view pdf in asp net mvc : Convert pdf to rich text format online Library application component asp.net html web page mvc memman12-part851

6.5. Chapter headings
second line of text following the heading ...
This is the start of the after-heading text which continues on . ..
The title
Chapter 3
____ top of the typeblock
?
\beforechapskip+ \baselineskip+ \topskip
?
\midchapskip+ \baselineskip
?
\afterchapskip+ \baselineskip
Figure 6.1: Class layout parameters for chapter titles. Working with
\beforechapskip
need a little thought, see the text.
The general layout is shown in Figure 6.1.
\clearforchapter
The actual macro that sets the opening page for a chapter is
\clearforchapter
.
The class options
openright
,
openleft
and
openany
(or their macro equivalents
\openright
,
\openleft
and
\openany
)define
\clearforchapter
to be respectively
(see §18.13)
\cleartorecto
,
\cleartoverso
and
\clearpage
. You can obviously
change
\clearforchapter
to do more than just start a new page.
\memendofchapterhook
Where
\clearforchapter
comesat the very beginning,
\memendofchapterhook
comes
at the very end of the
\chapter
command. It does nothing by default, but could be rede-
fined to insert, say,
\clearpage
:
\makeatletter
\renewcommand\memendofchapterhook{%
\clearpage\m@mindentafterchapter\@afterheading}
\makeatother
Some books have the chapter headings on a verso page, with perhapsan illustrationor
epigraph, and then the text starts on the opposite recto page. The effect can be achieved
like:
83
Convert pdf to rich text format online - Library application component:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to rich text format online - Library application component:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
6. D
OCUMENT DIVISIONS
\openleft
% chapter title on verso page
\chapter{The title}
% chapter title
\begin{centering}
% include a centered illustration
\includegraphics{...}
\end{centering}
\clearpage
% go to recto page
Start of the text
% chapter body
\chapterheadstart \beforechapskip
\afterchapternum \midchapskip
\afterchaptertitle \afterchapskip
The macro
\chapterheadstart
is called just before printing a chapter name and
number. By default it inserts
\beforechapskip
space (default 50pt).
The macro
\afterchapternum
is called just after printing a chapter number. By de-
fault it inserts
\midchapskip
space (default 20pt).
The macro
\afterchaptertitle
is called just after printing a chapter title. By default
it inserts
\afterchapskip
space (default 40pt).
The lengths
\beforechapskip
,
\midchapskip
and
\afterchapskip
can all be
changed by
\setlength
or
\addtolength
.Thoughas mentioned inFigure 6.1 they need
some explanation:
\beforechapskip
See Figure 6.1. The actual distance between the first baseline of the chapter stuff to
the top of the text block is
\beforechapskip
+
\topskip
+
\baselineskip
. But
because the implementation of
\chapter
(via
\chapterheadstart
)make use of
\vspace*
,getting rid of
\beforechapskip
astrange endeavour. If you want to
avoid any space before the first text in the chapter heading, use
\setlength\beforechapskip{-\baselineskip}
or redefine
\chapterheadstart
to do nothing.
\midchapskip
\afterchapskip
for both, one has to add
\baselineskip
to get the distance baseline to baseline.
\printchaptername \chapnamefont
\chapternamenum
\printchapternum \chapnumfont
The macro
\printchaptername
typesets the chapter name (default
Chapter
or
Appendix
)using the font specified by
\chapnamefont
. The default is the
\bfseries
font inthe
\huge
size. Likewise the chapter number istypeset by
\printchapternum
us-
ing the font specified by
\chapnumfont
,which has the same default as
\chapnamefont
.
The macro
\chapternamenum
,which is defined to be a space, is called between printing
the chapter name and the number.
\printchaptertitle{
title
}\chaptitlefont
The title is typeset by
\printchaptertitle
using the font specified by
\chaptitlefont
.By default this is a
\bfseries
font in the
\Huge
size.
84
Library application component:C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET class source code for creating PDF document from rich text in .NET framework project. Now you can convert text file to PDF document using the C#
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
Offer rich APIs to process Tiff file and its pages, like Convert Tiff file to bmp, gif, png, jpeg, and scanned 2. Word/Excel/PPT/PDF/Jpeg to Tiff conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
6.5. Chapter headings
\printchapternonum
If a chapter is unnumbered, perhaps because it is in the
\frontmatter
or because
\chapter*
is used, then when printing the command
\printchapternonum
is called
instead of printing the name and number, as illustrated below:
\newcommand{\chapterhead}[1]{ % THIS IS A SIMPLIFIED VERSION
\clearforchapter
% move to correct page
\thispagestyle{chapter} % set the page style
\insertchapterspace
% Inserts space into LoF and LoT
\chapterheadstart
% \beforechapskip space before heading
\printchaptername\chapternamenum\printchapternum
\afterchapternum
% \midchapskip space between number and title
\printchaptertitle{#1} % title
\afterchaptertitle}
% \afterchapskip space after title
By default the first paragraph following a
\chapter
is not indented, this can be controlled
by
\indentafterchapter
\noindentafterchapter
The default is not to indent the first paragraph following a
\chapter
.
\insertchapterspace
By default a
\chapter
inserts a small amount of vertical space into the List of Figuresand
List of Tables. It calls
\insertchapterspace
to do this. The default definition is:
\newcommand{\insertchapterspace}{%
\addtocontents{lof}{\protect\addvspace{10pt}}%
\addtocontents{lot}{\protect\addvspace{10pt}}%
}
If you would prefer no inserted spaces then
\renewcommand{\insertchapterspace}{}
will do the job. Different spacing can be inserted by changing the value of the length
arguments to
\addvspace
.
By making suitable changes to the above macros you can make some simple modifica-
tions to the layout.
6.5.1 Defining a chapter style
The classprovides many waysin which youcanimplement your designsfor chapter head-
ings.
\chapterstyle{
style
}
The macro
\chapterstyle
is rather like the
\pagestyle
command inthat it setsthe style
of any subsequent chapter headingsto be style.
The class provides some predefined chapter styles, including the default style which
is the familiar LaTeXbook class chapter headings style. To use the chapterstyle fred just
issue the command
85
Library application component:C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
images or svg file; Free to convert viewing PDF Offer rich annotation support for marking & highlighting PDF document using C#; Modified web PDF document, like
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
PDF Features. Viewable and printable on virtually cross-platform; Rich in file an easy-to-use interface enabling you to quickly convert your PDF images into
www.rasteredge.com
6. D
OCUMENT DIVISIONS
\chapterstyle{fred}
Different stylescan be used in the same document.
The simpler predefined stylesinclude:
default The normal LaTeXbook class chapter styling; shown in Figure B.1.
section The heading is typeset like a section; that is, there is just the number and the title on
one line. This is illustrated in Figure B.2.
hangnum Like the section style except that the chapter number is put in the margin, as shown
in Figure B.3.
companion This produces chapter headings like those of the LaTeX Companion series of books.
An example is in Figure B.4.
article The heading is typeset like a
\section
heading in thearticle class. This is similar to
the section style but different fonts and spacings are used, as shown in Figure B.5.
reparticle When thearticle class option is used the default chapter and section styles are close,
but not identical, to the corresponding division headsin thearticleclass. The reparti-
cle chapterstyle makes
\chapter
replicate the appearance of
\section
in thearticle
class.
If you use only the predefined chapterstylesthere is no need to plough throughthe rest
of this section, except to look at the illustrationsof the remaining predefined chapterstyles
shown a little later.
The various macrosshown in the
\chapterhead
code above are initially set up as:
\newcommand{\chapterheadstart}{\vspace*{\beforechapskip}}
\newcommand{\printchaptername}{\chapnamefont \@chapapp}
\newcommand{\chapternamenum}{\space}
\newcommand{\printchapternum}{\chapnumfont \thechapter}
\newcommand{\afterchapternum}{\par\nobreak\vskip \midchapskip}
\newcommand{\printchapternonum}{}
\newcommand{\printchaptertitle}[1]{\chaptitlefont #1}
\newcommand{\afterchaptertitle}{\par\nobreak\vskip \afterchapskip}
Anew style is specified by changing the definitions of this last set of macros and/or
the various font and skip specifications.
\makechapterstyle{
style
}{
text
}
Chapter styles are defined via the
\makechapterstyle
command, where style is the
style being defined and text is the LaTeX code defining the style.
To start things off, here is the code for the default chapter style, which mimics the
chapter heads in the standardbook andreport classes, as it appears in
memoir.cls
.
\makechapterstyle{default}{%
\def\chapterheadstart{\vspace*{\beforechapskip}
\def\printchaptername{\chapnamefont \@chapapp}
\def\chapternamenum{\space}
\def\printchapternum{\chapnumfont \thechapter}
\def\afterchapternum{\par\nobreak\vskip \midchapskip}
\def\printchapternonum{}
\def\printchaptertitle##1{\chaptitlefont ##1}
\de\afterchaptertitle{\par\nobreak\vskip \afterchapskip}
}
86
Library application component:VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Text Extractor SDK; Extract Text Content from
library of RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK, which contains rich APIs for from source TIFF file and output extracted text content to other format files, like Word
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:XImage.OCR for .NET, Comprehensive Feature Details
view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. OCR scanned result to Adobe PDF, Tiff image Rich format text recognition supported, like text font family and
www.rasteredge.com
6.5. Chapter headings
\newcommand{\chapnamefont}{\normalfont\huge\bfseries}
\newcommand{\chapnumfont}{\normalfont\huge\bfseries}
\newcommand{\chaptitlefont}{\normalfont\Huge\bfseries}
\newlength{\beforechapskip}\setlength{\beforechapskip}{50pt}
\newlength{\midchapskip}\setlength{\midchapskip}{20pt}
\newlength{\afterchapskip}\setlength{\afterchapskip}{40pt}
\chapterstyle{default}
(The mysterious
\@chapapp
is the internal macro that LaTeX uses to store normally the
chapter name.
3
It will normally have different values, set automatically, when typesetting
achapter in the mainbody (e.g.,
Chapter
)or in the appendices where it would usually be
set to
Appendix
,but you can specify these names yourself.)
As an example of setting up a simple chapterstyle, here is the code for defining the
section chapterstyle. In this case it is principally a question of eliminating most of the
printing and zeroing some spacing.
\makechapterstyle{section}{%
\renewcommand*{\printchaptername}{}
\renewcommand*{\chapternamenum}{}
\renewcommand*{\chapnumfont}{\chaptitlefont}
\renewcommand*{\printchapternum}{\chapnumfont \thechapter\space}
\renewcommand*{\afterchapternum}{}
}
In this style,
\printchaptername
is vacuous, so the normal ‘Chapter’ is never typeset.
The same font is used for the number and the title, and the number is typeset with aspace
after it. The macro
\afterchapternum
is vacuous, so the chapter title will be typeset
immediately after the number.
In the standard classes the title of an unnumbered chapter is typeset at the same
position on the page as the word ‘Chapter’ for numbered chapters. The macro
\printchapternonum
iscalled just before an unnumbered chapter title text is typeset. By
default this does nothing but you can use
\renewcommand
to change this. For example, if
you wished the title text for both numbered and unnumbered chapters to be at the same
height on the page then you could redefine
\printchapternonum
to insert the amount
of vertical space taken by any ‘Chapter N’ line. For example, as
\printchapternonum
is
vaucuous in the default chapterstyle the vertical position of a title depends on whether or
not it is numbered.
The hangnum style, which is like section except that it puts the number in the margin,
is defined as follows:
\makechapterstyle{hangnum}{%
\renewcommand*{\chapnumfont}{\chaptitlefont}
% allow for 99 chapters!
\settowidth{\chapindent}{\chapnumfont 999}
\renewcommand*{\printchaptername}{}
\renewcommand*{\chapternamenum}{}
\renewcommand*{\chapnumfont}{\chaptitlefont}
\renewcommand*{\printchapternum}{%
3
Remember, ifyou usea macrothat has an@ in its name it must bein a place where@ is treated as a letter.
87
Library application component:VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Code to Scan Document into TIFF Image File
those scanned documents in TIFF or PDF file format. to save scanned document file into TIFF file format. TIFF scanner control add-on contains rich imaging APIs
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
article layout of this VB.NET image editor control SDK online tutorial page. Compact rich image editing functions into several small-size libraries that are
www.rasteredge.com
6. D
OCUMENT DIVISIONS
\noindent\llap{\makebox[\chapindent][l]{%
\chapnumfont \thechapter}}}
\renewcommand*{\afterchapternum}{}
}
The chapter number is put at the left of a box wide enough for three digits. The box is put
into the margin, via
\llap
,for typesetting. The chapter title is then typeset, starting at the
left margin.
\chapindent
The length
\chapindent
is provided for use in specifying chapterstyles, but you could
use it for any other purposes.
The definition of the companion chapterstyle is more complicated.
\makechapterstyle{companion}{%
\renewcommand*{\chapnamefont}{\normalfont\LARGE\scshape}
\renewcommand*{\chapnumfont}{\normalfont\Huge}
\renewcommand*{\printchaptername}{%
\raggedleft\chapnamefont \@chapapp}
\setlength{\chapindent}{\marginparsep}
\addtolength{\chapindent}{\marginparwidth}
\renewcommand{\printchaptertitle}[1]{%
\begin{adjustwidth}{}{-\chapindent}
\raggedleft \chaptitlefont ##1\par\nobreak
\end{adjustwidth}}
}
As shown in Figure B.4 the chapter name is in small caps and set flushright. The title is
also set flushright aligned with the outermost part of the marginal notes. This is achieved
by use of the
adjustwidth
environment
4
to make LaTeXthink that the typeblock islocally
wider than it actually is.
6.5.2 Further chapterstyles
The class provides more chapterstyles, which are listed here. Some are mine and others
are from postings to
CTT
bymemoirusers. I have modified some of the posted ones to
cater for things like appendices, multiline titles, and unnumbered chapters which were
not considered in the originals. The code for some of them is given later to help you see
how they are done. Separately, LarsMadsenhascollected a wide variety of styles [Mad06]
and shows how they were created.
If you want to try several chapterstyles in one document, request the default style
before each of the others to ensure that a previous style’s changes are not passed on to a
following one.
bianchi This style was created by Stefano Bianchi
5
and is a two line centered arrangement
with rules above and below the large bold sanserif title line. The chapter number
line is in a smaller italic font. An example is in Figure B.6.
bringhurst The bringhurst chapterstyle described in the manual and illustrated in Figure B.7.
4
See§8.5.
5
CTT
,Newchapter style: chaptervschapter*,2003/12/09
88
Library application component:VB.NET Image: Image Drawing SDK, Draw Text & Graphics on Image
SDK that enables programmers to draw rich graphics on created by VB.NET image text annotation can powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:TIFF Image Viewer| What is TIFF
Aldus Corporation in 1986 to provide a rich environment within com, which provides an easy way to convert TIFF file such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Jpeg, PDF, MS-Word
www.rasteredge.com
6.5. Chapter headings
brotherton A very simple style designed by William Adams6 for the science fiction novel Star
Dragon by Mike Brotherton. The novel isfreely downloadable from Brotherton’sweb
site. The style is the same asthe default except that the number is spelt out in words.
It is demonstrated in Figure B.8. In the novel the chapters are actually untitled i.e.,
via
\chapter{}
.
chappell The name and number are centered above a rule and the title initalicsis below, again
centered. It is illustrated in Figure B.9.
crosshead The number and title are centered and set with a large bold font. It is illustrated in
Figure B.10.
culver A chapter style I created for Christopher Culver
7
based on the format of ‘ancient’
texts. It is one line, centered, bold and with the number printed as Roman numerals,
as shown in Figure B.11.
He also wanted sections to just start with the number and the text to immediately
follow on the same line. That can be accomplished like this:
\renewcommand*{\thesection}{\arabic{section}}
\renewcommand*{\section}[1]{%
\refstepcounter{section}%
\par\noindent
\textbf{\thesection.}%
\space\nolinebreak}
dash A simple two line centered chapterstyle. There is a short dash on either side of the
number and a slightly larger version of the regular font is used for both the number
and the title. This style is shown in Figure B.12.
demo2 A two line chapterstyle with a large sanserif title; the number is above, centered and
written (e.g., Six instead of 6) in a bold font. There are rules above and below the
title. An example is shown in Figure B.13.
demo3 The chapterstyle used in this document. It is a modified version of the demo2 chap-
terstyle, using an italic rather than bold font for the number.
dowding A centered style where the name and number are set in a bold font, with the number
spelled out. The title is below in a large italic font. The style is based on the design
used in Dowding’s Finer Points [Dow96]. It is illustrated in Figure B.14.
ell A raggedleft sanserif chapterstyle. The number line is separated from the title by
rules like an ‘L’ on its side and the number is placed in the margin, as shown in
Figure B.15. I will probably use this in my next book.
ger This style was created by Gerardo Garcia
8
and is a two line, raggedright, large bold
style with rules above and below. It is demonstrated in Figure B.16.
komalike A section-like style set with a sans serif type. It is like that in thescrbook class (part
of the KOMA bundle). It is illustrated in Figure B.17.
lyhne A style created by Anders Lyhne9 and shown in Figure B.18 where the raggedleft
sanserif title is between two rules, with the name and number above. I modified the
original to cater for unnumbered chapters. It requires thegraphicx package.
6
CTT
,Anexample ofa novel?,2006/12/09
7
CTT
,"Biblical" formatting,how?,2004/03/29
8
CTT
,Fancy Headings,Chapter Headings,2002/04/12
9
CTT
,Glossary,2006/02/09
89
6. D
OCUMENT DIVISIONS
madsen This was created by Lars Madsen10 and is shown in Figure B.19. It is a large sanserif
raggedleft style with the number in the margin and a rule between the number and
title lines. It requires thegraphicx package.
ntglike A smaller versionof the standard chapterstyle; it is like that in the NTG classes (boek
class) developed by the Dutch TeX User Group. It is illustrated in Figure B.20.
pedersen This was created by Troels Pedersen
11
and requires thegraphicx package, and, to
get the full effect, thecolor package as well. The title is raggedright in large italics
while the number is much larger and placed in the righthand margin (I changed the
meansof placing the number). The head of this chapter isset with the pedersen style,
because it cannot be adequately demonstrated in an illustration.
southall This style was created by Thomas Dye. It is a simple numbered heading with the
title set as a block paragraph, and with a horizontal rule underneath. It is illustrated
in Figure B.21.
tandh A simple section-like style in aboldfont. It isbased on the design usedin the Thames
&Hudson Manual of Typography [McL80] and is illustrated in Figure B.22.
thatcher A style created by Scott Thatcher
12
whichhasthe chapter name and number centered
with the title below, also centered, and all set in small caps. There is a short rule
between the number line and the title, as shown in Figure B.23. I have modified the
original to cater for multiline titles, unnumbered chapters, and appendices.
veelo This style created by Bastiaan Veelo is shown in Figure B.24 and is raggedleft, large,
bold and witha black square in the margin by the number line. It requiresthegraph-
icxpackage.
verville A chapterstyle I created for Guy Verville
13
. It is a single line, large centered style
with rules above and below, as in Figure B.25. Unlike my posted version, this one
properly caters for unnumbered chapters.
wilsondob A one line flushright (raggedleft) section-like style in alarge italic font. It is based on
the design used in Adrian Wilson’s The Design of Books [Wil93] and is illustrated in
Figure B.26.
The code for some of these stylesisgiven in sectionB.1within the Showcase Appendix.
For details of how the other chapter stylesare defined, look at the documented class code.
This should give you ideas if you want to define your own style.
Note that it is not necessary to define a new chapterstyle if you want to change the
chapter headings — you can just change the individual macros without putting them into
astyle.
6.5.3 Chapter precis
Some old style novels, and evensome modern text books,
14
include a short synopsis of the
contents of the chapter either immediately after the chapter heading or in the ToC, or in
both places.
\chapterprecis{
text
}
10
CTT
,Newchapter style: chaptervschapter*,2003/12/09
11
CTT
,Chapter style, 2006/01/31
12
CTT
,memoir: chapter headingscapitalizemath symbols, 2006/01/18
13
CTT
,Headers and special formatting of sections, 2005/01/18
14
For example, Robert Sedgewick,Algorithms,Addison-Wesley,1983.
90
6.5. Chapter headings
The command
\chapterprecis
prints its argument both at the point in the document
where it is called, and also adds it to the
.toc
file. For example:
...
\chapter{}% first chapter
\chapterprecis{Our hero is introduced; family tree; early days.}
...
Now for the details.
\prechapterprecisshift
The length
\prechapterprecisshift
controls the vertical spacing before a
\chapterprecis
.If the precis immediately follows a
\chapter
then a different space is
required depending on whether or not thearticleclass option is used. The class sets:
\ifartopt
\setlength{\prechapterprecisshift}{0pt}
\else
\setlength{\prechapterprecisshift}{-2\baselineskip}
\fi
\chapterprecishere{
text
}
\chapterprecistoc{
text
}
The
\chapterprecis
command calls these two commands to print the text in
the document (the
\chapterprecishere
command) and to put it into the ToC (the
\chapterprecistoc
command). These can be used individually if required.
\precisfont
\prechapterprecis \postchapterprecis
The
\chapterprecishere
macro is intended for use immediately after a
\chapter
.The
text argument is typeset in the
\precisfont
font in a
quote
environment. The macro’s
definition is:
\newcommand{\chapterprecishere}[1]{%
\prechapterprecis #1\postchapterprecis}
where
\prechapterprecis
,
\postchapterprecis
and
\precisfont
are defined as:
\newcommand{\prechapterprecis}{%
\vspace*{\prechapterprecisshift}%
\begin{quote}\precisfont}
\newcommand{\postchapterprecis}{\end{quote}}
\newcommand*{\precisfont}{\normalfont\itshape}
Any or all of these can be changed if another style of typesetting is required.
Next the following macros control the formatting of the precistext in the ToC.
\precistoctext{
text
}\precistocfont \precistocformat
The
\chapterprecistoc
macro puts
\precistoctext{
text
}
into the
toc
file. The
default definition similar to (but not exactly
15
)
15
Internally we use a different name for\leftskip and \rightskip to make it easier to do right to left
document withthe class and thebidi package.
91
6. D
OCUMENT DIVISIONS
second line of text following the heading ...
This is the start of the after-heading text, which continues on . ..
3.5 Heading Title
.. .end of last line of preceding text.
?
beforeskip+\baselineskip (ofheadingfont)
-
indent
?
afterskip +\baselineskip (of text font)
Figure 6.2: Displayed sectional headings
\DeclareRobustCommand{\precistoctext}[1]{%
{\nopagebreak\leftskip \cftchapterindent\relax
\advance\leftskip \cftchapternumwidth\relax
\rightskip \@tocrmarg\relax
\precistocformat\precistocfont #1\par}}
Effectively, in the ToC
\precistoctext
typesetsits argument like a chapter title using the
\precistocfont
(default
\itshape
), and
\precistocformat
(default
\noindent
).
6.6 L
OWER LEVEL HEADINGS
The lower level heads — sections down to subparagraphs — are also configurable, but
there is nothing corresponding to chapter styles.
There are essentially three things that may be adjusted for these heads: (a) the vertical
distance between the baseline of the text above the heading to the baseline of the title text,
(b) the indentation of the heading from the left hand margin, and (c) the style (font) used
for the heading title. Additionally, a heading may be run-in to the text or as a display
before the following text; in the latter case the vertical distance between the heading and
the following text may also be adjusted. Figure 6.2 shows the parameters controlling a
displayed sectional heading and Figure 6.3 shows the parameters for a run-in heading.
The default values of the parameters for the different heads are in Table 6.2 for the display
heads and Table 6.3 for the run-in heads.
In the following I will use
S
to stand for one of
sec
,
subsec
,
subsubsec
,
para
or
subpara
,which are in turn shorthand for
section
through to
subparagraph
,as sum-
marised in Table 6.4.
\setbeforeSskip{
skip
}
92
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested