mvc pdf viewer : C# extract text from pdf software control cloud windows azure html class merger-management-mckinsey-article-compendium4-part987

41
Perspectives on merger integration
Executives know instinctively that corporate culture matters in capturing value from M&A. In a recent 
survey by McKinsey and the Conference Board, 50 percent said that “cultural fit” lies at the heart of a value-
enhancing merger, and 25 percent called its absence the key reason a merger had failed. But 80 percent also 
admitted that culture is hard to define.  
Therein lies the rub. How can you address cultural problems, if you don’t know what you’re trying to fix?  
Hardly surprising then, that most executives feel more comfortable dealing with costs and synergies than 
culture, despite the potential of culture to enhance or destroy merger value.
In addition, CEOs all too often return from the deal table convinced that the companies’ cultures are similar 
and will be easy to combine. They miss the opportunity to use the merger as a catalyst to shift culture – both in 
the new organization and the acquiring company.
McKinsey has proprietary tools that split culture into specific, measurable components and link those 
components to more than 100 actions management can take to mitigate cultural risks. Most importantly, 
companies can apply a version of this tool outside-in, before even announcing a deal.
A practical approach to culture
At McKinsey, we take a practical approach to understanding and tackling cultural issues. Rather than thinking 
about norms, rites, or employee satisfaction – terms commonly used to discuss culture – we urge executives 
to focus on management practices: “the way we do things around here.”  
A company’s leadership style, the extent to which it holds employees accountable for their performance, 
its approach to innovation or building and maintaining external relationships – these are the management 
choices that define an organization’s culture and shape its performance. Merging companies that have 
incompatible cultures because their management practices drive conflicting behaviors risk loss of the best 
performers, a messy and prolonged integration period, and, ultimately, failure to capture merger value and 
synergies. 
Viewing culture as the result of certain management practices makes it tangible and actionable. Merging 
companies can readily assess their cultural differences and find ways to address them, thanks to tools that 
make cultural due diligence as central to the merger process as financial and legal checklists. This high-level 
assessment can happen during the deal process, giving executives time to design the merger in a way that 
builds on cultural assets and mitigates the risks of cultural clash.
Assessing cultural compatibility:
A McKinsey perspective on getting practical 
about culture in M&A
By Oliver Engert, Neel Gandhi, William Schaninger, & Jocelyn So
*The authors wish to acknowledge the contributions of Sophie Birshan, Kameron Kordestani, 
and Sunil Rayan to this article
C# extract text from pdf - SDK Library API:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
C# extract text from pdf - SDK Library API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
42
Scientific assessment
Many approaches to assessing and addressing cultural issues are flawed.  Many rely on leaders’ 
instincts. McKinsey research shows that managers in about 50 percent of merging companies read their 
organization’s culture very differently than other employees do, typically exaggerating the significance of 
their own leadership style.
Many CEOs of merging firms believe the integration will be relatively easy just because they get on well 
personally. They underestimate the challenges that different management practices create for most employees.  
Other approaches rely on focus groups and employee satisfaction surveys, but these can prove 
inadequate. Although they can locate conflicting behaviors and may make people feel better for awhile, 
they cannot reveal the root causes of the behaviors and so do not provide insights into what management 
can do about them.
Thorough organizational surveys, like McKinsey’s Organizational Health Index (OHI), deliver a more robust 
diagnosis.
The OHI produces detailed, quantitative analysis of company performance in nine broad management practices, 
enabling statistically significant comparisons between companies that establish their cultural compatibility.
Such a rigorous survey requires substantial commitment of time and organizational resources. It also requires 
access to employees of both the target and the acquirer at a time when they may be feeling anxious or when 
the absence of public knowledge of the deal makes access impossible. So the question becomes, how can 
you measure cultural compatibility accurately without a full survey?   
Climate/satisfaction surveys vs. OHI
Exhibit 1
Limitations of climate/satisfaction surveys
McKinsey’s enhanced organizational assessment
Do not...
Does...
Assess the breadth and depth of organiza-
tional performance
The level of performance across 9 manage-
ment practices
The methods used to deliver that perfor-
mance (37 fundamental practices)
The underlying mindsets that enable/hinder 
performance improvement
Address the drivers of practices and mindsets 
by disaggregating root causes of organizational 
limitations
Link directly to “what do we do about it”
Present an outcomes orientation – rather, they 
focus on behaviors that the organization 
exhibits (”I am satisfied with my job”)
Enable direct root-cause analysis
Take a holistic view of what drives organiza-
tional performance
Prescribe actions – rather, provide long 
descriptions
SDK Library API:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
if you are a Visual C# .NET programmer, you can go to this Visual C# tutorial for PDF text extraction in .NET project. Extract Text Content from PDF File in VB
www.rasteredge.com
43
Perspectives on merger integration
The answer is, an outside-in analysis that relies on relevant markers. This analysis uses publicly available 
information to assess the management of both companies. It can happen before the deal, remain confidential, 
take less than a week to complete, and does not require access to the target.  
Companies signal their management approach to the outside world in many ways: corporate websites, 
annual reports, speeches, news articles, blogs, stock market filings, recruiting, and mission statements, to 
name a few. All of this is potential fodder for an outside-in analysis, providing a basis for building a company 
profile that mimics the results of a full survey. While it cannot match the analytical depth of a full survey, it 
makes an effective and accurate barometer of company culture. 
McKinsey teams have conducted more than 20 outside-in assessments of merging companies where they 
had no prior knowledge. Many of these companies had already done full OHI surveys. The teams identified 
the same major areas of potential cultural friction that the OHI survey had found and that later became real 
issues in the merger process.  
To see how an outside-in analysis works, consider the recent merger of two consumer companies. The 
analysis revealed clear cultural challenges in leadership and coordination/control, potential conflict in 
accountability, and strong cultural alignment in external orientation.
The analysis showed that:
Company A had a patriarchal leadership style, driven by the owners and managers of this old, family-run 
• 
business. Employees looked to the owners for vision and leadership and felt an emotional stake in the 
company. 
Company B, the acquirer, had a more “community” leadership style. The small corporate center was 
• 
relatively hands-off, delegating authority and avoiding personality cults built around leaders.
OHI framework
Exhibit 2
Structure/role design
Performance contracts
Consequence systems
Personal obligation
Visionary
Strategic/directive
Consensus-driven
Direction
Coordination 
and control
Accountability
External 
orientation
Innovation
Capabilities
Motivation
Environment 
and values
Leadership
External 
sourcing
Top-down
Bottom-up
Cross-
pollination
Values
Inspirational leaders
Opportunities
Incentives
People focus
Operational controls
Financial controls
Values/professional 
standards
Open and trusting
Competitive
Operational/disciplined
Entrepreneurial
Internally 
developed
Acquired 
Rented/
outsourced
Process-based
Customer/ 
channel
Competitor/ 
market
Business/ 
partner
Government/ 
community
Community leader
Command & control
Patriarchal
SDK Library API:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; C#: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
www.rasteredge.com
44
With the former owners of Company A no longer involved, the merged entity risked Company A employees 
distrusting the new leadership and feeling uncertain about who would provide direction. The merger needed 
appropriate “interventions” to sustain employee motivation, especially among former employees of Company 
A,  and organizational momentum. 
Analysis of management practices around coordination/control and accountability found that Company A 
lacked the strong performance measurement systems of the acquirer, relying instead on employees’ sense of 
duty and loyalty. This potential cultural conflict cut both ways.
Company A employees might resist strict measurement, perceiving a loss of personal involvement in a 
• 
company that only cared about “making the numbers.”
Company B employees might feel disgruntled if the performance management system became less 
• 
robust and, in their minds, unfair.
This conflict might lower productivity and lose the most valued employees. 
The analysis also revealed an opportunity in the way both companies thought about and managed external 
stakeholders. Both had a strong customer focus that could support integration and value creation. Employees 
from both companies were likely to respond well to the idea that the merger benefitted customers, and 
building cross-functional integration teams around customers could integrate and motivate all employees.   
Intervention
With accurate data on cultural compatibility, what action should leaders take? In extreme cases, they might 
cancel the deal, as two industrial transportation companies did recently. The acquirer understood that the 
incompatibility posed too great an obstacle to performance and pursued other opportunities. 
Sample outside-in analysis
Exhibit 3
Clear challenges
Some key differences
Strong alignment
Dimensions
Target’s cultural practices
Acquirer’s cultural practices
No dominant practice, but indications of 
a community-oriented, delegating style
Strong indication of patriarchal 
leadership
Leadership
-oriented, delegating style
Dominant practice: clear, top-down 
specifics for achieving company 
direction
Company direction set top-down, both 
laying out a vision and offering specific 
guidance
Direction
-down 
-down, both 
Some weak indications of a process-
and efficiency-driven environment
Open, trusting, and collaborative 
environment for employee interaction
Environment/
values
Strong performance culture, with positive 
and negative consequences
Implicit personal obligation drives 
accountability, backed by clear roles 
and responsibilities
Accountability
Some signs of a management style 
focused on targets and metrics, along 
with a values code
Clear indications that company 
manages via people systems and a 
values-based code
Coordination/
control
Dominant practice: company acquires 
key skills and capabilities externally
Little indication of a dominant style for 
ensuring needed talent base
Capabilities
Indications that employees are 
motivated by a balance of factors, 
including company values
Strong indication that employees are 
motivated by company values and 
leaders
Motivation
Strong indication of a clear customer 
focus, but also signs of focus on 
competitors and government
Company engages externally with a 
strong customer focus, plus some 
government focus
External 
orientation
Management-driven ideas for change 
dominate innovation practice
Weak indication that management 
generates new ideas and innovation 
top-down
Innovation
SDK Library API:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. C#.NET Project DLLs: Insert Text Content to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as field data from PDF and how to extract and get field data from PDF in C#.NET project.
www.rasteredge.com
45
Perspectives on merger integration
The outcome of a compatibility assessment is usually less dire and informs planning of a targeted approach 
to changing the management practices that produce cultural conflict. The leaders of the merging companies 
have two intervention options: standard integration interventions and tailored cultural interventions.
Standard integration interventions apply in any merger. They tend to focus on integration structure and 
alignment of the top team on “the way we do things around here.” How leaders handle these interventions 
influences the organization’s culture because their actions demonstrate strong cultural intent.  
Take organizational design, for example.
A broadly inclusive process, where senior management just provides design principles and multiple 
• 
management levels develop the design, signals consensus-oriented leadership. 
A top-down process, where senior leaders design the entire organization with little input from others, 
• 
signals a command-and-control leadership culture.  
Talent assessment and selection offers another example. The criteria used – hard performance metrics or 
more subjective metrics like employee willingness to collaborate with colleagues – shape the organization’s 
culture going forward. 
No culture is “right,” and different choices fit different circumstances. But choices must apply consistently 
so aligning the top team around cultural choices is a critical standard integration intervention. Unless senior 
leaders are excellent role models, the rest of the organization will not internalize the change.
Tailored cultural interventions address the specific findings of the outside-in analysis and focus on changing 
targeted behaviors. Many organizational actions can influence each fundamental element of culture. For 
example, more than a dozen interventions can affect management of accountability within a company. 
In the merger of the two consumer companies, where the organizational compatibility assessment flagged 
accountability as an issue, the acquirer (Company B) decided to bring its strong performance measurement 
ethos to the new company.
The creation of regional manager roles with broad decision rights and strict P&L accountability pushed 
accountability much lower in the organization than Company A had done, sending a clear cultural message to 
employees. Corporate leaders made accountability a theme in most top-team communications from the start 
of the integration process. And the company conducted training – for all employees, but aimed at the former 
employees of Company A – in how to assess performance, conduct a performance dialogue, and deliver a 
performance review.
In another example, two merging pharmaceutical companies discovered major differences in the impact of 
leadership style on decision making during integration planning. The new company embedded decision-
making rights and rules in high-level governance processes and highlighted the changes to major company 
committees as a sign of broader cultural change.    
Ultimately, such choices have far greater impact on a merged company’s culture than any number of focus 
groups or mission statements can achieve on their own.  But whatever interventions a company chooses, 
leaders must make them mutually reinforcing. Otherwise, conflicting signals negate the intended impact.  
Cultural interventions must also be woven into the larger integration effort. Too often companies approach 
culture as a separate, HR-driven integration activity. This frequently makes line employees resist cultural 
efforts, perceiving them as a distraction from the real, value-capture-oriented work of integration. By weaving 
culture into core integration activities like organization design, communications, and value capture, leaders 
forestall these objections. 
SDK Library API:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Search PDF Text. C#.NET PDF SDK - Search and Find PDF Text in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF DLLs for Finding Text in PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
46
Thinking about cultural conflicts and opportunities in terms of management practices makes culture easier 
to define, identify, and tackle. Managers should avail themselves of tools that can help perform these tasks, 
whether an outside-in analysis that surfaces cultural issues even before deal close or a more thorough, fine-
tuned OHI survey. 
These tools offer a systematic way to diagnose and address cultural issues in a merger. Every integration 
action, from announcement to combination, has impact on corporate culture and therefore value. Executives 
need to understand the cultural compatibility of companies planning to merge as early as possible.   
SDK Library API:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
PDF in C#, C# convert PDF to HTML, C# convert PDF to Word, C# extract text from PDF, C# convert PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files
www.rasteredge.com
47
Perspectives on merger integration
48
49
Perspectives on merger integration
Best-practice companies explore the full range of opportunities to achieve maximum value from every merger. 
They take the broad view mapped in the McKinsey framework to identify, quantify, prioritize, and capture 
synergies and value.
But these companies also realize that opportunities to create value differ by deal type, and they tailor their 
search for synergies accordingly.
Opening the Aperture 3:
A McKinsey perspective on finding and 
prioritizing synergies
By Oliver Engert, Eileen Kelly, & Rob Rosiello
McKinsey synergies framework
Exhibit 1
Capital
Revenue
Cost
Capture 
combinational 
synergies
Seek select 
transformational 
opportunities
Protect base 
business
Typical deal focus
Open the aperture
50
Six deal types and their opportunities to create value
McKinsey has identified six deal types. Each requires asking different questions to locate their most likely 
synergies:
Improve target company performance. 
• 
The buyer leverages their superior capabilities to improve the 
target’s operations.
–  What superior capabilities does the buyer possess?
–  How can the buyer transfer these capabilities to the target?
Consolidate to remove excess industry cap
• 
acity. The combined company rationalizes 
commercialization to increase efficiency, prioritizes initiatives (e.g., R&D efforts), leverages economies of 
scale (e.g., back office consolidation), and cuts duplicative overhead.
–  Where is there excess overlap in the operating model?
Create market access for products. 
• 
The combined company uses its existing capabilities and 
capacity to sell through to new markets or geographies more effectively.
–  What market entry advantages does the buyer or the target have (e.g., channel access)?
–  How would additional resources affect sales?
Acquire capabilities or technologies quickly. 
• 
The buyer leverages the target’s capabilities, gaining 
access to skills or technologies more quickly than it could in-house. 
–  What skills or technologies does the target have?
–  How can the buyer leverage these capabilities?
Pick and develop winners early. 
• 
The buyer provides resources to promising targets.
–  What does the target need to succeed? What are the risks?
–  What capabilities does the buyer have that can help the target succeed?
Transform both buyer and target. 
• 
An industry-changing deal transforms the combined company into a 
superior company.
–  How much transformation is the buyer willing to undertake?
–  Which specific opportunities would create transformation?
–  What specific challenges could disrupt business during the transformation?
Unfortunately, many companies, and industries, look only to their traditional deal types, which they know how 
to pursue, and they leave money on the table as a result. Pharmaceutical companies, for example, typically 
merge for industry consolidation or quick acquisition of capabilities or technologies. Opening the aperture 
and exploring less traditional transformational deals could uncover additional opportunities to create value.
The highest-priority synergy opportunities by deal type
To encourage broader thinking, McKinsey has mapped synergy opportunities by deal type. The chart 
shows the most likely, and therefore highest-priority, synergies in each type of deal. Not surprisingly, 
opportunities in the combinational category of value creation are most common, but their focus extends 
well beyond cost.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested