view pdf in asp net mvc : Convert pdf to txt file control Library system azure asp.net html console memman29-part881

13.3. Epigraphs before chapter headings
The flush argument to the
\epigraphsourceposition
declaration controls the position
of the source. The default value is
flushright
.It canbe changed to
flushleft
,
center
or
flushleftright
.
For example, to have epigraphs centered with the source at the left, add the following
to your document.
\epigraphposition{center}
\epigraphsourceposition{flushleft}
\epigraphfontsize{
fontsize
}
Epigraphs are often typeset in a smaller font than the main text. The fontsize argument
to the
\epigraphfontsize
declaration sets the font size to be used. If you don’t like the
default value (
\small
), you can easily change it to, say
\footnotesize
by:
\epigraphfontsize{\footnotesize}
\epigraphrule
By default, a rule is drawn between the text and source, with the rule thickness being
given by the value of
\epigraphrule
.The value can be changed by using
\setlength
.
Avalue of
0pt
willeliminate the rule. Personally, I dislike the rule in the list environments.
\beforeepigraphskip
\afterepigraphskip
The two
...skip
commands specify the amount of vertical space inserted before and after
typeset epigraphs. Again, these can be changed by
\setlength
. It is desireable that the
sum of their values should be an integer multiple of the
\baselineskip
.
Note that you can use normal LaTeX commands in the text and source arguments.
You may wish to use different fontsfor the text (say roman) and the source (say italic).
The epigraph at the start of this section was specified as:
\epigraph{Example is the school of mankind,
and they will learn at no other.}
{\textit{Letters on a Regicide Peace}\\ \textsc{Edmund Burke}}
13.3 E
PIGRAPHS BEFORE CHAPTER HEADINGS
If all else fails, immortality can
always be assured byspectacular
error.
John Kenneth Galbraith
The
\epigraph
command and the
epigraphs
environment typeset an epigraph at the
point in the text where they are placed. The first thing that a
\chapter
command does
is to start off a new page, so another mechanism is provided for placing an epigraph just
before a chapter heading.
\epigraphhead[
distance
]{
text
}
253
Convert pdf to txt file - control Library system:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to txt file - control Library system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
13. D
ECORATIVE TEXT
The
\epigraphhead
macro stores text for printing at distance below the header on a
page. text can be ordinary text or, more likely, can be either an
\epigraph
command or
an
epigraphs
environment. By default, the epigraph will be typeset at the righthand mar-
gin. If the command is immediately preceded by a
\chapter
or
\chapter*
command,
the epigraph is typeset on the chapter title page.
The default value for the optional distance argument is set so that an
\epigraph
con-
sisting of a single line of quotation and a single line denoting the source is aligned with
the bottom of the ‘Chapter X’ line produced by the
\chapter
command using the default
chapterstyle. In other cases you will have to experiment with the distance value. The
value for distance can be either a integer or a real number. The units are in terms of the
current value for
\unitlength
. A typical value for distance for a single line quotation
and source for a
\chapter*
might be about 70 (points). A positive value of distance
places the epigraph below the page heading and a negative value will raise it above the
page heading.
Here’s some example code:
\chapter*{Celestial navigation}
\epigraphhead[70]{\epigraph{Star crossed lovers.}{\textit{The Bard}}}
The text argument is put into a minipage of width
\epigraphwidth
. If you use some-
thing other than
\epigraph
or
epigraphs
for the text argument, you may have to do
some positioning of the text yourself so that it is properly located in the minipage. For
example
\chapter{Short}
\renewcommand{\epigraphflush}{center}
\epigraphhead{\centerline{Short quote}}
The
\epigraphhead
command changesthe page style for the page on whichit is spec-
ified, so there should be no text between the
\chapter
and the
\epigraphhead
com-
mands. The page style is identical to the plain page style except for the inclusion of the
epigraph. If you want a more fancy style for epigraphed chapters you will have to do some
work yourself.
\epigraphforheader[
distance
]{
text
}
\epigraphpicture
The
\epigraphforheader
macro takes the same arguments as
\epigraphhead
but puts
text into a zero-sized picture at the coordinate position
(0,-<distance>)
; the macro
\epigraphpicture
holdsthe resulting picture. Thiscan then be used aspart of a chapter
pagestyle, as in
\makepagestyle{mychapterpagestyle}
...
\makeoddhead{mychapterpagestyle}{}{}{\epigraphpicture}
Of course the text argument for
\epigraphforheader
neednot be an
\epigraph
,it can
be arbitrary text.
\dropchapter{
length
}
\undodrop
254
control Library system:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to text file with good
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. It's easy to be integrated into your C# program and convert PDF to .txt file with original PDF layout.
www.rasteredge.com
13.3. Epigraphs before chapter headings
If a long epigraph is placed before a chapter title it is possible that the bottom of the epi-
graph may interfere with the chapter title. The command
\dropchapter
will lower any
subsequent chapter titles by length; a negative length will raise the titles. The command
\undodrop
restores subsequent chapter titles to their default positions. For example:
\dropchapter{2in}
\chapter{Title}
\epigraphhead{long epigraph}
\undodrop
\cleartoevenpage[
text
]
On occasions it may be desirable to put something (e.g., an epigraph, a map, a picture) on
the page facing the start of a chapter, where the something belongs to the chapter that is
about to start rather thanthe chapter that hasjust ended. In order to do thisin a document
that is going to be printed doublesided, the chapter must start on an odd numbered page
and the pre-chapter material put on the immediately preceding even numbered page. The
\cleartoevenpage
command is like
\cleardoublepage
except that the page follow-
ing the command will be an even numbered page, and the command takes an optional
argument which is applied to the skipped page (if any).
Here is an example:
... end previous chapter.
\cleartoevenpage
\begin{center}
\begin{picture}... \end{picture}
\end{center}
\chapter{Next chapter}
If the style is such that chapter headings are put at the top of the pages, then it would
be advisable to include
\thispagestyle{empty}
(or perhaps
plain
)immediately after
\cleartoevenpage
to avoid a heading related to the previous chapter fromappearing on
the page.
If the something is like a figure with a numbered caption and the numbering depends
on the chapter numbering, then the numbers have to be hand set (unless you define a
special chapter command for the purpose). For example:
... end previous chapter.
\cleartoevenpage[\thispagestyle{empty}] % a skipped page to be empty
\thispagestyle{plain}
\addtocounter{chapter}{1} % increment the chapter number
\setcounter{figure}{0}
% initialise figure counter
\begin{figure}
...
\caption{Pre chapter figure}
\end{figure}
\addtocounter{chapter}{-1} % decrement the chapter number
\chapter{Next chapter}
% increments chapter & resets figure numbers
\addtocounter{figure}{1}
% to account for pre-chapter figure
255
control Library system:VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET class. Able to copy and paste all text content from .txt file to PDF file by keeping
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Free .NET library for creating PDF from TXT in both C# C#.NET class source code for creating PDF document from Convert plain text to PDF text with multiple fonts
www.rasteredge.com
13. D
ECORATIVE TEXT
13.3.1 Epigraphs on book or part pages
If you wish to put an epigraphs on
\book
or
\part
pages you have to do a little more
work than in other cases. This is because these division commands do some page flipping
before and after typesetting the title.
One method is to put the epigraph into the page header as for epigraphs before
\chapter
titles. By suitable adjustments the epigraph can be placed anywhere on the
page, independently of whatever else is on the page. A similar scheme may be used
for epigraphs on other kinds of pages. The essential trick is to make sure that the epi-
graph pagestyle is used for the page. For an epigraphed bibliography or index, the macros
\prebibhook
or
\preindexhook
can be appropriately modified to do this.
The other method is to subvert the
\beforepartskip
command for epigraphs before
the title, or the
\afterpartskip
command for epigraphsafter the title (or the equivalents
for
\book
pages).
For example:
\let\oldbeforepartskip\beforepartskip % save definition
\renewcommand*{\beforepartskip}{%
\epigraph{...}{...}% an epigraph
\vfil}
\part{An epigraphed part}
...
\renewcommand*{\beforepartskip}{%
\epigraph{...}{...}% another epigraph
\vfil}
\part{A different epigraphed part}
...
\let\beforepartskip\oldbeforepartskip % restore definition
\part{An unepigraphed part}
...
256
control Library system:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
are allowed to view PDF on VB.NET project, annotate PDF document with various notes and shapes, convert PDF to Word document, Tiff image, TXT file and other
www.rasteredge.com
Fourteen
Poetry
The typesetting of a poem should ideally be dependent on the particular poem. Individual
problems do not usually admit of a general solution, so this manual and code should be
used more asa guide towards some solutions rather than providing a ready made solution
for any particular piece of verse.
The doggerel used asillustrative material has been taken from [Wil??].
Note that for the examples in this section I have made no attempt to do other than use
the minimal (La)TeX capabilities; in particular I have made no attempt to do any special
page breaking so some stanzas may cross onto the next page — most undesireable for
publication.
The standard LaTeX classes provide the
verse
environment which is defined as a par-
ticular kind of list. Within the environment you use
\\
to end a line, and a blank line will
end a stanza. For example, here is the text of a single stanza poem:
\newcommand{\garden}{
I used to love my garden \\
But now my love is dead \\
For I found a bachelor’s button \\
In black-eyed Susan’s bed.
}
When this is typeset as a normal LaTeX paragraph (withno paragraph indentation), i.e.,
\noident\garden
it looks like:
Iused to love my garden
But now my love is dead
For I found a bachelor’s button
In black-eyed Susan’s bed.
Typesetting it within the
verse
environment produces:
Iused to love my garden
But now my love is dead
For I found a bachelor’s button
In black-eyed Susan’s bed.
The stanza could also be typeset within the
alltt
environment, defined in the stan-
dardallttpackage [Bra97], using a normal font and no
\\
line endings.
Chapter lastupdated2013/04/24 (revision 442)
257
control Library system:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file. HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file.
www.rasteredge.com
14. P
OETRY
\begin{alltt}\normalfont
I used to love my garden
But now my love is dead
For I found a bachelor’s button
In black-eyed Susan’s bed.
\end{alltt}
which produces:
Iused to love my garden
But now my love is dead
For I found a bachelor’s button
In black-eyed Susan’s bed.
The
alltt
environment is like the
verbatim
environment except that you can use
LaTeX macrosinside it. Inthe
verse
environment long lineswillbewrappedandindented
but in the
alltt
environment there is no indentation.
Some stanzas have certain lines indented, often alternate ones. To typeset stanzas like
this you have to add your own spacing. For instance:
\begin{verse}
There was an old party of Lyme \\
Who married three wives at one time. \\
\hspace{2em} When asked: ‘Why the third?’ \\
\hspace{2em} He replied: ‘One’s absurd, \\
And bigamy, sir, is a crime.’
\end{verse}
is typeset as:
There was an old party of Lyme
Who married three wives at one time.
When asked: ‘Why the third?’
He replied: ‘One’s absurd,
And bigamy, sir, is acrime.’
Using the
alltt
environment you can put in the spacing via ordinary spaces. That is,
this:
\begin{alltt}\normalfont
There was an old party of Lyme
Who married three wives at one time.
When asked: ‘Why the third?’
He replied: ‘One’s absurd,
And bigamy, sir, is a crime.’
\end{alltt}
is typeset as
There was an old party of Lyme
258
14.1. Classy verse
Who married three wives at one time.
When asked: ‘Why the third?’
He replied: ‘One’s absurd,
And bigamy, sir, is a crime.’
More exotically you could use the TeX
\parshape
command
1
:
\parshape = 5 0pt \linewidth 0pt \linewidth
2em \linewidth 2em \linewidth 0pt \linewidth
\noindent There was an old party of Lyme \\
Who married three wives at one time. \\
When asked: ‘Why the third?’ \\
He replied: ‘One’s absurd, \\
And bigamy, sir, is a crime.’ \par
which will be typeset as:
There was an old party of Lyme
Who married three wives at one time.
When asked: ‘Why the third?’
He replied: ‘One’s absurd,
And bigamy, sir, is a crime.’
This is about as much assistance as standard (La)TeX provides, except to note that in
the
verse
environment the
\\*
version of
\\
will prevent a following page break. You
can also make judicious use of the
\needspace
macro to keep things together.
Some books of poetry, and especially anthologies, have two or more indexes, one, say
for the poem titles and another for the first lines, and maybe even a third for the poets’
names. If you are not usingmemoirthen theindex [Jon95] andmultind[Lon91] packages
provide support for multiple indexes in one document.
14.1 C
LASSY VERSE
The code provided by thememoirclass is meant to help with some aspects of typesetting
poetry but does not, and cannot, provide a comprehensive solutionto all the requirements
that will arise.
The main aspectsof typesetting poetry that differ from typesetting plain text are:
 Poems are usually visually centered on the page.
 Some lines are indented, and often there is a pattern to the indentation.
 When a line is too wide for the page it is broken and the remaining portion indented
with respect to the original start of the line.
These are the ones that the class attempts to deal with.
\begin{verse}[
length
]
...
\end{verse}
\versewidth
1
Seethe TeXbook for howtouse this.
259
14. P
OETRY
The
verse
environment provided by the class is an extension of the usual LaTeX envi-
ronment. The environment takes one optional parameter, which is a length; for example
\begin{verse}[4em]
.You may have noticed that the earlier verse examples are all near
the left margin, whereas verses usually look better if they are typeset about the center of
the page. The length parameter, if given, should be about the length of an average line,
and then the entire contents will be typeset with the mid point of the length centered hor-
izontally on the page.
The length
\versewidth
is provided as a convenience. It may be used, for example,
to calculate the length of a line of text for use as the optional argument to the
verse
envi-
ronment:
\settowidth{\versewidth}{This is the average line,}
\begin{verse}[\versewidth]
\vleftmargin
Inthe basicLaTeX
verse
environment the body of the verse is indented fromthe left of the
typeblock by an amount
\leftmargini
,as is the text in many other environments based
on the basic LaTeX
list
environment. For the class’s version of
verse
the default indent
is set by the length
\vleftmargin
(which is initially set to
leftmargini
). For poems
with particularly long lines it could perhaps be advantageous to eliminate any general
indentation by:
\setlength{\vleftmargin}{0em}
If necessary the poem could even be moved into the left margin by giving
\vleftmargin
anegative length value, such as-1.5em.
\stanzaskip
The vertical space between stanzas is the length
\stanzaskip
. It can be changed by the
usual methods.
\vin
\vgap
\vindent
The command
\vin
is shorthand for
\hspace*{\vgap}
for use at the start of an in-
dented line of verse. The length
\vgap
(initially 1.5em) can be changed by
\setlength
or
\addtolength
. When a verse line is too long to fit within the typeblock it is wrapped
to the next line with an initial indent given by the value of the length
vindent
. Its initial
value is twice the default value of
\vgap
.
\\[
length
]
\\*[
length
]
\\![
length
]
Each line in the
verse
environment, except possibly for the last line in a stanza, must
be ended by
\\
,which comes in several variants. In each variant the optional length is
the vertical space to be left before the next line. The
\\*
form prohibits a page break after
the line. The
\\!
form is to be used only for the last line in a stanza when the lines are
260
14.1. Classy verse
being numbered; this is because the line numbers are incremented by the
\\
macro. It
would normally be followed by a blank line.
\verselinebreak[
length
]
\\>[
length
]
Using
\verselinebreak
will cause later text in the line to be typeset indented on the fol-
lowing line. If the optionallength is not giventhe indentationis twice
\vgap
,otherwise it
islength. The broken line will count asasingle line as far asthe
altverse
and
patverse
environmentsare concerned. The macro
\\>
isshorthand for
\verselinebreak
,and un-
like other membersof the
\\
family the optionallength is the indentation of the following
partial line, not a vertical skip. Also, the
\\>
macro does not increment any line number.
\vinphantom{
text
}
Verse linesare sometimes indented according to the space takenby the text onthe previous
line. The macro
\vinphantom
can be used at the start of a line to give an indentation as
though the line started with text. For example here are a few lines from the portion of
Fridthjof’s Saga where Fridthjof and Ingeborg part:
Source for example 14.1
\settowidth{\versewidth}{Nay, nay, I leave thee not,
thou goest too}
\begin{verse}[\versewidth]
\ldots \\*
His judgement rendered, he dissolved the Thing. \\*
\flagverse{Ingeborg} And your decision? \\*
\flagverse{Fridthjof} \vinphantom{And your decision?}
Have I ought to choose? \\*
Is not mine honour bound by his decree? \\*
And that I will redeem through Angantyr \\*
His paltry gold doth hide in Nastrand’s flood. \\*
Today will I depart. \\*
\flagverse{Ingeborg} \vinphantom{Today will I depart.}
And Ingeborg leave? \\*
\flagverse{Fridthjof} Nay, nay, I leave thee not,
thou goest too. \\*
\flagverse{Ingeborg} Impossible! \\*
\flagverse{Fridthjof} \vinphantom{Impossible!}
O! hear me, ere thou answerest.
\end{verse}
Use of
\vinphantom
is not restricted to the start of verse lines — it may be used any-
where in text to leave some some blank space. For example, compare the two lines below,
which are produced by this code:
\noindent Come away with me and be my love --- Impossible. \\
261
14. P
OETRY
Typeset example 14.1: Phantom text in verse
...
His judgement rendered, he dissolved the Thing.
Ingeborg
And your decision?
Fridthjof
Have I ought to choose?
Is not mine honour bound by his decree?
And that I will redeem through Angantyr
His paltry gold doth hide in Nastrand’s flood.
Today will I depart.
Ingeborg
And Ingeborg leave?
Fridthjof
Nay, nay, I leave thee not, thou goest too.
Ingeborg
Impossible!
Fridthjof
O! hear me, ere thou answerest.
Come away with me \vinphantom{and be my love} --- Impossible.
Come away with me and be my love — Impossible.
Come away with me
—Impossible.
\vleftofline{
text
}
Averse line may start with something, for example open quote marks, where it is desire-
able that it is ignored asfar as the alignment of the rest of the line is concerned
2
—a sort of
‘hanging left punctuation’. When it is put at the start of a line in the
verse
environment
the text is typeset but ignored asfar as horizontal indentation isconcerned. Compare the
two examples.
Source for example 14.2
\noindent ‘‘No, this is what was spoken by the prophet Joel:
\begin{verse}
‘‘\,‘\,‘‘In the last days,’’ God says, \\
‘‘I will pour out my spirit on all people. \\
Your sons and daughters will prophesy, \\
\ldots \\
And everyone who calls \ldots ’’\,’
\end{verse}
Source for example 14.3
2
Requested byMatthewFord who alsoprovided the example text.
262
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested