view pdf in asp net mvc : Convert pdf to txt online application SDK utility azure wpf html visual studio memman30-part884

14.1. Classy verse
Typeset example 14.2: Verse with regular quote marks
“No, this is what was spoken by the prophet Joel:
“‘“In the last days,” God says,
“I will pour out my spirit on all people.
Your sons and daughters will prophesy,
.. .
And everyone who calls ... ”’
Typeset example 14.3: Verse with hanging left quote marks
“No, this is what was spoken by the prophet Joel:
“‘“In the last days,” God says,
“I will pour out my spirit on all people.
Your sons and daughters will prophesy,
.. .
And everyone who calls ... ”’
\noindent ‘‘No, this is what was spoken by the prophet Joel:
\begin{verse}
\vleftofline{‘‘\,‘\,‘‘}In the last days,’’ God says, \\
\vleftofline{‘‘}I will pour out my spirit on all people. \\
Your sons and daughters will prophesy, \\
\ldots \\
And everyone who calls \ldots ’’\,’
\end{verse}
14.1.1 Indented lines
Within the
verse
environment stanzas are normally separated by ablank line inthe input.
\begin{altverse}
...
\end{altverse}
Individual stanzas within
verse
may, however, be enclosed in the
altverse
environ-
ment. This has the effect of indenting the 2nd, 4th, etc., lines of the stanza by the length
\vgap
.
\begin{patverse}
...
\end{patverse}
\begin{patverse*}
...
\end{patverse*}
\indentpattern{
digits
}
263
Convert pdf to txt online - application SDK utility:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to txt online - application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
14. P
OETRY
As an alternative to the
altverse
environment, individual stanzas within the
verse
en-
vironment may be enclosed in the
patverse
environment. Within this environment the
indentation of each line is specified by an indentation pattern, which consists of an array
of digits, d
1
to d
n
,and the nth line is indented by d
n
times
\vgap
.However, the first line
is not indented, irrespective of the value of d
1
.
The indentation pattern for a
patverse
or
patverse*
environment is specified via
the
\indentpattern
command, where digits is a string of digits (e.g.,
3213245281
).
With the
patverse
environment, if the pattern is shorter than the number of lines in the
stanza, the trailing lines will not be indented. However, in the
patverse*
environment
the pattern keeps repeating until the end of the stanza.
14.1.2 Numbering
\flagverse{
flag
}
\vleftskip
Putting
\flagverse
at the start of a line willtypeset flag, for example the stanzanumber,
ending at a distance
\vleftskip
before the line. The default for
\vleftskip
is 3em.
The lines in a poem may be numbered.
\linenumberfrequency{
nth
}
\setverselinenums{
first
}{
startat
}
The declaration
\linenumberfrequency{
nth
}
will cause every nth line of succeeding
verses to be numbered. For example,
\linenumberfrequency{5}
will number every
fifth line. The default is
\linenumberfrequency{0}
which prevents any numbering.
The
\setverselinenums
macro can be used to specify that the number of the first line
of the following
verse
shall be first and the first printed number shall be startat. For
example, perhaps you are quoting part of a numbered poem. The original numbers every
tenth line but if your extract starts with line 7, then
\linenumberfrequency{10}
\setverselinenums{7}{10}
is what you will need.
\thepoemline
\linenumberfont{
font-decl
}
The
poemline
counter is used in numbering the lines, so the number representation is
\thepoemline
, which defaults to arabic numerals, and they are typeset using the font
specified via
\linenumberfont
;the default is
\linenumberfont{\small\rmfamily}
for small numbers in the roman font.
\verselinenumbersright
\verselinenumbersleft
\vrightskip
Following the declaration
\verselinenumbersright
,which isthe default, any verse line
numbers will be set in the righthand margin. The
\verselinenumbersleft
declaration
264
application SDK utility:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Online PDF to Text Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Able to copy and paste all text content from .txt file to PDF file Able to convert plain text to various fonts, colors and sizes of text content in PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
14.2. Titles
will set any subsequent line numbers to the left of the lines. The numbers are set at a
distance
\vrightskip
(default 1em) into the margin.
14.2 T
ITLES
The
\PoemTitle
command is provided for typesetting titles of poems.
\PoemTitle[
fortoc
][
forhead
]{
title
}
\NumberPoemTitle
\PlainPoemTitle
\thepoem
The
\PoemTitle
command takes the same arguments as the
\chapter
command;
it typesets the title for a poem and adds it to the ToC. Following the declara-
tion
\NumberPoemTitle
the title is numbered but there is no numbering after the
\PlainPoemTitle
declaration.
\poemtoc{
sec
}
The kind of entry made in the ToC by
\PoemTitle
is defined by
\poemtoc
. The initial
definition is:
\newcommand{\poemtoc}{section}
for a section-like ToC entry. This can be changed to, say,
chapter
or
subsection
or . ...
\poemtitlemark{
forhead
}
\poemtitlepstyle
The macro
\poemtitlemark
is called with the argument forhead so that it may be used to
set marks for use in a page header via the normal mark process. The
\poemtitlepstyle
macro, which by default doesnothing, is provided asa hook so that, for example, it can be
redefined to specify a particular pagestyle that should be used. For example:
\renewcommand*{\poemtitlemark}[1]{\markboth{#1}{#1}}
\renewcommand*{\poemtitlepstyle}{%
\pagestyle{headings}%
\thispagestyle{empty}}
\PoemTitle*[
forhead
]{
title
}
\poemtitlestarmark{
forhead
}
\poemtitlestarpstyle
The
\PoemTitle*
command produces an unnumbered title that is not added to the
ToC. Apart from that it operates in the same manner as the unstarred version. The
\poemtitlestarmark
and
\poemtitlestarpstyle
can be redefined to set marks and
pagestyles.
265
application SDK utility:C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Now you can convert text file to PDF document using Sample code for text to PDF converting in C# DocumentConverter.ToDocument(@"C:\input.txt", @"C:\output.pdf
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
VB.NET convert PDF to Jpeg, VB.NET compress PDF, VB.NET print PDF, VB.NET merge PDF files, VB.NET view PDF online, VB.NET Export and convert PDF to TXT file
www.rasteredge.com
14. P
OETRY
14.2.1 Main Poem Title layout parameters
\PoemTitleheadstart
\printPoemTitlenonum
\printPoemTitlenum
\afterPoemTitlenum
\printPoemTitletitle{
title
}
\afterPoemTitle
The essence of the code used to typeset a numbered title from a
\PoemTitle
is:
\PoemTitleheadstart
\printPoemTitlenum
\afterPoemTitlenum
\printPoemTitletitle{title}
\afterPoemTitle
If the title is unnumbered then
\printPoemTitlenonum
is used instead of the
\printPoemTitlenum
and
\afterPoemTitlenum
pair of macros.
The various elements of this can be modified to change the layout. By default the
number is centered above the title, which isalso typeset centered, and all in a
\large
font.
The elements are detailed in the next section.
14.2.2 Detailed Poem Title layout parameters
\beforePoemTitleskip
\PoemTitlenumfont
\midPoemTitleskip
\PoemTitlefont
\afterPoemTitleskip
As defined,
\PoemTitleheadstart
inserts vertical space before a poem title. The
default definition is:
\newcommand*{\PoemTitleheadstart}{\vspace{\beforePoemTitleskip}}
\newlength{\beforePoemTitleskip}
\setlength{\beforePoemTitleskip}{1\onelineskip}
\printPoemTitlenum
typesets the number for a poem title. The default definition,
below, printsthe number centered and in a large font.
\newcommand*{\printPoemTitlenum}{\PoemTitlenumfont \thepoem}
\newcommand*{\PoemTitlenumfont}{\normalfont\large\centering}
The definition of
\printPoemTitlenonum
,which is used when there is no number, is
simply
\newcommand*{\printPoemTitlenonum}{}
\afterPoemTitlenum
is called between setting the number and the title. It ends a
paragraph (thus making sure any previous
\centering
is used) and then may add some
vertical space. The default definition is:
\newcommand*{\afterPoemTitlenum}{\par\nobreak\vskip \midPoemTitleskip}
\newlength{\midPoemTitleskip}
\setlength{\midPoemTitleskip}{0pt}
266
application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Online Guide for Using RasterEdge WPF PDF Viewer to View PDF document with various notes and shapes, convert PDF to Word document, Tiff image, TXT file and
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images Viewer, C# HTML Document Viewer Export and convert PDF to TXT file
www.rasteredge.com
14.3. Examples
The default definition of
\printPoemTitletitle
is below. It typesets the title cen-
tered and in a large font.
\newcommand*{\printPoemTitletitle}[1]{\PoemTitlefont #1}
\newcommand*{\PoemTitlefont}{\normalfont\large\centering}
The macro
\afterPoemTitle
finishes off the title typesetting. The default definition
is:
\newcommand*{\afterPoemTitle}{\par\nobreak\vskip \afterPoemTitleskip}
\newlength{\afterPoemTitleskip}
\setlength{\afterPoemTitleskip}{1\onelineskip}
14.3 E
XAMPLES
Here are some sample verses using the class facilities.
First a Limerick, but titled and centered:
\renewcommand{\poemtoc}{subsection}
\PlainPoemTitle
\PoemTitle{A Limerick}
\settowidth{\versewidth}{There was a young man of Quebec}
\begin{verse}[\versewidth]
There was a young man of Quebec \\
Who was frozen in snow to his neck. \\
\vin When asked: ‘Are you friz?’ \\
\vin He replied: ‘Yes, I is, \\
But we don’t call this cold in Quebec.’
\end{verse}
which gets typeset as below. The
\poemtoc
is redefined to
subsection
so that the
\poemtitle
titlesare entered into the ToC as subsections. The titleswill not be numbered
because of the
\PlainPoemTitle
declaration.
ALimerick
There was a young man of Quebec
Who was frozen in snow to his neck.
When asked: ‘Are you friz?’
He replied: ‘Yes, I is,
But we don’t call this cold in Quebec.’
Next is the Garden verse within the
altverse
environment. Unlike earlier renditions
this one is titled and centered.
\settowidth{\versewidth}{But now my love is dead}
\PoemTitle{Love’s lost}
\begin{verse}[\versewidth]
\begin{altverse}
\garden
\end{altverse}
267
application SDK utility:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Online C# source code for convert PDF to various document and image file formats in .NET WinForms project. Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images C:\input.pdf"); BasePage page = pdf.GetPage(0 ocrPage.Recognize(); ocrPage.SaveTo(MIMEType.TXT, @"C:\output
www.rasteredge.com
14. P
OETRY
\end{verse}
Note how the alternate lines are automatically indented in the typeset result below.
Love’s lost
Iused to love my garden
But now my love is dead
For I found a bachelor’s button
In black-eyed Susan’s bed.
It isleft up to you how you might want to add information about the author of apoem.
Here is one example of a macro for this:
\newcommand{\attrib}[1]{%
\nopagebreak{\raggedleft\footnotesize #1\par}}
This can be used as in the next bit of doggerel.
\PoemTitle{Fleas}
\settowidth{\versewidth}{What a funny thing is a flea}
\begin{verse}[\versewidth]
What a funny thing is a flea. \\
You can’t tell a he from a she. \\
But he can. And she can. \\
Whoopee!
\end{verse}
\attrib{Anonymous}
Fleas
What a funny thing is a flea.
You can’t tell a he from a she.
But he can. And she can.
Whoopee!
Anonymous
The next example demonstrates the automatic line wrapping for overlong lines.
\PoemTitle{In the beginning}
\settowidth{\versewidth}{And objects at rest tended to
remain at rest}
\begin{verse}[\versewidth]
Then God created Newton, \\
And objects at rest tended to remain at rest, \\
And objects in motion tended to remain in motion, \\
And energy was conserved
and momentum was conserved
and matter was conserved \\
268
14.3. Examples
And God saw that it was conservative.
\end{verse}
\attrib{Possibly from \textit{Analog}, circa 1950}
In the beginning
Then God created Newton,
And objects at rest tended to remain at rest,
And objects in motion tended to remain in motion,
And energy was conserved and momentum was conserved and
matter was conserved
And God saw that it was conservative.
Possiblyfrom Analog,circa 1950
The following verse demonstrates the use of a forced linebreak; I have used the
\\>
command instead of the more descriptive, but discursive,
\verselinebreak
.It also has
aslightly different title style.
\renewcommand{\PoemTitlefont}{%
\normalfont\large\itshape\centering}
\poemtitle{Mathematics}
\settowidth{\versewidth}{Than Tycho Brahe, or Erra Pater:}
\begin{verse}[\versewidth]
In mathematics he was greater \\
Than Tycho Brahe, or Erra Pater: \\
For he, by geometric scale, \\
Could take the size of pots of ale;\\
\settowidth{\versewidth}{Resolve by}%
Resolve, by sines \\>[\versewidth] and tangents straight, \\
If bread or butter wanted weight; \\
And wisely tell what hour o’ the day \\
The clock does strike, by Algebra.
\end{verse}
\attrib{Samuel Butler (1612--1680)}
Mathematics
In mathematics he was greater
Than Tycho Brahe, or Erra Pater:
For he, by geometric scale,
Could take the size of pots of ale;
Resolve, by sines
and tangents straight,
If bread or butter wanted weight;
And wisely tell what hour o’ the day
The clock does strike, by Algebra.
Samuel Butler (1612–1680)
269
14. P
OETRY
Another limerick, but this time taking advantage of the
patverse
environment. If you
are typesetting a series of limericks a single
\indentpattern
will do for all of them.
\settowidth{\versewidth}{There was a young lady of Ryde}
\indentpattern{00110}
\needspace{7\onelineskip}
\PoemTitle{The Young Lady of Ryde}
\begin{verse}[\versewidth]
\begin{patverse}
There was a young lady of Ryde \\
Who ate some apples and died. \\
The apples fermented \\
Inside the lamented \\
And made cider inside her inside.
\end{patverse}
\end{verse}
Note that I used the
\needspace
command to ensure that the limerick will not get broken
across a page.
The Young Lady of Ryde
There was a young lady of Ryde
Who ate some apples and died.
The apples fermented
Inside the lamented
And made cider inside her inside.
The next example isa song you may have heard of. This uses
\flagverse
for labelling
the stanzas, and because the lines are numbered they can be referred to.
\settowidth{\versewidth}{In a cavern, in a canyon,}
\PoemTitle{Clementine}
\begin{verse}[\versewidth]
\linenumberfrequency{2}
\begin{altverse}
\flagverse{1.} In a cavern, in a canyon, \\
Excavating for a mine, \\
Lived a miner, forty-niner, \label{vs:49} \\
And his daughter, Clementine. \\!
\end{altverse}
\begin{altverse}
\flagverse{\textsc{chorus}} Oh my darling, Oh my darling, \\
Oh my darling Clementine. \\
Thou art lost and gone forever, \\
Oh my darling Clementine.
\end{altverse}
\linenumberfrequency{0}
270
14.3. Examples
\end{verse}
The ‘forty-niner’ in line~\ref{vs:49} of the song
refers to the gold rush of 1849.
Clementine
1.
In a cavern, in a canyon,
Excavating for a mine,
2
Lived a miner, forty-niner,
And his daughter, Clementine.
4
CHORUS
Oh my darling, Oh my darling,
Oh my darling Clementine.
6
Thou art lost and gone forever,
Oh my darling Clementine.
The ‘forty-niner’ in line 3 of the song refers to the gold rush of 1849.
The last example is a much more ambitious use of
\indentpattern
. In this case it is
defined as:
\indentpattern{0135554322112346898779775545653222345544456688778899}
and the result is shown on the next page.
271
14. P
OETRY
Mouse’s Tale
Fury said to
amouse, That
he met
in the
house,
‘Let us
both go
to law:
Iwill
prosecute
you. —
Come, I’ll
take no
denial;
We must
havea
trial:
For
really
this
morning
I’ve
nothing
todo.’
Said the
mouse to
the cur,
Such a
trial,
dearsir,
Withno
jury or
judge,
wouldbe
wasting
ourbreath.’
‘I’llbe
judge,
I’llbe
jury.’
Said
cunning
oldFury;
‘I’ll try
thewhole
cause
and
condemn
you
to
death.’
Lewis Carrol,Alice’sAdventures in Wonderland,1865
272
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested