mvc open pdf in browser : Reader convert pdf to jpg software Library dll winforms .net web page web forms Expert_.NET_Delivery_Using_NAnt_and_CruiseControl_.NET_200517-part1064

<target name="publish.web">
<copy todir="${core.distribution}\">
<fileset basedir="${core.source}\UI">
<include name="**"/>
<exclude name="obj/**"/>
<exclude name="**/*.cs"/>
<exclude name="**/*.resx"/>
<exclude name="**/*.csproj"/>
<exclude name="**/*.vspscc"/>
<exclude name="**/*.scc"/>
</fileset>
</copy>
<copy todir="${core.distribution}\bin\">
<fileset basedir="${core.output}\">
<include name="*.dll"/>
<exclude name="*Tests*"/>
</fileset>
</copy>
<zip zipfile="${core.publish}\${solution.name}-Build-${sys.version}.zip">
<fileset basedir="${core.distribution}">
<include name="**"/>
</fileset>
</zip>
</target>
<target name="publish.win">
<copy todir="${core.distribution}\">
<fileset basedir="${core.output}\">
<include name="*.dll"/>
<include name="*.exe"/>
<exclude name="*Tests*"/>
</fileset>
</copy>
<zip zipfile="${core.publish}\${solution.name}-Build-${sys.version}.zip">
<fileset basedir="${core.distribution}\">
<include name="**" />
</fileset>
</zip>
</target>
CHAPTER 5 ■ PROCESS STANDARDS
151
Reader convert pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
batch pdf to jpg converter online; best pdf to jpg converter for
Reader convert pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg; changing file from pdf to jpg
Clearly there is a lot of common script here that could be further refactored, but we will
concentrate on the former refactoring. We need a step for deciding which target should be
invoked. We can do this with a target called publishin the Build.Commonfile as follows:
<target name="publish">
<if test="${solution.isweb}">
<call target="publish.web"/>
</if>
<ifnot test="${solution.isweb}">
<call target="publish.win"/>
</ifnot>
</target>
This means that there needs to be a Boolean property in the specific build files. Therefore
we need to add the following line (with the appropriate value) to each of the build files: 
<property name="solution.isweb" value="false"/>
We then need to edit the publishtarget in each to the following:
<target name="publish" 
description="Place the compiled assets, reports etc. in agreed location.">
<nant buildfile="Build.Common.xml" target="publish" inheritall="true"/>
</target>
The result is a further reduction in code in the specific files.
Note
This could have been implemented by passing the name of the target from the specific build file
instead of a Boolean value and a conditional statement.In fact,that method would be preferred if there were
more than two options for publishing.The reason I did not specify the target here was also that I wanted to
hide the implementation details from the specific scripts in case I decide to change things internally to the
common file.
Caution
Introducing this further refactoring has had the desired effect,but you should be wary of the
dependencies now introduced on the publish step as well as the gains.Changes to the filesetpattern
could have serious negative as well as positive impact on the build process.
Creating the Deploy Files
We will now leave the build files alone and take a look at the deploy scripts. We discussed the
processes for deployment at the beginning of the chapter, and we can indeed see that the
deployment processes of the three solutions are different. We will take a brief look at each file
and the most relevant aspects for deployment.
CHAPTER 5 ■ PROCESS STANDARDS
152
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
change file from pdf to jpg on; pdf to jpeg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
convert pdf pages to jpg online; convert pdf page to jpg
Etomic.Library.Transformer.Deploy.xml
The properties to run this file are as follows:
<property name="nant.onfailure" value="fail"/>
<property name="company.name" value="Etomic"/>
<property name="solution.name" value="${company.name}.Library.Transformer"/>
<property name="project.name.1" value="${solution.name}.Engine"/>
<property name="core.directory" value="D:\BookCode\BuildArea"/>
<property name="core.projectarea" value="${core.directory}\${solution.name}"/>
<property name="core.publish" value="${core.projectarea}\Publish"/>
<property name="core.deploy" value="D:\TempDeploy"/>
<property name="core.environment" value="D:\BookCode\Assemblies"/>
The first few properties are the same as those for the build file. Perhaps there will be some
opportunity to join the two files so that they do not have to be maintained separately, with the
additional maintenance and risk that is introduced.
The next three properties are duplicates as well.
After that, the final properties are specific to deployment. The first is a random folder to
be used for unpackaging the application and any other bits and pieces of work before actually
positioning the assets. The second property is more important—it points to the actual loca-
tion for the assets to be published.
The next interesting steps are the “getting” of the assets and their unpackaging:
<target name="get" description="Grab the correct assets.">
<delete dir="${core.deploy}\" failonerror="false"/>
<mkdir dir="${core.deploy}\${sys.version}\"/>
<copy file="${core.publish}\${solution.name}-Build-${sys.version}.zip" 
todir="${core.deploy}\"/>
<unzip zipfile="${core.deploy}\${solution.name}-Build-${sys.version}.zip" 
todir="${core.deploy}\"/>
</target>
The tasks here are simple enough to follow. Then in this instance, we need to ensure that
the environment for the assembly exists through the following:
<target name="createenvironments" description="Create the environments required">
<mkdir dir="${core.environment}\${solution.name}\Latest\" 
failonerror="false"/>
<mkdir dir="${core.environment}\${solution.name}\Specific\" 
failonerror="false"/>
<mkdir dir="${core.environment}\${solution.name}\Deprecated\" 
failonerror="false"/>
</target>
Notice this includes the initial setup of the aggressive library management discussed ear-
lier as part of the standards.
CHAPTER 5 ■ PROCESS STANDARDS
153
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf image to jpg; batch pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
convert .pdf to .jpg online; convert pdf file into jpg
Finally, all that remains is to place the assemblies in the required folders with the relevant
names:
<target name="position" description="Place required assets">
<copy 
file="${core.deploy}\${project.name.1}.dll" 
todir="${core.environment}\${solution.name}\Latest\" 
overwrite="true"
/>
<copy 
file="${core.deploy}\${project.name.1}.dll"
tofile="${core.environment}\${solution.name}\Specific\ ➥
${project.name.1}_${sys.version}.dll"
overwrite="true"
/>
</target>
Again, these steps are not complicated. The important aspect of this work is the overwrit-
ing of the assembly in the Latestfolder with whichever published version is being used and
then the write of a named version of the assembly to the Specificfolder.
Note
There is no safeguard on overwriting the Latestversion with some older version of the assembly.
Once this file is run, with something like the following line, the assembly is then deployed
into the chosen locations, as can be seen in Figure 5-5 and Figure 5-6:
nant -f:Etomic.Library.Transformer.Deploy.xml -D:debug=false ➥
-D:sys.version=1.0.1.0
Figure 5-5.The Latest folder
CHAPTER 5 ■ PROCESS STANDARDS
154
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
batch pdf to jpg converter online; batch pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. XDoc.Tiff. XDoc.Dicom. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
pdf to jpeg; convert pdf picture to jpg
Figure 5-6.The Specific folder
Etomic.Transformer.Win.Deploy.xml
The Windows deployment script is similar to the script seen in the previous chapter, with the
addition of the newer properties from the enhanced script efficiencies. The key change in the
properties is the deployment environment, which is as follows:
Apart from that, the deployment is a straightforward XCOPY.
Following deployment of the 1.0.2.0 version, the structures look as shown in Figure 5-7.
Notice the differing versions of the assemblies used in the build of the overall solution.
Figure 5-7.The Windows deployment
CHAPTER 5 ■ PROCESS STANDARDS
155
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. XDoc.Tiff. XDoc.Dicom. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
convert online pdf to jpg; pdf to jpg converter
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
convert multi page pdf to jpg; convert .pdf to .jpg online
Etomic.Transformer.Web.Deploy.xml
The web deployment script is almost identical to the Windows deployment script. In this
instance, the solution name changes (of course), and the core.environmentproperty points
toa nominated share for web applications—in this case, D:\Webs.
Finally, at this point there is one additional line in the createenvironmentstarget.
<mkiisdir dirpath="${core.environment}\${sys.version}\"
vdirname="${solution.name}-${sys.version}"/>
This is about the simplest use of <mkiisdir>there is, but it suffices in this instance. 
After this, the deployment becomes another XCOPY scenario. Once it is completed, we
can access the web application as shown in Figure 5-8.
Figure 5-8.The web deployment
Note
It may seem that I am paying a lot more attention to the build process than I did to the deployment
process.This is true at this point,since the build process is much more feature-rich.The applications at this
point are trivial to deploy; they do not contain configuration information or links to databases,for example.
We will need to think more about these issues in subsequent chapters.
CHAPTER 5 ■ PROCESS STANDARDS
156
Observations
We should reflect on what we have seen so far regarding the delivery processes. The following
are the key points:
Level of difficulty.It is not especially difficult to create a build and deploy script for an
application, particularly a pure .NET application. However, the gains in creating build
scripts are in the standardization and efficiency of the overall process for a team of devel-
opers, in the same way that a standard architecture helps a developer learn about a
system.
Standards and organization. Given that all delivery scenarios will not be the same, we
need to make the best use of those aspects that arethe same, so that it is obvious where the
differences lie and the changes that need to be made to deliver a solution. Implementing
the standards listed in this chapter is no small task in a preexisting environment, with sig-
nificant active solutions, but at the same time none of the standards is complicated. 
Refactoring.Once a few scripts were completed, refactoring opportunities were immedi-
ately obvious and we applied some changes to make obvious gains. However, it also pays
to be wary of creating too much commonality between scripts; over the course of the
whole implementation program, we may be proved wrong in certain areas. There is also
an equal but opposite method of refactoring: that of code generation. Rather than create
efficiencies through commonality, we may be able to provide generated build and deploy
scripts for an application.
Awkward areas.There are a few holes in the process that are not easily plugged through
simple standard scripts. These are areas such as FxCop (a non-NAnt requirement), knowl-
edge of documentation and unit testing requirements, and so on. 
Overall, we should be pleased with our efforts so far. The implementation of the Design
toDeliver initiative is on track, and it seems to be proven that it can be done for a variety of
application types. Although we have not studied areas of complexity yet, we have worked out
core standards for issue to the development teams. Further success at this point will require
more thought and more complex interactions.
A More Complex Scenario
We have looked at a fairly common scenario and provided a useful delivery process for some
differing application types: Windows, web, and a class library. We will continue to develop the
processes further for those in the next chapter. Before we move on, though, we can take a look
at another application that contains a little more complexity and see how the scripts we have
developed perform with this application.
CHAPTER 5 ■ PROCESS STANDARDS
157
VSSManager
The application we will look at this time is called VSSManager. This is a utility application that
allows control of a set of VSS databases from a central control application. This is especially
useful for the team at Etomic because it means they can administer their VSS databases through
the Web, provide automatic lock-down of databases at release time, and similar activities. The
current functionality of  VSSManager is described in the use case shown in Figure 5-9.
Figure 5-9.VSSManager functionality
CHAPTER 5 ■ PROCESS STANDARDS
158
The important things to consider about the application for us with our “delivery hats” on
involve the implementation details for this system:
Automating VSS (a COM application) means that there must be some use of a COM
object.
Using the Web to access a database application such as VSS will not work due to permis-
sion issues and the requirement to have an interactive process. Therefore, a Windows
service has been developed that uses remoting to allow client access to the VSS databases.
Apart from the Windows service, there is a console version of the server, which is handy
when developing and testing the service. Both perform in the same way. 
A separate assembly contains the interfaces for the remote objects that can be referenced
by the server application, and will also be required for any client application.
The configuration of the application is handled through the app.configfile, which takes
lists of databases and users for use by the service. Some custom configuration section
handlers have been coded for this task.
Finally, logging is handled using the flexible log4net open source library. This is also con-
figured in theapp.configfile.
Caution
This little application demonstrates some remoting principles—programming to interface,for
example—some use of configuration section handlers,and a little COM interop work,but I would be wary
about using it in a production environment.There are some problems with its use,not least of which is the
lack of encryption of passwords.On the other hand,it was quite a fun application to develop!
Figure 5-10 shows the packages and dependencies forming the VSSManager application.
Given this information, we need to ensure the following in the delivery of this system:
COM interop. We need to ensure that the build correctly exposes the VSS API library to
.NET to allow the build to work. We also need to consider how we deploy given the
dependency on the VSS API library.
Remoting. We need to ensue that we deploy the remoting interface to the shared assem-
blies area as well as deploying the main application so that other developers can work
with the remoting interfaces to develop the client.
Windows service. We must install and configure the Windows service when we deploy the
application.
CHAPTER 5 ■ PROCESS STANDARDS
159
Figure 5-10.VSSManager packages and dependencies
So there are a few more things to think about, which will mean a little extra work in the
scripts. Before we worry about that, though, we can see how far our regular scripts will take us
in the delivery of this application.
In fact, they can take us a considerable distance. To build the application, the Etomic.➥
VSSManager.Build.xmlfile looks almost the same as the build scripts we have seen for the
Transformer suite of applications. Significant changes are, of course, the specifics of the
assemblies required:
<property name="project.name.1" value="${solution.name}.Remote" />
<property name="project.name.2" value="${solution.name}.Server" />
<property name="project.name.3" value="${solution.name}.Service" />
<property name="project.name.4" value="${solution.name}.ServerConsole" />
<property name="solution.isweb" value="false"/>
If you take a look at the rest of the build file, you will be able to see the slight changes to
the FxCop and NDoc tasks to include the relevant assemblies from the list above. Finally, there
are no unit tests for this application (very naughty!) and so there is no NUnit step.
CHAPTER 5 ■ PROCESS STANDARDS
160
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested