31
Perspectives on merger integration
Mergers offer tremendous opportunity to create and sustain breakthrough value, especially for companies 
that get three mutually reinforcing attributes right: pursue transformational as well as combinational sources of 
value; target a new level of synergies; and understand and address the merging companies’ points of cultural 
incompatibility.
The traditional program management office (PMO), focused on process, is poorly suited to handling the 
complex, often disruptive change typically needed to achieve breakthrough value in a merger. Instead, CEOs 
must establish a new breed of integration management office (IMO) – viewed, designed, and operated as a 
highly empowered vehicle to realize deal strategy and deliver value.
Profile of the IMO
This value-focused IMO should report directly to a CEO-led Steering Committee and be staffed with the 
company’s top performers. Indeed, it should be conceived as a vehicle to test and reveal the “leadership of 
tomorrow.” The IMO experience gives these future leaders significant exposure across the entire organization.
For this reason, the IMO team requires careful selection: in McKinsey’s experience, more than 70 percent of 
integration leaders assume more senior roles post-IMO. At one high tech company, senior leaders must have 
served as an integration leader on their path to the executive suite. 
In addition to having top-caliber leadership, strong IMOs share three characteristics:
•  They can conduct the rigorous analysis needed to support aggressive, stretch synergy aspirations.
They take the lead in generating ideas for creating value and constantly re-energizing the integration 
• 
process around ambitious goals. For example, in a year-long merger process between two 
multinationals, the IMO held a major global event every 6-8 weeks, bringing together key players to 
develop ideas and build momentum.
They do not see process management as their primary focus, but they nonetheless apply rigorous 
• 
mechanisms to track progress against milestones and hold people accountable for achieving results.
The central task of the IMO is to orchestrate pursuit of the major value creation opportunities presented by 
the merger. For example, a global healthcare IMO accelerated the combined company baseline to drive 40 
percent higher targets through comprehensive analysis of projects. 
Next-generation integration
management office:
A McKinsey perspective on organizing 
integrations to create value
By James McLetchie*
*The author wishes to acknowledge Sarena Lin’s contribution to this article
Pdf image to text - control SDK platform:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf image to text - control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
32
Supporting IMO roles
Supporting this objective, the IMO must play several other roles. It must manage the complexity inherent in 
most mergers, building robust yet simple processes that surface and resolve thorny issues and facilitate 
value creation. 
Further, the IMO should take the lead in identifying and developing the capabilities needed enterprise-wide 
to capture transformational value opportunities, such as a step-change in customer intimacy or a radically 
enhanced supplier negotiation capability. Indeed, the best acquirers have used mergers and the integration 
structure to build unique organizational capabilities for the future – well beyond the immediate needs of the 
integration. 
An often overlooked but highly impactful role of the IMO is to address organizational compatibility, or 
culture, issues. It can take the lead in understanding and assessing the culture of the merging entities 
“going in,” especially the cultural incompatibilities that represent the greatest obstacles to deal success 
and performance. This intelligence should inform integration design, the choice and profile of integration 
leadership, and ultimately the way the IMO runs day to day – as well as the broader organizational design and 
governance model for the merged entity. 
In a global mega-merger, the CEO and his integration leadership faced an incumbent culture where functions 
operated as silos, using meetings for “extreme collaboration” – code for slow decision making. The IMO 
needed to address this problem early, since 50 percent of synergies were expected in year #1. Accordingly, 
the IMO “forced” cross-functional interaction and rapid decision making – for example, organizing targeted 
special teams (legal entity, branding, product labeling, and so on) to handle cross-cutting strategic or value 
capture initiatives.
The new culture was also expected to drive rapid decision making. Eventually, the weekly IMO meetings held 
integration leaders accountable for decisions and timelines more aggressively than the general company 
culture. While this approach was tough at first, the front line of future leaders and the IMO itself became highly 
visible role models of the new, “can-do” culture.
What, then, does a next-generation IMO look like in practice? Its purview is cross-functional, as it must drive 
decisions across functions, business units, and divisions at a faster pace than the current organizational 
construct allows. For this reason, the IMO should be a microcosm of the existing company and governance 
model, with its own empowered “CEO” (Integration Leader), “CFO” (Value Creation Lead), and Executive 
Committee (Steering Committee).
The IMO is the “orchestra” of the deal: an ensemble of different talents playing their “instruments” together in 
a coordinated sequence, led by a respected “conductor,” in a highly visible performance that – at its best – 
delivers work worthy of a standing ovation.
control SDK platform:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
www.rasteredge.com
33
Perspectives on merger integration
control SDK platform:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Free PDF image processing SDK library for Visual Studio .NET program. Powerful .NET PDF image edit control, enable users to insert vector images to PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
www.rasteredge.com
34
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG formats.
www.rasteredge.com
35
Perspectives on merger integration
Make no mistake: mergers are challenging. But they can provide organizations with transformative 
possibilities. One of the biggest opportunities – integration of sales forces – is central to ensuring revenue 
growth and capturing the value that mergers promise but often fail to realize.
Yet integrating sales forces ranks among the hardest parts of a merger to execute –a fact not lost on 
senior executives.
Integrating sales operations 
in a merger:
A McKinsey perspective on four essential steps
By Ajay Gupta, Tom Stephenson, & Andy West*
*The authors wish to acknowledge the contributions of Sophie Birshan, Kameron Kordestani, 
and Sunil Rayan to this article
Percent of respondents (n = 89)
Need to improve integration of sales capabilities 
Exhibit 1
SOURCE: 2009 Post Merger Integration Conference Survey (New York and San Francisco combined)
In which functional area do you see the biggest need for improvement in terms 
of integration skills/capabilities given the focus of your future merger activity? 
4
7
8
16
18
20
27
Other, please specify
Operations/supply chain 
IT 
HR 
Sales/marketing 
Finance 
R&D
control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in C# application, then RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET can also help with this.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert Text to PDF. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
www.rasteredge.com
36
Mergers generate anxiety inside and outside the companies involved, and competitors happily exploit 
such fears to woo star salespeople and poach customers. Nonetheless, savvy companies embrace the 
opportunity to build a new sales organization that is more than the sum of its parts.
Four steps are essential to facilitating successful integration of sales operations:
Und
• 
erstanding the importance of sharing information about the integration process with customers 
and the sales force tops the list. Many companies take the opposite approach and are surprised when 
postmerger revenue fails to meet expectations.
The combined sales team must quickly win prominent accounts to build momentum and internal 
• 
confidence in the merger.
The executives running the integration effort must recognize the need to identify and retain essential 
• 
support people, as well as sales reps.
Senior managers should review the merged portfolio of customers and make tough calls about who 
• 
warrants new investments and who might be shed or given less attention.
With careful planning and implementation, acquiring companies can revitalize not only their own organizations 
but also their relationships with customers.
Overcommunicate
Some companies try to shield their customers from messy merger-related activities, such as changes in 
organizational structures and roles, customer engagement rules, and customer support. But most customers 
are willing and even eager to help a merging organization reshape itself. They prefer to participate in – rather 
than learn after the fact – the coming changes.
Mergers therefore give companies a chance to improve relationships with customers and address their 
unfulfilled needs. Many organizations are loath to make new commitments during a time of transition – they 
believe that management has enough issues to resolve without involving customers in the merger process. 
Yet such discussions are critical in determining what a merger can and can’t achieve and the role customers 
can play in shaping that outcome.
Leading companies therefore take an expansive view of their relationships with customers, discussing not 
only the details of the sales relationship – the nuts and bolts of what’s bought and sold and at what prices – but 
also such issues as contracting, delivery, support, and even the frequency of meetings between executives 
from both sides. Communicating openly and involving customers make them feel that their needs and 
expectations are being addressed and make them a party to merger success.
Consider what happened at a networking equipment company that found its customers worried about its 
postmerger product road map – the schedule specifying product ranges, prices, release dates, and other 
such details. Competitors fed this anxiety by questioning which products the merged company would 
support after integration, implying that there was too much uncertainty to do business with the company. 
In response, the company developed an integrated product road map before the merger even closed, so it 
could work with customers and launch a campaign to publicize its revamped product lineup as soon as the 
deal was completed.
That experience conveys another valuable lesson: involve salespeople in the integration process. Because most 
of them need to maintain a laser-like focus on revenue targets and compensation in order to succeed, many 
companies seek to protect them at this point so they can concentrate on customers and continue to make sales.
The problem is that customers and salespeople react negatively to ambiguity. Uncertainty about the 
organization’s structure, customer engagement rules, product road map, or operational details can all slow 
revenue generation as customers spend time discussing the issues and planning for the worst. Without firm 
direction, salespeople trying to quiet these concerns may give answers that are ultimately inconsistent with 
37
Perspectives on merger integration
the developing integration plan, so the reps seem out of the loop or the organization looks unresponsive or 
incompetent. Sales reps also need reassurance about internal issues, such as how they will be compensated 
and who will cover which accounts. Otherwise, high performers may defect to competitors.
In short, ambiguity – not the distraction of integration itself – is the fundamental enemy. Best-practice 
acquirers define, as specifically as possible, how the merged organization will eventually look and how 
integration will proceed. Managers can’t know all the answers, but they should describe their intentions and 
the criteria for decisions and commit to answering the field’s questions at a specific pace and timing.
Best-practice acquirers also track progress carefully. They monitor the sales integration process closely: 
following not only lagging indicators, such as revenue, but also leading indicators, such as how much training on 
new products is happening, how long deals take to close, how often prices or contracts must be altered, how 
much sales shrink, and how many customers previously served by both merging companies are won or lost.
Build sales momentum
Best-practice integrators know that the first 100 days after a merger closes are critical to demonstrating its 
value and tangible benefits to the sales force, customers, and investors. These companies focus on winning 
a few critical large transactions early as proof-of-concept cases, using the full weight of the top team, product 
development, salespeople, and technical support.
Sales of products identified as quick wins – those most easily sold initially to customers of both merging 
companies – provide an immediate, focused experience for the sales force. At the outset, sales performance 
incentives should target such transactions.
In the case of a semiconductor merger, for example, much of the deal’s value reflected the possibility of 
integrating products into a combined chip set. Because the merging companies persuaded a few key 
customers to commit quickly to this vision, sales reps felt reassured that the deal was sound and would help 
them succeed both in sales volume and compensation. The early sales in turn generated enthusiasm and 
revenue momentum among other customers as well.
One barrier to achieving such early sales success is the time needed to bring together the merging 
companies’ back-office systems and processes, particularly IT and finance – a problem that can hamper 
the execution of orders.  Excitement around a deal typically lasts six to nine months, not long enough for 
operations and IT to build a strong, integrated foundation for sales systems and processes.
The challenge of such long-term planning can put a deal’s early sales momentum at risk. Leading integrators 
accept the reality that momentum and a seamless transition may require temporary plug-and-play solutions 
for IT and finance. These workarounds ensure that sales reps can make forecasts, enter joint orders, gain 
pricing approval, manage exceptions and orders that need to be expedited, and troubleshoot issues in 
sales crediting and compensation. Longer term, the merged company will have time to cherry-pick each 
organization’s strongest processes, methodologies, and tools.
Look beyond sales reps
There is little argument that retaining top sales force talent is critical, and it’s easy to use pure revenue statistics 
to decide who stays and who goes in any integration effort. Yet all organizations employ certain people whose 
contributions are less easily measured but who are nevertheless the glue of a high-performing sales team.
Best-practice integrators identify these people and their place in the organization’s internal network and target 
them for retention. They may, for instance, be sales support staff in functional areas like IT and finance who 
have unique and specific technical expertise in sales processing or approval. 
38
In many start-ups and medium-sized enterprises, some people play many roles. Organizations can map 
such an internal network by using a variety of techniques to ensure that the people who hold it together stay. 
Otherwise, an overly rigid or out-of-touch HR process for categorizing employees risks losing the richness of 
these relationships.
Finally, companies must consider the sequence for unveiling the integrated sales unit and selecting staff for 
retention. Reorganizing the frontline sales staff and back-office support simultaneously can disrupt customer 
service significantly. Deferring changes in support functions until account coverage and related matters have 
been resolved may help ensure uninterrupted customer service.
Review the customer portfolio
Most sales organizations in a merger focus on retaining all customers, regardless of expense. That’s natural, 
given the heightened awareness of competitors’ actions and the desire to show that the company is meeting 
revenue expectations. But mergers provide an opportunity to refocus on the most important and promising 
customers and to allocate resources to meet their needs more fully.
While altering long-standing customer relationships is never easy, best-practice integrators use the merger 
process to evaluate a portfolio critically. To ensure that they focus on the most profitable accounts, they 
examine the true cost of serving customers – support activities as well as sales rep time. They explore options 
for reallocating account resources, which may mean reducing coverage for customers receiving top-tier 
service because of historical relationships rather than profitability. And these integrators are willing to have 
difficult conversations with customers – discussing contracts, terms and conditions, pricing, and anything 
else that affects account profitability.
Sometimes, a company must be willing to shed customers. A technology company, for example, acquired a 
smaller firm that had been using its engineering team as a quasi-sales force. Customers had come to expect 
customization of products for them. Once the two organizations merged, the acquirer refocused the team 
on core engineering. The decision cost some sales to smaller customers, but the increased engineering 
productivity more than offset the net effect on profitability .
Integrating sales organizations is never easy. But companies can make real progress by involving customers 
and employees in the merger process, generating momentum by quickly winning key accounts, retaining 
critical staff, and serving the right customers in the right way. These steps can ensure that the sales force 
helps, rather than hinders, a merger’s overall success.
39
Perspectives on merger integration
Case study:  Rapid sales force integration
Following  a  merger,  executives  must  decide  how  fast  to 
integrate sales forces. Moving too quickly invites a clash of 
corporate cultures, sagging morale, and lost sales momen-
tum. Moving too slowly leaves employees and customers in 
limbo, with competitors only too willing to poach accounts and 
top salespeople.
The president of one leading medical-device company chose 
sooner rather than later. He set the ambitious goal of presenting 
a single face to customers within eight weeks after closing a 
merger with a rival.  Within two months  of  the deal’s close, 
senior management had to decide the fate of more than 300 
sales reps and accounts totaling several hundred million dollars.
The  aggressive  timeline  called  for  careful,  systematic,  and 
rigorous planning. Immediately after the merger announcement, 
the leadership of the two companies’ sales operations went to 
work. Both companies had a record of solid performance and a 
strong culture, yet differences were already apparent.
One company had a highly entrepreneurial ethos. Its frontline 
sales reps had more leeway and authority to get deals done 
and celebrated great performance more exuberantly.
The other company was more low-key and measured. Roles 
were better defined, corporate oversight was greater, and 
employees regarded their merger partners as a bit brash.
The companies had different approaches to staff compensation 
and  performance  reviews,  so  directly  comparing  the  sales 
records of reps was impossible.
Yet  common  ground  emerged.  Over  the  course  of  several 
meetings among sales leaders from both companies after deal 
announcement, the business objectives and goals of a larger, 
more powerful  combined sales  force emerged.  The leaders 
agreed  on  a  new  selling  model  –  for  instance,  the  larger 
combined sales force could focus more intensely on physicians 
in offices, while maintaining the traditional focus on hospitals.
The  meetings  used  a  technology  that  monitors  audience 
responses in real time to help each side understand the other’s 
culture, which proved critical in determining how to unite the 
two teams. These cultural awareness sessions also helped the 
leaders work with sales reps and managers from both compa-
nies to retain the swagger while strengthening oversight.
Special clean teams examined both companies’ current and 
projected sales data to see how effective the merged entity 
could be. A new performance-ranking system enabled direct 
comparison of reps, allowing the clean teams  to create a first 
blueprint  for  integration  (with  leadership  oversight).  The 
blueprint  included  a  new  territory  structure  and  sales  rep 
organization, defining who would cover which region and how 
the new entity would ultimately serve customers in a way that 
minimized disruption for them and the organization.
Meanwhile, sales leaders began planning the thorny aspects of 
integration, such as compensation and benefits, training require-
ments, and support functions. They developed a day-by-day 
plan for the activities required once the merger closed. Problems 
that  the  clean  teams  couldn’t  resolve  were  noted,  so  the 
combined sales teams could address them after the close.
Within  three  weeks  of  the  deal’s  closing,  the  combined 
company had already implemented integrated policies on field 
compensation, benefits, relocation, and separation. In another 
two weeks, executives had established the complete integrated 
deployment of the combined sales forces, taking the clean-
team output as a starting point and refining it in workshops.
Retention offers to managers and sales reps went out quickly. A 
national sales meeting assembled the combined organization 
and  helped  forge  a  new  identity  and  culture.  Accelerated 
training of sales reps on the expanded product portfolio began, 
and plans were set to transfer relationships for each account 
and sales rep. In the weeks after the merger closed, a war room 
oversaw  the  sales  integration  process,  tracking  sales  and 
customer service performance, monitoring competitors,  and 
following the attrition or competitive poaching of sales reps.
The process wasn’t easy. The pace of sales integration meant 
that key personnel from both companies did double or even 
triple duty, and the risk of burnout required constant monitoring. 
While the combined organization’s leaders communicated and 
shared  constant  feedback,  cultural  differences  and  the 
sometimes bruised egos of sales reps had to be addressed and 
decisions made rapidly. Customers had to be kept informed 
about the progress of the effort to feel they had an investment 
in it, and sales reps needed quick wins to feel that the merger 
was paying off and to maintain sales momentum.
The net result of all this activity was reduction in many of the 
risks usually associated with integrating sales forces. Uncer-
tainty among reps about the merger’s impact on them declined, 
making overtures from competitors less appealing and ensuring 
that top sales talent remained – competitors don’t try to poach 
also-rans.  Effective  communication  mitigated  customer 
uncertainty, and the aggressive deadline set an end date for the 
upheaval. Quick sales wins, coupled with an expanded product 
portfolio and greater coverage, proved the logic of the deal to 
employees and customers, minimizing the risk that they would 
see it as a mistake. The effort met the president’s deadline: 
eight weeks after the merger closed, an integrated sales force 
was in place, with one face to the customer, and the combined 
company's revenue growth accelerated
40
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested