view pdf in asp net mvc : Convert .pdf to text software SDK project winforms wpf .net UWP 095-lensink1-part91

11 
Africa, ‘hundreds of thousands of slaves left their masters and went home.’ Those who stayed 
often did so because they had no other place to go or because the costs of building up a new 
life were too large; or they formed separate communities locally. These ex-slaves often 
remained in relations of dependence and exploitation, as in the western Sudan were released 
slaves farming for themselves generally paid their master the amount of grain necessary to 
feed a person for one year. It is also noteworthy that most observations on indigenous slavery 
were made in the period of colonial rule, which, as Klein (1978:601) stresses, ‘deprived ruling 
[indigenous] elites of their capacity to coerce’. Thus historically, observed indigenous slavery 
may have been the milder form. 
Indigenous slavery lasted longer than export slavery. In 1807 Britain passed a law abolishing 
the Atlantic slave trade, but the African colonies had laws against indigenous slavery passed 
by their colonizers much later and at different dates: in 1874 in the Gold Coast Colony (the 
southernmost part of Ghana), but not until 1908 in the Asante and Northern Territories of 
Ghana (Perbi, 2001:12). And even then, indigenous slavery often continued in practice. The 
abolition brought about a labour shortage that induced an increase in pawning, to which 
former slaves and their descendants - often in the most vulnerable strata of society – were the 
natural victims (Perbi, 2004). ‘Laws against slave trading were more strictly enforced than 
legislation on slavery, which was often a dead letter’… ‘Servile labour remained important in 
many areas well into the interwar period; and in a few economic backwaters it persisted even 
longer, generally with the knowing complicity of colonial regimes’ (Klein, 1978:599,608). 
Against this background we conduct an econometric analysis of the conditions under which 
indigenous slavery arose and existed. The review of the literature above suggest that 
indigenous slavery was more likely to be encountered in Central-West Africa (home to the 
most important slave markets). We therefore include in our empirical analysis below the 
degrees of longitude and the distance to the Equator (latitude) into the regression equation. As 
colonizers adopted different attitudes towards indigenous slavery, the nationality of the 
colonizer is plausibly relevant: we also include five binary variables for colonizer nationality 
(capturing the British, French, Belgian, German and Portugese colonizing powers
7
7
The reference group comprises countries that were never colonies (Ethiopia and Liberia), Equatorial Guinea, 
Lybia and Namibia (a former German colony) 
). Cooper 
(1981) and others describe how religion generally and Islam specifically was a distinctive 
Convert .pdf to text - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf image to text online; c# convert pdf to text file
Convert .pdf to text - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
convert pdf to rich text; convert pdf to text open source
12 
force in the development of indigenous slavery. Thus the prevalence of indigenous slavery 
may well have been higher in those areas where Islam was the dominant religion. We include 
the Islamic population share to capture this. The presence of export slavery may have 
stimulated the extent of indigenous slavery, as Rodney (1966), Ewald (1992) and Nunn (2008) 
suggest and we include a control variable for the number of exported slaves per land area
8
More hierarchical societies with stronger states may have induced indigenous slavery in their 
lands in various ways (e.g. by asking tribute in slaves as the Asante did) and we include a 
variable on state development, defined as the share of non-European population that belongs 
to indigenously 'centralised' ethnic group
9
. These considerations
10
lead to a model 
specification of the form 
Slavery
i
= C + ß
ij
X
ij  
+ e
ij
Where Slavery
with i = 1,2,…,43 and j = 1,2,…,11 
i
is the prevalence of indigenous slavery in country i, C is a constant, ß
ij
is the 
coefficient reflecting the impact of condition X
j
in country i on Slavery and e
ij
is a white-
noise error term. We refer to the Appendix for full details on data sources and definitions. We 
checked that independents are not seriously multicollinear with others
11
8
Using the numbers of exported slaves per population gives qualitatively similar results in all regressions below. 
9
We here follow the definition by Gennaioli and Rainer (20007), who provide more detail on data and sources 
for this variable. 
10
There are other variables that we considered but did not include in the analysis. Given the variation of forms of 
indigenous slavery over societal modes (Cooper, 1979; 1981), we experimented with variables on social 
heterogeneity, on community organization, on the presence of written records, on population density and on 
state-community relations (Gennaioli and Rainer, 2007; Bolt and Smits, 2008). But only the variable ‘presence 
of written records’ contains enough observations, and exploratory regressions indicated no robust correlations 
with indigenous slavery for other variables. Nor did their inclusion improve the explained variation in 
indigenous slavery. This is actually an understandable finding taking into account that indigenous slavery was 
pervasive across very different societies. It is clear from the literature that the type of indigenous slavery did vary 
over societies; but, according to our analysis, not the generic institution of indigenous slavery itself. This study is 
not about defining an the nature of African indigenous slavery, which would probably be in vain: ‘efforts to find 
an essence of slavery in Africa as a whole leads away from identifying more valid distinctions between slave 
systems’ (Cooper, 1981:274; also Cooper, 1979). Another consideration we pursued is that colonizers tended to 
discourage indigenous slavery, and plausibly more so in the coastal areas where they had most influence. We 
experimented with including a variable capturing the share of the population living within a hundred kilometers 
from the coast but left it out for similar reasons: it reduced the number of observations and did not improve the 
explained variation in indigenous slavery. 
11
Our cut off point is a Variance Inflation Factor exceeding 5. To compute this, we regress each independent on 
all others and compute the R2. The Variance Inflation Factor is then 1/(1-R2), If more then 80 % of the variation 
of a dependent is explained by variations in other dependents (i.e. if the Variance Inflation Factor exceeds 5), 
then we consider this variable multicollinear. This was not the case for any of the 11 variables. 
. Even so, we have 11 
variables on the 43 African countries in our sample for which we have indigenous slavery 
observations. We address the resulting degrees of freedom problem by estimating sequentially 
six models were we each we take out groups of variables from the full model in equation (1). 
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF files to Text.
convert image pdf to text pdf; convert pdf to text doc
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. Advanced Visual Studio .NET PDF text extraction control, built in .NET framework 2.0 and compatible with Windows system.
convert scanned pdf to word text; converting pdf to text
13 
This procedure also serves as a test on the robustness of coefficients to varying the model 
specification
12
. In order to account for the censored nature of our variable for indigenous 
slavery (which takes on values between 0 and 100) we estimate the more efficient ‘Tobit’ 
specification instead of OLS 
13
We find that indigenous slavery was more common in countries closer to the Equator, in West 
Africa
. In table III.1 we present estimation results. 
14
12
Another method of  model variable selection is Hendry’s general-to-specific stepwise regression, sequentially 
excluding variables with coefficient estimates of significance levels with, for instance,  p > 20 %. We 
experimented with this but found that the outcome is too sensitive to the initial set, yielding too arbitrary final 
variable selection results. 
13
Tobit specifications give qualitatively similar but statistically more significant results compared to OLS 
estimations of the same equations. 
14
Degrees of longitude start from zero at Greenwich (UK) and take increasingly negative values  in more 
westerly countries. 
and specifically in the West-Central African Belgian colonies (present-day Rwanda, 
Burundi, and the Congo Democratic Republic). It was more prevalent among societies with 
more developed states and in those that had written records (although these are not robust 
results across all model specifications). We find no clear impact of Islam or of export slavery 
on the prevalence of indigenous slavery. 
In conclusion of this section, we identified indigenous slavery as conceptually separate from 
the export slave trade in that it is slavery and the slave trade within Africa. While indigenous 
slavery in Africa did not involve the vast numbers of people traded in the Atlantic slave trades, 
it was more pervasive across Africa’s traditional states and societies than export slavery. It is 
also more recent and plausibly more deeply engrained in the fabric of society. It was mostly - 
but by no means always - more benign towards slaves. But it dislocated and disenfranchised 
large numbers of Africans, was a major motivation in inter-African wars, and intertwined 
commerce with warfare. While often less cruel than the Atlantic slave trades, it was arguably 
a strong and pervasive impediment to the development of political stability and human capital 
in traditional African states and societies before and during the colonial era, and well after 
export slavery had been ended. Its pervasiveness and longevity suggest that its impact on 
Africa’s development may have been strong, possible enduring to the present day. We now 
turn to investigate this issue. 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Text: Extract Text from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG formats.
convert pdf table to text; convert pdf to word to edit text
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File &
convert pdf to text document; convert scanned pdf to text
14 
Table III.1: Conditions of Indigenous Slavery: Tobit regressions  
Dependent variable: slavery  
model 
(1.1) 
(1.2) 
(1.3) 
(1.4) 
(1.5) 
(1.6) 
colony1 
0.045 
-0.016 
-0.026 
0.028 
0.051 
(0.094) 
(0.097) 
(0.097) 
(0.097) 
(0.093) 
colony3 
-0.162 
-0.245 
-0.348* 
-0.198 
-0.236 
(0.156) 
(0.184) 
(0.177) 
(0.154) 
(0.166) 
colony4 
0.332* 
0.333* 
0.487** 
0.493*** 
0.389** 
(0.178) 
(0.179) 
(0.185) 
(0.177) 
(0.185) 
colony5 
-0.514* 
-0.479* 
-0.216 
-0.456 
-0.444 
(0.257) 
(0.282) 
(0.293) 
(0.292) 
(0.276) 
longitude 
-0.008*** 
-0.007** 
-0.006* 
-0.004 
-0.009*** 
(0.003) 
(0.003) 
(0.003) 
(0.002) 
(0.003) 
abs_latitude 
-0.019*** 
-0.020** 
-0.020** 
-0.011* 
-0.015* 
(0.007) 
(0.008) 
(0.008) 
(0.006) 
(0.008) 
State_dev 
0.406** 
0.417** 
0.560*** 
0.095 
0.344* 
(0.177) 
(0.183) 
(0.177) 
(0.156) 
(0.178) 
writtenrec~s 
0.005* 
0.005* 
0.004 
0.002 
0.006*** 
(0.002) 
(0.002) 
(0.003) 
(0.002) 
(0.002) 
Islam 
0.002 
0.002 
0.002 
0.003 
0.004*** 
(0.002) 
(0.002) 
(0.002) 
(0.002) 
(0.001) 
ln_expor_~a 
0.004 
0.014 
0.039** 
0.014 
0.016 
(0.015) 
(0.016) 
(0.015) 
(0.014) 
(0.016) 
_cons 
0.651*** 
0.609*** 
0.524*** 
0.313** 
0.619*** 
0.600*** 
(0.107) 
(0.147) 
(0.138) 
(0.131) 
(0.137) 
(0.141) 
LR chi2 
31.928 
30.354 
25.254 
23.777 
28.643 
31.901 
41 
41 
41 
41 
43 
41 
Note: ***, **, and * denote statistical significance at probability levels below 1 %, 5 % and 10 %, respectIVely. 
Sources: see Appendix 
III. Indigenous Slavery and Long-Term Income Development 
Nunn (2008) showed statistically that export slavery had a negative impact on Africa’s long-
term development, as measured by the GDP per capita (income) levels in the year 2000. In 
this section we investigate whether this long-run effect is also observable for indigenous 
slavery. 
To begin with, we plot the percentage of the population within today’s borders of an African 
country that had the institution of indigenous slavery, against the logarithm of its per capita 
income in 2000, for 43 countries (Figure 2). The negative relation (with bivariate correlation 
coefficient of –55%) is already clear from visual inspection, and this is confirmed by 
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
change pdf to text for editing; converting image pdf to text
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Convert PDF to HTML. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
best pdf to text; convert pdf to word for editing text
15 
computation of a trend line with negative coefficient of -1.12. We find that nearly a third 
(R2=30%) of the variation in sub-Saharan Africa’s current income levels is statistically 
associated with variation in indigenous slavery. 
Figure 2: Indigenous Slavery Correlates Negatively to 2000 Income levels in 41 African 
Countries 
y = -1.1191x + 7.6668
R
2
= 0.2961
5
5.5
6
6.5
7
7.5
8
8.5
9
9.5
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
indigenous slavery prevalence
ln(GDP per capita 2000)
Sources: Atlas Narodov Mira (1964), Murdoch (1967), Maddison (2000) 
Our baseline OLS equations to test this relation more rigorously follow the specifications in 
Nunn (2008): 
ln(income2000)
i
= C + ß
ij
X
ij  
+ e
ij
Where ln(income2000)
with i = 1,2,…,43 and j = 1,2,…,11 
i
is the natural logarithm of average per capita GDP in the year 2000 in 
country i, C is a constant, ß
ij
is the coefficient reflecting the impact of condition X
j
in country 
i on year-2000 per capita income levels and e
ij
is a white-noise error term. We refer to the 
Appendix for full details on data sources and definitions. The set of X
variables always 
includes the indigenous slavery variable, and in one model also Nunn’s (2008) export slavery 
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
easy for C# developers to convert and transform style that are included in target PDF document file original formatting and interrelation of text and graphical
convert pdf to rich text format online; convert pdf to openoffice text
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
text from pdf; convert pdf to editable text online
16 
variable
15
. This specification allows us to examine if indigenous slavery has a long-term 
growth effect apart from the effect of export slavery already identified by Nunn (2008)
16
We start with a simple univariate model (2.1). as explored in Figure 2. In model (2.2) we add 
geographical position captured by longitude and latitude; in model (2.3) additionally a 
number of variables capturing climate, location, legal origin and religion. Of these variables, 
only longitude and coastline appear to contribute to explaining income variations, and in 
model (2.4) we estimate an equation with only these control variables.  We then add point 
resources (oil, gold and diamonds) in model (2.5), of which only oil endowments appear to 
have a significant coefficient. We include oil endowments in model (2.6), along with export 
slavery and control variables for colonial origin. This is our preferred model.
15
Compared to the Nunn (2008) specification, this model does not include a dummy for North Africa, as we 
have no North African countries in the sample. 
16
We also note that, in contrast to the regressions in section II above, we are not now concerned with the quality 
of the model explaining current income levels. Rather, we aim to probe the effect of our variable of interest, 
indigenous slavery. Therefore we need not worry about the large number of variables or about colinearity of 
control variables, both of which are also features of models reported in Nunn (2008, table III) who includes up to 
19 control variables in his model explaining current income levels by export slavery, in a sample of 52 African 
countries. 
17 
Table III.2: Indigenous Slavery and 2000 Income levels: OLS regressions
Dependent variable: log of GDP per capita in 2000 
(2.1) 
(2.2) 
(2.3) 
(2.4) 
(2.5) 
(2.6) 
Slavery 
-1.119*** 
-1.112*** 
-0.880* 
-1.147*** -1.010*** 
-0.514** 
(0.300) 
(0.358) 
(0.441) 
(0.303) 
(0.339) 
(0.227) 
abs_latitude 
0.011 
0.012 
(0.015) 
(0.017) 
longitude 
-0.006 
-0.006 
-0.004 
-0.003 
-0.006 
(0.004) 
(0.006) 
(0.004) 
(0.005) 
(0.004) 
rain_min 
-0.002 
(0.010) 
humid_max 
0.004 
(0.013) 
low_temp 
-0.006 
(0.024) 
ln_coastli~a 
0.043 
0.021 
0.018 
(0.042) 
(0.031) 
(0.032) 
island_dum 
-0.289 
(0.529) 
Islam 
-0.003 
(0.004) 
legor_fr 
-0.149 
(0.247) 
ln_avg_oil~p 
0.044 
0.072*** 
(0.031) 
(0.021) 
ln_avg_all~p 
0.028 
(0.064) 
ln_avg_gol~p 
0.002 
(0.017) 
ln_export_~a 
-0.098*** 
(0.024) 
colony0 
-0.998*** 
(0.276) 
colony1 
-0.821*** 
(0.177) 
colony2 
-0.966*** 
(0.180) 
colony3 
-1.049*** 
(0.307) 
colony4 
-1.744*** 
(0.329) 
colony5 
-0.275 
(0.230) 
_cons 
7.667*** 
7.616*** 
7.496*** 
7.769*** 
8.137*** 
9.241*** 
(0.242) 
(0.419) 
(0.867) 
(0.262) 
(0.340) 
(0.245) 
R2 
0.296 
0.330 
0.372 
0.323 
0.385 
0.724 
43 
43 
43 
43 
43 
43 
Note: ***, **, and * denote statistical significance at probability levels below 1 %, 5 % and 10 %, respectively. 
Robust standard errors are reported in parentheses. We use Maddison’s income data, as in Nunn (2008). Using 
other sources such as WDI (2008) gives qualitatively identical results. See the Appendix for data definitions and 
sources. 
18 
We find that colonial origin variables have statistically significant coefficient estimates
17
.  
The baseline countries for colonial origin are Libya (a former Italian colony) and the former 
German colony Namibia, which is significantly richer than the sample average (its per capita 
GDP level in 2000 was US$ 3,641 compared to US$ 1,119 for the sample average). 
Compared to this reference set, all formerly British (colony1), French (colony2), and Spanish 
(colony3) colonies as well as Liberia and Ethiopia which were never colonised (colony0) are 
significantly poorer, with negative coefficients of about the same magnitude, around one. The 
former Belgian colonies Rwanda, Burundi, and the Congo Democratic Republic (colony4) are 
poorer still, with a much larger negative coefficient. Also, export slavery is clearly and 
negatively correlated to income in 2000, as in Nunn (2008). Most importantly, in this and in 
the other five specifications indigenous slavery is also a significant and negative correlate of 
variations in current per capita income levels. While it is worthy of note that its coefficient 
halves when including export slavery in the model, and the total explained variation nearly 
doubles, still indigenous slavery has a negative long-term growth effect which is independent 
of the income-depressing effect of export slavery
18
While this is prima facie evidence that indigenous slavery depressed economic development 
in the long run, this is only a baseline set of estimations which requires further exploration. 
There may be a selection problem, where countries destined by climate or location to remain 
relatively poor also selected into the practice of indigenous slavery. One plausible selection 
mechanism would run via technology. Hopkins (1973:25) attributed indigenous slavery 
institutions to scarcity of labour especially in West Africa, where under conditions of simple 
agricultural technologies (which restrain income growth), ‘the costs of acquiring and 
maintaining slaves were less than the cost of hiring labour’. Similarly, Fielding and Torres 
(2008) explain that particular combinations of endowments and climates  - prevalent 
especially in West and Central Africa -  stimulated the development of plantation and mining 
economies with their attendant ‘extractive institutions’ (Acemoglu et al, 2001) inhibiting 
long-term development. This is another possible selection mechanism. In such and similar 
17
We include four colony dummies and left out the colony variable for Spansih Equitoreal Guinea (colony5). 
Including all five led to estimated covariance matrix of moment conditions not of full rank, which undermines 
reliability of  the standard errors and model tests. 
18
We explored other specifications within the set of variables in table 2, and found that indigenous slavery is 
robust also in this larger model set (and so is, incidentally, the Belgian colony variable). Results are available on 
request. 
19 
scenarios, we observe a negative correlation of indigenous slavery with today’s income levels, 
but this is no conclusive evidence of causation. Conducting a simple OLS regression would 
then lead to biased estimates. 
In order to assess how serious this selection problem is, we want to know if countries with 
endogenous slavery were already poor at the time of observation of indigenous slavery in our 
data set. Historically, as shown by (among others) Acemoglu et al (2002), Africa’s population 
density is a good indicator for prosperity. We explored this relation for the 27 countries for 
which we have data on both historical population density (in the 15
th
But we cannot be certain, of course, that our OLS estimates do not suffer from endogeneity 
problems in some other way. In order to address this possible problem, we apply an 
instrumental-variable approach to estimating the slavery-income relation
century) and indigenous 
slavery. With a correlation coefficient of +35%, it appears that if anything, there is a positive 
association between the two. This is also reported by Nunn (2008) on export slavery who 
finds it were the richer, not the poorer countries that selected into the slave trades. 
19
. We use 
instruments that are correlated with indigenous slavery, but not with the error terms in the 
equation explaining present-day income. We base our specification choice on model (2.6) 
above, where we now instrument indigenous slavery. We take the results in table III.1 
(models 1.1 to 1.6) as a guide to the selection of instruments for indigenous slavery. We there 
found that of the truly exogenous variables, longitude, latitude and colony dummies 
(especially colony4) were associated with the prevalence of indigenous slavery
20
. Also, we 
take account of the fact that export slavery itself may be an endogenous variable. As in Nunn 
(2008), we instrument it with a country’s shortest sailing distance to African coasts where 
important export slave trade ports were located: the Red Sea coast, the Atlantic Ocean coast, 
the Mediterranean coast and the Indian Ocean coast. 
19
The instrumental-variable approach This also controls for the fact that our indigenous slavery variable is a 
constructed variable, which may render OLS estimates biased. It should be noted, however, that IV regressions 
have bad small sample properties. Therefore, we present the IV regressions as just an additional robustness 
check of the OLS regression results in table III.2 We also note that we use a 2sls strategy with an OLS regression 
in the first stage. We do not use a Tobit regression technique in the first stage (as we did in table III.1) since this 
requires that in the second stage, the impact of indigenous slavery is identical across countries. A two-stage least 
squares method is less efficient, but its estimates are consistent also if the impact of indigenous slavery is not 
identical across countries (which is plausible). 
20
In addition, state development was also associated with the prevalence of indigenous slavery, but this variable 
is plausibly endogenous and therefore not suited as an instrument. 
20 
Estimations results are reported in table III.3a and III.3b below, where we report first and 
second stages, respectively, of IV regressions of four models (3.1) to (3.4). In each of the four 
models we report, the first-stage equation has indigenous slavery as the dependent variable. In 
model (3.1) we instrument both indigenous and export slavery, so that there are two estimated 
equations in the first stage, one with indigenous slavery as the dependent variable and one 
with export slavery as the dependent variable. In model (3.2) we omit instrumented export 
slavery. In model (3.3) we employ another instrumentation of indigenous slavery, adding the 
geographical variables capturing the presence of point resources (oil and diamonds) and 
measuring a country’s coastline. Finally in model (3.4.) we extend the second stage by 
including all four colony dummy variables. Note that  models (3.3) and (3.4) have identical 
first stage specifications. 
In all four models, the coefficient for instrumented indigenous slavery takes a negative value 
(between -1.23 and -2.71) which is highly significant statistically. We conclude from this that 
indigenous slavery was a robust long-term influence on African development, even taking 
account of any endogeneity problems and controlling for the presence of export slavery. We 
probe the validity of our instrumentation choices in two ways, reported in table III.3c. We ask 
whether we have chosen the right instruments (Hansen J test) and whether instrumentation is 
warranted at all (endogeneity test)
21
21
The Hansen J test is a test of overidentifying restrictions. The joint null hypothesis is that the instruments are 
valid instruments, i.e., exclude instruments are uncorrelated with the error term.  Hence a rejection of the null 
hypothesis casts doubt on the validity of the instruments.  In the endogeneity test, the test statistic is defined as 
the difference of two Sargan-Hansen statistics: one for the equation with the smaller set of instruments where the 
suspect regressor(s) are treated as endogenous, and one for the equation with the larger set of instruments, where 
the suspect regressors are treated as exogenous.  We consider the null hypothesis that the specified endogenous 
regressors can actually be treated as exogenous. If this tests fails to reject the null hypothesis, this supports the 
instrumentation strategy 
. Since the values for all Hansen J statistics are 
statistically insignificant in the Table, we cannot reject the null hypothesis that the 
instruments are valid instruments for any of the four models. This strengthens confidence in 
the choice of instruments. And since the endogeneity test statistic is significant in for all 
models at the 10 % cut-off point,. instrumentation seems warranted. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested