Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
1
Global
San
DieGo 
export plan
Metro export InItIatIve 
.Net convert pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert from pdf to jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg online
.Net convert pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert online pdf to jpg; change from pdf to jpg
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
3
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
2
Global
San
DieGo 
export plan
Metro export InItIatIve 
“Global SD - Engaging World Markets”
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
So, feel free to convert them too with our tool. want to turn PDF file into image file format in C# application, then RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET can also
bulk pdf to jpg converter; batch pdf to jpg converter
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF files to JPG RasterEdge PDF to JPEG converting control SDK (XDoc.PDF for .NET) supports converting
pdf to jpeg; convert pdf to jpg for online
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
5
Innovation
recognized as one of the leading technology 
hubs in the nation, San Diego’s innovation 
economy is anchored by established life 
science, 
communications, 
cleantech, 
so晴ware, and maritime industries.  The 
businesses are fueled by a collaborative 
culture and sophisticated support systems 
focused on commercializing research and 
growing entrepreneurial, knowledge-based 
companies.
tourism
the tourism (convention and visitor) industry 
is the largest employment industry cluster in 
San Diego.  With more than 30 million people 
visiting San Diego annually, the region is one of 
the top 10 visitor and meeting destinations in 
the U.S., with a growing sub-sector focused on 
arts and culture.
Military
San Diego is home to more than 60 percent of the 
ships in the U.S. Navy and more than one-third of 
the combat power of the U.S. Marine Corps (SD 
Military Economic Impact Study, April 2011). The 
defense industry includes leaders in unmanned 
vehicles, robotics, cyber security, command and 
control systems, and shipbuilding—synergizing 
well with the region’s innovation economy and 
ultimately representing one out of every four jobs 
in the region.
Intellect 
San Diego’s six universities and more 
than 80 research institutes conduct 
groundbreaking research, train the 
region’s workforce, and provide the critical 
technology infrastructure that enables the 
region to compete for investment and jobs 
on a global level.
the San Diego region, built on the foundation of a strategically located port and a strong military 
presence, has been an epicenter of innovation since the turn of the 20th century. In the early 1900s, 
San Diego became home to several military institutions - specifically naval and marine bases. 
The Port of San Diego is one of 17 commercial U.S. ports designated by the federal government 
as a Strategic Port to support military operations worldwide.In the years during and a晴er World 
War II, San Diego saw incredible growth in its military cluster. Defense contractors, which grew 
alongside the Navy and Marines, attracted the brightest engineers, scientists, and industry leaders.  
Over the last half-century, San Diego’s academic institutions, businesses, and civic leaders 
continued to advance the region’s influence nationally and abroad. This ongoing cooperation from 
regional leaders, when combined with geographic and demographic advantages, and the region’s 
globally competitive economic drivers – innovation, tourism, education, and military industries— 
provides San Diego with unprecedented opportunities for international trade and investment.
S
an Diego is o晴en defined by its most visible 
characteristics. The near perfect weather, 
world-class tourist destinations, and the largest 
military concentration in the world have provided 
San Diego with global recognition. The highly 
diverse neighborhoods, nationally-ranked research 
universities, powerhouse economic clusters and 
physical location on the world’s busiest border 
crossing put San Diego in an advantageous position 
to become a truly global 
city. 
introDuction
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert multi page pdf to jpg; convert multiple page pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Copy the code below to your .NET project to pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.bmp"; // Convert PDF to bmp C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion
change from pdf to jpg on; convert pdf file to jpg
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
7
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
6
Market assesment
this does not mean San Diego is completely 
impervious to the movements and machinations 
of the national economy. The San Diego region 
was hit hard, like the rest of the country, 
during the Great Recession. San Diego’s 
average home prices fell by more than one-
third during the recession (Q4 2007-Q2 2009), 
severely hampering San Diego’s economy 
(National Association of Realtors, EDC). The 
region shed 111,700 jobs—8.4 percent of 
its total employment—between December 
of 2007 when the local recession began and 
September of 2009 when it ended (Bureau of 
Labor Statistics, EDC). Unemployment peaked 
in June of 2010 at 10.9 percent of the labor 
force and stayed above 10 percent until April 
of 2011 (Bureau of Labor Statistics, EDC).
But it has also been home to major post-
recession growth in both established and 
emerging industries. Housing prices have 
almost fully recovered, the unemployment 
rate has dropped significantly off its peak, 
and the economy continues to expand as 
San Diego adapts to new market realities. 
as the region continues to accelerate out of 
the recession, an increased emphasis has 
been placed on utilizing San Diego’s inherent 
strengths to enhance the local economy 
through expanding and diversifying exports. 
according to research conducted by the 
Brookings Institution, half of the united 
States’ economic growth in the first year 
of post-recession recovery came from 
exports. Brookings further argues that 
the rapid expansion of global middle class 
consumers in emerging markets such as Brazil, 
China, and India, has shi晴ed the geography of 
future economic growth opportunities beyond 
the United States and Europe. Considering 
that emerging markets constitute 36 percent 
of global GDP and that 70 percent of global 
GDP growth between now and 2025 will occur 
outside of our nation, exporting will continue to 
represent a worthwhile investment in economic 
growth and stability. At the end of 2025, annual 
consumption in emerging markets is projected 
to climb up to $30 trillion, representing an 
unprecedented export potential for U.S. 
goods and services (The 10 Traits of Globally 
Fluent Metro Areas, Brookings Institution).
Now, more than ever, San Diego is ripe for both 
the institutional and policy changes that will 
secure long-term growth for the larger metro 
region and build a functional foundation for the 
small and medium-sized businesses whose 
ability to thrive in a global market will determine  
success not just for the region, but for the nation.
to shepherd this movement, the San Diego 
region has a fully engaged Core Team of 
leaders from the business sector, all levels of 
government, and higher education who  have 
come together toactively share resources and 
expertise to promote San Diego’s interests 
both nationally and abroad. The keystone 
product of this Core Team, with direction and 
assistance from the Brookings Institution, 
is the following comprehensive export 
strategy, which is comprised of a Regional 
Market Assessment, an Export Plan, a 
Global Outreach Plan, and a Policy Memo. 
City of San Diego (lead agency)
biocoM
connect 
calibaja bi-national Mega-region
California State University, San Marcos
County of San Diego
Jp Morgan chase & co
SanDaG
San Diego center for international trade & Development
San Diego County Regional Airport Authority
San Diego regional chamber of commerce
San Diego regional eDc
San Diego State University
tijuana eDc
uc San Diego – School of international 
Relations and Pacific Studies
port of San Diego
u.S. international trade administration
World trade center San Diego
Core Team
In 2012, the Brookings Institution selected San Diego as one of eight cities to participate in 
the Brookings Metropolitan Export Exchange Program. The program was developed to 
help regional leaders create and implement strategic action plans to increase exports, thus 
accelerating economic growth and job creation.  Since then, the Core Team has conducted 
research on San Diego’s export economy to support the development of a strategy using 
three methods: the Market Scan (data), the Market Survey, and Local Intelligence Interviews. 
This research focused on uncovering the strengths and weaknesses of the San Diego export 
economy by combining macroeconomic research with extensive input from more than 350 
local business leaders representing both exporting and non-exporting organizations. The 
results of this collaborative effort were compiled into the Market Assessment document. 
These findings represent a solid baseline for the development of the regional export strategy.
Bob Nelson, Chairman of 
Board of Directors, Port of 
San Diego
Councilman Mark Kersey
City of San Diego, 
5th District 
Michael Masserman, 
Executive Director for Export 
Policy, Promotion, and 
Strategy; U.S. Department 
of Commerce, International 
Trade Administration 
Peter Cowhey Dean at 
UC San Diego, School of 
International Relations and 
Pacific Studies; Qualcomm 
Chair in Communications 
and Technology Policy
Releasing  
the Market 
Assesment 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Of course, our XDoc.Converter for .NET still enables you to define a resolution for RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image
changing pdf to jpg on; batch pdf to jpg converter online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
convert pdf to gif or jpg; convert pdf image to jpg image
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
8
Key FinDinGS
SAN DIEGO IS UNDER-PERFORMING ON EXPORTS
San Diego’s export economy has struggled to 
make significant gains in growth over the last 
decade, growing at a pace of 1.44 percent between 
2002-2010. While San Diego’s Gross Metropolitan 
Product (GMP) has grown slowly, exports have 
not kept pace. This is contrary to national trends, 
which have seen an increase in export intensity 
(export share of Gross Domestic Product or GDP).  
Although San Diego ranks 17th in total export 
value, GMP and population size, it is only 55th in 
terms of export intensity.  With this relative drop 
in export intensity, San Diego’s competitiveness 
among other metropolitan areas is suffering
SAN DIEGO’S EXPORTS ARE SHIFTING TOWARDS THE PACIFIC RIM
San Diego’s top export markets are comparable to 
the top export markets for the nation.  The top five 
export markets – Canada, Mexico, Japan, China and 
the United Kingdom – account for almost 40 percent 
of San Diego’s exports. Over the past decade, exports 
from the San Diego region have shi晴ed from a focus on 
Atlantic-based trade to Pacific-based trade. Exports 
to European markets have slowed while exports to 
Southeast asia, east asia and Latin america have 
grown. China, Korea, Brazil, Singapore, and Taiwan 
have emerged as San Diego’s fastest growing foreign 
markets for exports
REGIONAL EXPORTS ARE CONCENTRATED WITHIN TEN EXPORT INDUSTRIES, INCLUDING 
SERVICES SECTORS
The top five industries account for almost 65 percent of 
all exports and the top ten industries account for nearly 
90 percent. The leading goods export industries – 
Computer and Electronics, Transportation Equipment, 
and Chemicals – send more than $7 billion of goods 
abroad. The leading service exports – Business Services, 
royalties, and travel and tourism – provide services 
valued at nearly $4.5 billion. San Diego’s relatively high 
concentration on service activity in business services, 
tourism, and information offer the region a competitive 
advantage.  These industries have continued to 
grow since the recession and have maintained their 
competitiveness relative to the national economy. 
The Market Assessment also produced key findings in areas including export barriers, infrastructure, 
and export assistance. the assessment generated valuable insights into the decision – making 
processes and impressions of the San Diego business environment, for exporters and non-
exporters of all sizes.
THE GREATEST BARRIER TO EXPORTING IS LACK OF AVAILABLE INFORMATION ON 
OPPORTUNITIES
the vast majority of survey respondents 
identified the lack of available information 
regarding export markets as the most 
important barrier to exporting.  Notably, 
cost was not identified as one of the 
top barriers to exports (only 6 percent 
of respondents identified it as such). 
U.S. protection and policy, and lack of 
professional and social networks were 
also identified as top barriers to exports. 
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. Jpeg image to Tiff image in your .NET application. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg
best convert pdf to jpg; change pdf file to jpg file
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer: Convert and Export PDF.
convert pdf images to jpg; convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
11
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
10
INFRASTRUCTURE IS CRITICAL TO EXPORT SUCCESS
Regional infrastructure can serve as a severe bottleneck to exporting practices, and the survey 
found that the three most important infrastructure types that need improvement are the airport, 
port, and cyber infrastructure. While the first two are commonly discussed within the San Diego 
context, the latter is relatively new to infrastructure discourse and the Infrastructure section of 
the report strives to make a convincing case for cyber infrastructure’s importance – particularly 
within the San Diego context.   Cyber infrastructure is a critical component of San Diego’s unique 
innovation economy for the acquisition and sharing of data across organizations.
SAN DIEGO DOES NOT EXHIBIT TRUE GLOBAL FLUENCY AND ORIENTATION
The San Diego region is not generally known for exhibiting the traits of global fluency, 
defined in the Brookings Institution’s 10 Traits of Globally Fluent Metros as the level of global 
understanding, competence, practice, and reach that a metro area exhibits in an increasingly 
interconnected world economy.  Leaders must continuously seek to increase global reach, 
visibility, and penetration by learning and applying innovative practices that facilitate progress 
toward a desired economic future.
Additionally, what was perceived as a fragmented approach to regional economic development—
handled by dozens of entities without common goals, metrics, or cooperation—le晴 companies 
without a clear concept of the resources available to them.  Coupled with a regional image 
heavily focused on tourism rather than business development, interviewees recommended the 
creation of a one-stop, full-service office for international business development.  In addition 
to the one-stop-shop, there are many opportunities to help orient the region towards a more 
global focus, including helping local firms translate their business products into exportable 
goods, services, and royalties. 
COMPANIES MUST BE AWARE AND INTENTIONAL ABOUT GOING GLOBAL
r
esults from more than twenty one-on-one interviews with business executives reveal that 
initial entry into exporting was either the nature of a business model, the “born global” concept, 
or the result of strategic planning a晴er experiencing limitations on business growth within 
domestic markets for some time. While some firms grow into foreign markets over time, 
others are viable for international business from the beginning as a characteristic of their initial 
business model.  
Acquiring the necessary knowledge, professional talent, and foreign partners required extensive 
networking or support from export assistance providers. Interviewees cited their professional 
networks and business associations as the key source for export market 
i
nformation, o晴en 
noting how their networks were pivotal to their initial entry into exporting. Export assistance 
providers offer services targeted at reducing the risk, costs, and challenges of entering foreign 
markets. Interviewees praised the benefits of these services. However, many were unaware that 
such services exist.
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
13
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
12
export plan
GOAL: Global San Diego – Striving for Global 
Competitiveness – Capitalizing on the Strength of 
our Regional Economy
The above stated goal relates to both an 
export strategy and a foreign direct investment 
(FDI) strategy for the region, and works to 
position San Diego as a globally fluent and 
globallyoriented metro region.  The following 
plan outlines the objectives and strategies 
primarily associated with increasing the 
region’s exports; of which there are components 
that connect to FDI.  A complete FDI strategy 
is planned for development in 2014.
Objectives
San Diego is in a position to become one of the 
nation’s largest and most diverse exporters. 
Based on the key findings of the market 
assessment, the creators of this Export 
Plan have identified three major objectives 
designed to elevate San Diego as one of the 
most globally competitive regions in the 
world: 
  1
Job growth driven by export 
growth -   create and retain export 
related jobs.
  2.  Increase the participation of 
small and medium-sized enterprises 
(SMEs) engaged in global trade. 
3.  Develop a brand to enhance 
the region’s global fluency and 
competitiveness. 
Four Strategies
To accomplish these objectives, the following 
four core strategies have been developed:
1. Proactively leverage San Diego’s 
diversity to target major markets 
based on industry strengths 
2. Develop and increase SME’s 
capacity and capability to export
3.  Promote the unique infrastructure 
assets that underpin export growth 
in the region
4. Leverage the trade potential of 
the CaliBaja Bi-National Mega Region
Strategy 1: Proactively leverage San Diego’s diversity to target major  
markets based on industry strengths 
San Diego is home to long-established 
firms in tourism, biotech, defense, and 
communications – many of which represent 
the majority of San Diego’s current traditional 
export power. While a few of these industry 
clusters are represented by active and 
engaged trade organizations, a great deal 
of institutional knowledge and potential 
relationships remain underutilized. Building 
bridges between trade organizations and 
local firms can benefit the larger region 
by providing a collective effort to establish 
relationships with new market partners. 
the development of this plan has already 
reaped the benefits of increased information 
sharing, collaboration, and a desire to 
break down silos between public, private 
and academic institutions.
Additionally, a wealth of diversity exists 
within San Diego’s foreign-born population, 
and San Diego’s location on both the Mexican 
border and the Pacific Rim is unique and 
ripe for capitalization. 
By focusing on the 
products and services 
that are distinctive to 
San Diego, which have 
an increased potential 
opportunity in foreign 
markets, it is possible 
to leverage and utilize 
the strength of the 
local population and 
enter new markets that 
would traditionally require more time and 
energy to establish relationships. 
For example, craft beer is one of the 
region’s newest industries that is ripe for 
export capitalization. San Diego’s craft 
beer industry is growing at a fantastic pace,  
with more than half of the brewery licenses  
in the region issued since 2011 and a 
$300 million annual economic impact. The 
craft beer boom has had another positive 
side-effect – the 
emergence of craft 
beer tourism. With 
dozens of beer 
festivals a year, 
and more than 70 
breweries open for 
tours and tastings, 
the San Diego 
region is being 
hailed as the new 
Munich for beer. 
With the support of the tourism industry 
and utilization of the latent potential of 
San Diego’s foreign-born population, the 
San Diego craft beer scene could better 
penetrate foreign markets and create 
demand for the products abroad.  
San Diego’s cra晴 beer industry 
is growing at a fantastic pace, 
with more than half of the 
brewery licenses in the region 
issued since 2011 and a $300 
million annual economic 
impact
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
15
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
14
In order to capitalize on the region’s industrial and cultural diversity and 
strong trade organizations, the following critical tactics  have been identified 
to support this strategy:
1. Establish Team San Diego  consisting of key representatives of San 
Diego’s Core Team, leading trade organizations, businesses, elected officials 
and bi-national partners will lead well-coordinated, high-impact trade missions 
to high-opportunity mature and emerging markets. In doing so, the Team 
will secure strong in-market partners to provide access to data analysis on 
demand, and connect to legitimate buyers, investors and partners resulting 
in forward progress to increase exports and foreign direct investment.  
Additionally, trade promotion collateral will be developed to highlight San 
Diego’s most prominent trade industries, assets and investment opportunities.
2. Coordinate Export Promotion/BuySD Program to help San Diego 
companies find international business partners by providing market opportunity 
presentations and information on the top ten priority markets for both high-
value and high-opportunity sectors.   In collaboration with the U.S. Commercial 
Services Export Assistance Center, create market guides for each sector including 
relevant resources for exporters, a list of potential importers/distributors 
and buyer needs from around the world. Recruit market experts and U.S. 
Foreign Commercial Service Officers to present on priority markets, while also 
attracting foreign buyers to speak to and connect with exporters.  Workshops 
and presentations will be coordinated in partnership with local export service 
providers, universities, and economic development and trade organizations.  
3. Host International Growth Promotion Forums that convene trade 
organizations, regional ethnic groups and professional networks, universities, 
businesses, elected officials, export and legal services to facilitate discussions 
that promote and encourage knowledge transfer, collaboration, global talent 
production, engagement and retention, trade promotion and policy advocacy.
Strategy 2: Develop and increase SME’s capacity and capability to export
Through a mix of existing and new resources, 
talent and services, developing and increasing 
SME’s capacity and capability to export. In order to 
create exporting jobs, the San Diego metro region 
first has to create export opportunities. Many of 
the SMEs which are ripe for exporting have already 
jumped the most difficult hurdle, developing a 
worthwhile product. As mentioned in the Market 
Assessment, a significant barrier to exporting is 
the vacuum of export leadership and lack of global 
fluency.  In order to address identified barriers to 
exporting the following tactics have been cra晴ed to 
widen access to professional and social networks, 
engage talent and directly support SMes:
1. Roadmap Export Services to increase 
awareness and navigation of export resources.  
Create a clear roadmap including identification, 
coordination and streamlining of all core 
export programs and services available at the 
local, state and federal levels that will not only 
ease navigation of the system, but inform the 
development of new programs and models.
2. establish an Export Mentoring Model 
to provide export-capable and new-to-market 
companies, specifically those that are currently 
exporting to one-to-two markets and have 
the potential to expand to new markets, with 
recommendations and direct guidance to 
increase their export activity and overall global 
competitiveness. A select group of businesses will 
be chosen on a quarterly basis to participate as a 
cohort. This group will work with an expert panel 
of industry leaders and export service providers 
to understand export success models and target 
markets to develop and hone individualized export 
plans. Partnering mature exporting companies 
with new or likely exporters has the added benefit 
of encouraging C-level business leaders to share  
knowledge, build the professional networks of new 
exporters and help them expand to new markets.
3. Host Leapfrog – a competitive challenge 
program for SMEs looking to break into exports, 
but lacking financial security.  The program aims 
to select an average of three new-to-market 
companies every six months to receive financing, 
consultation, trip guidance, strategic support 
and communication with in-market experts.
4. establish a Go-Early Approach for San 
Diego Incubator Programs to infuse global 
strategy planning and export resources into 
the development of early-stage companies by 
providing early exposure to market research and 
access to export service providers in an effort 
to promote global thinking from the beginning.
5. Leverage Talent and Existing University 
Programs - Beyond forming educational and 
competitive programs for SMes, it is crucial 
to capitalize on the diverse pool of students 
conducting research that supports global 
competitiveness and invest their knowledge and 
talent to support local companies looking to 
expand their exports. Within each of the identified 
tactics throughout the plan there are opportunities 
to refer companies to teams of MBA candidates 
and other graduate students at local universities 
to support the development of export plans, 
conduct market research and identify export 
resources.  For example, international graduate 
school students may be retained to conduct 
market research for the Export Promotion/
BuySD Program, while teams of MBA candidates 
will be referred to companies participating in 
the Export Mentoring Model to support the 
development of comprehensive export plans.
An SME is 
defined as a 
business with 
less than 250 
employees. In 
San Diego, SME’s 
account for 
99.37 percent of 
businesses
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
17
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
16
Strategy 3: Promote the unique infrastructure assets that underpin export 
growth in the region 
The San Diego Metro region is a gateway 
to Mexico and the Pacific Rim, and has truly 
unique infrastructure needs that must be 
met in order to strengthen export growth. 
Following the need for export education and 
opportunity, the most significant barriers to 
increased trade are the limited-efficiency of 
the border crossing, the underutilization of the 
ports and airports, and underdeveloped cyber 
infrastructure.
For example, the otay port of entry is 
responsible for $22.4 billion in imports and 
$12.1 billion in exports and, according to San 
Diego association of Governments (SanDaG) 
the economic impact of the inefficient wait 
times are costing the San Diego region $1.28 
billion in lost revenue, $2.5 billion in lost output, 
and more than 28,000 lost jobs annually. The 
lack of border infrastructure hurts both nations 
on the national and local level.
the San Diego region’s port and airport are 
both constrained by dense development 
and have little room to physically grow, but 
investments in increasing utilization of the 
space currently available or implementing 
newer more efficient technologies can help the 
port and airport remain competitive. 
The following tactics support the need to 
promote the region’s infrastructure assets:
1. Define Exports & Identify Existing and 
Needed Infrastructure  - To gauge what type 
of investment needs to be made, two types of 
assessments need to be conducted. The first is 
to determine what methods of infrastructure 
are used to move goods, and the second is 
to perform condition assessments on the 
current exporting infrastructure. Defining 
the types of exports the region produces,  
along with the method of transport, will 
assist with the prioritization of infrastructure 
investment. Knowing the quality and condition 
of current infrastructure assets is instrumental 
to developing long-term infrastructure 
planning.
2. Establish a Regional Infrastructure 
Council  - Consisting of business, civic and 
infrastructure leaders, the Council will be tasked 
with championing regional infrastructure and 
troubleshooting solutions for opportunities 
that enhance the region’s export potential, 
and recruiting representatives to advocate for 
the region’s infrastructure needs. The success 
of the Regional Infrastructure Council will be 
measured by its ability to secure infrastructure 
funding, protect existing export infrastructure, 
and increase awareness of the importance of 
infrastructure to the region’s economy in the 
21st century.  
Strategy 4: Leverage the trade potential of the CaliBaja Bi-National Mega 
Region
It should be no surprise that Mexico is one of San Diego’s top trading partners. The Baja 
California region of Mexico and San Diego are intrinsically linked.  The Baja California region 
is one of the few bi-national regions in the world where an advanced economy and developing 
economy are working together to create a marketplace as a global industry cluster. This allows 
for a unique partnership where two nations are sharing strategies, resources, and information 
in order to build a symbiotic and mutually beneficial localized economy. As both regions grow 
and continue to reinvest, they can share the burden of remaining globally competitive and 
better secure foreign trading partners.  This strategy aims to: 
1. Encourage ongoing communication including improved export data tracking and sharing, in 
addition to joint trade missions  in coordination with Team San Diego, with the goal of continuing 
to educate both regions on the trade potential and payoff that can support improved perception 
across borders.
2. Promote direct export opportunities through enhancement of existing border trade 
programs, including Centers for International Trade Development’s (CITD) Border Export 
Program and U.S. Commercial Service’s Border Trade Office.
3. Facilitate supplier engagement in CaliBaja’s global manufacturing base through the 
development of a repository linking information between Northern Baja, San Diego and Imperial 
valley companies.
Global 
San
DieGo 
Export 
plan
18
Global outreach plan
Global San Diego - Engaging World 
Markets
Cutting through the noise, establishing a 
clear message, and causing global fluency to 
permeate the private, public, and academic 
sectors are vital to a successful export plan. 
San Diego’s goal is more than hitting numeric 
targets. It is infusing the language of global 
competitiveness into the public conversation 
at all levels.  Exports are an entry point to 
creating a more globally fluent region and 
starting this conversation.
For this reason, the 
framers of the export 
plan have worked 
to come up with a 
marketing plan to inject a global perspective 
into our organizations, government, media, 
companies, and academic institutions. It 
also has an external component. Much like 
a physical export, San Diego will create a 
product and brand it. From this exercise the 
Core Team developed an identity - GLOBAL 
SD, and set the theme - ENGAGING WORLD 
MARKETS. Together, these elements will 
create a comprehensive name and slogan 
GLOBAL SD- ENGAGING WORLD MARKETS,” 
that will make our efforts more recognizable 
within San Diego and abroad. This marketing 
strategy will be further used as a springboard 
to help distinguish the region’s global identity. 
The target audiences are companies within 
the region as well as policy makers and 
other service providers. Although engaging 
companies outside the region and in world 
markets is a big picture goal of the plan, 
subsequent activities and programs will further 
focus on shaping 
San Diego’s global 
identity in foreign 
markets.  O晴en 
times, the hardest 
perceptions to change are internal, thus the 
focus will be on getting stakeholders (local 
companies and trade organizations) to engage 
and look to exporting as a viable way to grow 
their business. To build GLOBAL SD, three 
key messages need to be communicated:  the 
potential for vast growth in exporting is real, 
acting globally means thinking globally, and 
the payoff is worth the investment.
export potential 
the potential for vast growth in exporting is rea
l” With superb 
access to the Pacific, a highly-trained workforce, and capacity to grow jobs, San Diego has a 
strong potential to increase its exports 
1. San Diego is the eighth largest U.S. city and ranks 17thamong the top 100 largest U.S. 
metro areas in international exports, providing opportunity for growth. (Brookings Export 
Nation, 2010).
2. San Diego metro area export activities, which handled $16.3 billion in exports in 2010, 
support more than 113,000 jobs and have the potential to support many more. (San Diego 
Metropolitan Export Initiative: Market Assessment, 2013)
3. Located on the U.S.-Mexico border and the Pacific Rim, San Diego can serve as the 
nation’s cargo gateway to Latin America and Asia.
Global plan “
Acting globally means thinking globally” Through future programs, San Diego business leaders 
have resolved to cultivate talent and increase market access to help companies do business overseas 
1. Cultivate a collaborative approach by regional civic, business and political leaders to foster an environment 
for enabling the region’s exports to thrive.
2. Consistent with the aspirations of the National Export Initiative, San Diego aims to improve the conditions 
that directly affect the private sector’s ability to export.
3. A primary objective of the plan is to drive a culture of change to increase the region’s global competitiveness 
through export promotion, market access and productive near-sourcing.
Global payoFF  “
The payoff is worth the investment” Exports are a “win, win” situation for both workers and 
employers; not only do companies who export grow faster, but workers also receive higher wages. 
1. According to a study published by the Institute for International Economics, U.S. companies that export not 
only grow faster, but are nearly 8.5 percent less likely to go out of business than non-exporting companies.
2. Export jobs pay well.  Exporting industry workers earn 10-20 percent higher wages than those in non-
exporting jobs. (Brookings Export Nation, 2012)
3. Production of exported goods and services creates jobs both directly and indirectly—for every $1 billion in 
new exports, 5,400 additional jobs are created. (Brookings MEI, 2012)
The payoff for investing in building an export economy is well researched and the guiding rationale behind the 
Brookings Metropolitan Export Initiative. The following tactics have been developed to support the Marketing Plan 
in creating a global culture for the region:
1. Define and Promote Global SD brand  – Using the key messages, create and promote a recognizable 
theme for the San Diego region.  We will look more closely at San Diego industries poised for maximum export 
growth to develop secondary themes. 
2. Tell the story – Educate the community on the value of international trade and market San Diego’s key 
sectors globally through creation of the following: 
a.  Regional Export Website - Using basic design principles, the site will be a simple place to house the export 
plan and certain marketing tactics, learn about the benefits of exporting, and connect with organizations that 
can help companies expand their export capacity 
b. Global Calendar of Events- Provide better access, alignment and awareness of domestic and international 
trade missions, shows and events related to trade and investment
c. Export Corner – Promote successful export businesses and programs, and highlight mini case studies 
through the company’s perspective via video communications and blogs that aim to increase awareness and 
engage elected officials and the media in selling the economic benefits of export growth 
d. Global Footprint Map – Geographically track San Diego’s largest, fastest growing, most innovative companies 
to help local firms understand San Diego’s global presence and answer questions related to market access 
through peer driven support.  Additionally, incorporate an alumni tracker to include graduates of local 
universities, who have already established careers, to allow businesses to seek out and network with alumni 
who might be living in or have ties to target markets. 
e. Printed Materials – Partners will develop a visually compelling infographic on the benefits of exporting. 
Collateral materials will also be developed to promote key industries that are distinctive to San Diego to help 
raise internal awareness for high-opportunity sectors in the region as well as educate overseas markets.
f. Newsletter Integration – Global SD partners will provide regional organizations with coordinated language 
to push out in newsletters
g. Media/Public Relations – Employ local media to help change internal perception about international trade; 
partners will produce a steady stream of coordinated messages about Global SD and the region’s export 
capacity 
h. Social Media- Global SD partners will leverage social media to support the marketing plan
3. Market San Diego globally – Using the established messages, Global SD partners will leverage the theme 
of Engaging World Markets to tell the story internationally through social media, traditional media outlets, trade 
missions and more. San Diego will aim to tell its story through companies that have found success exporting. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested