University of Nebraska - Lincoln
DigitalCommons@University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Ecological and Environmental Anthropology
(University of Georgia)
Wildlife Damage Management, Internet Center for
1-1-2007
Merging Qualitative and Quantitative Data in
Mixed Methods Research: How To and W hy Not
David L. Driscoll
Senior Public Health Scientist, RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Road, P.O. Box 12194, Research Triangle park, NC 27709,
daviddriscoll@uaa.alaska.edu
Afua Appiah-Yeboah
Health Analyst, RTI International
Philip Salib
Health Analyst, RTI International
Douglas J. Rupert
Research Associate, RTI International
Follow this and additional works at:h瑴p://digitalcommons.unl.edu/icwdmeea
Part of theEnvironmental Sciences Commons
周is Article is brought to you for free and open access by the Wildlife Damage Management, Internet Center for at DigitalCommons@University of
Nebraska - Lincoln. It has been accepted for inclusion in Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia) by an authorized
administrator of DigitalCommons@University of Nebraska - Lincoln.
Driscoll, David L.; Appiah-Yeboah, Afua; Salib, Philip; and Rupert, Douglas J., "Merging Qualitative and Quantitative Data in Mixed
Methods Research: How To and Why Not" (2007). Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia).Paper 18.
h瑴p://digitalcommons.unl.edu/icwdmeea/18
Pdf to text converter - SDK Library API:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf to text converter - SDK Library API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Vol. 3, No. 1                Ecological and Environmental Anthropology               
2007 
19 
Articles 
Merging Qualitative and Quantitative Data in Mixed Methods 
Research: How To and Why Not 
David L. Driscoll
1
, Afua Appiah-Yeboah
2
, Philip Salib
2
, and Douglas J. Rupert
3
This study assesses the utility of mixed methods designs that integrate qualitative and quantitative 
data through a transformative process. Two strategies for collecting qualitative and quantitative 
datasets are described, and processes by which they can be merged are presented in detail. Some 
of  the benefits  of  mixed methods designs are summarized  and the  shortcomings and challenges 
inherent in quantitizing qualitative data in mixed methods research are delineated.  
KEYWORDS: study design, analytic design, mixed methods, program evaluation, quantitizing 
Introduction 
Researchers seeking associations between primarily quantitative biophysical and primarily qualitative 
sociocultural  data,  including  environmental  and  natural  resource  anthropologists,  can  look  to  mixed 
method research designs for structured and tested integrative processes. Such designs have been used to 
augment traditional methods for assessing and monitoring the impacts of recreation and tourism on the 
physical  environment  (Mackay  2004).  In  a  larger  sense  these  designs  could  aid  ecological  and 
environmental  anthropologists  in  their  efforts to  overcome  lack  of  public engagement  in,  or  denial  of, 
linkages between human activities and their physical environments (Schmidt 2005).  
We use the  term  mixed  methods research here  to refer to all  procedures collecting and analyzing 
both  quantitative  and  qualitative  data  in  the  context  of  a  single  study  (sensu  lato  Tashakkori  and 
Teddlie 2003). Our objectives are to describe how and why we conducted two mixed methods research 
designs,  and  to discuss some  of  the  benefits  and  challenges  of  mixed  method research.  We hope  to 
inspire further investigation and informed application of such designs. 
Background 
Researchers have been conducting mixed methods research for several decades, and referring to it 
by  an  array  of  names.  Early  articles  on  the  application  of  such  designs  have  referred  to  them  as 
multi-method,  integrated,  hybrid,  combined,  and  mixed  methodology  research  (Creswell  and  Plano 
Clark 2007: 6).  The  basis for employing  these designs are likewise varied, but  they can be generally 
described as  methods  to expand  the scope  or breadth of  research  to offset  the weaknesses  of  either 
approach alone (Blake 1989; Greene, Caracelli, and Graham 1989, Rossman and Wilson 1991). 
The  prospective  mixed  methods  researcher  will  find  a  variety  of  classificatory  metrics  by  which 
mixed  methods research designs can be  described.  The  designs have  been differentiated by the level of 
prioritization of one form of data over the other, by the combination of data forms in the research process 
(such as during the collection or analysis phases), and by the timing of data collection, such as whether 
the quantitative and  qualitative phases take place concurrently  or sequentially, and  if so, in what order 
(Creswell,  Fetters,  and  Ivankova  2004;  Datta  2001;  Johnson  and  Christensen  2004;  Tashakkori  and 
Teddlie  2003).  Some  researchers  have  integrated  several  different  metrics  to  create  mixed  methods 
1
Senior Public Health Scientist, RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Road, P.O. Box 12194, Research Triangle park, 
NC 27709 
2
Health Analyst, RTI International 
3
Research Associate, RTI International 
SDK Library API:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Online PDF to Text Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Text: Extract Text from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG formats.
www.rasteredge.com
Vol. 3, No. 1                Ecological and Environmental Anthropology               
2007 
20 
Structured Survey
Open-ended 
questions
Closed 
questions
QSR NVivo
Output of code –
Dichotomous and 
ordinal variables
SAS
Dataset
Dataset
Merge based on 
unique 
corresponding 
identifiers
Final dataset / 
Analysis
Structured Survey
Open-ended 
questions
Closed 
questions
QSR NVivo
Output of code –
Dichotomous and 
ordinal variables
SAS
Dataset
Dataset
Merge based on 
unique 
corresponding 
identifiers
Final dataset / 
Analysis
classificatory systems (see for example Creswell, Plano Clark, Guttman, and Hanson 2003; Johnson and 
Onwuegbuzie 2004). In sum, there is as of yet no discrete list of mixed  methods design options, and so 
researchers  should  plan  to  develop  a  design  that  answers  their  own  research  questions  within  the 
constraints and boundaries of the study context (Johnson & Onwuegbuzie 2004: 20).  
Some researchers have taken issue with the term  mixed methods to describe research designs that 
consciously  blend both  approaches within or  across the stages of  the research process (Johnson  and 
Onwuegbuzie  2004).  They  suggest  the  term  mixed  model  be  used  to  differentiate  research  designs 
integrating  qualitative  and  quantitative  data  from  those  who  merely  employ  both  types  of  data. 
These  include  transformative  designs  that  change  one  form  of  data  into  another  (most  often 
qualitative to quantitative data) so  that  the data collected by mixed  methods designs can be merged 
(Caracelli and Green 1993; Onwuegbuzie and Teddlie 2003).  
The  term  quantitizing has been coined  to describe the  process of  transforming coded qualitative 
data into quantitative data and  qualitizing  to describe the process of converting quantitative data  to 
qualitative data  (Tashakkori  and  Teddlie  1998:  126).  While some  recent studies have  explored  the 
utility  of  research  that  integrates  qualitative  and  quantitative  data  (e.g.,  Adamson  et  al.  2004; 
Sandelowski  2000;  Weisner  2005),  there  remains  a  need  for  systematic  information  on  how  to 
actually carry out such transformative analytic designs.  
This paper describes two transformative mixed methods research designs. The two designs fall on 
somewhat  different  ends  of  the  mixed  methods  design  spectrum  related  to  when  the  data  are 
collected.  The  first  is  a  relatively  simple  design  in  which  qualitative  and  quantitative  data  are 
collected concurrently.  The other is a fairly complex sequential design. We draw on examples from a 
recent evaluation of a federal policy regarding safe immunization practice to describe how these designs 
have been applied in practice. Contractual limitations preclude a detailed description of that study, and the 
objectives  and  findings  of  and  from  this  research  are  described  only  as  they  relate  to  design 
implementation.  
We begin by describing the data collection process employed for each design, then summarize the 
transformative  analytic  process we used  for  these designs,  and  finally  describe  the  relative benefits 
and shortcomings of these designs and transformative mixed methods approaches in general.  
DATA COLLECTION 
Concurrent Design  
Concurrent  mixed  method  data 
collection  strategies  have  been 
employed  to  validate  one  form  of  data 
with  the  other  form,  to  transform  the 
data  for  comparison,  or  to  address 
different types of questions (Creswell & 
Plano  Clark  2007: 118).  In  many  cases 
the  same  individuals  provide  both 
qualitative  and quantitative data  so that 
the data can be more easily compared. 
This  design  was  employed  in  a 
recent  study  (Figure  1)  to  collect  and 
compare  perceptions  of  vaccine  safety 
among  an  extensive  and  varied  set  of 
stakeholder  groups.  The  research 
questions involved levels of familiarity 
and  agreement  with  various  vaccine  safety  guidelines.  Although  the  structured  response  categories 
Figure 1:  
Concurrent Design 
SDK Library API:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. Advanced Visual Studio .NET PDF text extraction control, built in .NET framework 2.0 and compatible with Windows system.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
File from Text Using Visual Basic .NET Demo Code. Best VB.NET adobe text to PDF converter library for Visual Studio .NET project.
www.rasteredge.com
Vol. 3, No. 1                Ecological and Environmental Anthropology               
2007 
21 
Survey
In-depth 
Interviews
Access
QSR NVivo
Close-ended and 
linked open-ended 
questions
Output of codes in 
dichotomous 
variables in Access
Merge based on 
unique 
corresponding 
identifiers
Final SAS dataset / 
Analysis
Survey
In-depth 
Interviews
Access
QSR NVivo
Close-ended and 
linked open-ended 
questions
Output of codes in 
dichotomous 
variables in Access
Merge based on 
unique 
corresponding 
identifiers
Final SAS dataset / 
Analysis
were identified in close consultation with  vaccine specialists and agency officials, questions remained 
regarding  the  applicability  of  the  response  options  for  all  advocacy groups.  At  the  same  time,  the 
number  and  variety  of  survey  respondents  challenged  pre-testing  of  the  survey  items.  For  these 
reasons  we  chose  to  employ  a  concurrent  mixed  methods  research  design  involving  a  Web-based 
instrument  to  collect  both  structured  and  unstructured  data.  Each  topic-specific  set  of  structured 
questions in the survey instrument was followed by at least one  open-ended and unlimited comment 
field,  which  was  explicitly  linked  to  the  question  set  immediately  preceding it.  In  most  cases,  the 
open-ended question asked: “What additional information would you like to provide to explain these 
responses?”  
This data collection strategy has several advantages for  mixed-methods applications. First,  they 
can  be  fairly  intuitive  for  participants.  In  the  study  described,  the  Web-based  format  was  easy  to 
understand and the  open-ended response  fields were  unlimited, so  many respondents  took  advantage 
of  the resource  to post  extensive comments. Also,  these  fields were  overtly linked  to  the preceding 
structured  responses,  facilitating  linkage  both  by  the  participant  during data  collection  and  by  the 
research  team  in  relating  the  structured  and  unstructured  responses.  However,  concurrent  data 
collection  designs  preclude  follow-up  on  interesting  or  confusing  responses.  In  our  study  we  relied 
entirely  on  respondents  to  augment  their  survey  answers  by  following  up  on  such  issues.  Many 
respondents did provide such follow-up, as described below, but some did not. 
Sequential Design 
Sequential  mixed  methods  data  collection  strategies  involve  collecting  data  in  an iterative  process 
whereby the data collected in one phase contribute to the data collected in the next. Data were collected in 
these designs to provide more data about results from the earlier phase of data collection and analysis, to 
select participants who can best provide that data, or to generalize findings by verifying and augmenting 
study  results  from  members  of  a  defined  population  (Creswell  &  Plano  Clark  2007:121).  Sequential 
designs  in  which  quantitative  data  are  collected  first  can  use  statistical  methods  to  determine  which 
findings to augment in the next phase. 
This  design  was  employed  in  a 
recent  study  (Figure  2)  to  collect 
perceptions  and  attitudes  regarding 
the  utility  of  vaccine-safety 
guidelines  from  staff  of  several 
federal  agencies  with  vaccine-
safety  missions.  The  study 
participants  had  various  roles  and 
disciplinary  backgrounds  and  were 
associated  with  various  federal 
agencies.  Further,  the  prospective 
participants  had  very  limited  time 
available  to  respond  to  the  study. 
For  these  reasons  we  chose  to 
employ  a  flexible  and  iterative 
data  collection  strategy  consisting 
of  two  data  collection  phases.  In 
the  first  phase, we collected survey  data;  in  the second  phase, in-depth  interview data.  The  survey 
questions were entirely  close-ended, and  the response categories were developed in  consultation with 
representatives  of  the  various  federal  agencies.  The  subsequent  in-depth,  semistructured  interview 
instruments  consisted  of  individualized  questions  intended  to  explore  particularly  interesting  or 
ambiguous  survey  responses  as  well  as  standard  questions  exploring  general  perspectives  on  the 
purpose and future utility of vaccine safety guidelines.  
Figure 1:  
Sequential Design 
SDK Library API:C#: How to Use SDK to Convert Document and Image Using XDoc.
Sample Code. Here's a snippet of sample code for converting Tiff to PDF file using XDoc.Converter for .NET in C# .NET program. Six
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Best C# text to PDF converter SDK for converting adobe PDF from TXT in Visual Studio .NET project. Use Text to PDF Converter Library DLLs in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
Vol. 3, No. 1                Ecological and Environmental Anthropology               
2007 
22 
This two-phased approach allowed study participants to respond to  the survey on their own time 
and  reduced  the  time  required  for in-depth discussions of  emergent  themes.  It  provided  members  of 
the  research  team  with  the  opportunity  to  review  and  analyze  the  survey  results  and  tailor  the 
subsequent  in-depth  interview  instrument  to  follow-up  on  confusing  or  significant  responses.  This 
iterative analytic approach also simplified subsequent attempts to integrate the coded qualitative data 
collected in in-depth interviews with survey data. A primary disadvantage of this strategy is the time 
required  to  design  and  conduct  separate  tailored  instruments  for  each  key  informant.  A  second 
complicating  factor is  the lack  of  overt  linkages between  the structured and unstructured  responses 
compared to the concurrent design.  
Data analysis 
There are several strategies by which qualitative data collected using the designs described can be 
quantitized to create a single comprehensive dataset. One of the more common strategies counts the 
number of times a qualitative code occurs. Some qualitative data  analysis software programs (such as 
Atlas  or  NVivo)  can  generate  these  reports.  Such  quantitized  frequencies  can  indicate  particularly 
influential codes, but can also be prone to confounding by repetitive respondents who fix on a certain 
concept  or  theme.  Other  approaches  to  quantitizing  qualitative  data  include  enumerating  the 
frequency of  themes within a sample,  the  percentage  of  themes associated with a given category  of 
respondent, or the percentage of people selecting specific themes (Onwuegbuzie &  Teddlie 2003). In 
all  these  cases,  the  quantitized data  can be  statistically  compared  to  the quantitative  data  collected 
separately. 
Yet  another  strategy  for  quantitizing  qualitative  data  enumerates  whether  or  not  qualitative 
responses included certain codes. In other words, rather than seeking to understand how many times a 
certain  code  was  provided  by  each  participant  or  the  frequency  with  which  they  appeared,  this 
strategy quantitizes the presence or absence of each code for each participant.  
This was the strategy employed in the studies described earlier, and we will detail how the process 
was  conducted.  The  application  and  transformation  of  qualitative  to  quantitative  data  owes  some 
impetus to the development of software programs that allow qualitative researchers to process a large 
volume  of qualitative data (Bazeley  1999).  We used QSR NVivo2 to  transform  individual responses 
to our open-ended survey and interview questions into a series of coded response categories that were, 
in  turn,  quantified as binary codes and  integrated into  the  associated survey responses.  This  process 
involved four analytic steps: 
1.  The survey data were entered into an Access database (Figure 3). This process was fairly 
straightforward and similar to that used to manage any structured database. 
2.  The qualitative data were analyzed for codes or themes using NVivo.  These codes were 
then  developed  into  qualitative  response  categories  that  were  entered  into  a  second 
Access database (Figure 4).  
3.  These two databases were linked by key informant identification numbers to ensure that 
each record contained both the survey and in-depth interview data.  
4.  The coded qualitative data were then quantified into dichotomous variables 0 or 1 based 
on absence or presence of each coded response.  
5.  Associations were analyzed using SAS. 
SDK Library API:XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
file converter SDK supports various commonly used document and image file formats, including Microsoft Office (2003 and 2007) Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
PDF barcode generation, PDF content extraction and metadata editing if they integrate this VB.NET PDF converter control with other Conversion of PDF to Text.
www.rasteredge.com
Vol. 3, No. 1                Ecological and Environmental Anthropology               
2007 
23 
The quantitization and data entry in Step 2 involves transition of actual codes into dichotomous 
variable: either 0 or 1, corresponding to absence or presence of prospective coded responses  to each 
question.  Many  qualitative  data  analysis  software  packages  quantify  participant  attributes,  such  as 
demographic data or response frequencies, but few allow for the quantitization of coded response data 
Figure 3: Access Database for Survey Data 
Figure 4: Access Database for Qualitative Data Codes 
Vol. 3, No. 1                Ecological and Environmental Anthropology               
2007 
24 
Results 
While  many studies have described  transformative designs, few have focused on  their advantages 
and  disadvantages.  Our  discussion  of  this  matter  here  should not be  considered  an argument  against 
the  use  of  such  designs.  We  are  interested  in  providing  information  that  allows  prospective 
researchers, specifically those working in the environmental arena, to make informed decisions about 
whether or not to apply these designs in their research. 
Advantages 
Concurrent  Design.  The  collection  and  analysis  of  embedded qualitative  responses  can  augment 
and  explain  complex  or  contradictory  survey  responses.  For  example,  structured  responses  to  our 
survey  of stakeholders  indicated strong  support  for specific  immunization guidelines.  In  the  survey 
responses more than 90% of respondents either  “agreed” or  “strongly agreed” with a statement  that 
the  process by which  the guidelines  were determined was objective  and rigorous.  An  approximately 
equal  proportion  affirmed  that  “there  is  a  continuing  need”  for  such  assessments  and  guidelines. 
However,  more  than  30%  of  respondents either  “somewhat  disagreed” or  “strongly disagreed” with 
many of the immunization safety guidelines resulting from this process. 
Ordinal Survey Responses 
Figure 5. Evidently Contradictory Survey 
Findings 
Strongly Agree 
or Agree 
Neither Agree 
no Disagree 
Strongly 
Disagree or 
Disagree 
Vaccine Safety Review Process is 
Scientifically Rigorous and Objective
90% 
5% 
5% 
Continuing Need Exists for the Vaccine 
Safety Review Process 
90% 
10% 
Recent Vaccine Safety Decisions Are 
Accurate  
45% 
25% 
30% 
This evident  contradiction in survey  responses was explained by  the qualitative  data.  The coded 
open-ended  responses  revealed  that  the  primary  reason  for  disagreement  with  specific  guidelines 
centered  on  the  information  used  in  the  review  process.  Respondents  who  disagreed  with  the 
guidelines believed  them  to be based on minimal  or limited scientific evidence.  Thus, the evaluation 
highlighted a disagreement with the inclusion criteria used in the review process.  This finding was not 
anticipated by the structured responses provided in the structured instrument despite extensive review 
by vaccine specialists and agency representatives. 
Sequential  Design.  The  collection  and  analysis  of  structured  survey  and  open-ended  key 
informant  interviews  in  an  iterative  analytic  process  can  provide  important  information  on 
emergent  and  unexpected  themes.  For  example,  a  statistical  analysis  of  the  combined  survey  and 
quantitized  interview  responses  in  our  sequential  design  revealed  a  significant,  and  heretofore 
unrealized,  association  between  the  perceived  utility  of  the  vaccine  guidelines  and  their  audience. 
Initial  analysis of  the  survey responses demonstrated significant differences  in satisfaction  with  the 
readability and utility of the guidelines by agency. Many used the open-ended response fields to detail 
their  concerns  or  satisfaction  with  the  format  and  content  of  the  reports,  but  these  fields  did  not 
explain the disparity by organizational affiliation.  
Vol. 3, No. 1                Ecological and Environmental Anthropology               
2007 
25 
We  explored  this  disparity  in  subsequent  in-depth  interviews,  and  the  resulting  themes  were 
quantitized and integrated with  the survey responses. Subsequent  analysis revealed that  those agency 
officials  most  satisfied  with  the  reports  viewed  the  scientific  community  as  the  major  audience. 
Those  who  felt  that  the  general  public  and  policy  makers  were  the  main  audiences  felt  that  the 
reports  were  too  dense  or  complicated  to  be  readily  understandable.  The  use  of  simple  statistical 
measures  of  association,  in  this  case  chi  square,  thus  allowed  for  the  discovery  of  an  important 
difference of opinion that may have been missed without the iterative combination of structured and 
unstructured data.  
Disadvantages 
While  there  are  demonstrated  benefits  to  the  transformative  mixed  methods  designs,  there  are 
several  limitations  and  challenges  as  well.  We  will  start  with  a  disadvantage  commonly  voiced  by 
qualitative  researchers:  the  loss  of  depth  and  flexibility  that  occurs  when  qualitative  data  are 
quantitized.  Qualitative codes are multidimensional,  meaning they can and do provide insights into a 
host  of  interrelated  conceptual  themes  or  issues  during  analysis  (Bazeley  2004).  Codes  can  also be 
revisited  during  analysis  in  an  iterative  analytic  process  to  allow  for  the  recognition  of  emergent 
themes  and  insights.  Conversely,  quantitized  data  are  fixed  and  one-dimensional;  that  is,  they  are 
composed  of a single set  of  responses  prospectively representing a conceptual category  determined 
prior  to  data  collection.  They  cannot  change  in  response  to  new  insights  in  analysis.  In  short, 
reducing  rich  qualitative  data  to  dichotomous  variables  renders  them  single  dimensional  and 
immutable.  
This  is  a  serious  challenge  to  transformative  mixed  methods  designs.  In  theory,  mixed  method 
researchers who quantitize qualitative data need only  to avoid focusing on the quantitative dataset  to 
the exclusion of the original qualitative data to avoid this problem. In practice, however, this can be 
difficult. Analyzing, coding, and integrating unstructured with structured data is a complex  and time-
consuming process.  The prospect  of  reconsidering and  potentially  reconfiguring  the  coding  scheme 
can be unappealing after the team has begun statistical analyses with the existing dataset. We found it 
helpful  to  return  to  discrete  and  topically-bounded qualitative  responses  associated  with  significant 
statistical  findings  rather  than  to  the  entire  qualitative  dataset.  For  example,  we  reviewed  agency 
representative responses about  the utility of  vaccine guidelines  to verify  the coding structure before 
accepting the association between such responses and agency affiliation. 
 second  broad  category  of  challenges  to  mixed  methods  research,  commonly  leveled  by 
quantitative  researchers,  concerns  the  limitations  of  quantitized  qualitative  data  for  statistical 
measurement.  First,  these  data  are  vulnerable  to  the  problem  of  collinearity,  wherein  response 
categories are themselves linked as a consequence of the coding strategy (Roberts 2000). Second, the 
need  to collect  and analyze qualitative  data  can  force  researchers  to  reduce sample size, which  can 
curtail  the  kinds  of  statistical  procedures  that  might  reasonably  be  used,  particularly  the  more 
rigorous parametric measures of association, such as t-tests and analyses of variance.  
Collinearity is a problem for even the most forgiving measures of statistical association including the 
nonparametric  tests  chi-square,  a  workhorse  for  bivariate  tabular  analysis  of  a  wide  variety  of 
research  data.  Mixed  methods  researchers,  however,  can  largely  avoid  collinearity  associated  with 
quantitization  by  identifying  and  separating  dichotomized  codes  derived  from  a  single  open-ended 
question  in  subsequent  statistical  analyses.  In  the  studies  described  above  we  employed  simple 
statistical measures of association only for response categories collected in different phases and with 
different  questions.  The  problem  related  to  sample size,  however,  is  a  serious  challenge  for  mixed 
methods studies involving quantitization.  Prospective mixed methods researchers should be aware  of 
the sample size required to provide sufficient statistical power for the study question, and whether the 
study  parameters  will  allow  for  the  inclusion  of  quantitized  qualitative  data.  If  not,  they  might 
consider mixed methods designs not requiring data transformation.  
Vol. 3, No. 1                Ecological and Environmental Anthropology               
2007 
26 
Conclusion 
Mixed  methods  designs  can  provide  pragmatic  advantages  when  exploring  complex  research 
questions.  The  qualitative  data  provide  a  deep  understanding  of  survey  responses,  and  statistical 
analysis can  provide detailed assessment of patterns of  responses. However,  the  analytic process of 
combining  qualitative  and  survey  data  by  quantitizing  qualitative  data  can  be  time  consuming  and 
expensive and thus  may lead researchers working under tight budgetary or time constraints  to reduce 
sample  sizes  or  limit  the  time  spent interviewing. Ultimately,  these  designs seem  most  appropriate 
for  research  that does  not  require  either extensive, deep  analysis  of qualitative  data  or  multivariate 
analysis of quantitative data.  
This study demonstrates some techniques for and outcomes from mixed methods research designs 
involving  quantitizing  qualitative  data.  The  strategies  employed  had  some  commonalities.  For 
example,  open-ended  survey  responses  and  in-depth  interview  data  were  coded  using  an  analytic 
software package.  The data collected for each task were integrated using a data management software 
package.  These  combined data could  then be  assessed using simple measures of frequency  to explain 
apparent  discrepancies by  providing contextual  data on what survey  responses actually  meant  (i.e., 
stakeholders’  disagreement  with  guidelines)  and  reveal  determinants  of  various  responses  (i.e.,  key 
informants’ conceptions of the major audience for guidelines). 
This form of sequential data collection  may be of use for  environmental researchers involved in 
descriptive studies of readily-structured biological or environmental measures as patterns of resource 
use  or  activity  and  of social  metrics  that  may  defy  easy  categorization,  such  as potentially-related 
perceptions,  attitudes,  or  beliefs.  The  opportunity  to  provide  additional  qualitative  information 
augmenting structured responses can provide key insights into unexpected relationships between local 
resource use patterns and community  factors.  This is but one example, and researchers interested in 
applying  this design could revise the structure as necessary  to be responsive to their particular study 
objectives and parameters. 
Acknowledgements 
The  authors  gratefully  acknowledge  Asta  Sorensen,  MA,  for  her  comments  and  word  processing 
contribution. 
References 
Adamson, J., R. Gooberman-Hill, G. Woolhead, and J. Donovan 2004 Questerviews: Using 
Questionnaires in Qualitative Interviews as a Methods of Integrating Qualitative and Quantitative Health 
Services Research. Journal of Health Services Research and Policy 9(3):139-145. 
Bazeley, Pat 1999 The Bricoleur With a Computer: Piecing Together Qualitative and Quantitative Data. 
Qualitative Health Researcher 9(2):279–287. 
Bazeley, Pat 2004 Issues in Mixing Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches to Research. In Applying 
Qualitative Methods to Marketing Management Research. R. Buber, J. Gadner, eds. Pp 141–156. 
Hampshire, United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan. 
Blake, R. 1989 Integrating Quantitative and Qualitative Methods in Family Research. Families Systems 
and Health 7:411–427. 
Caracelli, V. J., and J. C. Greene 1993 Data Analysis Strategies for Mixed-Method Evaluation Designs. 
Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis 15(2): 195-207. 
Vol. 3, No. 1                Ecological and Environmental Anthropology               
2007 
27 
Creswell, J. W., V. L. Plano Clark, M. Gutmann, and W. Hanson 2003 Advanced Mixed Methods 
Research Designs. In Handbook of Mixed Methods in Social and Behavioral Research. A. Tashakkori and 
C. Teddlie, eds. Pp. 619-637. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 
Creswell, John, Michael Fetters, and Nataliya Ivankova 2004 Designing a Mixed Methods Study In 
Primary Care. Annals of Family Medicine 2:7–12. 
Creswell, John W., and Vicki L. Plano Clark 2007 Designing and Conducting Mixed Methods Research. 
Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 
Datta, Lois-ellin 2001 The Wheelbarrow, the Mosaic, and the Double Helix. Evaluation Journal of 
Australasia 1(2):33–40.  
Greene, J., V. Caracelli, and W. Graham 1989 Toward a Conceptual Framework for Mixed-Methods 
Evaluation Designs. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis 11:255-274. 
Johnson, Jeffrey C., ed. 1990 Selecting Ethnographic Informants. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 
Johnson, B., and L. Christensen 2004 Educational Research: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed 
Approaches (2
nd
Edition). Boston, MA: Pearson Education, Inc. 
Johnson, R. B., and A. J. Onwuegbuzie 2004 Mixed Methods Research: A Research Paradigm Whose 
Time Has Come. Educational Researcher 33(7):14-26 
MacKay, Kelly J., and J. Michael Campbell 2004 A Mixed-Methods Approach for Measuring 
Environmental Impacts in Nature-Based Tourism and Outdoor Recreation Settings. Tourism Analysis; 
9(3):141-152. 
National Institutes of Health, Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research 1999 Qualitative Methods 
in Health Research. Opportunities and Considerations in Application and Review. Washington, DC: 
National Institutes of Health 
Onwuegbuzie, A. J., and C. Teddlie 2003 A Framework for Analyzing Data in Mixed Methods Research. 
In Handbook of Mixed Methods in Social and Behavioral Research. A. Tashakkori and C. Teddlie, eds. 
Pp. 351-383. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 
Roberts, C.W. 2000 A Conceptual Framework for Quantitative Text Analysis. Quality and Quantity 
34:259–274. 
Rossman, G., and B. Wilson 1991 Numbers and Words Revisited: Being “Shamelessly Eclectic.” 
Evaluation Review 9(5):627–643. 
Sandelowski, Margaret 2000 Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Sampling, Data Collection, and 
Analysis Techniques in Mixed-Methods Studies. Research in Nursing and Health 23:246–255. 
Schmidt, G. 2005 Ecology & Anthropology: A Field Without a Future? Ecological and Environmental 
Anthropology 1(1):13-15. 
Tashakkori, A., and C. Teddlie 1998 Mixed Methodsology: Combining Qualitative and Quantitative 
Approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested