mvc open pdf in browser : Convert pdf pages to jpg control software utility azure html winforms visual studio export-restrictions-raw-materials-201410-part1122

3. EFFECTS OF REMOVING EXPORT TAXES ON STEEL AND STEEL-RELATED RAW MATERIALS – 
101
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
of the export tax wedge ultimately leads to changes in those prices, once all the direct and indirect 
market adjustments are taken into account. For example, the average export tax on scrap and 
ferrous metals in the Russian Federation is estimated at 13.4%. After removal of this tax and all 
other export taxes shown in Figure 3.5, the price that international buyers of Russian scrap and 
ferrous metals have to pay is reduced by 10.4%, which is less than the change of the tax rate. The 
price that Russian sellers receive is increased by 4.4%, driven by an expansion of international 
demand for their products. Sellers’ prices fall in countries that do not make any policy changes, as 
international supply in those products increases, and changes in international markets are already 
fully transmitted to domestic producers.  
Table 3.2. Simulated changes in international trade prices, percentage change from base 
Steel 
Ferrous waste  
and scrap 
Iron ore 
Coke 
Exporter/ 
Importer 
Buyers' 
price 
Sellers' 
price 
Buyers' 
price 
Sellers' 
price 
Buyers' 
price 
Sellers' 
price 
Buyers' 
price 
Sellers' 
price 
Argentina 
-1.42 
0.35 
-0.81 
-0.81 
-9.99 
0.02 
-13.59 
-13.59 
China 
-2.19 
1.71 
-18.01 
24.08 
-6.99 
3.34 
-28.73 
18.78 
Japan 
-0.78 
-0.78 
-0.89 
-0.89 
0.00 
0.00 
-8.67 
-8.67 
United States 
-0.51 
-0.51 
-0.86 
-0.86 
-0.08 
-0.08 
-6.25 
-6.25 
India 
-3.05 
3.22 
-7.54 
7.86 
-24.92 
7.14 
-18.14 
-18.14 
Russia 
-0.37 
-0.31 
-10.39 
4.42 
-0.49 
-0.49 
-10.04 
-6.33 
Korea 
-0.63 
-0.63 
-0.23 
-0.23 
0.31 
0.31 
11.13 
11.13 
Turkey 
-1.03 
-1.03 
-0.03 
-0.03 
1.29 
1.29 
26.80 
26.80 
Brazil 
-0.73 
-0.53 
-0.47 
-0.39 
-0.40 
-0.40 
0.04 
0.04 
Australia 
-0.45 
-0.45 
-0.34 
-0.34 
-0.55 
-0.55 
-9.32 
-9.32 
South Africa 
-0.51 
-0.51 
-0.36 
-0.36 
-0.04 
-0.04 
-2.10 
-2.10 
European 
Union 
-0.43 
-0.42 
-0.36 
-0.36 
-0.04 
-0.04 
-6.60 
-6.60 
Rest of the 
World 
-1.23 
0.35 
-1.48 
0.45 
-0.73 
-0.42 
-9.03 
-8.78 
Note: Reforming countries indicated by bold and italicised text. 
Source: OECD Trade Model.  
Removal of export taxes increases the returns from exporting relative to serving the 
domestic market, but there is an exception in the case of coke: the Russian Federation imposes a 
relatively low export tax on coke and has a small share on the relatively thin world market for coke. 
China is the biggest exporter of coke according to the data reported in Table 3.1, and its coke 
exports increase substantially (about 50%) after the simulated removal of export taxes. As a result, 
world prices for coke plummet and this leads to a fall in the price that Russian exporters receive. 
The same reasoning holds for the Rest of the World.  
Macroeconomic results 
The macroeconomic effects of the removal of export taxes are found to be quite modest, with 
negligible impacts on GDP in individual countries. Globally, households experience an increase of 
about USD 10.5 billion, or 0.03% of household income. Relatively small macroeconomic effects are 
consistent with the sector-specific and country-specific nature of the simulated policy change. 
Improvements in GDP and household income stem from improved allocation of resources and the 
model does not take dynamic effects through investments into account.  
The removal of export taxes may have some noticeable impact on government revenue, 
especially in China and India. The model assumes that the loss in tax revenue is translated into a 
reduced level of government expenditure. In order to test the macroeconomic importance of this 
Convert pdf pages to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
.net convert pdf to jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg
Convert pdf pages to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
conversion pdf to jpg; convert multi page pdf to jpg
102
– 3. EFFECTS OF REMOVING EXPORT TAXES ON STEEL AND STEEL-RELATED RAW MATERIALS 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
assumption, an alternative model specification requires income tax rates to adjust to keep 
government expenditure fixed. While this is clearly a very simple specification of the fiscal 
implications, it illustrates the weight of export tax revenue in the government accounts. At the macro 
level, this alternative closure has marginally greater negative GDP effects for these two countries, 
as the burden of government expenditure shifts from export to income tax, and private consumption 
in the two countries falls.  
Although the counterfactual policy simulation concerns changes in only a few sectors and 
only in the subset of countries that have export taxes in place in the base data, the results show 
important effects on boosting global trade. Each region becomes more connected with the global 
economy, as reflected by each region’s increased imports, with additional imports totalling about 
USD 13.8 billion. Exports increase mostly in those economies with significant export taxes in the 
base data, while exports in the remaining regions fall slightly, reflecting different patterns of demand 
effects associated with the change in relative prices.
Steel and relevant raw material industries 
The regions with the highest rates of export tax on scrap, iron ore and coke experience the 
greatest price movements when these taxes are removed, leading to increased export demand for 
their products, which provides a stimulus to production. There are some large increases in export 
values. The Russian Federation increases its scrap exports by USD 1.3 billion (+67%), India 
increases iron exports by USD 2.5 billion (+49%), and China increases coke exports by 
USD 2.2 billion (+50%), but some of the large percentage changes reported in Table 3.3 stem from 
the small initial base values of most of these countries (for example, China and India in the scrap 
industry, China in the iron ore industry, and India in the coke industry). 
Economies with no export taxes in the base run, and hence no policy change, experience 
more competition on the international raw materials market and see their market shares reduced. 
This illustrates the profit-shifting effect discussed in Chapter 2, where the theoretical model showed 
that an export tax can raise the relative profitability of other countries’ raw materials sectors. For 
example, the removal of export taxes on iron ore by Argentina, and India leads to expansion of their 
iron ore output and greater supplies to world markets. This in turn leads to contractions of iron ore 
production in those countries that had no export restriction on iron ore in place. The expansion of 
iron ore production is simulated to amount to nearly 1% in Argentina and 21% in in India 
(Table 3.3). China, on the other hand is found to reduce its iron ore production by 1.2%, although it 
is amongst the countries that removes its export tax on iron ore. It had a relatively low export tax 
when compared to the level of other export taxes on these commodities; as a result, prices of its 
international competitors fall relatively further and demand from both domestic and international 
buyers shifts to those cheaper inputs.  
As a result of removing export taxes on these inputs into steel making, the sourcing of these 
raw materials shifts to where they are relatively cheaper. When prices of both domestic and foreign 
inputs into an industry fall, the decline tends to be greater for domestic inputs, which suggests a 
relative shift towards cheaper foreign supply. For example, domestic prices for ferrous waste and 
scrap input into steel making in the European Union are simulated to fall by 0.2% while prices of 
imported ferrous waste and scrap decline by 1.1%. 
The falling prices of foreign intermediate inputs causes a shift in sourcing patterns of steel 
making inputs: all countries and country blocs increase their imports of intermediate inputs and in 
some cases this is at the expense of domestic input sources (Table 3.3). The economies that 
remove taxes on steel (Argentina, China, India, Rest of the World) see the fastest expansion of their 
output, and as this expansion requires more inputs they also increase purchases from domestic 
intermediate producers, although their input mix is simulated to have a higher share of imports. 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
convert pdf to jpg for online; conversion of pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code convert TIFF file all pages to jpg images.
pdf to jpeg converter; changing file from pdf to jpg
3. EFFECTS OF REMOVING EXPORT TAXES ON STEEL AND STEEL-RELATED RAW MATERIALS – 
103
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table 3.3. Simulated effects on producing industries  
Percentage change from base 
ARG 
CHN 
JPN 
USA 
IND 
RUS 
KOR 
TUR 
BRA 
AUS 
ZAF 
EU 
ROW 
Steel 
Production 
Quantity produced 
1.65 
0.96 
-0.12 
-0.79 
2.36 
-1.41 
-0.78 
1.13 
-0.11 
-1.02 
-0.73 
-0.76 
0.69 
Production cost 
-0.23 
-0.52 
-0.67 
-0.15 
-0.24 
-0.02 
-0.55 
-1.16 
-0.46 
0.01 
-0.29 
-0.34 
-0.27 
Production inputs 
Domestic steel inputs 
1.60 
0.74 
-0.56 
-1.30 
2.12 
-2.04 
-1.36 
0.23 
0.02 
-1.44 
-0.90 
-1.42 
0.09 
Imported steel inputs 
2.05 
3.26 
2.96 
1.38 
3.75 
2.46 
1.32 
3.28 
1.39 
1.71 
1.41 
0.03 
1.74 
Total imported inputs 
1.96 
2.41 
2.25 
0.48 
2.65 
0.28 
0.94 
2.88 
0.38 
0.00 
-0.06 
-0.19 
1.39 
Exports 
Intermediate exports 
3.45 
7.76 
-0.46 
-1.83 
13.65 
-2.29 
-1.01 
1.50 
-0.31 
-2.34 
-1.39 
-1.00 
2.63 
Total exports 
3.45 
7.89 
-0.46 
-1.83 
13.65 
-2.21 
-1.01 
1.50 
-0.31 
-2.34 
-1.39 
-1.00 
2.60 
Ferrous waste and scrap 
Production 
Quantity produced 
1.55 
1.28 
-0.23 
-1.61 
0.50 
46.78 
-2.03 
-4.90 
0.12 
-1.45 
-0.80 
-3.13 
0.22 
Production cost 
-0.22 
-0.26 
-0.27 
-0.06 
-0.01 
-0.03 
-0.37 
-0.34 
-0.03 
0.01 
-0.04 
-0.10 
-0.21 
Production inputs 
Domestic steel industry inputs 
1.49 
1.36 
-0.22 
-2.07 
0.53 
46.83 
-2.29 
-4.62 
0.05 
-1.83 
-0.99 
-3.43 
-0.07 
Imported steel industry inputs 
2.00 
1.16 
-0.10 
-1.54 
0.33 
46.86 
-1.96 
-4.85 
0.18 
-1.38 
-0.76 
-3.06 
0.31 
Total imported inputs 
1.85 
0.11 
0.04 
-0.06 
0.02 
1.23 
-0.06 
-0.08 
0.01 
-0.01 
0.00 
-1.74 
0.43 
Exports 
Intermediate exports 
-0.20 
97.00 
-2.02 
-3.91 
26.12 
66.95 
-1.63 
-4.02 
-0.93 
-2.44 
-1.73 
-3.89 
2.22 
Total exports 
-0.20 
97.00 
-2.02 
-3.91 
26.12 
66.95 
-1.63 
-4.02 
-0.93 
-2.44 
-1.73 
-3.89 
2.22 
Iron ore 
Production 
Quantity produced 
0.86 
-1.15 
1.16 
-0.15 
21.36 
-0.31 
-0.60 
0.15 
-2.04 
-2.92 
-3.83 
-0.40 
-0.59 
Production cost 
0.01 
-0.06 
-0.02 
-0.01 
0.17 
0.01 
0.00 
0.04 
0.00 
-0.01 
-0.02 
-0.01 
0.01 
Production inputs 
Domestic steel inputs 
6.86 
-2.24 
4.35 
-0.51 
21.06 
-0.47 
-0.45 
0.90 
-2.07 
-3.00 
-6.06 
-1.07 
-0.73 
Imported steel inputs 
-1.37 
2.56 
2.19 
26.95 
1.27 
2.06 
0.28 
-0.13 
-1.35 
17.33 
0.00 
-0.07 
Total imported inputs 
0.28 
-0.55 
36.17 
0.07 
21.40 
-0.07 
-0.63 
0.15 
-2.07 
-2.79 
-3.71 
-0.38 
-0.57 
Exports 
Intermediate exports 
0.89 
9.34 
1.22 
-0.38 
48.54 
-1.78 
0.29 
3.96 
-3.21 
-4.52 
-3.87 
-0.52 
-1.88 
Total exports 
0.89 
9.34 
1.22 
-0.38 
48.54 
-1.78 
0.29 
2.98 
-3.21 
-4.52 
-3.87 
-0.52 
-1.88 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
pdf to jpeg; convert pdf file into jpg format
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
c# pdf to jpg; convert online pdf to jpg
104
– 3. EFFECTS OF REMOVING EXPORT TAXES ON STEEL AND STEEL-RELATED RAW MATERIALS 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table 3.3. Simulated effects on producing industries (cont.) 
Percentage change from base
ARG 
CHN 
JPN 
USA 
IND 
RUS 
KOR 
TUR 
BRA 
AUS 
ZAF 
EU 
ROW 
Coke 
Production 
Quantity produced 
-26.06 
3.35 
-3.87 
-3.73 
-2.75 
-0.34 
-0.48 
-29.09 
-43.31 
-0.31 
-36.89 
-14.31 
-2.92 
Production cost 
0.02 
0.07 
0.00 
0.00 
0.12 
0.01 
0.01 
0.00 
-0.09 
-0.08 
-0.01 
0.02 
0.02 
Production inputs 
Domestic steel inputs 
3.22 
-3.96 
-2.76 
-0.62 
Imported steel inputs 
4.53 
-1.95 
-1.94 
5.67 
Total imported inputs 
-25.16 
3.35 
-3.87 
-3.75 
-2.36 
-0.30 
-0.49 
-13.00 
-43.37 
-0.85 
-36.90 
-14.32 
-2.92 
Exports 
Intermediate exports 
-45.43 
50.17 
-20.97 
-16.22 
-36.65 
-13.03 
24.21 
12.04 
-48.49 
-18.87 
-42.36 
-27.14 
-19.83 
Total exports 
-45.42 
50.16 
-20.97 
-16.22 
-36.65 
-13.03 
24.11 
13.64 
-48.49 
-18.87 
-42.36 
-27.14 
-19.83 
Notes (1) For the individual sector results, ‘exports’ refers to the commodity exports of the sector and ‘imports’ refers to total intermediate commodities imported to that sector. 
(2) In this table, ‘steel inputs’ relates to the use of steel and related raw materials as inputs into the production process in each sector. 
Source: OECD Trade Model. 
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
bulk pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
change pdf to jpg file; .pdf to .jpg converter online
3. EFFECTS OF REMOVING EXPORT TAXES ON STEEL AND STEEL-RELATED RAW MATERIALS – 
105
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table 3.4. Simulated effects on major steel or related raw materials purchasing industries, percentage change from base 
ARG 
CHN 
JPN 
USA 
IND 
RUS 
KOR 
TUR 
BRA 
AUS 
ZAF 
EU 
ROW 
Metal products and machinery 
Production 
Quantity produced 
0.15 
0.31 
0.02 
-0.06 
0.19 
0.01 
0.10 
0.48 
0.07 
-0.15 
-0.03 
-0.05 
0.19 
Production cost 
-0.10 
-0.15 
-0.07 
-0.03 
-0.18 
-0.04 
-0.08 
-0.17 
-0.07 
-0.01 
-0.05 
-0.03 
-0.10 
Production inputs 
Domestic steel inputs 
0.06 
0.35 
-0.03 
-0.60 
0.22 
-0.54 
-0.35 
1.04 
-0.02 
-0.63 
-0.24 
-0.41 
-0.25 
Imported steel inputs 
0.58 
0.66 
2.01 
2.45 
0.44 
3.29 
1.96 
0.13 
3.30 
2.37 
1.97 
0.40 
0.86 
Total imported inputs 
0.29 
0.20 
0.21 
0.48 
0.13 
0.49 
0.40 
0.43 
0.39 
0.38 
0.31 
0.07 
0.36 
Exports 
Intermediate exports 
0.20 
0.46 
0.05 
-0.13 
0.52 
-0.03 
0.13 
0.74 
0.10 
-0.25 
-0.07 
-0.07 
0.24 
Total exports 
0.17 
0.43 
0.02 
-0.15 
0.45 
-0.06 
0.04 
0.65 
0.05 
-0.27 
-0.05 
-0.09 
0.22 
Other metals and minerals 
Production 
Quantity produced 
0.03 
0.34 
0.02 
-0.03 
0.50 
0.05 
0.05 
0.17 
0.23 
-0.33 
0.07 
0.00 
0.07 
Production cost 
0.00 
-0.16 
0.00 
-0.01 
-0.17 
0.01 
-0.01 
0.01 
-0.09 
0.07 
-0.01 
-0.02 
-0.02 
Production inputs 
Domestic steel inputs 
-0.15 
-0.56 
-0.06 
-0.50 
0.64 
-0.10 
-0.16 
0.33 
0.19 
-0.40 
-0.14 
-0.64 
-0.25 
Imported steel inputs 
0.09 
4.10 
1.96 
3.11 
0.08 
1.35 
1.86 
0.10 
2.27 
0.78 
2.08 
0.51 
0.55 
Total imported inputs 
0.08 
0.85 
0.03 
0.09 
0.47 
0.30 
0.07 
0.18 
0.28 
-0.12 
0.11 
0.05 
0.12 
Exports 
Intermediate exports 
0.01 
0.60 
-0.01 
-0.01 
0.78 
-0.01 
0.03 
0.08 
0.34 
-0.39 
0.08 
0.00 
0.07 
Total exports 
0.00 
0.60 
-0.01 
-0.01 
0.77 
-0.01 
0.02 
0.07 
0.34 
-0.39 
0.08 
0.00 
0.07 
Rest of petroleum and coal products 
Production 
Quantity produced 
0.01 
0.75 
0.00 
-0.03 
0.06 
-0.01 
0.03 
0.28 
0.47 
0.08 
-0.08 
-0.06 
0.00 
Production cost 
0.04 
-0.04 
0.01 
0.01 
0.12 
0.02 
0.02 
-0.03 
-0.21 
-0.06 
-0.01 
0.03 
0.03 
Production inputs 
Domestic steel inputs 
-0.13 
0.76 
-0.06 
-1.02 
-0.88 
-0.39 
0.03 
0.47 
0.41 
0.08 
-0.57 
-4.12 
-0.03 
Imported steel inputs 
-5.00 
2.24 
1.93 
51.72 
19.38 
18.77 
1.87 
0.23 
0.49 
-0.50 
0.21 
32.16 
0.43 
Total imported inputs 
0.03 
0.77 
0.00 
-0.05 
0.47 
0.57 
0.03 
0.30 
0.25 
-0.45 
-0.12 
-0.02 
0.00 
Exports 
Intermediate exports 
0.01 
0.65 
0.10 
0.01 
0.00 
0.04 
0.11 
0.35 
0.69 
0.20 
-0.08 
-0.04 
0.03 
Total exports 
0.01 
0.63 
0.10 
0.01 
0.00 
0.04 
0.10 
0.35 
0.69 
0.20 
-0.08 
-0.04 
0.02 
Notes: (1)  For the individual sector results, ‘exports’ refers to the commodity exports of the sector and ‘imports’ refers to total intermediate commodities imported to that sector.  
(2) In this table, ‘steel inputs’ relates to the use of steel and related raw materials as inputs into the production process in each sector. 
Source: OECD Trade Model.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
to jpeg; convert pdf to jpeg
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
convert pdf into jpg format; convert from pdf to jpg
106
– 3. EFFECTS OF REMOVING EXPORT TAXES ON STEEL AND STEEL-RELATED RAW MATERIALS 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table 3.4. Simulated effects on major steel or related raw materials purchasing industries, percentage change from base (cont.) 
ARG 
CHN 
JPN 
USA 
IND 
RUS 
KOR 
TUR 
BRA 
AUS 
ZAF 
EU 
ROW 
Transport nec 
Production 
Quantity produced 
0.02 
0.12 
0.02 
0.02 
0.00 
0.02 
0.05 
0.12 
0.24 
0.03 
0.05 
0.05 
0.01 
Production cost 
0.01 
-0.05 
0.01 
-0.01 
0.02 
0.00 
0.01 
-0.07 
-0.23 
0.01 
-0.02 
-0.02 
0.01 
Production inputs 
Domestic steel inputs 
-0.22 
0.26 
0.01 
-6.39 
-0.83 
-0.20 
0.06 
0.67 
-30.84 
0.01 
-7.45 
-13.41 
-0.28 
Imported steel inputs 
0.48 
0.92 
1.96 
35.65 
20.09 
6.09 
2.78 
0.35 
2.32 
2.55 
51.74 
14.27 
0.49 
Total imported inputs 
0.03 
0.11 
0.02 
0.45 
0.00 
0.25 
0.03 
0.30 
0.67 
0.01 
0.43 
0.23 
0.02 
Exports 
Intermediate exports 
0.04 
0.20 
0.03 
0.04 
0.07 
0.06 
0.09 
0.22 
0.40 
-0.01 
0.03 
0.08 
0.04 
Total exports 
0.01 
0.16 
0.02 
0.04 
0.00 
0.05 
0.08 
0.19 
0.45 
0.03 
0.11 
0.08 
0.02 
Construction 
Production 
Quantity produced 
0.00 
0.01 
0.00 
0.01 
-0.05 
0.00 
0.01 
0.01 
0.02 
-0.02 
0.01 
0.01 
0.01 
Production cost 
-0.02 
-0.16 
-0.02 
-0.01 
-0.19 
-0.01 
-0.05 
-0.10 
0.01 
0.00 
-0.02 
-0.01 
-0.04 
Production inputs 
Domestic steel inputs 
-0.13 
0.04 
-0.08 
-0.51 
0.09 
-0.54 
-0.42 
0.56 
-0.03 
-0.47 
-0.23 
-0.41 
-0.47 
Imported steel inputs 
0.25 
0.92 
1.96 
2.57 
0.17 
3.33 
1.88 
-0.30 
3.23 
2.48 
2.35 
0.40 
0.59 
Total imported inputs 
0.06 
0.08 
0.08 
0.15 
0.03 
0.37 
0.33 
-0.07 
0.16 
0.19 
0.10 
0.07 
0.11 
Exports 
Intermediate exports 
0.04 
0.24 
0.02 
0.00 
0.24 
0.02 
0.09 
0.19 
0.06 
-0.07 
0.03 
0.01 
0.06 
Total exports 
-0.08 
0.21 
-0.01 
-0.03 
0.21 
0.00 
0.06 
0.15 
-0.06 
-0.12 
-0.01 
-0.01 
0.03 
Other manufacturing 
Production 
Quantity produced 
0.00 
0.17 
0.03 
0.02 
-0.06 
0.00 
0.11 
0.07 
0.15 
0.07 
0.06 
0.03 
0.02 
Production cost 
0.00 
-0.01 
-0.01 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
-0.01 
0.00 
-0.03 
-0.02 
-0.01 
0.00 
0.00 
Production inputs 
Domestic steel inputs 
-0.15 
-0.11 
-0.05 
-1.16 
-0.15 
-0.26 
-0.04 
0.45 
0.03 
-0.20 
-0.16 
-1.16 
-0.50 
Imported steel inputs 
0.27 
3.11 
1.97 
5.88 
0.81 
4.39 
1.93 
-0.35 
2.46 
2.46 
1.86 
1.34 
0.51 
Total imported inputs 
0.03 
0.16 
0.06 
0.10 
0.03 
0.13 
0.10 
0.07 
0.15 
0.11 
0.08 
0.06 
0.04 
Exports 
Intermediate exports 
0.03 
0.17 
0.06 
0.02 
0.01 
0.00 
0.15 
0.09 
0.18 
0.07 
0.04 
0.02 
0.04 
Total exports 
0.02 
0.10 
0.05 
0.02 
-0.02 
0.00 
0.13 
0.05 
0.17 
0.09 
0.05 
0.03 
0.03 
Motor vehicles and transport equipment 
Production 
Quantity produced 
0.02 
0.18 
0.07 
-0.01 
0.09 
0.03 
0.19 
0.29 
0.13 
0.08 
0.07 
0.02 
0.06 
Production cost 
-0.04 
-0.12 
-0.05 
-0.02 
-0.15 
-0.05 
-0.09 
-0.10 
-0.05 
-0.01 
-0.03 
-0.03 
-0.05 
Production inputs 
Domestic steel inputs 
-0.12 
0.21 
-0.02 
-0.57 
0.11 
-0.51 
-0.27 
0.80 
-0.02 
-0.42 
-0.14 
-0.35 
-0.44 
Imported steel inputs 
0.40 
0.27 
2.02 
2.50 
0.33 
3.21 
2.04 
-0.11 
3.31 
2.61 
2.07 
0.46 
0.67 
Total imported inputs 
0.05 
0.03 
0.13 
0.11 
0.04 
0.19 
0.36 
0.27 
0.21 
0.25 
0.13 
0.07 
0.12 
Exports 
Intermediate exports 
0.15 
0.36 
0.08 
-0.03 
0.44 
0.09 
0.27 
0.46 
0.19 
-0.07 
0.04 
0.00 
0.08 
Total exports 
0.04 
0.30 
0.06 
-0.05 
0.38 
0.06 
0.23 
0.42 
0.09 
-0.07 
0.00 
0.00 
0.07 
3. EFFECTS OF REMOVING EXPORT TAXES ON STEEL AND STEEL-RELATED RAW MATERIALS – 
107
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
The shifting trade patterns due to the simultaneous and global removal of taxes on the 
exports of steel and its key raw material inputs causes production costs in the steel making industry 
to fall across all regions except Australia (where production costs increase by 0.01%), including the 
regions that are simulated to remove export restrictions on steel raw materials (Table 3.3). Once 
export taxes on steel inputs are lifted, global supply expands and prices fall. This enables the 
(downstream) steel industry to source its inputs more cheaply. In addition, steel producers in 
countries that abolish export taxes on steel benefit from higher sellers’ prices on the international 
market, while the lower buyers’ price boosts demand. They thus benefit from two sides: the 
multilateral elimination of export taxes on steel making raw materials reduces their inputs costs and 
the abolition of export taxes on the final product improves their position on international markets. 
Users of steel and relevant raw materials 
A major effect of export restrictions is the diversion of raw materials to domestic downstream 
industries. This motivates the use of these measures in many countries. The modelling results cast 
doubt on this strategy. A key insight is that the multilateral removal of export taxes will benefit even 
those industries downstream from raw material suppliers on whose exports taxes are currently 
imposed.  
China, India and the Russian Federation are the three regions with the highest export taxes 
on steel. In these three regions, production in all industries downstream from steel increases when 
export taxes are removed, with the exception of construction in India. This means that the global 
removal of barriers to the exports of steel is eventually beneficial for downstream industries even 
where they were initially benefiting from input prices that were below those faced by foreign 
competitors. The reason is that the improved functioning of global markets for steel inputs (and 
associated fall in global prices) would more than offset the loss of that protection. This result 
underlines that the argument whereby export taxes help to develop downstream industries is based 
on the unlikely assumption of no retaliatory policies by other countries. It shows that the multilateral 
removal of all ‘copy-cat’ export taxes improves the working of international markets by increasing 
the volumes traded at lower prices for downstream producers across the world. The explanation of 
this result is that removing export taxes on a multilateral basis improves the working of international 
markets by increasing the volumes traded at lower prices for downstream producers across the 
world The same mechanisms that explain falling international prices of raw materials for steel 
making when export taxes on them are removed are at work in industries that use steel as an input. 
Removal of those taxes expands international supply, allows all countries to source their inputs 
more cheaply and reduces production costs in downstream industries. Almost all countries are 
found to increase imports of steel or raw material intermediate inputs in every industry.  
In some countries, the effects on output in some downstream industries are found to be 
slightly negative. While these industries still benefit from lower input prices coming from the removal 
of export taxes on steel and steel-related raw materials, those inputs have less weight in their cost 
structure compared to other inputs such as services and capital. As a result, the relative cost 
reduction they experience from reduced raw material prices is insufficient to give them an 
advantage over competitors whose overall cost are more heavily dependent on the raw materials 
that are currently subject to export taxes.  
Export restrictions are beggar-thy-neighbour policies that look attractive from a unilateral 
point of view only if it is assumed that other countries do not react when an export restriction is 
imposed. However, as argued in Chapter 2, there is an incentive for others to react by adopting 
similar policies so that export restrictions snowball. Using export taxes in an attempt to provide 
preferential market conditions to domestic suppliers ignores this implication. What this work shows 
is that when used multilaterally they, in fact, drive up domestic production costs and undercut the 
competitiveness of downstream industries. A concerted multilateral decision to abolish those 
measures can avoid this sub-optimal outcome, and indeed the results show that both upstream and 
downstream industries globally can be better off as long as all counties abolish simultaneously. 
108
– 3. EFFECTS OF REMOVING EXPORT TAXES ON STEEL AND STEEL-RELATED RAW MATERIALS 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Furthermore, the simulation reported in Box 3.1 shows that even unilateral removal of an 
export tax can bring benefits to the global supply chain with minimal impacts on the downstream 
sectors of the country removing the restriction.  
Box 3.1. Effects on global value chains from unilateral removal of India's export taxes on iron ore 
The unilateral removal of India’s export taxes on iron ore would increase the returns to its iron ore exporters 
by 17%. Production responds by shifting resources into the iron ore industry with a 14% increase in production, 
90% of which is directly exported, so that total iron ore exports rise by 31%. The Indian steel industry, as well as 
construction and other metals and minerals, are hardly affected as the model shows the iron ore price on the 
Indian market does not follow the price rise for exports. The extent of this imperfect price transmission depends to 
a certain degree on the cost structure of the iron ore industry. If production can expand at current marginal cost, 
prices do not have to rise on the domestic market. If, on the other hand, capacity constraints increase the cost of 
iron ore production, domestic prices could rise and export gains would be smaller. The majority of additional iron 
ore exports is sent to China. These exports flow specifically into its steel industry, and to other metals and minerals 
industries. Cheaper imports lower China’s production costs in these industries and allow for small increases in 
production (0.3% in steel making, 0.2% in other metals and minerals). Over 99% of the output in these two 
industries are inputs for further production.  
The additional production is used domestically in China as well as exported. Apart from their own industries, 
the extra production is sold domestically to the metal products and machinery industries, and to the construction 
industry. As a result, production costs in these industries fall slightly. Externally, exports of Chinese steel increase 
by less than 1% and slightly smaller increases are observed for products that use steel as inputs. These exports 
are sent all round the world, but especially to the EU, the United States, Korea and Japan.  
The effects of the unilateral tax removal filter through to all the inter-related industries in global value chains 
that draw on iron ore and steel. Overall, the model suggests that the unilateral removal of India’s export taxes 
increases global production in a range of inter-related sectors, including other metals and minerals, steel, and 
other manufacturing. 
Source: OECD Trade Model. 
3.3. 
Conclusions 
This chapter has focussed on steel and steel-related raw materials because these 
commodities have a central place in all economies, and especially in emerging economies that are 
increasing the steel content of their investment. But export restrictions (as well as import 
restrictions) are creating major distortions and impeding full realization of the growth potential in 
those sectors. 
Export taxes have been singled out in order to analyse the potential for improving the 
efficiency of global markets for steel and related raw materials. Domestically, export taxes punish 
upstream mining and raw materials sectors by making producers less able to exploit the 
opportunities that international markets offer. Internationally, export taxes drive up world market 
prices for raw materials and raise input costs for processing industries. The functioning of domestic 
as well as global value chains is hampered by these measures, and taxes and import duties can 
accumulate to raise the cost to final consumers. For example, Chinese importers of iron ore from 
India have to pay a price that includes an export tax, while the country itself levies an export tax on 
some finished steel items that are used for further processing by other countries.  
The simulations reported in this chapter find that multilateral action to reduce and eventually 
remove such export taxes can benefit both the upstream and downstream industries, including in 
the countries that remove their export taxes. This finding runs counter to the expectation that export 
taxes, or other export restrictions, must necessarily benefit domestic downstream industries and 
enhance domestic value added.  
This result occurs because, with multilateral removal of export taxes, international markets 
see increased volumes traded at lower prices. This enables downstream industries in all countries 
to source their inputs more cheaply. The corollary is that, when an export tax on the upstream 
industry is used without taking account of the effect on international markets or the possible 
reactions from other suppliers, it may well not have the desired outcome on the domestic economy. 
3. EFFECTS OF REMOVING EXPORT TAXES ON STEEL AND STEEL-RELATED RAW MATERIALS – 
109
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
The efficiency gains resulting from the simulated removal of export restrictions should be 
considered a lower-bound estimate. The simulations reported here take into account ad valorem 
export taxes only, and ignore other instruments that restrain export activity. As Chapter 1 shows, 
besides export taxes, other policies including export bans, non-automatic export licensing 
requirements are applied to the main steelmaking materials (iron ore, steel scrap and coke) studied 
here. Moreover, the simulation focuses on the three main inputs into steelmaking, but there are a 
number of other minerals and metals that are also used in steelmaking, often to give steel specific 
performance or other characteristics. These raw materials also face export restrictions, which are 
not considered in this study. 
Notes 
1. Frank van Tongeren is Head of the Policies in Trade and Agriculture Division, James Messent is a Trade 
Policy Analyst, and Dorothee Flaig and Christine Arriola are statisticians in the OECD’s Trade and 
Agriculture Directorate. The authors are grateful for comments and inputs received from numerous 
colleagues. We would particularly like to mention Ken Ash, Anthony de Carvalho, Barbara Fliess, Jane 
Korinek and Susan Stone for their critical reviews during the various stages of production, and Dirk Kamps 
for collecting information on the cost structure of the steel industry. We would also like to thank delegations 
to the working party of the OECD Trade Committee for providing helpful comments on earlier drafts. 
2. The OECD Trade Model is based on the GTAP database, version 8 with a base year of 2007. The region 
and industry aggregation, as well as other details of the model, are provided in Annex 3.A. 
3. In the OECD Trade Model database, nearly 33% of Australia’s scrap production and just under 60% of its 
iron ore production is exported.  
4. A number of other materials are used in connection with steel production, even if they are not necessarily 
incorporated into the steel itself. Both processes use fluorspar to lower the melting point of the iron ore or 
steel scrap and to help remove impurities from the molten steel. Zinc is frequently used to produce 
galvanized steel (steel with a thin coating of zinc that prevents oxidization). Tin is used as both an alloying 
agent and a coating. Because of its very high melting point, magnesium carbonate is a vital component of 
refractory bricks, which are used to line both basic oxygen and electric arc furnaces (Price and Nance, 
2010). Manganese and nickel enhance the strength of steel while chromium is used for its corrosion and 
discoloration resistance. 
5. Note that the OECD Trade Model records data in value terms. In volume terms (weight) the picture looks 
different. For example, the EAF share in steelmaking in India is very high, but the country uses more direct 
iron reduction as a feedstock; South Africa’s share of BOF is higher than that of EAF, which means that 
more iron ore is used in volume terms. The share of BOF in the European Union is above 60%, which 
means greater demand for iron ore than scrap, in volume terms. 
6. Of the export restrictions on those materials, 35% are export licenses, followed by export taxes at 32%. 
‘Quantifiable’ measures include: bans, quotas, taxes, and minimum export price requirements.  
7. An alternative closure rule fixes the trade balance, while exchange rates fluctuate, with the euro acting as 
numeraire. This closure rule delivers similar macro-economic results to the base closure. Australia and 
South Africa experience slight currency depreciation, while the currencies in the other regions appreciate 
slightly. The countries with a depreciating currency increase their exports, while the countries with an 
appreciating currency increase their imports to keep the trade balance fixed. 
110
– 3. EFFECTS OF REMOVING EXPORT TAXES ON STEEL AND STEEL-RELATED RAW MATERIALS 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
References 
de Melo, J. and S. Robinson (1989), “Product Differentiation and the Treatment of Foreign Trade in 
Computable General Equilibrium Models of Small Economies”, Journal of International 
Economics, Vol. 27, pp. 47-67. 
Devarajan, S., J.D. Lewis and S. Robinson (1990), ‘Policy Lessons from Trade-Focused, Two-
Sector Models’, Journal of Policy Modeling, Vol. 12, pp. 625-657. 
Devarajan, S., D.S. Go, J.D. Lewis, S. Robinson and P. Sinko (1997), “Simple General Equilibrium 
Modelling”, in J.F. Francois and K.A. Reinert, (eds.), Applied Methods for Trade Policy Analysis, 
Cambridge University Press. 
International Monetary Fund (2014), World Economic Outlook Database, April 2014, 
http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2014/01/weodata/index.aspx 
McDonald, S., K.E. Thierfelder and T. Walmsley (2013), Globe v2: A SAM Based Global CGE 
Model using GTAP Data, Model documentation. Available at: http://www.cgemod.org.uk/.  
Narayanan, B.G., A. Aguiar and R. McDougall (eds.), (2012). Global Trade, Assistance, and 
Production: The GTAP 8 Data Base, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Purdue University. 
OECD (2005), Trade and Structural Adjustment: Embracing Globalisation, OECD Publishing, Paris, 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264010970-en
Price, A. and D. Nance (2010), "Export Barriers and the Steel Industry", in OECD, The Economic 
Impact of Export Restrictions on Raw Materials, OECD Publishing, Paris, 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264096448-6-en. 
Robinson, S., M.E. Burfisher, R. Hinojosa-Ojeda and K.E. Thierfelder (1993), “Agricultural Policies 
and Migration in a US-Mexico Free Trade Area: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis”, 
Journal of Policy Modeling, Vol. 15, pp. 673-701. 
Robinson, S., M. Kilkenny and K. Hanson (1990), USDA/ERS Computable General Equilibrium 
Model of the United States, Economic Research Services, USDA, Staff Report AGES 9049. 
World Steel Association (2010a), Steel Statistics Yearbook 2010, www.worldsteel.org
World Steel Association (2010b), World Steel in Figures 2009, www.worldsteel.org. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested