mvc open pdf in browser : Batch pdf to jpg converter online software application cloud windows html .net class Expert_.NET_Delivery_Using_NAnt_and_CruiseControl_.NET_20059-part1092

Loading a specific assembly such as a debug VS .NET–generated version would look
likethis:
<loadtasks assembly="D:\Projects\CustomSoln\MyTask\bin\debug\MyTask.dll" />
Loading a set of assemblies from a particular directory such as the latest versions of all
ofmy custom tasks would look like this:
<loadtasks path="P:\Repository\CustomNAntTasks" />
Loading a set of specific assemblies such as targeted versions of my custom tasks would
look like this (and notice here how <loadtasks>accepts a <fileset>type):
<loadtasks>
<fileset>
<include name="P:\Repository\CustomNAntTasks\DBTask_v1.dll" />
<include name="P:\Repository\CustomNAntTasks\FxCopTask_v3.dll" />
</fileset>
</loadtasks>
NAnt will give a response when it has found assemblies and is searching for NAnt tasks
within the assembly:
---------- NAnt ----------
NAnt 0.85 
Copyright (C) 2001-2004 Gerry Shaw
http://nant.sourceforge.net
Buildfile: file:///Loadtasks.build
[loadtasks] Scanning directory "D:\MyTasks\" for extension assemblies.
[loadtasks] Scanning assembly "NAntExtensions" for extensions.
BUILD SUCCEEDED
Total time: 0 seconds.
Output completed (0 sec consumed) - Normal Termination
Conditional Tasks
The conditional tasks follow on quite neatly from the structural tasks. Generally, they provide
a similar flexibility but on a micro rather than a macro level. That is, conditionals are probably
best used to provide flexibility within a target rather than a build file.
Once again, take care when using conditionals as part of the process. The effect of a condi-
tional is to introduce new alternative paths to the process and the use cases comprising the
process definition. Because NAnt is not easy to test in terms of process paths, the introduction of
too many conditionals could lead to behaviors that are difficult to see during implementation.
CHAPTER 3 IMPORTANT NANT TASKS
69
Batch pdf to jpg converter online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpeg on; convert multipage pdf to jpg
Batch pdf to jpg converter online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
changing pdf to jpg; convert pdf pages to jpg
Tip
I am being cautious about the introduction of conditionals and in fact I actually prefer the structural
tasks as part of the overall process.This is mainly because I think that defining a process with too many
branches and possibilities represents a weakness in the process itself; perhaps it should be a suite of
processes instead.
<foreach> [NAnt]
We saw a useful example of the <foreach>task in our discussion of the <call>task earlier; we
used it as part of our recursive call procedure. <foreach>is a useful task but has a limited set
oflooping possibilities, namely that it operates on a folder, a file, a string, or a line. Essentially
this means that loops over files and folders are quite straightforward, but other less obvious
loops tend to have to be thought about and managed carefully in order to get the best use out
of<foreach>.
The previous example showed a simple implementation of <foreach>, but in fact the con-
struct can be relatively involved because it accepts filesets as input.
<fail> [NAnt]
This is a useful debugging task. I generally would not use it explicitly in a production build file
since it is easy enough to make a build file fail in the first place. 
On the other hand, you may wish to double-check some important property prior to
beginning any build activities and instruct the build to fail if some explicit setting is not pres-
ent—for example, if no project name is being passed to the master build file. In other words, it
simply is not worth continuing until failure if certain conditions are not met. <fail>is a useful
task to combine with the <if> and <ifnot> tasks.
<if> [NAnt] and <ifnot> [NAnt]
In addition to <fail>, a useful check in the master build file is as follows:
<ifnot test="${property::exists('project.name')}">
<fail message="Please enter a project.name to run this file." />
</ifnot>
This will avoid any unnecessary debugging where a parameter that is required has not
been used by the caller of the build file. It can be especially useful when build files are being
chained and called by each other.
The code in bold is a slight departure from anything we have seen so far and makes use of
built-in functions from NAnt. We will look at these functions later in the chapter. For now, the
result of running the previous script (without a project.nameproperty) is as follows:
---------- NAnt ----------
NAnt 0.85 
Copyright (C) 2001-2004 Gerry Shaw
http://nant.sourceforge.net
CHAPTER 3 ■ IMPORTANT NANT TASKS
70
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
convert pdf to jpg for; change pdf into jpg
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Features and Benefits. High speed JPEG to GIF Converter, faster than other JPG Converters; file name when you convert the files in batch; Storing conversion
change pdf to jpg on; convert pdf pages to jpg online
Buildfile: file:///IfNot.build
BUILD FAILED
IfNot.build(4,7):
Please enter a project.name to run this file.
Total time: 0 seconds.
Output completed (0 sec consumed) - Normal Termination
File Tasks
Undoubtedly you will not be surprised to learn that the file tasks are among the most popular
since they are used across all of the process: creating and cleaning the environment, moving
inputs and outputs, assembling structures for distribution, and so on.
File tasks are quite easy to understand; they are largely analogous to the DOS commands
of the same or similar names.
Tip
You can really learn to love these tasks.As I became NAnt-infected (to borrow a term) I quickly real-
ized that I could automate many mundane tasks to clean up the environment,gather reports,and so on.
<attrib> [NAnt]
This task allows a build file to change a file attribute, for example, the readonlyattribute. The
task is useful when you want to manipulate files that have been grabbed from source control.
In the next example, we can see that a specific file is made writable in order to manipulate it
and then made read-only once the operation is completed. As you might be able to tell from
the code, this task might come in useful for versioning.
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<project>
<attrib file="${core.source}\CommonAssemblyInfo.cs" readonly="false" />
<!--Do some clever things with the now writable file-->
<attrib file="${core.source}\CommonAssemblyInfo.cs" readonly="true" />
</project>
<copy> [NAnt],<delete> [NAnt],and <move> [NAnt]
These tasks represent the core file-manipulation tasks. What more could you want? They gen-
erally behave in the same way: they are able to accept a single file for manipulation or they
can accept a fileset. Our first example shows a useful function for cleaning up web code and
removing all of the unnecessary source and source control material from the web code:
CHAPTER 3 IMPORTANT NANT TASKS
71
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Open JPEG to DICOM Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "DICOM" in
batch pdf to jpg online; convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Open JPEG to JBIG2 Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "JBIG2" in
change file from pdf to jpg on; convert pdf file to jpg online
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<project>
<copy todir="D:\CleanFolder\">
<fileset basedir="D:\DirtyFolder">
<include name="**"/>
<exclude name="**\*.cs"/>
<exclude name="**\*.resx"/>
<exclude name="**\*.csproj"/>
<exclude name="**\*.vspscc"/>
<exclude name="**\*.scc"/>
</fileset>
</copy>
</project>
Remember to look back at the previous descriptions of filesetandfiltersettypes in
this chapter to explain the symbols used here.
The next example shows a simpler use of the <delete>task to remove a specific file. In
this instance, we are looking to regenerate the CREATE script:
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<project>
<delete file="${core.source}DB-Create.sql"/>
</project>
The<copy>task and the <move>task can perform some token replacement using a
filterchaintype. The following simple <copy>task demonstrates the use of the filterchain
described earlier:
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<project>
<copy file="template.txt" tofile="specific.txt">
<filterchain>
<replacetokens>
<token key="DRIVELETTER" value="D" />
</replacetokens>
</filterchain>
</copy>
</project>
The file template.txtcontains the following text:
I should be deployed to the @DRIVELETTER@ drive.
Although I have used a text file for the sample, this could easily be a build file itself or any
other file where the token could be embedded. Running the build file results in the following
output:
CHAPTER 3 ■ IMPORTANT NANT TASKS
72
JPG to JPEG2000 Converter | Convert JPEG to JPEG2000, Convert
Open JPEG to JPEG2000 Converter first; ad JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "JPEG2000" in
.net convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg file
JPG to Word Converter | Convert JPEG to Word, Convert Word to JPG
Open JPEG to Word Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "Word" in
conversion pdf to jpg; convert pdf into jpg format
---------- NAnt ----------
NAnt 0.85 
Copyright (C) 2001-2004 Gerry Shaw
http://nant.sourceforge.net
Buildfile: file:///CopyFilterchain.build
[copy] Copying 1 file to 'D:\dotNetDelivery\Chapter3\specific.txt'.
BUILD SUCCEEDED
Total time: 0.1 seconds.
Output completed (1 sec consumed) - Normal Termination
A very trivial <copy>task has completed correctly. More importantly, though, the content
of the specific.txtfile has been updated to read as follows:
I should be deployed to the D drive.
Filter-chaining is another powerful feature of NAnt when used across many files.
Tip
In Chapter 9,we show how to use code generation to save effort on script maintenance (among other
uses).Using filterchains for token replacement is a good first step in the generation effort,though clearly
not as sophisticated as XSLT or other full generation techniques.
<mkdir> [NAnt]
An operation missing from our earlier discussion is of course the ability to make folders; the
<delete>task handles the reverse. 
The following example will in fact create the entire folder tree specified rather than fail if
one of the parent folders does not exist:
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<project>
<mkdir dir="D:\Folder\SubFolder" />
</project>
One way to take advantage of the <mkdir>task is in the initial construction of the build or
deploy environment. For this reason, we will sometimes use it with the failonerrorswitch set
tofalsesince in fact we are just checking that the environment exists and, for once, we may
not want the build file to produce an error if it does.
CHAPTER 3 IMPORTANT NANT TASKS
73
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "PNG" in "Output
best pdf to jpg converter online; convert pdf file to jpg on
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
RasterEdge .NET Imaging PDF Converter makes it non-professional end users to convert PDF and PDF/A documents commonly in daily life (like tiff, jpg, png, bitmap
changing pdf file to jpg; batch convert pdf to jpg online
<get> [NAnt]
This task is useful for obtaining assets when we begin to deploy the constructed systems. It
accepts a URL and a folder destination to move the URL content to. Also included are options
for adding proxy and credentials settings to the <get>if required.
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<project>
<target name="getresources">
<get 
dest="D:\SomeFolder\" 
src="http://someurl.com/myassets.zip"
/>
</target>
<project>
The ability to use <get>to obtain resources guides our hand slightly when considering
how best to organize and manage the constructed systems. Of course, a <copy>could also be
used if the Web is not to be used for this purpose.
Build Tasks
The build tasks form the kernel of the actual solution for building and deploying. They tend to
be very specific and also sometimes quite lengthy to script. This is because the tasks have to
adapt to whatever nonautomated solution they come across and so it is not always possible to
make this translation concise. Also, the activities themselves may be complex or full of options.
The good news is that once you have mastered how to use these tasks, that is usually
that—there are not many other ways to use it, and also the task tends to solve a significant
part of a process: building a solution or outputting a set of test cases, for example.
Note
I have included the <exec>task in this section as well.I think that in reality this is a utility task
because it can be turned to many uses,but in practice it is generally used to execute some specific
command-line utility that is required for the core process and so is appropriate to this section.
<asminfo> [NAnt]
The first task in this section is a good example of a specific task. The one clear goal of
the<asminfo>task is to generate an assemblyinfo.csstyle of file, containing assembly-level
attributes.
The following example shows a simple example of the <asminfo>task. Notice how the task
is quite involved owing to its specific requirements:
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<project>
<asminfo output="CommonAssemblyInfo.cs" language="CSharp">
<imports>
CHAPTER 3 ■ IMPORTANT NANT TASKS
74
<import name="System" />
<import name="System.Reflection"/>
<import name="System.EnterpriseServices"/>
<import name="System.Runtime.InteropServices"/>
</imports>
<attributes>
<attribute 
type="AssemblyVersionAttribute" value="1.0.0.0" />
<attribute
type="AssemblyProductAttribute" value="MyProduct" />
<attribute 
type="AssemblyCopyrightAttribute" 
value="Copyright (c) 2005, Etomic Ltd."/>
</attributes>
<references>
<include name="System.EnterpriseServices.dll" />
</references>
</asminfo>
</project>
Running this task results in the production of a file called CommonAssemblyInfo.cscon-
taining the following code:
using System;
using System.Reflection;
using System.EnterpriseServices;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
//------------------------------------------------------------------------------
// <autogenerated>
//     This code was generated by a tool.
//     Runtime Version: 1.1.4322.573
//
//     Changes to this file may cause incorrect behavior and will be lost if 
//     the code is regenerated.
// </autogenerated>
//------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[assembly: AssemblyVersionAttribute("1.0.0.0")]
[assembly: AssemblyProductAttribute("MyProduct")]
[assembly: AssemblyCopyrightAttribute("Copyright (c) 2005, Etomic Ltd.")]
We can use this task to generate version numbers during the build process, and in itself,
this task can solve one aspect of the proposed process almost single-handedly.
CHAPTER 3 IMPORTANT NANT TASKS
75
<exec> [NAnt]
As mentioned earlier, in the event that NAnt does not have an available task to complete a
specific action, then the first port of call would be to use the <exec>task. The second approach
might be to go right ahead and create a custom task, but this takes a little longer than using a
command-line option if it is available.
A good example of using the <exec>task is the automatic production of FxCop (see
Appendix A) reports for assemblies. Calling the command line can be done like this:
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<project>
<exec 
program="C:\Program Files\Microsoft FxCop 1.21\FxCopCmd.exe"
commandline="/f:MyAssembly.dll /o:fxcop.xml /r:D:\MyRules\" 
failonerror="false" />
</project>
The effect of this script is to produce an XML-based report called fxcop.xmlby reviewing
MyAssembly.dllwith the rules held in the D:\MyRulesfolder. 
Although the <exec>task fills in a gap, it is not especially pretty or intuitive. Moreover,
assembling the command line in a more dynamic fashion may be difficult. In Chapter 7, we
will see another way of tackling the FxCop problem, but for the time being, and throughout
our work, it is useful to have this option at our disposal.
<mkiisdir> [NAntContrib]
A useful task for solving deployment issues, this task can come in handy when a new virtual
directory is required on the web server. A huge number of attributes are available for this task
because of the number of options for directory configuration in Internet Information Server
(IIS). The simplest example, which can sometimes suffice, is shown here:
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<project>
<mkdir dir="D:\Deploy\MySite"/>
<mkiisdir
dirpath="D:\Deploy\MySite"
vdirname="MySite"/>
</project>
Here we have combined the creation of the physical folder with the virtual folder. This
task has related siblings: iisdirinfo, which reports on the settings of an IIS virtual directory,
anddeliisdir, which deletes an IIS virtual directory. Both may also be useful for deployment
purposes.
<ndoc> [NAnt]
This is another specific and wordy task, as our next example shows. If you have used the NDoc
package as a stand-alone tool, then you will see the similarity to the user interface for NDoc.
CHAPTER 3 ■ IMPORTANT NANT TASKS
76
Ifyou are unfamiliar with NDoc, you should know that it can be used to create extremely pre-
sentable MSDN-style documentation in web or compiled HTML (CHM) formats from the
XML documentation capabilities of the C# language. NAnt comes with a version of the core
NDoc assembly, and this task can be used to perform the same action:
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<project>
<ndoc>
<assemblies basedir="D:\MySystem\">
<includes name="MyAssembly.dll" />
</assemblies>
<summaries basedir="D:\MySystem\">
<includes name="MyAssembly.xml" />
</summaries>
<documenters>
<documenter name="MSDN">
<property name="OutputDirectory" value="D:\MyDocs\" />
<property name="HtmlHelpName" value="MyProject" />
<property
name="HtmlHelpCompilerFilename" value="hhc.exe" />
<property name="IncludeFavorites" value="False" />
<property name="Title" value="MySystem (NDoc)" />
<property name="SplitTOCs" value="False" />
<property name="DefaulTOC" value="" />
<property name="ShowVisualBasic" value="False" />
<property name="ShowMissingSummaries" value="True" />
<property name="ShowMissingRemarks" value="False" />
<property name="ShowMissingParams" value="True" />
<property name="ShowMissingReturns" value="True" />
<property name="ShowMissingValues" value="True" />
<property name="DocumentInternals" value="True" />
<property name="DocumentProtected" value="True" />
<property name="DocumentPrivates" value="False" />
<property name="DocumentEmptyNamespaces" value="False" />
<property name="IncludeAssemblyVersion" value="True" />
<property name="CopyrightText" value="Etomic 2005" />
<property name="CopyrightHref" value="" />
</documenter>
</documenters>
</ndoc>
</project>
The generated documentation can then be distributed or displayed by moving the output
appropriately. The clever part about the <ndoc>task is that the XML used in the NAnt task is
the same as the relevant part of the NDoc project that can be used through the NDoc graphi-
cal user interface (GUI) to produce documentation independently. Of course, this also makes
it quite lengthy, but given the context of the required settings, that is probably unavoidable.
CHAPTER 3 IMPORTANT NANT TASKS
77
<nunit2> [NAnt]
The<nunit2>task is similar to the previous task in the sense that it is specifically included to
automate another popular tool: NUnit. The purpose of NUnit is to provide a unit testing exe-
cution library and execution environment for the tests. Ordinarily, a developer would use the
NUnit GUI or console to run his/her tests. In an automated environment, a different mecha-
nism is needed. 
The task generally has the same available options as the command-line facilities of NUnit.
The following example shows a common use of the task—to run tests over an assembly and
then output the results as an XML file:
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<project>
<nunit2>
<formatter 
type="Xml" 
usefile="true" 
extension=".xml" 
outputdir="D:\MyTests\" />
<test assemblyname="MyTestAssembly.dll" />
</nunit2>
</project>
<nunit2>is a good example of a task that could have been run using the <exec>task since
NUnit has excellent command-line facilities, but it has been deemed important enough to
warrant a specific task. In contrast to the <ndoc>task, the <nunit2>task does not follow the
same XML format as an NUnit project.
<solution> [NAnt]
Thank goodness for this task. The <solution>task can accept a solution file as a parameter and
then generate and execute the required actions to build the solution according to dependen-
cies, references, and any other support you would expect from the Visual Studio environment
itself—in theory, at least. In practice, the <solution>task constantly has problems reported
against it. The task has gradually been improving since version 0.84 of NAnt, but it tries to
cover a lot of ground and new scenarios appear that it cannot handle.
However, you will find it useful for rapid automation of most solutions, because it will in
fact handle most regular scenarios suitably—general projects and dependencies are usually
OK. From my own experience I have found that it has had problems with .licxfiles and Sea-
gate’s Crystal Reports. The cause of the issues stem from two areas:
The “unusual” format of .slnfiles. Unfortunately, VS .NET does not use XML for every-
thing it does, so a judicious use of RegEx parsing and the like has been employed to
translate .slnand then .csprojfiles—the latter does support XML (sort of).
VS .NET appears to help the compiler in various ways so in fact the C# compiler does not
behave in precisely the same way that a build through VS .NET would.
CHAPTER 3 ■ IMPORTANT NANT TASKS
78
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested