. In other words, the figure 
was reduced by about 130 million (The Economist, 2012a).
MDG 2: universal primary education – probably 
overstated
UNESCO tracks data provided by schools to education 
ministries and collates the information into an annual 
report, the Global Monitoring Report (GMR). But this is 
very problematic as UNESCO itself openly states: official 
enrolment data may overstate the numbers of children in 
school at the appropriate age, suggesting that more needs to 
be done to address the problems of late entry and dropout. 
Household survey data for a number of countries indicate 
overestimates of 10% or more in school attendance rates. 
According to the GMR, administrative data may also be 
misreported and institutional incentives may play a role in 
this: if the number of students in the appropriate grade for 
their age determines the allocation of grants or teachers, 
schools and local governments might have a tendency to 
inflate the school register (UNESCO, 2010 and Sandefur 
and Glassman, 2014).
MDG 4: child mortality – uncertain
Child mortality, MDG 4, is regarded as the goal on which 
the data are best (Lopez, 2007). Indeed with the exception 
of the Pacific islands, data on child mortality appear to 
be widely available. Of the 161 developing countries, 136 
have data to track this metric (Rodriguez-Takeuchi, 2014). 
Yet, according to data from the UN Interagency Group for 
Child Mortality, over two-thirds of the 75 countries which 
account for more than 95% of all maternal, newborn and 
child deaths do not have registries of births and deaths. And 
more than one-third do not have a child mortality estimate 
less than five years old. Twenty-six countries have no data 
on child mortality since 2009. As a result, child mortality 
data are estimates, often derived from surveys. In some cases 
these surveys collect very limited information on births and 
deaths, rather than full birth histories, so estimates are based 
on a number of assumptions (UN, 1983), such as fertility 
models that are unlikely to be representative of regions 
including sub-Saharan Africa (UN, 1982). 
To see how this matters, take the example of Nigeria in 
1998, where four different surveys of under-five mortality 
levels generated rates of death per thousand live births of: 
225,
11
186,
12
173,
13
and 157.
14
The official UN interagency 
The data revolution – Finding the missing millions 13
10 PovcalNet.org (accessed 21 May 2015).
11 Using 2003 DHS and a full-birth history method.
12 2008 DHS, full birth history.
13 Malaria Indicator Survey.
14 2011 MICS and indirect method.
C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C# Recognize scanned PDF document and output OCR result to MS Word file.
convert pdf to word searchable text; convert pdf to searchable text
C# TIFF: How to Convert TIFF File to PDF Document in C# Project
Convert Tiff to Scanned PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.Tiff ›› C# Tiff: Tiff to PDF.
convert pdf to text; batch pdf to text
group modelled estimate for 1998 is 198 – somewhere in 
the middle – but the confidence intervals are sizeable.
15
MDG 5: maternal mortality – a veil of ignorance
Most people, on reading a figure for maternal mortality, 
think this is the actual number of women who have died, 
expressed with forensic accuracy. Indeed, this is how the 
data are used: every year countries’ performances are 
tracked against maternal mortality indicators. Results 
are published, and league tables drawn up with the 
achievement of one country judged against that of its 
neighbours, and other countries around the world.
16
Yet, 
the reality is that we do not know how many mothers are 
dying each year in poor countries, or even over longer 
intervals (Ronsmans and Graham, 2006). 
How can this be possible? First, we lack adequate 
data. More than 100 countries do not have functioning 
systems to register births or deaths (World Bank/WHO, 
2014), meaning that fewer than one in five births occur 
in countries with complete civil registration systems, 
with the remainder occurring either in countries with 
incomplete registries or with no data at all (2% of births 
– but 11 countries). Theoretically, the data could be taken 
from hospital registries, but many women in developing 
countries die outside hospital (PBR, 2007). This leaves 
household surveys. 
Here too there are problems. The sensitivity of maternal 
death could lead family members to under-report it (PBR, 
2007). More generally, maternal mortality is relatively 
rare – which is why it is measured per hundred thousand 
live births, compared to child mortality ratios which are 
measured per thousand live births. A typical household 
survey would find few respondents that have experienced 
a maternal death within their household or have a sibling 
who died of pregnancy-related causes.
17
It follows that the 
margin of error attached to these estimates is very large. 
For most countries, therefore, maternal mortality is 
estimated based on a regression model that includes just 
three key predictors: per capita GDP, the general fertility 
rate and skilled birth attendance.
18
As a result of this 
modelling, we conclude that globally, for 2013, there 
were an estimated 210 maternal deaths per 100,000 
live births.However, the uncertainty is such that the 
actual number could reasonably be (with 95% certainty) 
anywhere between 160 and 290 maternal deaths per 
100,000 live births. 
A maternal mortality rate (MMR) of 210 deaths per 
100,000 live births translates into about 289,000 deaths. 
It follows that the difference between a MMR of 290 and 
a MMR of 160 is in the order of 180,000 deaths. In other 
words, there may have been 220,000 maternal deaths in 
2013, or as many as 400,000. 
If we look at just at the data for sub-Saharan Africa, 
the MMR is 510 – this means that about 179,000 women 
died in childbirth in the region in 2013, such that a woman 
faced a 1 in 38 chance of dying from causes related to 
pregnancy and childbirth in her lifetime. However, the 
uncertainty around this estimate is such that a reasonable 
MMR estimate could be anywhere between 380 and 730, 
which equates to a potential difference of about 123,000 
lives. In other words, about 133,000 women may have 
died or about 256,000 (an almost 100% difference) – we 
cannot predict the number with greater precision.
19
At country level, there is again considerable variation. 
In Nigeria, the maternal mortality ratio in 2013 was 
estimated at 560, but the confidence interval suggests the 
value may be anywhere between 300 and 1,000 (Figure 1). 
If the true number of maternal deaths were at the bottom 
end of the confidence interval in 1990 but at the higher 
end in 2013, then the number of maternal deaths may 
have risen over this period (Figure 1, overleaf) – the large 
margins of error put in question not only levels but trends 
(Melamed, 2014).
MDG 6: combating HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases
HIV infection rates have often been extrapolated from 
numbers among particular population groups for which 
such testing is mandatory – e.g., pregnant women visiting 
(often urban) clinics – which may be non-representative. 
In recent years, Ethiopia, Kenya and India reduced their 
estimated prevalence rates by half, following national 
population surveys (Kresge, 2007), and The Lancet 
recently reported a new methodology for modelling deaths 
from HIV which concluded that nearly 20% fewer people 
were living with the virus than previously thought (Murray 
et al., 2014). The data on malaria must also be interpreted 
with caution – we cannot be certain either about the 
incidence of malaria or trends in tackling it in countries 
14 Development Progress Research Report
15 Computed from data at www.childmortality.org.  
a potential difference of 132,316 deaths.
16 Multi-sectoral reports include the Global Monitoring Report, produced annually by the World Bank and IMF, and the World Health Statistics Report by 
the World Health Organization.
17 dbirth within a certain 
recall period, or if any of their sisters died during pregnancy, birth or within two months of the end of the pregnancy (www.maternalmortalitydata.org/
definitions.html).
18  See Wilmoth et al., 2012.
19 In this section, numbers are taken from or computed on the basis of data in WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA, World Bank and United Nations Population 
Division (2014).
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast.
convert pdf to txt file format; convert pdf file to txt file
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Supports text extraction from scanned PDF by using XDoc.PDF for .NET or fetch text content from source PDF document file for word processing, presentation
convert pdf scanned image to text; convert pdf to text file online
that account for 85% of all (estimated) deaths from the 
disease. This leaves the claim that malaria deaths fell by 
49% in sub-Saharan Africa between 2000 and 2013 open 
to considerable question (Melamed, 2014). 
1.2 The people left behind
Most of these data gaps arise because current data 
collection techniques and sources are inadequate. One 
gap is temporal: internationally comparable household 
surveys are carried out every 3-5 years, meaning we have 
inadequate information between those years. The other 
key gap is in subject: many people (Carr-Hill, 2013) and 
many issues of great importance to poor people (Alkire, 
2009) are left out. Importantly, for the SDG mission to 
ensure that the poorest and most vulnerable benefit from 
development initiatives, there are several discriminated-
against populations about whom we know very little. 
These include women, persons with disabilities and those 
who are mentally ill.
20
There are particular challenges in the collection 
of disaggregated data needed to identify the most 
marginalised. For example, the sample for the DHS 2011 
from Nepal consisted of 11,000 households containing 
over 47,000 people. But suppose you want to monitor 
malnutrition among children under five from rural areas 
in the Far-Western region – a not unreasonable request 
for a national policy-maker: the sample size falls to 751 
individuals. To then track performance of girls leaves 
a sub-sample of under 400 – enough to be statistically 
representative, but with a relatively large error. And if you 
want to add any additional filter, say smaller geographical 
regions or socioeconomic groups, the samples dwindle to 
such small sizes that it becomes very challenging to make 
any reliable inferences (Samman and Roche, 2014). 
Increasing sample sizes may be possible, in some 
cases. But the larger the sample, the more expensive and 
difficult it becomes to get high-quality data. Pooling data 
across time is one possibility – but still problematic, in 
any country. It was estimated to take at least eight years 
of survey data to obtain reportable estimates for some 
population subgroups in the US National Health Interview 
Survey. An alternative is to use census data – but these are 
produced only every decade, and therefore inadequate for 
monitoring (Samman and Roche, 2014). Two marginalised 
groups least covered in terms of data are older people and 
ethnic minorities.
1.2.1 Older people 
Although these numbers should be treated with caution, it 
is estimated that people over the age of 60 currently make 
up an estimated 12.2% of the world population, rising to 
The data revolution – Finding the missing millions 15  
20 For gender gaps, see World Bank Group (2014). E. and Rodriguez-
Takeuchi, L. (2013).
Figure 1: Trends in maternal mortality, Nigeria, 1990 to 2013
1990
1995
2000
2005
2010
2012
2013
0
1000
800
600
400
200
Estimated maternal deaths in Nigeria, 1990-2013 (per 100,000 live births)
Note: The trend line depicts estimated maternal mortality and the 
shaded area shows the margin of error at a 95% level of confidence.
Source: WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA, The World Bank and United 
Nations Population Division (2014).
Box 1: 10 basic facts about development we still don’t know*
1. How many people live in cities.
2. The volume of global assets which are held 
offshore, undeclared to tax authorities.**
3. How many girls are married before the age of 18.
4. The ethnicity of most Europeans.***
5. The percentage of the world’s poor that are women.
6. Basic educational outcomes at primary level in 
sub-Saharan Africa, South-East Asia, Latin America.
7. The number of street children worldwide.
8. How many people in the world are hungry.
9. The size of sub-Saharan Africa’s economy.
10. How many people work in the informal economy.
Sources: 
Lucci, 2014; Buvinic et al., 2014; Marcoux, 1998; Klasen, 
2004; UNESCO, 2014; de Benitez, 2014; The Economist, 
2012b; Blas, 2014; La Porta and Shleifer, 2014.
Notes: 
* There are data on these issues, but they are inadequate to 
give even a sufficiently accurate estimation.
** Zucman (2014); this figure could be between $8tn and 
$32tn (Henry, 2012).
*** This is a controversial issue. See Open Society 
Foundations (2014).
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
OCR text from scanned PDF by working with XImage.OCR SDK. Best VB.NET PDF text extraction SDK library and component for free download.
convert pdf to text for; convert pdf to text without losing formatting
VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. Recognize scanned PDF document and output OCR result to MS Word file.
convert .pdf to text; convert pdf to plain text online
16.3% by 2030 (HAI, 2014; UNDESA, 2013). Globally, 
there are already more older people than children under 
the age of five; by 2030 they will outnumber those aged 10 
and under (UNDESA, 2013). 
Aging brings with it a specific set of needs and 
challenges: households headed by older people, or with 
older members, tend to be poorer than others. At present, 
an estimated 340 million older people are living without 
any secure income and, if current trends continue, this 
number will rise to 1.2 billion by 2050 (Samman and 
Rodriguez-Takeuchi, 2013).
However, the DHS and the MICS currently ask detailed 
questions of women only up to the age of 49 in most 
countries,
21
meaning the circumstances and needs of older 
people cannot be fully assessed. 
The INGO HelpAge International has attempted to 
fill this gap by producing a global index of wellbeing for 
older people. This is an important contribution, accounting 
for 90% of the world’s older people (HAI, 2014) but it 
has suffered from data gaps. Only 96 countries are listed 
because those were the only ones with data available on all 
four elements of income security, health status, capability 
and enabling environment. Nor was it possible to identify 
differences between women and men, as the data were not 
disaggregated in this way. 
1.2.2 Ethnic minorities 
Being a member of an ethnic minority can be a key factor 
in passing poverty between generations (Bird, 2007). 
Ethnic minorities often face the biggest barriers to good 
health, and therefore have the worst health outcomes. 
Language and ethnicity may lead to marginalisation in 
education through complex channels (UNESCO, 2010). So 
monitoring progress explicitly in these communities may 
be particularly important. 
But again, data gaps mean that ethnic minorities 
are often uncounted. In DHS surveys there are reliable, 
consistent ethnic trend data (or a sufficient proxy) for 
only 16 of 90 countries (Lenhardt, 2015). In some cases, 
the information exists, but is not consistent across years, 
making it difficult to estimate and track the progress of 
groups over time. 
In Sierra Leone, information on ethnicities is available 
in the 2005 MICS but not in the 2010 survey. In India, 
the 2005/06 DHS lists scheduled castes, scheduled tribes 
and other backward castes, while the 1995/96 survey does 
not include other backwards castes (which in 2005/06 
accounted for 29% of the entire sample). But for India, one 
of the most ethnically diverse countries in the world, even 
three categories does not give a sufficiently disaggregated 
picture (Mukherjee, 2013).
16 Development Progress Research Report
21 Because it was designed to survey women of reproductive age. 
Box 2: DHS, LSMS and MICS: the three big household surveys
Health Survey (DHS), funded by USAID; the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS), housed in UNICEF; and 
the Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS), overseen by the World Bank.
DHS health and nutrition. These 
are collected through a household questionnaire, a woman’s questionnaire (asked of all women in the household of 
reproductive age, usually 15-49 years), and a men’s questionnaire asked of men aged 15-59. The standard survey is 
carried out every five years, with large sample sizes (5,000-30,000 households), and an interim one carried out in 
between, with fewer indicators and a smaller sample size.
MICS This includes questions on health, education, child protection and HIV/AIDS. It is of a similar design to 
the DHS, allowing comparisons to be made between the two. The surveys are organised into four questionnaires: 
households, women, MICSs have 
been conducted in 1995, 2000, 2005-06, 2009-11 and 2012-14. Survey sizes range between 5,000 and 20,000 
households (Carr-Hill, 2013).
LSMS The World Bank’
survey data. Questionnaires are administered to households, individuals and communities. The samples are 
nationally representative, but fairly small (2,000-5,000 households), meaning that accurate estimates can be 
obtained for the country and large sub-areas (such as urban/rural), but not at state or provincial level. These 
surveys are conducted every three to five years (Alkire and Samman, 2014). 
The data revolution – Finding the missing millions 17  
Box 3: Real-world policy constraints: the ODI survey
T ODI 
in their respective countries.*
The most serious of these, concerning food costs, was cited by a respondent based in an African trade ministry, 
reporting a lack of data resulting in sub-optimal policy-making relating to maize imports and exports. He said: 
the moment. ’ 
Others reported that data gaps impeded the government’s capacity to provide services effectively. A respondent 
from an African education department said: ‘There is no way to follow individual children through their school 
careers and into adulthood. It is not possible to measure the returns to education, nor to see what predicts future 
employment opportunities.’
Three respondents identified constraints in setting economic policy. One, based in a national statistics office 
reported that a lack of data seriously constrains the country’s ability to calculate an accurate Consumer Price Index 
(CPI). 
only in the capital and on a sample of under 200 households), and the price data are currently also only collected 
from the capital city. 
Another said:  spending) and 
difficult to clearly 
understand how and where budget is spent, and to devise ways to better execute the budget.’
There are also problems with stability and continuity of data collection, particularly in countries in conflict. 
One respondent said, . This means that for a 
lot of variables annual time-series are pretty short. Usually, this data can be found somewhere, for instance some 
civil society organisations have better records. But within the government the institutional memory was, for a big 
part, destroyed and no one really knows where to find the relevant data.’
she recently needed to 
check historical data on export figures for crops. Export figures for key commodities are collected by the central 
bank, but are not available online, and have to be requested. ‘The figures are presented in “containers” (as opposed 
establish what a “container” might be.’
She said, ‘The ministry of 
finance is well supplied with the necessary IT, technical assistance and staff to access and make use of the data and 
statistics that we use. There are some IT issues of systems not being compatible with each other, but these can even 
be resolved... A shortage of solutions is not the problem. Rather, there’s a limited understanding of how the public 
them which makes development actors think there is a capacity issue. Furthermore, any issues which exist are 
One respondent said that his government was planning to build a multi-million dollar airport, but basing the 
decisions on scant data: ‘There was no cost-benefit analysis, and few pieces of data to underlie one. There were 
passenger numbers but not good quality enough for forecasting, especially once dynamic factors, e.g. growth of 
the economy, were taken into account.’
* The unpublished survey canvassed the opinions of 11 policy-makers based in line ministries in Africa, South America and the Pacific. Findings have 
been anonymised at the request of contributors.
2.1 Policy implications of better data
If these data were used only by donors to assess to whom 
they should allocate aid, or by countries to assess their 
international ranking, this illusory sense of certainty, while 
not desirable, might not be so problematic. However, 
at the national level, greater granularity, accuracy and 
timeliness are essential. Here, data gaps are not a matter of 
theoretical imperfection: they mean that vital knowledge 
that could be used to improve lives is missing.
There is a wide literature on evidence-based policy-
making, discussed elsewhere.
22
Here, we note the key 
aspects of government that require good data: 
• spotting emerging policy concerns
• informing programme design and policy choice
• forecasting 
• monitoring policy implementation and evaluating impact. 
Without data, certain programmes would be very difficult 
to deliver: an obvious example is targeted cash-transfer 
programmes. But it is also clear that data are necessary 
to provide services systematically. While governments 
and NGOs are able to deliver improvements without 
perfect data, quality data are essential to reach the most 
marginalised in a way that responds to the specific needs of 
their communities, and to track progress.
Data gaps mean that governments cannot plan accurately. 
Despite the relatively extensive nature of data in Kenya, 
education planning is hampered by the lack of accurate 
country-level profiles of school participation. Watkins and 
Alemayehu (2012) argue that ‘any estimate of out-of school 
numbers in Kenya is subject to large margins of error related 
to divergent estimates for the denominator (the number 
of children) and the use of different indicators for the 
nominator (the number of children enrolled or attending 
18 Development Progress Research Report
2. Why we need to fill the 
gaps
22 For more discussion of evidence-based policy, see Head (2008) and Shaxson (2005). 
Participatory climate-service and information training in Tanzania. Photo: © Cecilia Schubert / CCAFS.
school)’. Table 1 illustrates differences between enrolment 
and out-of-school numbers, according to data source.
This also means that governments cannot allocate 
their budgets efficiently. The Tanzanian government 
commissioned ODI to support its policy of more equitably 
allocating Local Government Authority (LGA) staff 
and funds by analysing its current strategy for grant 
allocations. The task, however, was difficult. During the 
timeframe considered, some budget lines were reclassified, 
making it difficult to compare spending across years. 
There were also changes in jurisdictions – in 2012 four 
new districts
23
were created and several had boundaries 
changed. In addition, different budget collection and 
management systems are used, making it nearly impossible 
to harmonise budget allocations with expenditure data. 
The education and health sectors, which were the focus of 
the study, are those with the most comprehensive budget 
data, implying that problems encountered in analysing 
other sectors in depth may be even greater.
Such gaps mean that governments (as well as NGOS, the 
private sector and citizens themselves) are not able to fix 
key public-policy problems because they don’t know where 
or what the problems are. That child labour is a serious 
and persistent concern in Bangladesh is evident from 
talking to NGOs that work there.
24
But getting a complete 
understanding of the problem across the country, so the 
government can address it systemically, is not currently 
possible. This is ironic as there are three separate surveys in 
the country that could measure the number of children in 
work – yet none of them is adequate to the task: 
• The most recent Labour Force Survey (LFS, 2010) only 
covers people over 15. 
• The Bangladesh Integrated Household Survey (2011-
12) covers the 6-11 age-group but the number of 
observations on child labour for this group (71 boys 
and 41 girls) is too small to permit rigorous analysis. 
Also because the survey does not cover household 
chores, the data on gender roles are skewed (as more 
girls than boys are likely to carry out such chores).
• The 2011 Demographic and Health Survey again does not 
cover employment among the 6-15 age group. Moreover, 
while the data are nationally and regionally representative, 
they are not necessarily representative of identifiable areas 
with high concentrations of child labour.
25
Data can catalyse government accountability, although of 
course other things are also needed (McGee and Gaventa, 
2010). A healthy democracy requires that the citizen should 
have access to honest and reliable information on public 
issues (SCUK, 2008). This is something that the majority of 
governments care about, even if it means different things in 
different contexts. Many will want to provide education, 
healthcare and a safety net to their citizens in the best way 
possible, and data can help by informing them in detail of 
needs.
26
While gaps in data on marginalised groups mean 
governments (and civil society, academics and others) 
cannot reach far into societies and communities to find 
out about the most marginalised, these gaps also matter 
to citizens who need data to assess their own lives and 
communities. Absent this, they cannot assess whether 
budgets are being correctly and fairly allocated and whether 
they are missing out on opportunities to improve their 
own livelihoods. In fact, many people may not focus on 
the national level: the kind of power that matters may 
not be not wielded by national government, but by local 
government structures. It is at this level of disaggregation 
that vast improvements in data availability are necessary 
(Development Initiatives, 2014).
The data revolution – Finding the missing millions 19  
23 Usetha District Council, Msalala District Council, Kigoma District Council and Uvinza District Council.
24 See for instance, Bangladesh Labour Welfare Foundation (http://www.blf-bd.org/index.php/cms/priorities/#s).
25 Based on the 2005-2006 Annual Labour Force Survey.Understanding Children’s Work Programme (2011) Understanding Children’s Work in Bangladesh
Rome.
26 For an analysis of how this can work, see Fung et al. (2010). 
Quality data are essential to reach the most marginalised in a way that responds to 
the specific needs of their communities, and to track progress.
Table 1: Reported school attendance and enrolment (Kenya)
Source
Attendance/enrolment 
(percentage)
Out-of-school 
estimate 
(millions)
Census 2009*
77
1.9
DHS 2008*
79
1.8
Uwezo 2011*
87
1.2
National administrative 
data**
90
1.1
*Out-of-school population calculated using the Census 2009 Primary 
School Population (ages 6-13).
** As reported on the Global Monitoring Report 2011 (ages 6-11).
Source: Watkins and Alemayehu (2012).
2.2 The economic value of better data
Good quality data yield not only social benefits, but also 
real economic returns, such that, in the medium term, a 
data revolution could pay for itself. First, if governments 
invest in better economic data, this can improve investor 
confidence. The IMF has found that, if countries invest 
in better-quality data, it is cheaper for them to borrow 
internationally. It investigated the effect of its data 
standards on sovereign borrowing costs in 26 emerging-
market and developing countries and estimated that 
countries that sign up to its more stringent data standard 
reduce borrowing spreads (that is, the cost of borrowing) 
by an average of 20%.
Improving the quality of economic statistics can 
have other benefits too. In September 2013, the Kenyan 
government announced that the previous year’s GDP was 
$53.4 billion – 25% higher than previously stated, and a 
level that now ranks it as a middle-income country, after 
updating the base year for its calculation. Growth for 2013 
was revised up to 5.7% (Miriri and Blair, 2014). The IMF 
says that the rebasing made it easier to negotiate a new 
loan with the country (IMF, 2014).
Beyond this, other evidence is emerging on the value 
of data in other sectors. Many of these examples show 
the value to the private sector of releasing government-
held data, allowing companies to be more efficient and 
innovative, although some also speak to the lower cost of 
doing government business with better information:
• McKinsey Global Institute puts the global value of 
better data and more open data at $3tn a year (with 
most of that accruing to the US and Europe) (McKinsey 
Global Institute, 2013). The main benefits would be seen 
in education, transport, consumer products, electricity, 
oil and gas, healthcare, and consumer finance. 
• A report produced for the UK’s Department for Business, 
Innovation and Skills estimates the economic value of the 
data held by the public sector which is then used by the 
private sector at £5bn a year (Department of Business, 
Innovation and Skills (UK) and Ordnance Survey, 2014).
• A report by PWC Australia commissioned by Google 
Australia found that, in 2013, data-driven innovation 
added an estimated AUS$67bn in new value to the 
Australian economy, or 4.4% of GDP, broadly equivalent 
to the retail sector’s contribution (PWC, 2014).
• Corporate holdings of data and other intangible 
assets such as patents, trademarks and copyrights, 
could be worth more than $8tn, according to Leonard 
Nakamura, an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of 
Philadelphia (Monga, 2014).
• A report by the World Bank, identifies several economic 
benefits of open data, including reducing the costs 
of existing services, and supporting creation of new 
businesses, digital service and innovation (Stott, 2014). 
Kenya, which in 2011 became the first sub-Saharan 
African nation to launch an open data initiative, 
estimates that opening up government procurement data 
and exposing price differences could save the government 
$1bn annually (Berkowitz and Paradise, 2011).
• In New Zealand, the government did a randomised 
controlled test on employment services. Without 
targeting, the service delivered NZ$1.20 (US$0.91) 
in saved benefits to a spend of NZ$1 (US$0.76). But 
when they used data on who uses the services most 
heavily – non-immigrant, young ex-criminals – to target 
provision, that figure jumped to NZ$4 (US$3.05).
27
Better data can also result in important cross-
departmental cost-savings for governments. Alex Pentland, 
co-creator of the MIT Media Lab says: ‘When I worked in 
India, the head of the All India Institute of Medical Science 
told me that 90% of drugs were wasted because they 
couldn’t track disease prevalence, so they had to hand out 
the same package to all districts.’
In the UK, following the release of data showing that 
some medical procedures were not effective, the Audit 
Commission found that the National Health Service could 
20 Development Progress Research Report
27 Author’s conversation with James Mansell, Member of New Zealand Data Futures Forum.
Box 4: The value of data for evaluation 
When Julio Frenk took office as minister for health 
in Mexico in 2000, more than half the nation’s 
health expenditures were being paid out of pocket, 
and each year 4 million families were shattered by 
catastrophic health expenditures. Mexico ranked 
144 in terms of ‘fairness of financial contributions’ 
in a 2000 WHO report. Frenk introduced the Seguro 
Popular, a public insurance scheme that was one 
of the largest health reforms in any country over 
the last two decades. A requirement to evaluate 
this – projected to cost 1% of the GDP of the 
twelfth-largest economy in the world in 2002 – 
was enshrined in law. Gary King, a Harvard data 
academic, was hired to carry out the evaluation. 
His experimental design paired communities with 
similar demographic characteristics, with one in 
each pair receiving encouragement to sign up for the 
insurance. The matched-pair design enabled pairs to 
be removed if needed (for example, owing to political 
intervention), without compromising the evaluation. 
Subsequent analysis found that the programme 
was linked to a 23% reduction in catastrophic 
health spending among participant households, 
though the effect on health outcomes was not 
significant.
Sources: King, et al., 2009; King, 2014.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested