mvc open pdf in browser : Convert pdf pages to jpg online software control cloud windows web page azure class Expert_.NET_Delivery_Using_NAnt_and_CruiseControl_.NET_20052-part1067

Once we understand what we have set out to do, and have organized the tools we will use
to do it, the next three chapters describe actually implementing the processes. In these chap-
ters we start with a simple example and then move on to more complex and more general
scenarios, considering how the practical implementation needs to extend. Here we also utilize
CruiseControl.NET to provide continuous integration.
Chapter 4,“A Simple Case Study”:Now that we are fully versed in NAnt, in this chapter
we take a simple application and implement a build file for it. We flesh out the framework
described in Chapter 2 using the tasks described in Chapter 3 to implement the identified
steps. At the end of this chapter, we are left with a crude but effective build process with
some successes but also some issues to build on.
Chapter 5,“Process Standards”:If only it was as easy as the example in Chapter 4! Here
we look at another application and we apply the same process to this solution in addition
to the deploy script. We then refactor the scripts for the applications we have looked at to
provide some common functions in the process that we can harness later on. We look at
some of the features a solution should contain, and examine some useful features of the
development environment to ensure that we can feasibly maintain an automated process
that works across multiple solutions.
Chapter 6,“Continuous Integration”:Although we now have a process defined by a
script outline and some refactored examples, it all feels a bit loose. This chapter looks at
the use of CruiseControl.NET to implement continuous integration. We expand on our
earlier discussions of this area and consider the consequences of such an activity. 
Having successfully introduced automated delivery processes, the remainder of the
booklooks at some individual aspects of the tools, some complex parts of the process, and
suggestions for enhancements to gain further efficiency and coverage of automated delivery
processes.
Chapter 7,“Extending NAnt”:This chapter explores a little of the source code for NAnt
and describes how you can create your own NAnt tasks. We take a look at some features
ofcurrent NAnt tasks to get a feel for coding, and then we build a task for use in our own
scripts to solve problems we discovered in Chapter 4. We build more in later chapters.
Chapter 8,“Database Integration”:This chapter looks at what may be the most complex
activity for automation, an area we have until now studiously avoided: the database. We
take a look at a potential process to at least partially solve the issues in this area, as well as
specific tools to handle the task for us. We then create a NAnt task and consider solution
standards we can use in our scripts to facilitate this part of the process. We also take a
look at standards for DTS packages.
Chapter 9,“Code Generation”:We have now covered a considerable amount of work for
handling build and deploy processes, but there are further efficiencies to be made. In a
world that is handled via XML, code generation can be very useful indeed. This chapter
looks at some candidate areas for automation, and the benefits automation can provide.
We then look at code-generation techniques and add them to our process.
Chapter 10,“Closing Thoughts”:This chapter takes everything we have worked with so
far and recaps this work, considering what we have and have not covered. I then specu-
late on a wish list for delivery processes in relation to those subjects and themes.
INTRODUCTION
xxvii
Convert pdf pages to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf image to jpg online; change pdf file to jpg file
Convert pdf pages to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert multiple pdf to jpg online; change pdf to jpg file
Finally, there are two appendixes, the first one containing additional information on tools
and the organization of those tools, and the second one describing a “fun” project with NAnt.
Appendix A,“A Fistful of Tools”:This appendix covers the organization and dependencies
of the tools used throughout the book to aid the implementation of your own build
processes.
Appendix B,“NAnt Sweeper”:Just in case you thought NAnt was all about work and no
play, an entirely inappropriate but amusing example of its utility may make you think
otherwise.
Just Before We Begin
It has been tough to consider all of the options for delivery processes and at times difficult to
describe these options adequately and concisely on paper. Nevertheless, writing this book has
been a lot of fun and has helped the processes in my own teams significantly.
I hope you find the same utility and fun from this book’s exploration of the tools, tech-
niques, and processes for software delivery.
Whether you agree or disagree with my thoughts, I am always happy to hear other views,
and you can share these by contacting me through my blog: http://bitarray.co.uk/marc.
Happy software delivery-ing!
INTRODUCTION
xxviii
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
reader pdf to jpeg; convert pdf to jpg converter
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code convert TIFF file all pages to jpg images.
change pdf file to jpg online; best program to convert pdf to jpg
A Context for Delivery
T
he introduction of sound delivery processes can be a complex and confusing affair. Occa-
sionally, some parts of the process seem impossible and other times they seem impossibly
easy. Just when you think you have cracked an area of difficulty, another issue raises its head.
It is a long journey to achieve a smooth and reliable process—and when considered as a whole,
it is quite unpalatable. In this book, we will aim to tackle it piece by piece and issue by issue
until we are satisfied we have a solution, or a framework, or even an idea of how to provide
benefit through delivery processes.
For that reason, I think it is important to have a context for the areas of build and deploy
processes we will address throughout the rest of the book. It is important because otherwise
these efforts are the kind that may never have an endpoint. There will always be one more
tweak, one restructure, one bit of coding wizardry that can be applied to make things just a bit
better. In the real world, this is not usually an option; work must reap practical rewards in the
short term. This is the usual problem facing development teams today: the need for scaffold-
ing to improve development effort is not encouraged by management teams who need to be
making maximum external/customer charges with the available development resource. To
compound this, the very people who understand why the scaffolding and processes are a
good idea—the developers—are the very people who probably will not make a good job of
expressing the idea by way of cost benefits and so on to the management teams. The result
can be inertia in the environment and processes to begin with, but ultimately the result can
beincreased costs for the same work.
To begin with, and to ensure that we are all facing the same direction, we will look at the
situation and goals of a fictitious development company in terms of its aims for delivery. Then
we will look at a variety of processes and problems for consideration for planning. We will come
up with a plan for “delivering on delivery processes” and assess the practical benefits of such a
plan. This plan may have an end goal that is utopian in vision too, but at the least it will include
milestones and deliverables that can provide focus and measurement to our efforts.
It is this plan that will form the cornerstone for our efforts throughout the rest of the book. 
Why Delivery Processes Are Needed
The short answer to this question is obvious: hiring a new person to handle delivery for every
xsystem is too expensive to maintain, and untenable for a development team going forward.
Maintaining a knowledgebase on the individual delivery of dozens of individual systems going
forward is equally untenable, as is maintaining an individual development and delivery envi-
ronment for dozens of systems going forward.
1
CHAPTER 1
■ ■ ■
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
bulk pdf to jpg; changing pdf file to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
convert pdf into jpg online; .net pdf to jpg
CHAPTER 1 A CONTEXT FOR DELIVERY
2
The common factor in this answer is “individual.” Development is an individual activity:
it is creative, it is based on “knowing” the domain you are in, and it is about craftsmanship
rather than commodity (in the main). This is not necessarily a bad thing: the creativity, the
skills, and the craft of developers provide us with elegant and innovative solutions to problems.
In the development area, these things are in fact a boon. To harness and focus individuality in
development, we create processes that ensure there is planning and product from the creative
aspects of development work so that the customer and team management can understand
what is happening with the money. And then—guess what? We do not quite remove the indi-
viduality from the delivery of the product to the customer. The innovative solution is developed
on time but cannot be moved from the development area to the production area without a lot
of effort, or with any confidence. The perception of the product is spoiled at the point it is at
its highest profile to the customer—as delivery begins—and so the credibility of the product
for the customer is damaged before they have even worked with it. Even when this works
relatively well for a specific product, a development team handling multiple systems and
subsystems will be quickly caught up in a never-ending set of issues relating to delivery.
Conversely, removing creativity from the delivery of a product results in a set of known
parts to the process. It can be specified, costed, measured, and assessed for success upon com-
pletion. Doing this requires defining a process for delivery. To define the processes for delivery,
we need an understanding of the issues involved. We will spend the rest of the chapter consid-
ering these issues and the process itself. Before we do, consider the differences that a sound
delivery process could make for you, your team, or your customers, as shown in Table 1-1.
Table 1-1.Individual Delivery vs.Delivery Process
Item
Individual Time/Comment
Process Time/Comment
Delivery effort setup cost
Not done/guessed at 2 days?
3 hrs (with a script by script
breakdown)
CM activities
Unknown/ad hoc
2 hrs (aligned to standard)
Availability of system to customer
3 days prior to testing
Upon project
commencement
System assets
Most under source control
All assets controlled
Time to perform release
Unknown/2 hrs?
257 seconds
Response time for new release
As per queue
257 seconds
The responses shown in the table are a matter of context for your own team, but these rep-
resent the responses from teams I have worked with. The message is clear: delivery processes
are required if you want a cost-effective, efficient, and professional software development life
cycle. With many systems, the need is further accentuated.
The Etomic Situation
Etomic is a small company that can handle full project life cycles for small to medium (up to
around 12 months of development effort) web- and Windows-based applications. Primarily,
these projects are web based. 
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
.pdf to .jpg converter online; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
change pdf to jpg format; convert pdf to jpg for online
It has approximately 50 projects in-house in various stages of completion and with vary-
ing degrees of activity. These projects are handled by a team of 6 project managers, 24 analysts
and developers, a handful of graphic designers, and a few system/network administrators. 
They are a busy team and have many satisfied customers. In particular:
• They receive considerable repeat business from customers. 
• Projects have a tendency to be released on time and on schedule.
• Project life cycles tend to be extended longer than originally envisaged through a pro-
gram of change initiated by customers.
In short, customers tend to get what they want, and as a result, Etomic is a good place to
work and has expanded significantly.
Behind the scenes, though, lurk some problems. These problems have been brought on in
many cases as a result of business successes. Only five years ago, it was a much smaller, five-
person operation operating in a “boutique” style. Projects could be worked in a “handcrafted”
style, and indeed they were. There was little concern as to the broader implications of hand-
crafting and the attention this needed.
On the other hand, if every time an application is produced risk and complexity are
added to the overall operation, then a number of things are occurring:
More staff are required to administer the day-to-day activities, because everything begins
to take time.
More mistakes are made during routine operations such as development, archiving, bug
fixing, building, and releasing.
More pressure is placed on those striving to meet the same levels of customer satisfaction
that have been previously achieved.
There is a high risk that, ultimately, something will go wrong with an application that will
be difficult to recover from. This could manifest itself in a number of ways:
Estimates are too short and deadlines are missed as change takes a lot longer than originally
thought. This could be owing to difficulty in obtaining assets, constructing environments,
or maybe just the coding. The result is either an upset customer, or absorption of incurred
cost, or quite possibly both. The stress on the team cannot be underestimated either,
potentially leading to the loss of team members.
A development server crashes and a backup is not available. Not every asset is stored in
source control. The 30 projects that were on that server are in trouble. The result is serious
stress for the team, and perhaps multiple instances of estimates being too short and
deadlines being missed.
Bob leaves. Oh dear. Bob’s application only ran properly on his laptop, but he used to
come in on a Sunday to handle live releases. No one is sure what he used to do. The result
is more stress, and more estimation and cost problems. Once this sort of malaise is preva-
lent among the team, it can be hard to overcome.
CHAPTER 1 A CONTEXT FOR DELIVERY
3
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Supports for changing image size. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images. C# class source codes and online demos are provided for .NET.
change file from pdf to jpg on; best way to convert pdf to jpg
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
convert pdf file to jpg; pdf to jpg
One day, the team will not be able to account for, or fix, one of these problems. At that
point, Etomic may be in some trouble. We cannot account for every problem of this kind with
the processes we seek to address and develop with our efforts, but we will be helping to remove
the risk from the overall scenario.
Currently, work arrives thick and fast. Projects represent significant commitment to the
team. Each handcrafted solution reduces the flexibility of the team, reducing operational
capacity as more time is spent in the intervening processes and management of the projects
than actually in development.
Of course, as the team has grown, there have been some general gains in terms of process
and of course Etomic has been unable to keep functioning as a boutique. But at the same time
it has not developed processes to “industrialize” the life cycle.
Note
When you are engrossed in these techniques and tools,it is easy to assume that everyone knows
something about them.The truth can be very different.I would say that in my experience of recruiting devel-
opers,most are unaware of good configuration management and good development processes even if they
are quite gifted in terms of general development skills.
As a business, Etomic has a broad aim of improving its capability to deliver. In particular
it wants processes that
Cut down on effort and administration at the point of delivery
Reduce overall project risks and improve confidence in delivery
Ensure that mundane, but important, delivery tasks are completed
Introduce standards/frameworks for the development team to adhere to
These are aims with which we can all identify. You may have guessed from the title of the
book that we are going to be looking at automation as the key facilitator to these aims. Automa-
tion comes with its own baggage, though, and we will quickly see that automation requires
more effort than simply coding until a goal is achieved.
Potential Processes
Let us take a look at some activities and processes that may constitute delivery processes
indevelopment teams such as Etomic. Actual scenarios will differ for a variety of reasons—
there are always business-related hoops that have to be jumped through, the balance of work
type may differ, and so on. But I think you will find some common ground in some of these
descriptions.
Simple Delivery
This is about as simple as it can get: one developer, one system, one single-minded approach
to “getting the system released.” It is a poor approach, even though it may in fact contain
CHAPTER 1 A CONTEXT FOR DELIVERY
4
many of the correct steps needed to ensure a successful delivery. The main problem is the sin-
gle point of failure: the sole developer. Without standardization, without checking and controls
through the use of standards to control the team overall and then tools to control the delivery,
we run the risk of being lost in the mind of the developer—the embodiment of the “Bob
Leaves!” scenario described earlier.
Note
You may scoff and consider yourself to be better than this.My suggestion is to try it; I have,on
several pet projects.Despite my focus,I found it very easy to forget about delivery from time to time.If you
had picked any point of time for me to hand my project to someone else,I think that there is a good chance
they would have had a hard time taking it on.Delivery is in many ways like other “agile”techniques.They
work great if you are disciplined and are working to strong principles,but they can fall apart quickly if the
reverse is true.This is why pair programming is a crucial aspect of successful agile implementations.In the
same way,checkpoints and standards become crucial for delivery.
Figure 1-1 demonstrates the simple activities occurring in the process. Note that the “Run
Tests” step encompasses a few potential activities that may occur during delivery.
Figure 1-1.A simple delivery process
Developer
Complete Code
Check In
Build Solution
Run Tests
Deploy
CHAPTER 1 A CONTEXT FOR DELIVERY
5
Segregated Delivery
This is a better delivery process than the Lone Ranger approach just described. Although the
practices remain similar, we now have a series of checkpoints to move through where various
roles can identify issues and thus take remedial action. Everyone would have to be complicit
for delivery to be poor. Figure 1-2 demonstrates the separation of activities.
The problem here may be fairly clear from the additional activities and roles involved in
the process. That is, it seems quite time consuming.
In practice, it does not have to be. A well-designed, or relatively simple, system may mean
that these activities are very straightforward and can be completed quickly. Unfortunately, this
may not be the case all of the time. Moreover, we are considering the delivery of 50 systems,
not of one or two. Twenty percent of these systems may be in the process of development, and
therefore integrated, tested, staged, and deployed at any one time. This puts pressure on the
roles involved in this process.
Another issue crops up in this scenario as well. We can see that by giving responsibility to
the Operations team to build the software, thus reducing the risk of a developer becoming the
point of failure for a system, we have introduced the risk of Operations accessing source con-
trol and performing the wrong actions: building and deploying the wrong version, damaging
source control, not understanding source control, and so on. Additionally, we may be over-
loading the Operations team with mundane activities such as documentation production.
Therisk here is that in an effort to provide a better managed process, we now have people
completing tasks inappropriate to their role.
Automated Delivery
To improve upon segregated delivery, we can provide automation to various activities that are
required for success but that are actually quite mundane—or at least they should be mundane.
Much of the work in this book involves ensuring that the activities we have proposed to auto-
mate are indeed mundane prior to automation.
In this process, several activities are the responsibility of the automation agent. These
include items such as the actual build and distribution of the system given the correct inputs
by the Operations team.
This process removes the risk of developers and operators being the points of failure for
delivery of a system, and has also kept the roles of each within expected norms.
The core issue introduced with this process is as you might expect: how do you automate
this process and these activities? This is the question we will be answering in the rest of the
book. This supposes, therefore, that the question can be answered satisfactorily. If that is the
case, then the issue for this kind of delivery is one of standardization and discipline. Automa-
tion will only succeed across multiple systems if they are broadly comparable. Specific
activities within the process will only succeed if exact standards are followed. Figure 1-3
demonstrates an automated process.
Simply automating a delivery on an individual basis is not such a good principle. This is
effectively “Bob Leaves!” except that Bob left behind some scripts. And then Alice leaves and
also leaves behind some scripts, and so on.
CHAPTER 1 A CONTEXT FOR DELIVERY
6
Figure 1-2.Segregated delivery process
Note
Whether or not you see this as an issue comes down to mind-set.In a busy team responsible for
the production of scores of systems,it makes a huge amount of sense.If you have a team or teams
producing very different software,it may not seem so viable to have rigorous standards for delivery.We will
see what form these standards take in Chapter 5.
CHAPTER 1 A CONTEXT FOR DELIVERY
7
Figure 1-3.Automated delivery process
Later, we will also look at continuous integration (CI) as a potential process. As its name
suggests, CI provides integration as required. Using CI can provide additional structure to the
automatic delivery process because it includes a set of feedback and measures. Perhaps CI
can be thought of as a goal for our processes. 
Developer
Operations
Automated Agent
Complete Code
Check In
Build Solution
Run Tests
Create
Documentation
Publish & Report
Prepare Release
Plan
Review Release
Plan
Deploy
CHAPTER 1 A CONTEXT FOR DELIVERY
8
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested