mvc open pdf in browser : Best way to convert pdf to jpg software SDK dll windows wpf html web forms export-restrictions-raw-materials-20141-part1121

OVERVIEW – 
11
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Part III consists of four chapters that address the general question: where do we go from 
here? How can the international community respond to the challenge of improving mutually agreed 
disciplines in this area, and what can be learned from any progress made so far? As part of the 
answer, Chapter 5 documents in detail the successes achieved by various regional trade 
agreements (RTAs) in going beyond the current state of discipline achieved within the WTO. The 
extent of agreed disciplines in the WTO as regards export restrictions is much less as compared 
with disciplines on imports.  The Chapter first examines the multilateral rules that have been agreed 
in this area.  It then underlines what has been possible within a smaller negotiating group of 
interested parties within RTAs. What is particularly enlightening is the array of novel strategies and 
procedures adopted by some of these RTAs for strengthening their disciplines on export 
restrictions. 
Chapter 6 implicitly recognises that robust multilateral disciplines (as currently exist with 
respect to restrictions on imports) will not be achieved overnight, and explores ways in which, in the 
meantime, some of the more damaging consequences for stakeholders of the current use of export 
restrictions can be reduced by the adoption of certain transparency rules governing the design, 
development and implementation of export restrictions. Undoubtedly, the benefits of greater policy 
transparency for all those involved, including the policy-setting governments themselves, go well 
beyond the context of export restrictions and apply across the whole policy spectrum. This chapter, 
however, keeps its focus closely on the export restriction issue, and shows how well-defined 
transparency protocols, set out in detail in a transparency checklist, can greatly assist those 
operating in markets subject to the unpredictability and potential instability that are provoked by the 
way many export restrictions are currently used. 
Finally, Chapter 7 looks in great detail at two success stories provided by Chile’s 
management of its copper industry, and Botswana’s steering of its mineral industry (principally 
diamonds) as an engine of growth and development for the economy as a whole. This chapter 
provides conclusive evidence that the objectives stated by many export-restricting countries to 
justify the use of this set of trade instruments can be achieved more efficiently and more sustainably 
over the longer term by quite different policy approaches, which leave their export flows unimpeded. 
An important common factor shared by these two countries is a strong institutional framework, with 
full legal backing, to guide the detailed functioning of the respective sector and its role in the wider 
economy. However, the institutional arrangements are very different between the two countries, in 
each case tailored to specific circumstances and even to the nature of the raw material concerned. 
This emphasises that a one-size-fits-all approach to the governance issue is not just unnecessary 
but may also be counter-productive. Having said that, there is much that can be learned and 
transferred from these case studies to other national contexts. 
Main findings and conclusions 
Recent trends in the use of export restrictions (Chapter 1) 
 
Use of export restrictions is often highly unpredictable. Substantive international disciplines 
in this area are weaker than for import restrictions.  
 
Export restrictions on raw materials have become more frequent over the last decade. The 
phenomenon includes bursts of escalating but relatively short-lived interventions (e.g. the 
spiral of restrictions triggered by rising global food prices in 2008-9) as well as creeping 
protectionism (certain minerals and metal scrap). Some restrictions have been in place 
unchanged for decades. Sometimes governments adjust restrictions several times a year. 
Governments use a variety of measures. The OECD Inventory records more than thirteen 
different types of export-restraining measures or policies, the most common of which are 
export permits, export taxes and quantitative restrictions. 
 
Export restrictions are broadly applied across all raw materials sectors, from minerals and 
metals, and metal scrap, to wood and agricultural commodities. They are used mostly, but 
not exclusively, by emerging and developing countries and for a variety of reasons.  
Best way to convert pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
reader pdf to jpeg; change file from pdf to jpg
Best way to convert pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
batch pdf to jpg online; batch pdf to jpg
12
– OVERVIEW 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
 
Global markets for raw materials often feature a high concentration of supply of, and hence 
dependency on, production and exports by a small number of countries. When markets are 
dominated by a few exporting countries that supply many importing countries, export 
restrictions have a large and more extensive effect on trade.  
 
Experience shows that export controls can trigger similar actions in other supplier countries, 
driving up prices further, making price volatility worse, and creating a crisis of confidence that 
spreads from one resource to the next. Nobody benefits. Countries using export restrictions 
for some minerals are often heavily reliant on imports of other minerals, where they may face 
a restricted supply due to the use of similar trade instruments by other countries. These and 
other circumstances make a strong case in favour of addressing export restrictions and their 
effects through coordinated action.  
 
The OECD Inventory confirms a transparency deficit in the design and implementation of 
export restrictions.  
Expected economic effects of export restrictions (Chapter 2) 
 
Governments expect export restrictions to help achieve certain policy objectives and tend to 
ignore that restrictions invariably hurt trading partners and interfere in the allocation of 
resources in the domestic economy, entailing costs.  
 
Export restrictions distort trade flows. When a country applies a restriction, the welfare of its 
trading partners invariably suffers. Importers pay a higher price on imports from the 
restricting partner, user industries see their costs increase and consumers may see the price 
for final goods rise.  
 
In theory, when an export restriction is applied by a ‘large’ country on its raw material, 
domestic processing firms, as well as competing foreign raw materials producers, will be 
favoured at the expense of domestic mining firms and foreign processing firms. In this way, 
there is a “profit-shifting” effect of export restrictions. 
 
Abroad, raw materials producers gain from higher world prices and lower exports of the 
firm(s) in the country that is subject to a tax or quota and will therefore increase production. 
Higher world market prices for their goods increase their profits. They may increase their 
investment, although due to the uncertainty of the policy, they will engage in less investment 
than they normally would if they were responding to sustainable changes in market 
conditions rather than a policy that may be altered.  This is another way by which global 
welfare falls due to export restricting policies. 
 
The welfare gains which a “large” country may hope to obtain from an export tax or 
quantitative restrictions will not materialise if partner countries caught by this beggar-thy-
neighbour policy retaliate in kind. The “large” country is then also worse off.  
 
Exports restrictions taken by one economy give trading partners an incentive to divert their 
imports to other non-restricting countries supplying the same commodity. Diverting demand 
to other non-restricting countries creates pressure there to export more. When the restricting 
country is a large supplier and hence its action lowers world supply and raises world price, 
this can significantly increase the price of the commodity in the global marketplace. This may 
prompt these countries to restrict their exports in turn, the result of which would be a further 
rise in the price on the world market.  
 
Export restrictions reduce domestic prices in the countries applying the measures. They 
indirectly subsidise domestic industries that use the restricted commodity as input. Assisting 
downstream industries to grow and compete may be the intended result of such restrictions. 
However, the restrictions punish producers of the commodity and discourage investment that 
will ensure long-term local supply of the raw material.  
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Best C#.NET PDF converter SDK for converting PDF fidelity PDF to TIFF conversion in an easy way. control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to
convert multipage pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg on
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Creating a PDF document is a good way to share your ideas because you can make sure that the PDF
change format from pdf to jpg; best program to convert pdf to jpg
OVERVIEW – 
13
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Real-world observations on the effects of export restrictions (Chapters 3 and 4) 
 
Steel, and the iron ore, steel scrap and coke used for steelmaking are part of a supply chain 
with many industrial activities as end users. Together, these commodities also represent an 
important share of countries’ industrial production, in the case of emerging economies more 
than 10%, and significant shares of industrial value added, but their trade is hampered by 
many export restrictions. 
 
Diversion of raw materials to domestic downstream industries is an important effect of export 
restrictions, which motivates the policy choices in many countries using those measures. 
The wisdom of using restrictions to those ends is put into question by the results from a 
multi-country, multi-sector Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model. The simulation 
measures the effects of a simultaneous removal of export taxes in steel and steelmaking raw 
materials markets, including the indirect effects of the restrictions through the supply chain. 
When regions that apply export taxes remove these in coordination with similar action by 
trading partners, their downstream industries actually benefit. 
 
Supply chains are increasingly global, relying on imported intermediate inputs and exporting 
finished products or semi-finished products for further processing. This means that removing 
a trade distortion) at one step of the chain has consequences throughout the global 
economy. As demonstrated for the steel industry, the CGE model simulation of a removal of 
all export taxes increases global supply and decreases world price. Through these effects 
and resulting changes in the pattern of increased imports and exports production costs for 
steel and the main inputs for steelmaking fall across all regions. 
 
Partly because other countries join in the removal of export taxes, production costs decline 
for the steel industries of all regions that remove restrictions. The same effects are found for 
the scrap, iron ore and coke industries. The regions with the highest export tax levels 
experience the greatest price changes, leading to increased demand for their products and 
higher levels of production that contribute to GDP growth. Overall, coordinated action to 
lower and eventually remove export taxes helps both the upstream and the downstream 
industries expand, including in the countries that remove their export taxes.  
 
In another sector, agriculture, use of export restrictions increased noticeably during the 2007 
to 2011 period, when the world economy was hit by the financial crisis and the price of many 
agricultural commodities were rising and volatile. The presence of multiple causal factors 
makes it difficult however to isolate the effect of export restrictions alone.  
 
Use of a set of statistical approaches found some evidence that the restrictions lowered 
agriculture exports from the countries imposing them. However, this was not always the 
case. On a year to year basis, because of the type of measure or its short duration, annual 
exports from some countries using restrictions continued flowing. In other cases, as would 
be expected, exports from countries using restrictions were substantially reduced relative to 
their level in the previous year; but whether due exclusively to the restriction or to tight 
domestic markets (which might have motivated the restriction itself) is not always clear.  
 
Often the measures taken were highly restrictive (e.g. export bans) and subject to frequent 
changes, which causes uncertainty, a condition conducive to market disruptions caused by 
panic buying, shortages and oscillating monthly prices.   
 
Market disruptions occurred in certain markets such as rice or wheat especially during 2008 
and 2010, when many restrictions were applied. Some mitigating factors prevented further 
deterioration. Most restrictions were put in place for only a short time, there was sufficient 
global supply in order to meet demand and other suppliers stepped in. In most years from 
2007 through 2011, exports from countries without restrictive measures made up for 
potential shortfalls, which allowed global exports to expand despite export restrictions of 
some countries. However, it cannot be ruled out that individual importers had difficulties 
finding alternative suppliers, which caused uncertainty and higher costs for them. 
14
– OVERVIEW 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Approaches for better control, and more transparent use, of export restrictions (Chapters 5 
and 6) 
 
Efforts to enhance disciplines on export restrictions at the multilateral level have stalled, but 
there has been progress in negotiating restraints on use of export restrictions through 
bilateral and regional trade agreements.  
 
The provisions found in some RTAs have the potential to inform future rulemaking in this 
area at the multilateral or pluri-lateral level. Other RTAs extend the disciplines already 
agreed in WTO rules. Existing disciplines in WTO on export restrictions are however less 
precise and more open to interpretation than disciplines in other areas, e.g. import 
restrictions.  
 
RTAs set controls in different, often innovative ways. Many RTAs circumscribe use of export 
restrictions by setting specific conditions for their use, e.g. by prescribing maximum time 
limits for their use, or specifying situations in which the restrictions are not allowed or the 
types of products that can be restricted. Some fix ceilings for export taxes. Other RTAs 
grandfather restrictions that are in place but do not allow new ones.  
 
RTAs recognise the importance of transparent and predictable application of permitted 
measures, often requiring members to observe higher publication and consultation standards 
than are found in WTO provisions. For example, an approach common to many RTAs is to 
set specific conditions on use of export restrictions. These RTAs showcase various ways of 
controlling export restrictions, without necessarily banning their use altogether.  
 
Transparency regarding the use of export restrictions should be improved, given the 
inadequacy of many information policies at national level and the variation in transparency 
practices across countries.  
 
Transparency is an important policy objective in its own right. Transparency allows trading 
partners and market operators to anticipate interventions in trade and adjust. Global markets 
work best when traders and end users can base decisions on rational assessments of 
potential costs, risks and market opportunities.  
 
Transparency does not mean de-regulation. It is about a predictable business climate for all. 
Neither exporting nor importing countries benefit from opaque, unpredictable conditions of 
trade. Non-transparent export regulation in restrictions-using countries deters investors and 
stifles growth of the export sector in these countries. In countries applying export restrictions, 
non-transparency can encourage corruption and make it more difficult for a government to 
ensure regulatory compliance.  
 
Transparency norms in WTO, RTAs and general guidelines for good governance together 
form a set of state-of-art principles and information requirements that governments can use 
when they develop and implement export restrictions. The resulting list (provided in 
Chapter 6) is also a benchmark against which governments can determine the adequacy of 
their own and their trading partners’ present information policies and which can guide 
improvements that governments may wish to pursue on their own or through collaboration.  
Alternatives to use of export restrictions (Chapter 7) 
 
Export restrictions are undertaken for different reasons, ranging from the generation of 
government revenue to the conservation of resources, environmental protection and 
industrial diversification away from resource extraction into upstream or downstream 
activities. Some may be justified and compatible with WTO rules while others not. 
 
With respect to raw materials, the specific issues that export restrictions are expected to 
address, in those countries that use them, are in the main domestic market or policy failures, 
unrelated to trade. Previous chapters in this volume show that the effectiveness of export 
OVERVIEW – 
15
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
restrictions in achieving any of the policy objectives requires close scrutiny. Trade measures 
such as export taxes or quotas will not be first-best policy instruments for dealing with these 
issues. Some countries which have the same policy objectives have addressed these 
effectively without resorting to export restrictions.  
 
Economies dependent on mineral export have to manage the risk of export volatility resulting 
from booms and busts of international commodity markets. For public sector revenues and 
spending such dependence is a source of uncertainty and instability. In the case of Chile, the 
government receives a substantial share of its revenue from the mining sector, but 
notwithstanding fluctuations in revenue due to changes in copper prices and hence profits of 
mining firms, does not link government spending to the commodity cycle. Revenue is 
managed by applying a structural balance rule that disciplines government spending leading 
to budget surpluses in times of high revenue intake, typical of commodity booms, and 
provides stable sources of revenue during periods of low government income. Fiscal 
surpluses have been invested in sovereign wealth funds. A strong legal framework with 
checks and balances, and accounting practices open to public scrutiny, contribute to its 
success.  
 
Industry development and diversification is possible in the absence of export restrictions. 
Chile has developed mining-related sectors, although the largest share of exports comes 
from mining and mineral extraction is primarily an export-related activity. A widely shared 
view holds that the country has no comparative advantage in downstream processing. 
Rather, by opting for promoting a range of less capital and less energy intensive 
intermediate goods and services industries that support mining operations, Chile is following 
a path which other minerals-rich countries, including Australia, Canada, Finland and the 
United States, have taken. These countries are all successful exporters of goods and 
services in the field of mining technology.  
Looking forward 
Just as collaboration at the multilateral level proved to be the most effective vehicle for 
putting in place today’s disciplines on import-restricting trade instruments, a multi-country approach 
would also be the most effective way to make lasting progress on disciplining export restrictions. 
There are international discussion and decision-making institutions for this purpose, including the 
various WTO fora, regional country groupings and trade negotiating fora, the G20 process, as well 
as smaller sectoral initiatives, such as the global Agriculture Market Information System (AMIS). 
These existing mechanisms as well as possibly new multilateral collaborative fora dedicated 
to raw materials can contribute to address export restrictions and perhaps other trade policy issues 
in the raw materials sector comprehensively and decisively, leading to results that far exceed the 
sum of uncoordinated initiatives by individual governments. This volume attempts to contribute to 
such efforts, highlighting that export restrictions invariably reduce global welfare, typically fail to 
achieve their stated objectives, and that alternative policy approaches can be more effective at 
home while avoiding negative international spill-overs. 
Notes 
1. 
OECD Workshop on Raw Materials, Paris, 30 October 2009, and OECD Workshop of on 
Regulatory Transparency in Trade in Raw Materials, 11-12 May 2012. 
2.  
OECD (2010),The Economic Impact of Export Restrictions on Raw Materials, OECD Trade 
Policy Studies, OECD Publishing, Paris, http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264096448-en.  
Reference 
OECD (2014), Inventory of Restrictions on Exports of Raw Materials. 
http://www.oecd.org/tad/ntm/name,227284,en.htm.
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
17
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Chapter 1 
RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS 
IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE 
Barbara Fliess, Christine Arriola and Peter Liapis
1
1.1. 
Introduction 
For decades, trade policy negotiations have concentrated on reducing import barriers that 
governments use to impede access to national markets and protect domestic producers. The focus 
has widened in recent years, with governments and the private sector also paying much closer 
attention to policies and practices that hinder their access to raw material supplies from exporting 
countries.  
Industrial raw materials prices on world markets remained fairly stable during the 1980s and 
1990s; since the early 2000s, however, world markets came under pressure from strong economic 
growth in major emerging and developing economies. Prices of many raw materials soared to historic 
levels from 2005, and although the adverse environment of the financial crisis abruptly reversed the 
trend in 2008-09, countries engaged in extracting and exporting minerals have become more inclined 
to regulate output and trade. Many of these resources are critical inputs for industrial production and 
have to be procured by many countries through trade. A similar situation has developed in markets for 
agricultural products. Global demand for agricultural goods has been growing as a result of increasing 
world population, and higher world incomes have resulted in greater demand for more diversified, 
healthier diets. Strong demand and periodic weather-related production shortfalls have resulted in 
higher prices. When the prices of wheat, rice and other agricultural commodities reached record highs 
during 2007-2009, several governments concerned about inflation and the internal food security 
situation took steps to restrict export flows. 
Access to raw materials, including imported materials, determines in a sense the “heartbeat” of 
an economy. Traditional industries producing motor vehicles, machinery or steel are major consumers 
of basic and other minerals as inputs. Since the 1990s a range of new technologies has created 
additional demand for many industrial raw materials, often used in very small quantities although not 
visible to end-consumers. A smartphone, for example, contains from 9 to 50 different metals. An array 
of different minerals are used in areas of clean energy technology. Besides iron ore, ferrous scrap and 
various alloying metals for steel structures, wind turbines contain aluminium, cobalt, copper, zinc and 
certain rare earth metals. Building a hybrid car requires aluminium, cadmium, cobalt and at least 
16 other metals. The number of non-renewable materials used to make a solar panel, or a LED light 
bulb, is even higher. Economic activity depends on raw materials, many of which are traded around 
the world because no country has domestic endowments of all the inputs needed. Thus, all 
economies are to some extent vulnerable to changing conditions in some raw material markets. 
The prospect of more restrictive export policies has prompted firms to factor the risk of less 
secure world market access to raw materials into their business strategies. Governments of 
countries that are reliant on procuring food and industrial raw materials abroad have also been 
following developments on global markets more closely. Where they are dependent on access to 
commodities that are produced abroad but are of strategic industrial and military value to their own 
economies, they have begun developing strategies for mitigating supply risks and reducing supply-
chain vulnerabilities caused by reliance on foreign supplies.
2
The issue of export restrictions and the 
distortions they create in the global marketplace for raw materials and the products for which they 
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
18
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
are inputs has been raised in many trade policy discussions. The rise of tensions and outright 
conflicts underlines the importance of achieving a more restrained and orderly use of these 
measures. 
This chapter describes and analyses the spread of export restrictions in international trade in 
raw materials. It draws on recent OECD survey data on export restrictions available from 2009 to 
2012 for industrial raw materials and for agricultural raw materials from 2007 to 2011. Section 1.2 
outlines the development and the salient features of the global demand-supply relationships and 
trade in raw materials. Section 1.3 presents statistics compiled by the OECD on the incidence of 
measures that restrict raw materials exports, starting at the level of broadly defined product groups 
and trade relationships between countries and then examining in more detail the types of measures 
adopted and products affected. Section 1.4 looks at the situation of selected industrial and 
agricultural product groups, namely steelmaking raw materials, mineral waste and scrap, non-
ferrous metals, rice and wheat. Section 1.5 examines the motives that prompt governments to 
introduce export restrictions and identifies features of the measures and ways in which they are 
implemented from which the distorting effects on international trade can be gauged. Section 1.6 
concludes. 
1.2. 
Why the heightened concern about raw materials supplies in recent years?  
Demand for industrial and agricultural raw materials has grown consistently over the past 
100 years in line with production. The pattern of supply and demand itself has also changed over 
time. For decades, developing countries were increasing and diversifying their production of raw 
materials, while demand for them – especially for industrial raw materials – was driven primarily by 
industrial growth in developed economies. Since the early 2000s, however, accelerating economic 
growth in China, India and other emerging economies has increased global demand for raw 
materials, which has contributed to a significant expansion of international trade. China provides the 
most striking example of recent changes taking place in some of these countries with expanding 
industries. In 1955, China was the leading producer of 14 commodities monitored by World Minerals 
Statistics, and by 2012 had become the leading producer of 44 commodities and a top-three 
producer of a further 12 commodities. Notwithstanding this, and despite a growing and diversifying 
mining sector, China’s rapidly growing industries have not been able to meet all their mineral needs 
from domestic supplies and have sourced some of their requirements in the international market 
(British Geological Survey, 2014). 
Increasing incomes, changes in tastes, growing expectations to be able to consume 
seasonal products throughout the year, rising population and improved communication, 
transportation and logistics have all led to a steady expansion over time of global trade in 
agricultural goods. Between 2000 and 2012, trade in agricultural and food products grew at an 
annual average rate of 10% from less than USD 311 billion to just under USD 1 trillion.
3
As most of 
the population and income increases are taking place in the developing world, trade patterns have 
evolved accordingly. In agriculture, high income countries supplied 58% of the world’s agricultural 
exports in 2000, but by 2012 their share had fallen to less than 45% reflecting the additional output 
emanating from developing countries. Even more dramatic is the drop in their share of agricultural 
imports falling from about two-thirds of the world’s total to about 40% during this time. Developing 
and emerging countries are not only trading more with the developed world, they are also trading 
more with each other. South-South agricultural trade was only 14% of the total in 2000 as against a 
hugely increased 29% in 2012.  
Figure 1.1 tracks the evolution of global export volumes for the major categories of non-
energy commodities 
over
the past decade. The increase in global minerals and metals requirements 
and production has led to sustained growth in world exports that was reversed only temporarily by 
the onset of the world financial crisis of 2008. Exports of minerals and metals have doubled since 
the early 2000s, reaching a record high of 2.3 billion metric tons in 2013. Exports of agricultural 
commodities rose by 74%, to 1 billion tons. Traded metal waste and scrap more than doubled 
between 2000 and 2013 from some 48 million to 104 million tons, which is a rough estimate 
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
19
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
because UN Comtrade statistics in this sector are poor for many countries. Wood exports, on the 
other hand, declined by 30% during the same time period. 
Figure 1.1. Global exports raw materials, by sector  
(net weight) 
Note: Net weight of gross exports of unprocessed and semi-processed minerals, metals and wood products and all 
WTO-defined agricultural products. For the list of products that comprise each category in the figure see the 
methodological notes accompanying the OECD Inventory accessible at: 
http://qdd.oecd.org/subject.aspx?subject=8F4CFFA0-3A25-43F2-A778-E8FEE81D89E2. Global exports refer to all 
countries of the world. Data excludes intra-EU trade.  
Source: UN Comtrade. 
Every country imports at least some of the raw material inputs necessary for industrial 
production. While dependence on access to foreign sources varies across economies and 
industries, exporting and importing economies alike have faced a situation of rising and also more 
volatile commodity prices in the last decade. Sometimes prices have skyrocketed in the course of a 
few months. For example, the price of rare earth metals as a whole doubled from 2010 to 2011, 
while prices of some elements like lanthanum and cerium (both rare earths) rose by 900%. Prices of 
antimony and tungsten more than doubled over this same period (Silberglitt et al., 2013). 
Agricultural commodities have experienced similar volatility. Between 1975 and 2000, cereal prices 
were low and stable, but this situation changed within a few years. Food prices as revealed by the 
IMF’s food price index rose steeply between 2005 and 2008 to the highest levels in 30 years, before 
falling by 33% in the second half of 2008. Another peak in world food prices was reached in 2011.
4
World market prices of individual agricultural commodities showed even more extreme swings, and 
remain much more volatile than in the first five years of this century (see Chapter 4, section 4.4 for 
more details). 
Thus, as demand for raw materials has increased, global markets have become tighter, 
prices have risen, and so has the tendency for countries supplying these markets to tax exports or 
erect export barriers in various ways. Export restrictions have become part of the problem of 
escalating prices and volatile markets for raw materials. They have caused growing apprehension 
among countries, both developed and developing, that depend on imports for foodstuffs and other 
raw materials.  
Several factors render concerns about restrictive export policies more acute. The first is that 
resource endowments, and consequently production of raw materials, have a very uneven 
geographical distribution. This is especially true for minerals and other industrial raw materials. For 
example, while nickel is mined in at least 30 countries, zinc in 40 countries, and silver in more than 
50 countries, global supply of other minerals is concentrated in a small number of countries. In 
Agriculture
Minerals and metals
Waste and scrap
Wood
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
Million metric tons
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
20
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
2012, China alone produced 91% of the world’s supply of rare earth metals on which products 
ranging from hybrid electric vehicles and energy-efficient light bulbs to cell phones and computer 
displays depend. Some 60% of the world’s chromium, used mostly by the chemical and 
metallurgical industries, was produced in South Africa and Kazakhstan, which together account for 
99% of all currently known chromite reserves. Almost 90% of world production of platinum and 
related metals occurs in South Africa and the Russian Federation. Recent world production shares 
of leading producers are shown in Table 1.1 for a number of raw materials. The production figures 
for minerals and metals mask the fact that known reserves are often less concentrated. The 
prospect of new supply coming into the market can act as a buffer when demand exceeds supply 
and prices rise. However, even when high prices lead to new investments, it takes years for mining 
operations to start. 
In contrast to minerals, agricultural commodities are renewable resources. All countries 
produce agricultural products, but some countries do not produce enough foodstuffs to feed their 
own populations and thus need to import them. Although world supply of agricultural commodities 
does not have the pronounced oligopolistic features of many markets for industrial raw materials, 
there are some large players here too (Table 1.1). Droughts or government interventions affecting 
supply in key producing regions can easily disrupt global commodity markets and upset trade 
relationships. 
Another factor heightening concern about restrictive export policies is that, in the short run, 
there are few or no substitutes available for many of the necessary inputs. For example, rare earth 
metals, antimony, and tungsten are difficult to replace without significantly increasing production 
costs or compromising the performance of the products in which they are used. Rare earths are 
used to make lasers and many components of electronic devices and defence systems, antimony is 
crucial for flame retardant plastics and textiles, and tungsten is used to produce cemented carbides 
for cutting tools used in many industries (Silberglitt et al., 2013). To safeguard against possible 
supply shortfalls, some industries and governments have stepped up efforts to stockpile industrial 
commodities essential for their operations (see, for example, Areddy, 2011, p.10). Similarly, the 
food price spike of 2008 has given impetus to initiatives at national and regional levels to hold more 
food stocks in reserve. 
In the case of manufactured goods, attempts are being made to reduce dependence on 
access to primary raw materials by recycling more secondary material (waste and scrap) so that it 
can be used in the making of new products. Steel, copper and aluminium are among the most 
recycled secondary materials today, which have become globally traded commodities. As prices for 
primary raw materials have risen, collecting and processing scrap for re-use has become 
increasingly cost-effective and small-scale secondary markets and trade opportunities are emerging 
even for metals used in minute quantities that are difficult to recover, such as rare earths. Another 
incentive for recovering scrap for recycling is that this process can be very efficient in saving water 
and energy, and is otherwise environmentally sound.  
The availability of secondary material for recycling depends on past production and is limited 
at national level. With demand growing, and in order to prevent shortages in certain geographical 
areas and surpluses in others, it is crucial to be able to trade metal scrap internationally as freely as 
possible. However, the global market for metal waste and scrap has also seen a steady increase in 
recent years in government-imposed export bans and other types of export restrictions.  
The increased use of export restrictions across raw materials markets has caused concern 
and friction, including two recent challenges at the WTO to the legality of export restraints imposed 
by China on a broad set of raw materials.
5
At the same time, there have been efforts to strengthen 
the disciplines on export restrictions of the multilateral trading system. While WTO rules on the use 
of import restrictions are numerous and extensive, those on export restrictions are more limited. 
These multilateral rules are described in Annex 1.A. Various proposals for improvement have been 
tabled during the ongoing Doha Round trade negotiations, but concrete steps in this direction could 
not be agreed. As Chapter 5 of this volume shows, the bulk of concrete recent achievements in 
restraining the use of these measures has occurred in the context of negotiated regional trade 
agreements (RTAs).  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested