mvc pdf viewer : Convert .pdf to text application software tool html windows azure online accessibility-in-e-learning0-part919

Accessibility in e-Learning 
What You Need to Know 
Prepared on behalf of the  
Council of Ontario Universities by: 
Greg Gay, Inclusive Design Research Centre 
OCAD University, Toronto, ON 
JULY 2014 
Convert .pdf to text - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to text doc; convert pdf to text
Convert .pdf to text - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
convert pdf file to text document; convert pdf to word editable text
Contents 
Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 4 
Defining Accessibility and Inclusion ............................................................................................ 4 
Traditional Definitions ............................................................................................................. 4 
Disability vs. Mismatch ........................................................................................................... 4 
What Is Web Accessibility? ..................................................................................................... 5 
How People with Disabilities Use the Web and the Barriers They Face ..................................... 5 
Vision Loss ............................................................................................................................. 5 
Hearing Impairment ................................................................................................................ 7 
Motor Impairments.................................................................................................................. 8 
Cognitive Impairment and Learning Differences ..................................................................... 9 
Standards and Specifications ....................................................................................................10 
Creating Accessible Content .....................................................................................................10 
Authoring Tools .....................................................................................................................10 
Level A (must haves): ........................................................................................................11 
Level AA (should haves): ...................................................................................................11 
Multimedia Production ...........................................................................................................11 
Mathematical Notations .........................................................................................................12 
Document Accessibility .............................................................................................................12 
Accessible Online Assessments ...............................................................................................13 
Testing Web Content Accessibility ............................................................................................13 
Automated Accessibility Testing Tools...................................................................................13 
Manual Accessibility Tests .....................................................................................................14 
Screen Reader Testing ..........................................................................................................14 
User-Testing ..........................................................................................................................15 
Social Networking and Social Media .........................................................................................15 
Facebook ..............................................................................................................................15 
Google+ etc. ..........................................................................................................................15 
Twitter ...................................................................................................................................16 
YouTube ................................................................................................................................16 
LMS Accessibility ......................................................................................................................16 
Keyboard Access ..................................................................................................................17 
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF files to Text.
convert pdf to rich text format online; convert pdf to text file using
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. Advanced Visual Studio .NET PDF text extraction control, built in .NET framework 2.0 and compatible with Windows system.
convert pdf to text file online; change pdf to text file
Within-Page Navigation .........................................................................................................17 
Logical Tab Order ..................................................................................................................18 
Visible Focus .........................................................................................................................18 
Labelled Forms with Instructions ...........................................................................................18 
Accessible Feedback .............................................................................................................19 
Personal Preferences ............................................................................................................20 
Accessible Authoring .............................................................................................................20 
Timing ...................................................................................................................................22 
Accessibility Statement ..........................................................................................................23 
MOOC Accessibility ...............................................................................................................23 
The Future of Accessibility ........................................................................................................23 
GPII/Cloud4All .......................................................................................................................23 
Conclusion ................................................................................................................................23 
Checklist of Best Practices ........................................................................................................25 
References ...............................................................................................................................26 
Appendix: Accessibility in e-Learning Companion Documents ..................................................28 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Text: Extract Text from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG formats.
changing pdf to text; change pdf to text
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File &
convert pdf file to txt; convert pdf to rich text format
Introduction 
This paper looks at what you need to know as an educator about the accessibility of online 
courses, course materials, and other web-based learning activities and tools as part of teaching 
and learning at postsecondary institutions in Ontario. It introduces accessibility not simply as a 
requirement of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) to accommodate 
people with disabilities, but as a best practice for creating and delivering e-learning opportunities 
that are accessible to everyone. It provides basic principles that capture the essence of 
accessibility – principles that you as an educator can apply going forward as part of the e-
learning development process and the creation of online courses. 
The paper provides some examples of how people with different learning needs can learn 
online. It introduces some of the common assistive technologies (ATs) that people with 
disabilities might use to access courses on the web, and describes some of the barriers that 
they could encounter and that might prevent them from participating fully in e-learning. It also 
provides practical strategies to create accessible learning experiences, as well as strategies for 
identifying potential barriers that may limit access to online learning activities and materials. 
Understanding what accessibility means in the context of e-learning is necessary for any 
instructor, content author, or e-learning specialist who creates or leads activities on the web.  
Defining Accessibility and Inclusion 
Traditional Definitions 
Traditional definitions of disability focus on a medical description, “typically a physical or mental 
condition that limits a person’s movement, senses, or activities.” [Oxford Dictionary] When 
talking about accessibility however, the traditional definition of disability limits what one might 
consider when developing content that is accessible to everyone. Other considerations come 
into play when we talk about accessible learning, including how learners process different types 
of information. For instance, the common visual, verbal, kinesthetic distinction in learning styles 
[1] should also be considered when designing content that is accessible to everyone.  
Disability vs. Mismatch 
Everyone has a disability at one time or another that affects her/his ability to consume 
information or learn from it. Take for instance watching television in a noisy environment; one 
might be considered hearing impaired, regardless of how well one might normally hear. In such 
a case, captions would allow a person to watch the television, providing the viewer with an 
option of reading the captions as an alternative to listening to the audio. These types of 
accommodations are often referred to as “curb cuts.” Curb cuts were initially created to allow 
people in wheelchairs to navigate between street and sidewalk, but they also accommodate a 
person pushing a baby carriage, a person on a bicycle, or an elderly person walking who might 
find stepping up a curb stressful. In these cases, the accommodations will benefit a wider range 
of people than just those with disabilities. This paper proposes that it would be advantageous to 
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
convert pdf to searchable text; convert pdf to ascii text
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Convert PDF to HTML. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
convert pdf to word editable text online; convert pdf to text c#
view accessibility as curb cuts – in that it provides accommodations for persons with various 
disabilities but that, in its application, it also has the potential to serve a larger population.  
Inaccessibility is essentially a mismatch between the needs of an individual within an 
environment and the format in which that information or content is provided. Accessibility in e-
learning can be thought of in terms of matching content or activities to individuals. For learners 
who are blind, text or audio alternatives for graphic materials can provide a match depending on 
the abilities of each learner. For learners who are deaf, captions or transcripts of audio material 
would be used to provide the match. For visual learners, graphics and other visual presentations 
of information would provide the match. For kinesthetic learners, hands-on or step-by-step 
presentation of information would be used. When developing content, consider providing 
multiple representations of the same information. Processing information through multiple 
modalities has long been associated with better learning outcomes [2], so adaptations of e-
learning content to accommodate people with disabilities can provide the “multimodal curb cut.” 
What Is Web Accessibility? 
It was not until the late 1990s that web accessibility – in essence, access to online information 
for people with disabilities – became a concern for web developers. About this time, the World 
Wide Web Consortium, known as the W3C, introduced the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI), 
which focused on making the web and web technology accessible to people with disabilities. 
Today, this is still somewhat specialized knowledge, and not all web developers have mastered 
it. For the general public, web accessibility may not be a widely known concept but, with the 
AODA and emerging accessibility laws worldwide, there is a growing awareness around the 
need for equal access to the web and web-based learning opportunities. 
How People with Disabilities Use the Web and the Barriers They Face  
Vision Loss 
Vision loss encompasses an array of conditions ranging from simple nearsightedness or 
farsightedness, to age-related difficulties, to a variety of colour-blind conditions, to significant 
loss of sight and complete loss of sight, with a continuum of conditions in between. How people 
with vision impairments use the web is just as varied. Those who are blind face the most 
significant barriers in accessing web content, given the web’s obvious visual nature. Any 
meaningful visual element in web content must have an alternate text or audio equivalent to 
accommodate this group of learners.  
screen reader is used to access the web for those with total or significant vision loss. It 
extracts the text from web content, as well as features of the computer’s operating system, and 
reads it back to the person using text-to-speech technology. Screen readers also have a 
collection of tools that allow a person who is blind to list the headings or links on a page, 
navigate through tabular information in a meaningful way, and successfully complete forms. 
Barriers are created when correct heading elements have not been used to structure content, 
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
easy for C# developers to convert and transform style that are included in target PDF document file original formatting and interrelation of text and graphical
convert image pdf to text; convert pdf to text open source
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
convert pdf image to text online; convert pdf to word to edit text
when link text is not meaningful on its own (e.g., “click here” provides no useful information), 
and when forms are not properly labelled. Some common screen readers include JAWS, 
Window Eyes, and NVDA for Windows systems; VoiceOver for Mac systems and iOS mobile 
devices; Orca for Linux systems; and Talkback for Android mobile devices. 
Another significant issue for users of a screen reader is keyboard accessibility. Most learners 
who are blind will use a keyboard to access web content, not a mouse. Web developers often 
overlook this fact, creating features in websites or applications that operate with a mouse click 
and that do not include an equivalent keyboard alternative. For a quick test of keyboard 
accessibility, press the Tab key repeatedly and follow the cursor’s focus through the web 
content to be sure that all elements receive focus. While navigating with the Tab key, if you 
press the Enter key (or sometimes the space bar) when features receive focus, this action will 
reveal whether these elements are also keyboard operable.  
An area that could create barriers for those who are blind is multimedia content. Making this 
accessible requires not only that the video player be keyboard accessible, but also that all 
meaningful actions in the video that are not understood by listening to the audio track are 
augmented by audio description (or described video). Audio description is created by 
recording short, spoken descriptions of the meaningful actions in a video, and weaving these 
descriptions into a separate audio track in the video file.  
For those with significant vision loss but enough residual vision to see magnified content, a 
screen magnification program may be used to access web content or their computer’s 
operating system. These users could also just rely on a browser’s zoom feature to increase 
the text size to make the text more readable. Barriers can occur when content has been created 
in a way that does not allow for resizing. Web content sizes can be defined in absolute 
measures using points (pt) or pixels (px), or in relative measures using “em” or percent (%). 
Potential barriers can result when content is created using absolute measures, or a mix of 
absolute and relative measures. Content may not resize, or only parts of it resize. For example, 
if you use relative measures to create text size but use absolute measures to create the 
containers in which the text is presented, when the text size is increased, the container stays 
the same width, sometimes creating a column of words that can be difficult to read. 
Another common issue for those who view magnified content is presenting text in images. In 
many cases when images are magnified, the text in the images becomes pixelated, losing its 
sharp edges and making it more difficult to read. Wherever possible, you should use actual text, 
to ensure that it remains readable regardless of the zoom factor.  
From a curb cuts perspective, developing content using relative measures makes the content 
more adaptable to various screen sizes – for example, content created for a computer screen 
that is viewed on a mobile device – than if the same content had been created using absolute 
measures. Likewise, ensuring that visual content has meaningful text alternatives can help 
make visual information indexable by search engines, and therefore make image searches 
easier for everyone.  
Hearing Impairment 
People with hearing loss will typically experience fewer barriers in accessing web content than 
people with vision impairments, though multimedia and audio content will obviously present 
barriers if alternatives such as captions or transcripts are not provided. Many tools are 
available for creating captions, including Capscribe, as well as web-based tools such as Amara 
(formerly Universal Subtitles), and the captioning tools built into services such as YouTube. 
YouTube also has an automated caption service that uses speech recognition technology to 
produce text from a video’s audio track. Automated captioning, however, is still an emerging 
technology and ideally should not be used to create captions for your videos. Test this for 
yourself by turning on YouTube’s automated captioning for, say, an instructional video to get an 
idea of the errors that can occur. 
Consider using captions, as a curb cut, to help all listeners in a noisy environment to read what 
would otherwise be an inaudible audio track. Captions can also make video indexable by search 
engines, making it possible to search for specific words in a video and potentially jump directly 
to that point in the video where the words are spoken. Captions can also be used by people 
whose first language may not be the language presented in the video, and read along while 
listening to the video. Figure 1, which follows immediately, shows the transcript displayed along 
with a YouTube video when captions are available. 
Figure 1: The YouTube transcript feature, which is a compilation of captions from a video, 
makes the video content indexable, and allows viewers to read while they watch the video. 
(The image unavailable in French.) 
Motor Impairments 
People with significant motor impairment generally face barriers associated with using a mouse 
or aspects of a keyboard to access web content. This group will often rely on various keyboard 
technologies to access web content, including a “large key” keyboard, an onscreen keyboard, 
or a scanning keyboard that is operated with a single switch or head mouse. 
Switch access is similar to a mouse click. A switch can be a button device 
(similar to those shown to the left) that can be activated by a small body 
movement or by leaning on the device. Such a switch might be used by a 
person with limited mobility to operate an onscreen scanning keyboard. 
Sip and puff switches operate in a similar fashion. However, instead of 
using movement to activate the switch, a person would use her/his mouth to 
either sip on the straw to mimic a mouse click, or blow into the straw to 
mimic a double click. A switch might be used along with a head mouse
which uses head movements to control the position of a mouse pointer on 
the screen. 
There are now a variety of commercial and open-source, onscreen 
scanning keyboards that can be used with switch access devices. Typically, depending on your 
configuration settings, when you access the keyboard, it will begin to slowly scan down line by 
line. As shown in Figure 2, when the line with the target letter (in this case, “f”) is reached, the 
person might sip on the switch, or push a button switch, to start the scan moving right letter by 
letter, and when the scan reaches the target letter, sip again to type that letter. In the top row of 
the keyboard, a word prediction feature lists potential words that can be selected during the 
scan, or the scan can continue line by line and another letter could be selected to update the 
word prediction list. When the target word appears in the list, it would be selected during the 
scan of the first line in the keyboard, which would then enter the word into a web form. 
Figure 2: Gnome onscreen keyboard (GOK) 
People with limited mobility but with full use of sight and speech could use speech recognition 
software to navigate web content. Along with a variety of standard commands, a person might 
say the words associated with a link, along with a command such as “click” to activate a link. 
The same might be true for operating buttons, speaking the word on the button and announcing 
the word “click.” They might also bring focus into a form field on a web page, and begin 
speaking words to have them transcribed into the form.  
The barriers that people with mobility impairments typically encounter are similar to those 
encountered by people who are blind – for instance, buttons created that only use images of 
text and that provide no text alternative. Speaking the text of this kind of button has no effect. 
Form fields that are not properly labelled may also present barriers, particularly for those who 
having difficulty positioning a mouse pointer over a tiny form element such as a radio button or 
checkbox. To format a proper label, use the HTML <label> element; it makes the label itself 
clickable to activate a form element, providing a larger target area on which the user can click. 
Technologies created for people with mobility impairments have resulted in a number of curb 
cuts. Onscreen keyboards are now commonly found in kiosks, bank machines, ticket 
dispensers, and of course all smartphones and tablet devices. Speech recognition, in addition to 
captioning YouTube videos, is found in various hands-free devices, and can be used for 
transcribing, or simply for enabling multi-tasking computer users to work hands-free. 
Cognitive Impairment and Learning Differences 
Barriers for people with cognitive or learning impairments generally revolve around consistency, 
predictability, complexity, and memory. A wide range of cognitive impairments can be made 
more manageable in terms of accessibility if they are grouped based on functional abilities [3]: 
the ability to understand or comprehend; the ability to adapt or problem-solve; the ability to 
recall or recognize; and the ability to attend to the task at hand.  
A variety of strategies can be used to make content understandable to the broadest possible 
audience. While a typical web user would likely deduce from clicking a “sign-up” link and landing 
on a page called “registration” that s/he is on the right page, a person with a cognitive 
impairment may not draw the association between the two words of similar meaning. The user 
could become confused or frustrated, which may ultimately prevent her/him from filling out the 
registration form. This could be easily avoided by simply using words in the link or link text that 
matches the title and heading on the page the link leads to. 
The reading level of web content may also create barriers for those who have difficulty with 
comprehension. When writing for the web, especially for sites geared to the public, use the 
simplest language possible, generally at a grade 9 or 10 level. Avoid using sarcasm, idioms, 
metaphors, and other non-standard forms of writing that run the risk of being misunderstood. As 
a curb cut, the use of simple language can improve a website’s readability – and therefore its 
understanding – for people whose first language is not the language in which the content is  
being presented. If your website’s audience is more defined and advanced, use language that is 
appropriate for your audience, but still be mindful of simplifying words wherever possible. 
While reading levels and complexity make up the majority of potential barriers, other areas of 
concern for learners with cognitive impairments are math comprehension and visual 
comprehension. The most effective strategy in both instances is providing multiple 
representations of web content. 
While many strategies can help to make web content more accessible or usable, there will be 
times when an author may be required to use specific, advanced language (for example, in a 
legal document) that may not be understood by a person with a cognitive impairment. In this 
case, the use of simpler language would not be appropriate. 
Standards and Specifications  
Standards play an important role in the development of accessible e-learning. The primary 
accessibility standards are the W3C’s Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.0), its 
Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG 2.0), and its Accessible Rich Internet Application 
(ARIA 1.0) specification.  
The web accessibility requirements of the AODA mirror those of the WCAG 2.0, with the 
exception of its guidelines that refer to captioning for live multimedia content and providing 
audio descriptions for video (Guidelines 1.2.4 and 1.2.5). For a more details on accessibility 
standards relevant to e-learning, see Accessibility in e-Learning: Standards and Specifications
Creating Accessible Content 
Authoring Tools 
A wide range of authoring tools are available for creating e-learning content, and many of these 
allow authors to add accessibility into the content they create. The W3C’s ATAG specification 
provides guidance for developers on creating authoring tools that can create accessible content 
and that can be used by people with disabilities. Information about an authoring tool’s 
accessibility features can usually be found in its documentation, and often online either on the 
developer’s website or on websites that offer secondary forms of documentation.  
Software that might be considered an authoring tool would include: 
● HTML editors used to create web pages. 
● Content manage systems (CMS) used to create and manage websites. 
● Learning content management systems (LCMS) used for developing and storing e-
learning content. 
● Learning management systems (LMS) used to manage online courses. 
● Blogs, Wikis, and Forums used for web-based documentation and communication. 
● Multimedia production editors used to create video content. 
10 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested