mvc pdf viewer : Convert pdf to text file control application system web page azure asp.net console merger-management-mckinsey-article-compendium1-part983

11
Perspectives on merger integration
Most mergers are doomed from the beginning. Anyone who has researched merger success rates knows 
that roughly 70 percent of mergers fail. Over time, this statistic has created an entire culture and practice 
of merger integration focused on avoiding failure: processes, IT solutions, checklists, and workplans, all 
crafted to ensure that integration avoids doom by sticking to its plan. “Don’t overcomplicate integration” is a 
common mantra. “Just follow the process and you will not fail” is another.
The problem is that avoiding risk can conflict with realizing the full value at stake in the merger. The issue 
begins with the fact that due diligence has only limited ability to set accurate expectations of the total synergies 
available in a deal. A recent McKinsey study found that 42 percent of the time, due diligence conducted before 
a merger failed to provide an adequate roadmap for capturing synergies and creating value.
In addition, the risk-avoidance mindset usually translates into an intense focus on pure process that can 
actually hamper an organization’s ability to adapt and capture emerging or unforeseen sources of value 
from a deal.  
For example, in one unsuccessful software deal, a relentless focus on running the process limited discussion 
of the real opportunity, which lay in leveraging two very different sales models for top line growth. Specifically, 
integration teams concentrated almost entirely on tracking detailed interdependencies, leading to pages 
and pages of process analyses. Integration leadership spent relatively little time thinking about the game-
changing opportunities to create value, e.g., driving implementation of new but practical approaches to cross-
Beyond risk avoidance:
A McKinsey perspective on creating 
transformational value from mergers
By James McLetchie & Andy West
Flawed due diligence
Exhibit 1
SOURCE: 2009 Post Merger Integration Conference Survey (New York and San Francisco combined)
Close to the 
original valuation 
How accurate have your due diligence 
numbers been?
Percent of respondents (n=83)
Meaningfully over 
or under value
58
42
Convert pdf to text file - control application system:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to text file - control application system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
12
selling. In this case consistent over-attention to process and under-attention to value creation resulted in the 
merged company’s stock price lagging the market and its primary competitor.  
Yet M&A is critical for long-term survival.  McKinsey research found that acquirers who truly outperform 
over time strike the right balance between traditional best practices, or “combinational” activities, and 
“transformational” activities – those that maintain the flexibility to identify and capture new sources of value 
which emerge during integration planning. 
Great integrators begin by distinguishing between combinational and transformational opportunities and 
then pursue them in tandem. To generalize, successful integrations capture combinational value, but the 
best integrators find specific transformational opportunities that go beyond these basic synergies to create 
tremendous additional value.  
Striking the right balance – implementing traditional best practices where appropriate without limiting 
flexibility where required in the search for value –  requires three actions that go beyond risk avoidance:
Taking an expanded view of value during integration and setting the right stretch aspirations and targets
• 
Looking beyond current integration approaches to capture targeted opportunities for transformation
• 
Committing fully to targeted transformational efforts.
• 
One caveat: this article focuses on capturing value from mergers, not pricing them. Acquirers are rightly 
risk-averse in what they pay for, and pricing inherently risky transformational value into a deal before 
integration planning has taken place is not necessarily appropriate. But once a deal is concluded, 
restricting integration planning to the necessarily conservative synergies that formed the basis for the 
transaction price is equally unwise.
Taking an expanded view of value and setting the right stretch aspirations and targets
To understand the sources of value in deals, we organized all value into two categories – combinational and 
transformational. While this is an obvious oversimplification, it reflects genuine tendencies in most mergers and 
enables us to identify characteristics that differentiate truly successful mergers from merely average ones. 
Combinational synergies rely on merging operations, resulting in scale economies and/or basic scope 
economies (for example, cross-selling existing products), as well as protecting value by ensuring business 
continuity. These synergies are the least risky, easiest to quantify, and most easily managed with a repeatable 
process (such as synergy benchmarks). They also represent the type of value that is most often the 
cornerstone of valuations. Not surprisingly, most integrations work predominantly on combinational synergies 
– often underplaying more complex, more profitable sources of value.
Transformational synergies, in contrast, typically come from unlocking one or more long-standing constraints 
on a business. This change can come from the impact of the merger itself or the role it plays in “unfreezing” the 
organization. Transformational synergies represent huge potential for breakthrough performance.
But because transformation involves complexity that often exceeds management’s capacity, it can also 
bring the business to a grinding halt. Management needs to focus selectively – on a handful of targeted 
functions, processes, capabilities, or business units that make breakthrough performance possible and 
financially worthwhile. 
Consider the recent merger of two major consumer goods companies. Recognizing the superiority of the 
target’s innovative approach to distribution management, the acquirer assigned its top integration team the 
task of figuring out how to incorporate that approach into its own entrenched distribution practices. Their 
success boosted the value of the deal 75 percent.
control application system:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to text file with good
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Able to extract and get all and partial text content from PDF file. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
13
Perspectives on merger integration
Companies contemplating transformational synergies must assess their readiness to capture each 
opportunity but must not shy away from an opportunity simply because it looks risky or falls outside a pre-
set process or due diligence baseline.
The McKinsey study built a database of large transactions (where the target represented a meaningful 
enough proportion of the acquirer’s business to affect share price) and identified a subset of companies 
whose performance improved significantly after a merger or acquisition.  Profiling several of these 
companies in detail showed each able to move beyond combinational sources of value and find something 
truly transformational to capitalize on.
Consider a recent high tech merger in the top portion of the performance profile. An entrepreneurial, low-
cost manufacturer with a presence limited to one region acquired a player with a larger global brand and 
leveraged that company’s network for high-margin leadership in all markets.
The company not only did an adequate and structured job in approaching the combinational aspects of 
the merger, but also made significant investments in ensuring the realization of the more transformational 
aspects of the deal. The company replaced over 35 percent of the senior management team with outsiders 
expert in realizing the new vision of the organization. Corporate headquarters moved from the acquirer’s 
geography to a new geography that represented the future of the business. The company also seized the 
opportunity to radically change its go-to-market model and supplier relationships. 
Early realization of significant cost synergies, e.g., procurement and supply chain, funded the more 
transformational strategic shifts, but the view from the beginning had been that the deal should trigger 
transformation. The result was major value creation. Whereas the acquirer’s total return to shareholders 
had lagged the industry by an average of 42 percent in the two years before the merger, it outperformed the 
industry by 27 percent in the two years after the deal. 
Another example is an automotive merger that created tremendous value by rebuilding the acquired 
company’s traditional relationship-based procurement system, replacing it with a profit model that 
Recent consumer goods merger
Exhibit 2
SOURCE: McKinsey Merger Management Practice
Combinational 
synergy
Transforma-
tional synergy
Total
0.8
0.6
1.4
Transformational synergies
Annual run-rate of delivered synergies, USD billions
+75%
Used transaction to retool 
trade promotion
control application system:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through VB
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
14
cut costs dramatically. The combinational aspects of the deal did not go ignored, but they also did not 
prevent the organization from dismantling a process and program that represented 20 years of operations 
excellence. The effort helped to define the company as a global player – embracing a new model that 
represented the next 20 years of procurement excellence.
Simply focusing on bringing existing programs together or absorbing the acquired processes into the 
parent’s would have been much easier, but would have meant less risky integration at the cost of truly 
transformational value. The chosen course required radical change in the company’s culture and real 
leadership and focus by the executive team, but was clearly worth the investment
Looking beyond current integration approaches to capture targeted opportunities 
for transformation
Just as combinational and transformational synergies differ in nature, so do approaches to capturing them. 
For example, the mantra in pursuing combinational value is: simplify, de-risk, be practical, do things fast. Value 
comes from managing and effectively limiting options, instead of creating new ones, and moving quickly to 
prevent the integration from distracting attention from “real” business. The focus is on managing process and 
ensuring that baseline joint operating capabilities are in place on day #1. Best-practice managers seek to:
Limit the changes in how a business runs before and after legal close
• 
Focus ruthlessly on hitting announced, typically conservative synergy targets
• 
Deploy ever more refined process management tools to ensure that, as one leading serial integrator put it, 
• 
“we never invent anything twice or make the same mistake again.”
Capturing combinational value in these ways is the appropriate territory of classic program management offices. 
Transformational approaches, on the other hand, are usually far more fluid and experimental, as they reach into 
unfamiliar territory and likely involve unusual combinations of people, process, and technology. Transformational 
value creation can therefore be quite disruptive for those involved.
Transformational activity typically proceeds on a longer timescale, allowing time for brainstorming, testing, 
piloting, and building capabilities. Maintaining momentum and energy usually requires some early wins to earn 
permission for transformation, but efforts to capture transformational value are likely to run well beyond the 
traditional 90 days of integration planning.  
The success of transformational approaches typically hangs on:
Creating a cross-functional team dedicated to locating breakthrough opportunities
• 
Setting bold goals for value creation
• 
Providing incentives with real upside for breakthrough performance. 
• 
Capturing transformational synergies demands disproportionate senior executive time. The CEO in the 
consumer goods merger mentioned above met twice as often and twice as long with the breakthrough team 
lead than with the leads of the other 12 integration teams; the breakthrough team delivered more than 40 percent 
of the total synergies.   
Setting aspirations involves more than setting a high target – it’s about stretching people along multiple 
dimensions and rooting the stretch in well-investigated facts. Managers should start by systematically exploring 
synergy ideas across cost, revenue, and the balance sheet. They should ground the aspirations in analytical 
insight, not gut feel, to avoid having to negotiate what is or is not a reasonable stretch. 
The best examples we uncovered used the analytical process of setting synergies not only to anchor but also 
to ratchet up aspirations. After reviewing detailed synergy plans and realizing that a different organizational 
control application system:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
PDFPage page = (PDFPage)doc.GetPage(0); // Convert the first PDF page to a JPEG file. page.ConvertToImage(ImageType.JPEG, Program.RootPath + "\\Output.jpg");
www.rasteredge.com
15
Perspectives on merger integration
construct could yield far more value, one CEO demanded that 
certain teams linked to his transformational themes come back 
with “twice the synergies, delivered in half the time.” While hugely 
challenged, they delivered. (See the sidebar on cross-functional 
synergy workshops.)
Transformational efforts typically run in parallel with established 
integration processes, so each approach can operate at its full 
potential. To understand how these efforts can work in parallel, 
consider a global mega-merger with a multi-billion-dollar cost 
synergy commitment. In a two-day synergy workshop, leaders 
identified, quantified, and prioritized both combinational and 
transformational value levers. 
The combinational levers included plans for immediate 
reduction of overlapping headcount and overhead costs and 
procurement synergies arising from consolidating vendors and 
reducing duplicative spend on marketing and IT. 
The team also defined a number of “model-shifting” initiatives, 
including a new industry-changing sales force model to deliver 
more product to customers more efficiently – in other words, 
having a smaller sales force get more product into customers’ 
hands. The shared services team located opportunities to 
redefine the support model far beyond existing practices, 
capitalizing on opportunities in sales administration, IT, 
procurement, finance, legal, and even R&D. Other teams found 
other such “radical” ideas. In all, these ideas generated an 
additional 30-50 percent in revenue growth and cost reduction 
opportunities. 
The company implemented the sales force model just after deal 
close and sequenced the shared services changes after a major 
ERP initiative. By looking at the deal and sources of value early 
and more comprehensively, integration leadership defined and 
sequenced the transformational opportunities in line with the 
immediate combinational plans.
Committing fully to targeted transformational efforts
The courage to move beyond risk avoidance is the starting point for creating transformational value in a merger. 
When pursuing transformational synergies, successful companies expand their core integration approach in 
four ways:
The CEO or business unit leader participates actively in the effort to capture transformational value (for 
• 
example, by personally leading key initiatives).
The company sets clearly defined stretch aspirations, in financial or operational terms, that represent a 
• 
genuinely new level of performance.
Staff feel ownership for changes, do not focus excessively on process, and are energized and mobilized 
• 
to develop new ideas to create value. 
The integration has a readily understandable structure, with distinct responsibilities and parallel efforts to 
• 
pursue combinational and transformational sources of value.
Many  companies  contemplating  their  merger 
options find that they get farther faster by organizing 
synergy workshops of cross-functional teams than 
by  completing  cycle  after  cycle  of  business  plan 
templates. In a recent pharmaceutical merger, this 
approach uncovered almost 40 percent more syner-
gies than a rigorous bottom-up spreadsheet-based 
approach had identified.
These one- or two-day workshops look for ways to 
meet synergy targets and then create realistic plans 
for achieving the targets.
The  teams  develop  initial  ideas  for  reaching  the 
targets, analyze data to see if the ideas will work, 
and  then  brainstorm  options  that  might  capture 
even  more value.  The  focus is  on new ideas  and 
challenges, not numbers.
The entire group reviews the ideas and agrees on 
which  to  pursue.  By  the  end  of  the  workshop, 
targets are often reset at higher levels, and people 
have committed to the plans.  
These  workshops  are  intense,  but  people  are 
energized  by  the  opportunity  to  engage  with 
colleagues in shaping ideas. They leave with much 
greater ownership of the targets and plans – partially 
because they  had  the  space  to  debate concerns 
about what could and could not work. There's also 
a palpable sense of relief at not having to fill in yet 
another template.
Cross-functional synergy workshops 
control application system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; This professional .NET solution that is designed to convert PDF file to HTML web page using VB.NET code efficiently.
www.rasteredge.com
16
A recent study of over 365 managers involved in 310 deals between 2003 and 2008 found that success requires 
commitment to employing all four tactics. Mergers that did so were much more likely be self-rated “extremely 
successful” than those that deployed only one or two tactics.
Mergers offer exciting opportunities to shape new business models, innovate, ramp up growth, and deliver 
breakthrough performance. While classic integration management is essential for controlling the many risks that 
mergers create, it often stands in the way of the complex, strategic efforts needed to capture transformational 
opportunities. Those efforts require unparalleled aspiration and commitment from CEOs and other senior 
leaders, often repaid with the most memorable moments of their careers.
Use of tactics; percent (n=365)
Power of tactics used in combination
Exhibit 3
SOURCE: Performance Transformation Executive Survey
8
16
17
43
74
Used all tactics
Used heavy CEO 
involvement and 
stretch aspirations
Used only heavy 
CEO involvement
Used any 1 tactic
Used none
Success rate
~65%
Combining these 4 transformational 
tactics can increase success rate 
~10% to ~75%  
17
Perspectives on merger integration
19
Perspectives on merger integration
Almost 50 percent of the time, due diligence conducted before a merger fails to provide an adequate roadmap 
to capturing synergies and creating value. Typically compiled in haste, and concentrated on determining fair 
market value, this outside view often ignores critical sources of additional value offered by synergies between 
merging companies.
Traditionally, companies merged to achieve scale within an industry or reduce costs. Today many companies 
turn to mergers for new capabilities or access to adjacent businesses with which they may have limited 
experience. They need to open the aperture, looking beyond the traditional sources to achieve maximum 
value. They need to answer the question, “Now that we own this asset, what are all the ways we could create 
value with it?”
Identifying and quantifying synergies requires a systematic approach. McKinsey has developed a framework 
to guide the effort. This framework can help companies locate value creation opportunities that exceed due 
diligence estimates by 30-150 percent.
Overview of the framework
Putting new emphasis on transformation and revenue, the framework opens the aperture so companies 
consider the full range of opportunities to derive maximum value from any merger.
Opening the aperture 1:
A McKinsey perspective on value creation 
and synergies
By Oliver Engert & Rob Rosiello
McKinsey framework for identifying, quantifying, 
and capturing synergies
Exhibit 1
SOURCE: McKinsey Merger Management Practice
Capital
Revenue
Cost
Capture 
combinational 
synergies
Seek select 
transformational 
opportunities
Protect base 
business
Typical deal focus
Open the aperture
20
Layers of value creation
The framework defines three layers of value creation:
• P rotect the base business: efforts to preserve pre-merger value and maintain the core business
Capture combinational synergies: 
• 
traditional value creation efforts to achieve economies of scale and 
enhanced efficiency
Seek select transformational synergies: 
• 
often ignored, often capability-based opportunities to create 
value by radically transforming targeted functions, processes, or business units.
Levers of value creation
Within each layer of value creation, companies can pull three levers to realize value:
•  Cost: capture cost savings by eliminating redundancies and improving efficiencies
Capital:
• 
improve the balance sheet by reducing such things as working capital, fixed assets, and 
borrowing or funding costs 
Revenue:
• 
enhance revenue growth by acquiring or building new capabilities (e.g., cross-fertilizing 
product portfolios, geographies, customer segments, and channels).
Of course, cost, capital, and revenue opportunities differ by value creation layer. But mapping the full range 
of opportunities reveals the entire landscape of synergies that a merger might tap to create value. (See the 
sidebar on the four types of synergy targets.)
Sample sources of value and synergies: 
consumer goods example
Exhibit 2
SOURCE: McKinsey Merger Management Practice
Capital
Revenue
Cost
Capture 
combinational 
synergies
Seek select 
transformational 
opportunities
Protect base 
business
Typical deal focus
Open the aperture
Redesign trade promotion 
across the board
Outsource/offshore 
back-office functions
Establish industry alliance for 
distribution
Optimize hedging and risk 
positions
Reconfigure warehouse 
network to optimize 
inventory/tax
Redesign order-to-cash process
Redesign routes 
market/optimize distributor 
network
Enter products, geographies, 
and channels new to both 
companies
Duplicate overhead
Overlapping sales branches
Procurement
Market research spend
Protect current customer accounts and sales volume
Prevent talent poaching
Manage union/labor to avoid potential adverse actions, business disruptions, and negative 
impact on top line
Keep safe level of cash on hand
Underutilized warehouses
Cash flow and liquidity 
positions
Leverage lower funding rates
Cross-fertilizing products
Cross-fertilize products, 
geographies, and channels
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested