mvc open pdf in browser : Convert pdf photo to jpg Library SDK component asp.net .net windows mvc export-restrictions-raw-materials-20140-part1120

Convert pdf photo to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert multiple page pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter for
Convert pdf photo to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
changing pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter
This work is published under the responsibility of the Secretary-General of the OECD. The opinions 
expressed and the arguments employed herein do not necessarily reflect the official views of 
OECD member countries. 
This document and any map included herein are without prejudice to the status of or sovereignty 
over any territory, to the delimitation of international frontiers and boundaries, and to the name of 
any territory, city or area. 
Statistical data for Israel are supplied by and under the responsibility of the relevant Israeli 
authorities. The use of such data by the OECD is without prejudice to the status of the Golan 
Heights, East Jerusalem and Israeli settlements in the West Bank under the terms of international 
law. 
The publication of this document has been authorised by Ken Ash, Director of the Trade and 
Agriculture Directorate 
Photo credit: Jukree © Thinkstock 
© OECD (2014) 
You can copy, download or print OECD content for your own use, and you can include excerpts from 
OECD publications, databases and multimedia products in your own documents, presentations, blogs, 
websites and teaching materials, provided that suitable acknowledgment of OECD as source and 
copyright owner is given. All requests for commercial use and translation rights should be submitted to 
rights@oecd.org 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
change pdf to jpg format; convert pdf image to jpg online
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
convert pdf to high quality jpg; best way to convert pdf to jpg
FOREWORD – 
3
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Foreword 
Trade policy discussions and negotiations have long taken aim at removing import 
restrictions to enable greater access to markets. In recent years their focus has widened. 
Growing global demand for raw materials and increasing resort to export restrictions has 
forced governments and other stakeholders to pay close attention to conditions of supply 
and the adverse effects of government restrictions on exports in this sector and look for 
ways of placing greater controls on their use. 
This volume brings together different strands of analysis carried out by OECD since 
2009 on the use of export restrictions in the trade of raw materials. The aim is to 
contribute to an informed policy dialogue among countries that irrespective of whether 
they apply export restrictions or not, all rely on a well-functioning global market for at least 
some of the raw materials needs of their industries. Some of the analysis presented here 
has been published as individual working papers. But as the saying goes, the whole is 
greater than the sum of its parts, and it is hoped that this volume will provide the reader 
with a thorough understanding of how export restrictions affect economies with 
international supply chains and what could constitute possible actions leading to greater 
restraint in the use of such measures. 
In addition to the authors of the chapters, many other individuals have contributed to 
the work published here. Overall management is provided by Ken Ash, OECD Director for 
Trade and Agriculture, and Raed Safadi, OECD Deputy Director for Trade and 
Agriculture. Collecting the data for the OECD Inventory of Export Restrictions would not 
have been possible without the collaboration of individuals and government officials in the 
countries surveyed. The OECD’s work on export restrictions in raw materials trade is 
directed by Frank van Tongeren, Head of the Division on Policies in Trade and 
Agriculture. The analysis leading to the various chapters was conducted under the 
guidance of the OECD Trade Committee and its Working Party, which along with the 
OECD Business and Industry Advisory Committee and the participants of two multi-
stakeholder OECD workshops held in 2009 and 2012 provided valuable data, 
observations and comments at different stages. Barbara Fliess was the project manager 
for this publication. Alison Burrell edited the volume and Michèle Patterson coordinated its 
production.
VB.NET Image: How to Save Image & Print Image Using VB.NET
and printing multi-page document files, like PDF and Word different image encoders, including tif encoder, jpg encoder, png VB.NET Code to Save Image / Photo.
convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg
VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Flipping Image Using Our .NET Image SDK
SDK, an image (including BMP, PNG, JPG, etc) can be becomes a mirror reflection of the photo on the powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
convert pdf file to jpg online; change from pdf to jpg on
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature remove multiple or all images from PDF document.
.pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg format
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature or all image objects from PDF document in
convert pdf to gif or jpg; change from pdf to jpg
TABLE OF CONTENTS – 
5
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table of contents 
Overview ................................................................................................................................................. 9 
Part I. Trends in the Trade of Raw Materials 
Chapter 1Recent developments in the use of export restrictions in raw materials trade 
by Barbara Fliess, Christine Arriola and Peter Liapis ............................................................................ 17 
Part II. Economic Effects of Export Restrictions 
Chapter 2. Economics of export restrictions as applied to industrial raw materials 
by K.C. Fung and Jane Korinek ............................................................................................................. 63 
Chapter 3Effects of removing export taxes on steel and steel-related raw materials 
by Frank van Tongeren, James Messent, Dorothee Flaig, and Christine Arriola ................................. 93 
Chapter 4How export restrictive measures affect trade in agricultural commodities 
by Peter Liapis ..................................................................................................................................... 115 
Part III. Approaches for Enhanced Control and More Transparent Use of Export Restrictions 
Chapter 5  Multilateralising regionalism: Disciplines on export restrictions in  
regional trade agreements 
by Jane Korinek and Jessica Bartos ................................................................................................... 149 
Chapter 6Increasing the transparency of export restrictions: Benefits, good practices and  
a practical checklist 
by Barbara Fliess and Osvaldo R. Agatiello ........................................................................................ 183 
Chapter 7Mineral resource policies for growth and development: Good practice examples 
by Jane Korinek ................................................................................................................................... 225 
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
pasting and cutting from adobe PDF file in image formats, including Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif and cut vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature
batch convert pdf to jpg online; convert multiple pdf to jpg online
VB.NET Image: Create Image from Stream; Stream to Image Converter
to capture image from web url, convert image to like image sharpening and old photo effect adding powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
convert pdf pictures to jpg; convert pdf picture to jpg
VB.NET PowerPoint: Use .NET Converter to Convert PPT to Raster
so it is not widely used for digital photo. If temp IsNot Nothing Then temp.Convert( imageStream, ImageFormat & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; changing pdf to jpg on
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
gif, jpeg, bmp and tiff) and a document file (supported files are PDF, Word & TIFF to decide the output barcode image format as you need, including JPG, GIF, BMP
convert pdf file to jpg; bulk pdf to jpg
ACRONYMS – 
7
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Acronyms 
ADA 
Anti-Dumping Agreement 
AMIS 
Agricultural Market Information System 
APEC 
Asia-Pacific  Economic Cooperation 
BACI 
Base pour l’Analyse du Commerce International 
CEPII 
Centre d'Etudes Prospectives et d'Informations Internationales 
c.i.f. 
cost, insurance, freight 
DDA 
Doha Development Agenda 
EFTA 
European Free Trade Area 
EITI 
Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative  
f.o.b. 
free on board 
FYROM 
Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia 
GAPP 
Generally Accepted Principles And Practices 
GATT 
General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 
GRB 
Government of the Republic of Botswana 
HHI 
Hirschman-Herfindahl index 
HS 
Harmonised System (Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System) 
IMF 
International Monetary Fund 
MEP 
minimum export price 
MFDP 
Ministry of Finance and Development Planning (Botswana) 
MOFCOM  
Ministry of Commerce of the People’s Republic of China  
PPI 
Policy Perception Index 
RTA 
regional trade agreement 
SACU 
South African Customs Union 
SCM 
Subsidies and Countervailing Measures 
SDT 
Special and Differential treatment 
SOE 
state-owned enterprise 
SWF 
sovereign wealth fund 
ton; metric weights and measures are used throughout the volume  
URAA 
Uruguay Round Agreement on Agriculture 
USD 
United States Dollar 
WCO 
World Customs Organisation 
WTO 
World Trade Organisation 
OVERVIEW – 
9
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
OVERVIEW
Introduction 
This volume uses multiple approaches to examine world trade in raw materials. “Raw 
materials”, for the purpose of this publication, comprise the minerals and metals that are crucial 
inputs for the capital and consumer goods industries around the world, and the agricultural 
commodities that supplement domestic food supplies in many countries and sustain the global food 
processing industry. Virtually all countries need access to many or most of these raw materials for 
core economic activities and to sustain a healthy, well-nourished population.  
As no country is self-sufficient in every raw material, it follows that virtually all countries are 
vulnerable to any attempt to restrict the export of at least some commodities. However, 
notwithstanding that resource nationalism is increasingly at odds with the interdependence of 
economies in the 21
st
century, the last decade has seen a marked expansion in efforts to regulate 
the supply and export flows of these materials through the use of export restrictions around the 
globe.  
In the face of this trend, the issue of export restrictions on raw materials has raised concern 
within industry and government circles. While some restrictions were put in place in reaction to the 
strong demand and rising prices of commodities prior to the international financial crisis, or to the 
sudden demand surges and price peaks in agricultural commodities that accompanied the crisis, 
others have since followed and many are still in place. Export restrictions have contributed to 
episodes of global supply shortages and strong swings in prices. They have also become a source 
of friction and open trade disputes among governments using them and trading partners affected by 
them. All these developments make raw material export restrictions and other forms of resource 
protectionism a global challenge that calls for well informed and coordinated responses. 
Against this background, the OECD initiated a programme of work in 2009 designed to study 
these restrictive measures and their economic effects, and to facilitate dialogue among 
stakeholders directly or indirectly affected by them. The programme has focused on export 
restrictions affecting, in particular, industrial raw materials. Two workshops were organised.
1
The 
first major publication of the programme
contains a selection of the papers from the first of these 
workshops.  
Since then, the programme has continued to place its work in the public domain via a 
number of OECD Trade Policy Papers, on which some of the chapters in this volume draw heavily. 
Other parts of this volume constitute new work that is published here for the first time. The reader 
should be aware that the work presented in this volume is not concerned with import policies and 
restrictions on imports. There has been considerable work on import barriers, some of which 
contributed directly to securing the strong disciplines on imports currently enshrined in WTO legal 
texts, and this work continues. It is not, however, reflected in this publication. 
Some of the chapters make use of a unique new database, the OECD Inventory of 
Restrictions on Trade in Raw Materials (OECD, 2014) (or, for short in this volume, the OECD 
Inventory). Set up in 2009 to overcome the dearth of systematically compiled information on export 
restrictions for raw materials, it covers both industrial raw materials and agricultural commodities. It 
compiles annual information, from 2007 onwards, on the complete range of export restraint 
instruments as applied by a large number of exporting countries to the main relevant, internationally 
10
– OVERVIEW 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
traded raw materials in both the industrial and agricultural categories. Much of the analysis and 
discussion assembled in the present volume makes use of the information contained in the 
Inventory. 
The chapters are organised in three parts. Part 1 consists of a single chapter, which 
presents global trends in the use of export restrictions, broken down by exporting country, type of 
instrument and type of raw material. It documents how, for the vast majority of these commodities, 
the high concentration of supply or at least of exportable surpluses imparts an oligopolistic structure 
to the corresponding world market for that commodity. This creates the conditions in which 
individual large exporters may perceive an incentive to use their leverage over the world market to 
pursue domestic, or at least country-specific, policy objectives by manipulating the flow of this 
product onto the world market. The chapter also analyses the information recorded in the Inventory 
on the reasons given by individual countries for their use of export restrictions. Additional useful 
components of this chapter are a detailed description of the structure and coverage of the Inventory, 
a brief overview of current multilateral disciplines concerning export restrictions and some specific 
examples of their use by particular countries for certain products, together with some specific 
consequences of these policy choices. Thus, the chapter sets the scene for the rest of the volume, 
and justifies – albeit implicitly – the various analytical and conceptual approaches taken in 
subsequent chapters.  
Part II consists of three chapters that explore the trade and welfare effects of export 
restrictions from different perspectives. Chapter 2 uses an economic theory framework to predict 
the effects of an export restriction on trade flows, world market and domestic prices, and the market 
outcomes for trading partners, including both exporters of the commodity whose exports are 
restricted and net-importing countries. Two restrictive instruments – a tax and a quota – are 
analysed. Welfare transfers and net losses generated by the restriction are also identified. The 
economic models used are designed to depict the oligopolistic nature of world markets for industrial 
raw materials. This represents the first time such a model has been used in this precise context. 
The insights gained from the theoretical analysis are then used to consider whether, and if so in 
which circumstances, export restrictions might in fact be effective in achieving any of the objectives 
countries have claimed for their use. 
Chapter 3 reports the results of an empirically-based simulation exercise focussing on the 
global steelmaking industry and the world market for steel. This is an industry where both import 
protection on the final product and export restrictions on raw materials used as inputs are very 
prevalent. Using information on export taxes from the OECD Inventory and the OECD Trade Model, 
it examines the global effects of removing all export taxes currently applied on steel and the main 
raw materials used in steel production: scrap and ferrous waste, iron ore, and coke. For the most 
part, the simulated impacts on world market are strongly consistent with the predictions made in 
Chapter 2. Furthermore, the multilateral policy change that is simulated for just a few sectors and 
involving relatively few countries nonetheless gives an important boost to global trade. An important 
finding is that – contrary to widespread belief – export taxes and other export restrictions do not 
necessarily benefit domestic downstream industries or enhance the domestic value-adding process. 
Chapter 4 uses various empirical approaches to capture the effects of recent agricultural 
export restrictions during 2004 to 2011 on (inter alia) world market prices, on global exports of the 
product whose exports are restricted, and on the country-specific export prices and exported 
quantities of certain commodities whose imports are restricted. The results are mixed and for the 
most part inconclusive. There is some evidence that the use of restrictions on rice exports reduced 
the exports of the restricting countries and importers diversified sourcing partners, but these effects 
were not found for two other crops, wheat and maize.  
In summary, the two empirical chapters in Part II provide some real-world support for the 
effects predicted by the theoretical analysis in Chapter 2. The results presented here should not be 
taken as the final word, as other approaches, longer time series, and more probing statistical 
approaches are yet to be tried. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested