June 2010
Perspectives on 
merger integration
Convert pdf to word to edit text online - SDK control API:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to word to edit text online - SDK control API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF document to DOC and DOCX formats in Visual Basic control to export Word from multiple PDF files in Create editable Word file online without email.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
third-party software, you can hardly edit PDF document Under this situation, you need to convert PDF document to some easily editable files like Word document
www.rasteredge.com
5
A new generation of M&A:
A McKinsey perspective on the opportunities 
and challenges
Despite continued uncertainty, signs point to a 
surge in M&A activity that will be ambitious in 
both scope and profi le.
11
19
Beyond risk avoidance: 
A McKinsey perspective on creating trans-
formational value from mergers
Most mergers are doomed from the beginning. 
Anyone who has researched merger success rates 
knows that roughly 70 percent of mergers fail. 
Opening the aperture 1: 
A McKinsey perspective on value creation 
and synergies
Almost 50 percent of the time, due diligence 
conducted before a merger fails to provide an 
adequate roadmap to capturing synergies and 
creating value. 
31
Next-generation integration
management offi ce: 
A McKinsey perspective on organizing 
integrations to create value
Mergers offer tremendous opportunity to create 
and sustain breakthrough value, especially for 
companies that get three mutually reinforcing 
attributes right...
35
Integrating sales operations in a merger: 
A McKinsey perspective on four essential steps 
Make no mistake: mergers are challenging. But 
they can provide organizations with transforma-
tive possibilities.
41
49
Assessing cultural compatibility: 
A McKinsey perspective on getting practical 
about culture in M&A 
Executives know instinctively that corporate 
culture matters in capturing value from M&A.
Opening the aperture 3:
A McKinsey perspective on fi nding and 
prioritizing synergies 
Best-practice companies explore the full range 
of opportunities to achieve maximum value from 
every merger. 
25
Opening the aperture 2:
A practical guide to capturing synergies and 
creating value in mergers
Most companies contemplate mergers with great 
ambitions, but their vision quickly narrows to cost.
Table of contents
SDK control API:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. XImage.Raster. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. Microsoft Office. XDoc.Word. XDoc.Excel. XDoc.PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
source PDF document file for word processing, presentation extract text content from source PDF document file obtain text information and edit PDF text content
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#.NET convert csv to PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET convert csv to PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET
www.rasteredge.com
5
Perspectives on merger integration
Despite continued uncertainty, signs point to a surge in M&A activity that will be ambitious in both scope 
and profile. Even M&A veterans will require new tools for analysis and integration to manage these deals for 
maximum benefit – new organizational efficiencies, market expansion, employee development, product 
innovation, and profit.   Mergers often accelerate in the second half of a downturn, which is where the 
economy seems to be these days. Prices are low. Competitors may be weakened. Businesses that may 
have disdained overtures, likely or unlikely, may be more receptive. Unusual numbers of executives and 
boards report seeing opportunities to make “once in a lifetime” deals.
At the same time, economic uncertainty has left many organizations cautious. Executives may be excited 
about the prospects, but their boards may be less convinced and willing to act because they doubt the 
company’s ability to manage an ambitious deal successfully.
A McKinsey survey of almost 90 M&A professionals conducted in mid 2009 showed new interests and 
attitudes toward mergers. Nearly half of those surveyed believed the deals they manage would “increase in 
transaction value” over the next three years. Respondents expressed great interest in using M&A to move 
beyond existing lines of business into new strategic areas and build their R&D portfolios.
Of course, most acquisitions will remain focused on more traditional sources of value closer to existing lines 
of business, but any of these deals may bring opportunities to create transformational value that reaches far 
beyond the potential of conventional integration strategies. The survey and the M&A success of McKinsey 
clients indicate that transformational value can increase the return on an acquisition 30-100 percent.   
Identifying transformational value opportunities and managing mergers that stretch a company’s 
capabilities in new ways require a dramatic departure from the traditional approach to integration that has 
emerged as best practice over the past 10-20 years – using templates, checklists, and strong process 
management to avoid risk. Even now, this approach produces M&A failure rates of 66-75 percent.
These numbers have reinforced the risk-avoidance mindset and encouraged deal assessment focused on 
answering two questions: Can we afford it? Can we buy it? But, as many acquirers discover to their (and 
their stockholders‘) dismay, the ability to buy may have nothing at all to do with the capacity to own. 
Old vs. new approaches to integration
Building integration capabilities requires a new approach to managing the deal. In the traditional integration 
approach, the integration leader, teams, and consultants focus on preventing anything bad from happening 
until the deal is done. In a rapidly paced process, they try to secure a quick close and leave the issue of how 
to make the combination work for later. They aim to minimize risks and realize the cost savings associated 
with reducing redundant operations and people. 
But many deals need to look beyond the value that justified the transaction, opening the aperture to find 
new sources of synergies and value. The survey showed that the due diligence in most deals can overlook 
as much as 50 percent of the potential merger value. Survey respondents also admitted that due diligence 
is inadequate in more than 40 percent of their deals. Companies clearly need to improve and expand their 
due diligence.
A new generation of M&A:
A McKinsey perspective on the 
opportunities and challenges
By Clay Deutsch & Andy West
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. XImage.Raster. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. Microsoft Office. XDoc.Word. XDoc.Excel. XDoc.PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast. Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
www.rasteredge.com
6
Great integrators understand that two very different types of value can emerge in most mergers – 
combinational and transformational. But because identifying and capturing transformational value requires 
a different and more difficult approach, most deal teams concentrate on the combinational at the expense 
of the transformational. 
Certainly, limiting operational risk is essential to keeping the business running smoothly during integration. 
But the survey found that too few companies, including very experienced acquirers, are getting even the 
combinational basics right. They don’t plan and execute a thoughtful, end-to-end integration process. They 
don’t put the right leadership in place. And they don’t hone the skills needed to realize fully even the most 
obvious value from the merger. 
When companies falter on these fundamentals, they have little chance of identifying and capturing 
transformational value. Success here requires:
Deeper, stronger integration skills and intense management commitment 
• 
An integration approach that’s flexible enough to allow leadership to pursue sources of 
• 
transformational value along with combinational value
Rigorous analysis and integration management that exceed the capability of too many companies 
• 
and M&A professionals.
In the recovering business environment, more and more companies are considering bold, transformational 
moves. They will need to expand their M&A capabilities to handle deals outside their existing business lines, do 
more and/or larger deals, and identify and capture both transformational and combinational sources of value.
This calls for a new methodology and toolkit built around four distinctive capabilities that can close the skills 
gaps identified in the survey of M&A professionals.
Rigorous analysis of the value potential of the merger
This begins by rejecting the traditional risk-avoidance mindset, recognizing the need to look beyond 
traditional sources of value and being willing to ask the question, “When we own this asset, what are all 
the ways we could create value with it?”  Taking a more expansive view to identify and quantify synergies 
requires a systematic approach that can locate value creation opportunities which often exceed due 
diligence estimates by 30-150 percent.
This broader view requires considering three layers of value creation:
Protecting the base business, which includes efforts to preserve pre-merger value and maintain the 
• 
core business
Capturing traditional combinational synergies, which includes efforts to achieve economies of scale 
• 
and enhanced efficiency 
Seeking select transformational synergies, which are often ignored, but are aimed at radically 
• 
transforming targeted functions, processes, or business units.
Within each layer, companies have three options for realizing value:
Capture cost savings by eliminating redundancies and improving efficiencies
• 
Improve the balance sheet by reducing such things as working capital, fixed assets, and borrowing or 
• 
funding costs
Enhance revenue growth by acquiring or building new capabilities (e.g., cross-fertilizing product 
• 
portfolios, geographies, customer segments, and channels).
7
Perspectives on merger integration
Intensive focus on the corporate cultures involved
Ninety two percent of the survey respondents said that their deals would “have substantially benefitted 
from a greater cultural understanding prior to the merger.” Seventy percent conceded that “too little” effort 
focuses on culture during integration.
Part of the problem may be that, especially when integrating companies are in the same or similar businesses, 
their top executives tend to assume they are “just like us” and dismiss the need for deep cultural analysis. 
Likewise, when the CEOs in a deal get along with each other, they tend to assume that their companies will get 
along equally well. No two companies are cultural twins, and companies seldom get along with each other 
as easily as their executives might. In fact, the survey establishes that the issue of culture comes down to two 
fundamental problems: understanding both cultures and providing the right amount and type of leadership.
Percent of respondents
Need for more attention to culture
Exhibit 1
SOURCE: 2009 Post Merger Integration Conference Survey (New York and San Francisco combined)
(n = 86)
(n = 89)
Would your past mergers have substantially 
benefited from greater cultural understanding 
prior to the merger?
In your experience, how much effort is typically 
focused on culture during integrations?
2
28
70
Too much
About right
Too little
92
8
Yes
No
Percent of respondents (n = 89)
Cultural and leadership issues
Exhibit 2
SOURCE: 2009 Post Merger Integration Conference Survey (New York and San Francisco combined)
When cultural differences create difficulties in a merger, what is to blame?
9
44
47
Wrong choice of target
Poor leadership of
integration effort
Lack of understanding
of both cultures
8
Culture clearly baffles most merger managers – which is probably the reason that virtually none of them 
use culture as a screening criterion. But few have had a tool for describing and analyzing carefully defined 
cultural characteristics for each company. McKinsey teams are bringing just such a tool to their clients, 
enabling them to understand vulnerabilities and similarities in the ways the businesses run and interact. The 
analysis pinpoints specifically how the companies differ, what is meaningfully distinct, and how to reconcile 
important differences.
A better approach to sales integration
Almost one-third of the survey respondents called combining and developing the sales functions of 
the merging companies their greatest integration challenge. As M&A focuses increasingly on growth, a 
powerful sales force will be critical to breakthrough profitability.
Four steps essential to integrating sales forces effectively are often overlooked or missed: 
Share information about the integration process with customers and the sales force. Many companies 
• 
take the opposite approach and are surprised when postmerger revenue fails to meet expectations.
Win prominent accounts quickly to build momentum and generate internal confidence in the merger.
• 
Identify and retain essential support people, as well as sales reps.
• 
Review the merged portfolio of customers and make tough calls about who warrants new investments 
• 
and who might be shed or given less attention.
Successful sales force integration also requires excellent execution of the basics, including detailed planning 
Percent of respondents (n = 89)
Need to improve integration of sales capabilities 
Exhibit 3
SOURCE: 2009 Post Merger Integration Conference Survey (New York and San Francisco combined)
In which functional area do you see the biggest need for improvement in terms 
of integration skills/capabilities given the focus of your future merger activity? 
4
7
8
16
18
20
27
Other, please specify
Operations/supply chain 
IT 
HR 
Sales/marketing 
Finance 
R&D
9
Perspectives on merger integration
that identifies and taps the best managers and staff, sets ambitious sales targets, creates an effective 
program for retaining top talent, and spells out the best ways to cultivate the most promising customers. This 
planning should be an integral part of the merger process that proceeds in parallel with conceiving and valuing 
the deal, assessing synergies and culture, and devising the end-to-end merger methodology.
A unique period in M&A is looming. It will offer unprecedented opportunities to build new skills and 
methodologies to get mergers right, recognizing and capturing their transformational value. Successful 
integration efforts will share two fundamental characteristics: determination to achieve unprecedented 
goals for value creation and performance and executive courage and commitment to tackle the risks 
inevitably associated with such ambitions.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested