3. EFFECTS OF REMOVING EXPORT TAXES ON STEEL AND STEEL-RELATED RAW MATERIALS – 
111
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Annex 3.A 
OECD Trade Model 
The quantitative analysis is performed with the OECD Trade Model,
1
a computable general 
equilibrium (CGE) model. As the name implies, CGE models require a complete specification of all 
economic activity and explicit recognition of inter-sectoral linkages. This approach is ideal for 
examining the economy-wide impact of a policy or other change. 
The OECD Trade Model is derived from the CGE model GLOBE developed by McDonald, 
Thierfelder and Walmsley (2013).
2
GLOBE is a Social Accounting Matrix (SAM)-based model and a 
direct descendant of an early US Department of Agriculture model (Robinson et al., 1990, Robinson 
et al., 1993). It follows trade principles deriving from the 1-2-3 model (de Melo and Robinson, 1989; 
Devarajan et al., 1990). The OECD’s SAM database starts from the GTAP V8 database (see 
Narayanan et al., 2012) and disaggregates imports according to use-categories based on OECD 
sources
3
, as opposed to the widely used proportionality assumption. The database consists of all 
57 GTAP sectors and 56 regions, for the purpose of this study it is aggregated as displayed in 
Annex Table 3.1. 
The novelty and strength of the OECD Trade Model lies in the detailed trade structure and 
the differentiation of commodities by use. Commodities, and thus trade flows, are distinguished by 
use category as those designed for intermediate use, for use by households, for government 
consumption and as investment commodities.  
Annex Table 3.1. Data aggregation: Regions, sectors and factors 
Region 
Commodity/sector 
Factors 
Argentina 
Ferrous waste and scrap  
Skilled labour 
China 
Steel 
Unskilled labour 
Japan 
Iron ore 
Capital 
United States 
other minerals 
Land 
Russia 
Coke 
Natural resources 
Korea 
Rest of Petroleum and coal products 
Turkey 
Construction 
Brazil 
Oil and gas 
Australia 
Motor vehicles and transport equipment 
European Union 
Metal products and machinery 
Rest of the World 
Other metals and minerals 
Paddy rice 
Wheat 
Cereal grains nec 
Oil seeds 
Other agri and food products 
Other manufacturing 
Transport nec 
Water and air transport 
Other services 
.Pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file to jpg file; convert pdf photo to jpg
.Pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf to jpg for
112
– 3. EFFECTS OF REMOVING EXPORT TAXES ON STEEL AND STEEL-RELATED RAW MATERIALS 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Like GLOBE, the underlying approach for the multi-region model is the construction of a 
series of single country CGE models that are linked through trade relationships. As is common in 
CGE models, the price system in the model is linearly homogeneous, which means that simulations 
generate relative, not absolute, price changes. Each region has its own numéraire, typically the 
Consumer Price Index (CPI), and a nominal exchange rate (an exchange rate index of reference 
regions serves as model numéraire). Thus, price effects inside a country are fed through the model 
as a change relative to the country’s numéraire, and prices between regions change relative to the 
reference region. The Model also contains a “dummy” region to allow for inter-regional transactions 
where full bilateral information is not available, i.e. data on trade and transportation margins.  
The model distinguishes activities that produce commodities. Activities maximise profits and 
create output from primary inputs (i.e. land, natural resources, labour and capital), combined using 
constant elasticity of substitution (CES) technology, and intermediate inputs in fixed shares 
(Leontief technology). Households are assumed to maximise utility subject to a Stone-Geary utility 
function, which allows for the inclusion of a subsistence level of consumption. All commodity and 
activity taxes are expressed as ad valorem tax rates, and taxes are the only income source to the 
government. Government consumption is in fixed proportions to its income and government savings 
are defined as a residual. Closure rules for the government account allow for various fiscal 
specifications.
4
Total savings consist of savings from households, the internal balance on the 
government account and the external balance on the trade account. The external balance is defined 
as the difference between total exports and total imports in domestic currency units. While income 
to the capital account is defined by several savings sources, expenditures by the capital account 
are based solely on commodity demand for investment. 
Notes to Annex 3.A
1.
A detailed model description is available in the “OECD Trade Model Documentation” (OECD internal 
document). 
2.  The original model and a detailed documentation are available at http://www.cgemod.org.uk/. 
3.  Shares for manufacturing and agricultural sectors derive from data underlying OECD BTDIXE 2013ed. 
Data on services derive from the OECD Inter-Country Input-Output Model (May 2013). 
4. The default assumption for the government account is a fixed internal balance and fixed government 
expenditure. Income tax is variable to balance the government account. Similarly, any of the other tax 
rates could be set free to balance the government account. As an alternative to fixing the volume of 
government demand, the government’s share of final demand or the value of government expenditure 
could be fixed. Yet another setting could assume, for example, a flexible internal balance and fixed tax 
rates. 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour.
convert pdf pages to jpg online; changing pdf to jpg file
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Web Security. Your PDF and JPG files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
convert pdf to jpg file; convert pdf image to jpg image
3. EFFECTS OF REMOVING EXPORT TAXES ON STEEL AND STEEL-RELATED RAW MATERIALS – 
113
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Annex 3.B. 
Sensitivity Analysis 
Standard closure rules 
The closure used for the base scenario of the modelling exercise assumes fixed exchange 
rates and trade balances are determined within the model, allowing for a better reflection of 
changes in trade patterns. The region-specific consumer price index serves as regional numéraire. 
In the capital market, the model setup follows the Keynesian approach with investment-driven 
savings, thus fixing the value of investment and adjusting the savings rate. Regional governments 
are assumed to maintain the internal balance by adjusting their expenditure, all tax rates remaining 
fixed. An alternative closure would keep the GDP share of government expenditure fixed by 
adjusting income tax. In factor markets, all production factors are assumed to be fully employed and 
mobile across sectors.  
Closure sensitivity 
The variability of the results when different closure assumptions are used was explored. 
Three variants of the standard closure rules were used. Annex Table 3.B1 shows the results of the 
sensitivity analysis. The first closure variant assumes wages remain fixed and unemployment of 
labour can occur, while all other standard closure assumptions are retained. With unemployment, 
labour supply can increase but wages remain fixed until full employment is reached. At that point, 
wages can adjust. Overall the effects, positive and negative, are greater compared to the case of 
the standard full employment closure. Annex Table 3.B1 shows that real GDP effects in most 
regions are enhanced (especially in China, Republic of Korea, Turkey and Brazil) and are smaller 
only in India. Trade effects are little affected by the unemployment assumption. 
The second closure variant assumes a floating exchange rate regime and a fixed current 
account balance with full employment of all factors. The comparison between the base and this 
variant shows small effects on GDP. Unsurprisingly, the foreign exchange closure setup affects the 
results for trade flows: generally, the appreciation of the exchange rate, which occurs for most 
countries in the simulation, decreases export demand and increases import demand. 
The third closure variant assumes fixed government income by allowing income taxes to 
adjust to compensate for revenue lost by the removal of export taxes. Comparing the base closure 
with the third variant 3 shows no significant changes to the macro-economic or trade outcomes of 
the model.  
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
convert pdf document to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
convert pdf image to jpg; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
114
– 3. EFFECTS OF REMOVING EXPORT TAXES ON STEEL AND STEEL-RELATED RAW MATERIALS 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Annex Table 3.B1. Macroeconomic results with varying closure setups 
ARG 
CHN 
JPN 
USA 
IND 
RUS 
KOR 
TUR 
BRA 
AUS 
ZAF 
EU 
ROW 
% change real GDP 
Base 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.01 
0.02 
0.01 
-0.01 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
Variant 1: Unemployment 
0.00 
0.02 
0.00 
0.01 
-0.04 
0.01 
0.02 
0.06 
0.11 
0.02 
0.02 
0.01 
0.01 
Variant 2: Floating 
exchange rate 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.01 
0.02 
0.01 
-0.01 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
Variant 3: Fixed government 
expenditure 
-0.01 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
-0.01 
0.00 
0.01 
0.02 
0.01 
-0.01 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
% change imports 
Base 
0.06 
0.31 
0.08 
0.09 
0.17 
0.14 
0.13 
0.18 
0.13 
0.06 
0.07 
0.05 
0.06 
Variant 1: Unemployment 
0.07 
0.32 
0.09 
0.10 
0.15 
0.14 
0.14 
0.22 
0.20 
0.08 
0.08 
0.06 
0.07 
Variant 2: Floating 
exchange rate 
0.11 
0.42 
0.06 
0.03 
0.40 
0.21 
0.13 
0.24 
0.08 
-0.21 
-0.07 
0.02 
0.09 
Variant 3: Fixed government 
expenditure 
0.05 
0.31 
0.07 
0.09 
0.17 
0.12 
0.13 
0.18 
0.13 
0.05 
0.06 
0.05 
0.06 
% change exports 
Base 
0.12 
0.56 
0.00 
-0.05 
1.68 
0.26 
0.08 
0.30 
-0.24 
-0.54 
-0.29 
-0.04 
0.09 
Variant 1: Unemployment 
0.14 
0.58 
0.00 
-0.05 
1.66 
0.27 
0.08 
0.30 
-0.21 
-0.53 
-0.29 
-0.04 
0.09 
Variant 2: Floating 
exchange rate 
0.06 
0.35 
0.02 
0.01 
1.35 
0.19 
0.07 
0.12 
-0.18 
-0.15 
-0.07 
0.00 
0.05 
Variant 3: Fixed government 
expenditure 
0.11 
0.50 
0.01 
-0.05 
1.55 
0.26 
0.09 
0.30 
-0.24 
-0.54 
-0.29 
-0.04 
0.09 
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
similar software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter online
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Image Converter Pro - JPEG to JBIG2 Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from JBIG2 Images on Windows.
bulk pdf to jpg converter online; .pdf to .jpg online
4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES – 
115
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Chapter 4 
HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES  
AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES 
Peter Liapis
1
4.1 
Introduction
Information on export taxes and other export restrictions as applied to trade in agricultural 
commodities has until recently been scattered across various sources and has not been 
systematically collected.
2
The second part of the OECD Inventory of Restrictions on Trade in Raw 
Materials (see Chapter 1 of this volume) fills this gap for agricultural commodity trade. The first step 
in compiling this database was to identify those countries that used any export restriction during the 
time period of interest (that is, from a few years prior to the 2007/08 world market price spikes until 
the most recent year possible). This was done by examining the literature, including the popular 
press. A FAO survey of 105 countries found that, between 2007 and the end of March 2011, 
33 countries restricted exports of at least one agricultural product (Sharma, 2011). Since our 
immediate purpose was to analyse the effect of export restrictions on world trade, the initial focus 
has been on major exporters whose export restrictions spill over onto international markets. Hence, 
some countries that imposed export restrictions are not included in the current database. However, 
all countries that notify an export restriction under Article 12 of the Uruguay Round Agreement on 
Agriculture (URAA) are included, irrespective of their relative importance in trade. 
Once a country was identified for selection, information was collected from its official 
government sources. The Harmonized System (HS)
3
was adopted for classifying traded products, in 
line with the first part of the Inventory dealing with industrial raw materials (Chapter 1). The 
information recorded matches the description given in official sources, at whatever HS-digit level 
that source uses. Since international comparisons are typically performed at the HS6 level, 
information recorded in the inventory (product codes and product descriptions) is also provided at 
this level of disaggregation. For those countries that classify their products at the more detailed HS8 
level or higher, the HS6 codes were obtained simply by truncating at the 6-digit level. In those (less 
numerous) cases where the product description was provided at a more aggregated level, the 
information was disaggregated to HS6 level by assuming that the restrictive measure is applied 
uniformly to each HS6-digit product within the more aggregate category. 
Information on export restrictions was collected from 16 countries: Argentina, Belarus, China, 
Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM), Egypt, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz 
Republic, Moldova, Myanmar, Pakistan, the Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Ukraine and Viet Nam. 
The information spans 2002 to 2012, depending on the country. For Argentina, Belarus, China, 
Egypt, Indonesia, India Kazakhstan, Myanmar, Pakistan, the Russian Federation, Ukraine and Viet 
Nam the information is from official national government sources. For Ukraine, this is supplemented 
by information from its WTO notifications under URAA Article 12. Data for the Russian Federation 
and Viet Nam are supplemented with information from their WTO accession treaties and from the 
FAO. WTO notifications are the source for the other countries in the inventory.  
The database contains more than 3 800 lines of export restrictions used by the 16 countries 
during the relevant time period. The export restrictions cover the whole range of agricultural 
products as defined by the WTO, but grains, oilseeds and vegetable oils are among the most 
frequently targeted products.  
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from GIF Images on Windows. JPEG to GIF Converter can directly convert GIF files to JPG files.
convert .pdf to .jpg online; pdf to jpg converter
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Image Converter Pro - JPEG to DICOM Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from DICOM Images on Windows.
best convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpeg on
116
– 4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
The inventory also collects information, when available, on the rationale given by each 
country for any export restrictions used. The most frequently offered rationales are concerns about 
food security, domestic price stability and curbing food inflation. Occasionally, promoting domestic 
value-added activities and access to input supplies by domestic producers are also mentioned. 
Unfortunately, not all countries provided this information for all their measures, so coverage is 
incomplete in this area. 
The next section provides a brief overview of export restrictions in the context of the 
multilateral trading system as well as a breakdown of the agricultural products subject to export 
measures and the instruments employed by the countries in the database. Section 4.3 presents a 
summary of the timeline of restrictions used by individual countries from 2007 to 2011 for selected 
major commodities, followed in Section 4.4 by a discussion of market developments for these 
products. Sections 4.5 and 4.6 analyse the available data, using various techniques at different 
levels of disaggregation, in order to test the predictions of the theory in Chapter 2. These effects 
were sought at the level of total exports, aggregate exports of the countries using restrictions, and 
bilateral trade flows. Section 4.7 summarises the findings and concludes.
4
4
.2. 
Export restrictions in the multilateral trading system 
Overview 
Export duties and taxes are not prohibited under WTO rules but, unlike their counterparts on 
the import side (import duties and tariffs), they are not bound or otherwise disciplined, and can 
therefore be unilaterally adjusted. For new WTO members, however, the accession process may 
impose disciplines, as was the case for China, Viet Nam and the Russian Federation. For example, 
in its accession agreement, China made a commitment to eliminate all export duties except for 84 
specific items (Kim, 2010). 
Article XI of GATT 1994, on the other hand, explicitly prohibits quantitative export restrictions 
whether by quotas, import or export licenses or other measures (see Chapter 5, section 5.3). Some 
exceptions to the general rule are nevertheless allowed, including “export prohibitions or restrictions 
temporarily applied to prevent or relieve critical shortages of foodstuffs or other products essential 
to the exporting contracting party” (paragraph 2(a)) and “import and export prohibitions or 
restrictions necessary to the application of standards or regulations for the classification, grading or 
marketing of commodities in international trade” (paragraph 2(b)). A further basis for imposing 
export restraints is found in Article XX, the “general exceptions” provision. Examples are 
paragraph (b) allowing an exemption from other GATT disciplines when deemed “necessary to 
protect human, animal or plant life or health”, and paragraph (i) granting an exemption to “ensure 
essential quantities” of (raw) material used in domestic processing (see Chapter 5 of this volume for 
more details).  
Countries routinely apply export restrictions or bans under the exemption clauses as there is 
no agreement on how long “temporary” is, what is “critical”, or what is “essential” in determining 
whether the export ban is allowable. Moreover, since export taxes are not disciplined, a prohibitive 
export tax can be equivalent to an export ban. 
Article 12 of the Uruguay Round Agreement on Agriculture (URAA) stipulates that in cases 
where countries institute new export prohibitions on foodstuffs in accordance with paragraph 2(a) of 
Article XI of GATT 1994, they must take into account the effects of such actions on importing 
members’ food security and should give notice in writing as far in advance as practicable to the 
WTO Committee on Agriculture indicating the nature and duration of the measure. They must also 
consult, upon request, with any other member having a substantial interest as an importer that may 
be affected by the measure in question. All relevant information must also be made available to that 
member if requested.  
Paragraph 2 of Article 12 of the URAA then exempts developing countries from the 
notification and consultation requirements, unless the measure is taken by a developing country 
4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES – 
117
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
member that is a net food- exporter of the specific foodstuff concerned. In any case, it seems that 
there are no penalties for failure to notify (Mitra and Josling, 2009).  
Overview of targeted agricultural products 
To provide a general overview of the agricultural products subject to export restraining 
measures, the products in the Inventory were divided into four broad categories: bulk, horticultural, 
processed and semi-processed.
5
Although data prior to 2007 and for 2012 are available for some 
countries, the most complete set of information is for the period 2007 to 2011. The table contains 
information for each year, the number of countries that imposed export restrictions within that 
particular product category and the total number of distinct restrictions used. In order to quantify the 
number of restrictions used in a given year, an export restriction in force for more than six months is 
counted as 1, while those in force for less than six months count as 0.5. These ‘frequency counts’ 
are computed at the HS6 digit level.
6
Standardisation to the HS6 digit level, rather than counting 
restrictions at the HS digit level at which they are defined, is necessary in order to make the figures 
comparable between countries.
7
Table 4.1 summarises the results.  
Table 4.1. Frequency of export restrictions used for agricultural products 
Bulk 
Horticulture 
Semi processed 
Processed 
Year 
Countries 
Restrictions 
Countries 
Restrictions 
Countries 
Restrictions 
Countries 
Restrictions 
2007 
67.5 
97.5 
164.5 
87.5 
2008 
11 
85.5 
48.0 
120.5 
82.5 
2009 
43.5 
16.0 
104.5 
131 
2010 
11 
46.5 
10 
70 
14 
2011 
34.5 
10 
72 
10.5 
The results indicate that few countries took measures to restrain exports of horticultural 
products especially in the last two years. More countries restricted exports of bulk commodities 
such as grains and oilseeds compared to the others, and the number of countries using restrictions 
for bulk product exports fluctuated more from year to year. Across the broad spectrum of 
commodities, far more restrictions were in place during the first three years shown, with the number 
dropping substantially in the last two years for all groups except bulk commodities. Over the five 
year period as a whole, semi- processed products such as vegetable oils, live animals or hides and 
skins were targeted the most.
8
Overview of export restrictions on agricultural products 
The export restrictive instruments used by the countries in the inventory include export duties 
(either ad valorem or specific, including variable duties whose rates change depending on specified 
conditions), tax rebates on exported goods, quotas, bans, licensing requirements, and minimum 
export price. At times, countries use a combination of these measures, either concurrently or 
sequentially. In certain cases, despite an export ban, some exports were allowed of more 
specialised products or to select trading partners.  
In Table 4.2, each column shows which countries used a particular instrument at least once 
during the period, for at least one product. Each row shows which instruments were used by a 
particular country at least once during the period for at least one product. Thirteen of the 
16 countries banned exports of at least one product in at least one of the five years between 2007 
and 2011. Export taxes were used by nine countries while export quotas were used by eight.  
118
– 4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table 4.2. Export restrictions used on agricultural products, 2007-2011 
Export tax 
(including  
variable tax) 
Export  
quota 
Export  
ban 
Export licensing 
requirements
Minimum export 
price 
Tax rebates  
on exported 
goods 
Argentina 
Argentina 
Argentina 
Argentina 
Belarus 
China 
China 
China 
China 
Egypt 
Egypt 
Egypt 
FYROM 
India 
India 
India 
Indonesia 
Indonesia 
Indonesia 
Indonesia 
Kazakhstan 
Kyrgyz 
Republic 
Republic of 
Moldova 
Republic of 
the Union of 
Myanmar 
Republic of 
the Union of 
Myanmar 
Pakistan 
Pakistan 
Pakistan 
Pakistan 
Russia 
Russia 
Tajikistan 
Ukraine 
Ukraine 
Viet Nam 
Viet Nam 
Viet Nam 
Viet Nam 
*
To avoid double-counting, countries that use export licenses only to allocate export quotas (already shown in 
column 2) are not shown again in this column.  
4.3. 
Timeline of restrictions used for selected major agricultural products 
This section expands the broad overview given in Table 4.2, indicating the products targeted 
by export restrictions, the frequency or duration of the restraint, the importance of the restraining 
country in world markets, and the importing countries that may have been adversely impacted.  
Major grains (maize, rice, wheat), oilseeds, (soybeans, sunflower seeds among others) and 
vegetable oils are products for which many of the measures listed in Table 4.2 have been used and 
to which most of the countries in the inventory applied them. These products also provide most of 
the calories consumed by developing country populations, either directly or indirectly via vegetable 
oils and livestock feed, and they were among the commodities whose shortages and high prices led 
to social discontent in some countries during the food price crisis of 2006-9. Furthermore, they are 
among the more traded agricultural products, in both value terms and the number of countries 
importing them. Additionally, rice, wheat, maize and soybeans are the products of interest to the 
Agricultural Market Information System (AMIS). Hence, the timeline summary below focuses on 
these products.
9
The reader is reminded that although generic commodity names like “rice” or 
“wheat” are used below, countries targeted their interventions to very specific varieties, often at the 
HS8 or HS10 level. The presentation below is a summary of all the restriction placed on the specific 
varieties of each commodity. 
Rice 
Of the 16 countries in the inventory, eight restricted rice exports at least once during 2007-
2011. The instruments they used included export taxes (at fixed or variable rates), export bans, 
export quotas, licensing and minimum export prices. Argentina was the only country using 
restrictions every year, levying a 10% export tax. India and Viet Nam ended restrictions in 2011 with 
4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES – 
119
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
the other countries jumping in and out at various times. The export ban was among the most 
frequently used instruments, with India using it every year except 2011 (see Table 4.3 for more 
details). Using the count method described in the previous section, a total of 90 annual export 
restrictions actions were used in the international rice market during the five year period, with 2008 
registering a total of 39 actions.  
Wheat 
More countries (11) placed restrictions on their wheat exports than on exports any of the 
other agricultural commodity in the inventory. Restrictions included export taxes, export quotas, 
licensing and outright bans. Export bans were the most frequently used instrument during the time 
period, with four countries adopting this measure in 2008, including traditionally significant traders, 
the Russian Federation, Pakistan and Kazakhstan. In fact, in each year from 2007 to 2011, wheat 
exports were banned by at least one country (see Table 4.3 for more details). As in the rice market, 
2008 was the year with the most restrictions (16) based on the method of counting described 
above. 
Table 4.3. Timeline of export measures on rice and wheat markets for selected countries 
Rice 
Wheat 
2007 
2007 
Argentina 
Export Tax (10%) 
Argentina 
Export Tax (20% increased to 28%) 
Export Quota (15 000 for organic wheat 
and 20 000 for wheat in bags not 
exceeding 50 kg.) 
India 
Export Ban (conditional on minimum export 
price (USD 500/ton) and with exceptions for 
country specific quotas) 
India 
Export Ban 
Viet Nam 
Export Ban  
Pakistan 
Export Ban (ban was lifted part of year 
allowed 800 000 tons to be exported 
Russia 
Export Tax (10% but not less than EUR 
22/ton increased to 40% but not less 
than EUR 105/ton) 
Ukraine 
Export Quota (3 million mt) 
2008 
2008 
Argentina 
Export Tax (10%) 
Argentina 
Export Tax (variable switched to 28% or 
23% depending on variety at HS8 level) 
China 
Export Tax (5%) 
Export Quota (4.4 million mt) 
Egypt 
Export Tax (300 Egyptian pounds/t) 
Export Ban 
China 
Export Tax (20%) 
India 
Export Ban 
India 
Export Ban (conditional on minimum export 
price and with exceptions for country specific 
quotas) 
Kyrgyz 
Republic 
Export Tax (15 LC/kg) 
Indonesia 
Export License 
Kazakhstan Export Ban 
Myanmar 
Export Ban  
Pakistan 
Minimum Export Price (from USD 750/ton to 
USD 1 500/ton  
based on variety)  
Pakistan 
Export Ban 
Viet Nam 
Export Quota (4.5 million tons) and Minimum 
Export Price (from USD 360/ton to 
USD 800/ton depending on variety) 
Export Tax (variable rate from USD 30 to 
USD 175/ton based on FOB price) 
Russia 
Export Ban 
Ukraine 
Export Quota (3 million mt) 
120
– 4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table 4.3. Timeline of export measures on rice and wheat markets for selected countries (cont.) 
Rice 
Wheat 
2009 
2009 
Argentina 
Export Tax (10%) 
Argentina 
Export Tax and exports with license 
requirement 
China 
Export Tax (lowered to 3% then to 
0%); Export License 
China 
Export Tax (3% then to 0%); Export 
License 
Egypt 
Export Tax (EGP 300/ton) converted 
to Export Ban , converted to Export 
Tax (EGP 2 000/ton) 
India 
Export Ban (with exceptions for country 
specific quotas which for some countries 
would be revoked if minimum export price 
exceeds USD 1 200/ton) 
India 
Export Ban replaced by Quota 
(900 000 tons and additional 
300 000 tons allocated to three 
firms) 
Indonesia 
Export License 
Viet Nam 
Minimum export price (USD 350/ton 
on 25% broken rice 
2010 
2010 
Argentina 
Export Tax (10%) 
Argentina 
Export Tax 
China 
Export License 
China 
Export License 
Egypt 
Export Quota (100 000 mt first part of year 
plus 128 000 second half) 
Export Ban (second half of year) 
Egypt 
Special Export Procedure 
India 
Export Ban 
Indonesia 
Export License 
Pakistan 
Export Quota (1 million mt) 
India 
Export Ban (with exceptions for 
country specific quotas) 
Russia 
Export Ban 
Viet Nam 
Minimum Export Price (USD 300 to 
USD 540/ton depending on variety) 
Ukraine 
Export Quota (500 000 mt) 
2011 
2011 
Argentina 
Export Tax (10%) 
Argentina 
Export Quota (1 million mt),  
Export Tax 
China 
Export License 
China 
Export License 
Egypt 
Export Ban 
Former 
Yugoslav 
Republic of 
Macedonia 
Export Ban 
Myanmar 
Export Ban  
Republic of 
Moldova 
Export Ban 
Russia 
Export Ban 
Ukraine 
Export Quota (1 million mt), 
switched to 
Export Tax (9% but not less than 
EUR 17/mt) 
Maize 
Fewer countries restricted maize exports compared to rice and wheat in most years. In all, 
six countries applied restrictions at least once during the period studied. Instruments used included 
export taxes, export quotas, licensing and bans. Unlike the rice and wheat markets, where more 
governments restricted exports during 2007-2009, relatively more countries restricted maize exports 
in 2010 and 2011, but 2008 was the year with the most restrictions (6.5) as counted using the 
method described above. Table 4.4 summarises the timeline of the restrictions used by these 
countries in the period 2007-11. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested