4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES – 
121
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table 4.4. Timeline of export restrictions for maize and other coarse grains for selected countries, 2007-2011 
Maize 
Other coarse grains 
2007 
2007 
Argentina 
Export Quota, Export Tax  
(20% raised to 25%) 
Argentina 
Export Tax (20% on various coarse grains) 
Export Ban 
Russia 
Export Tax (30% on barley) 
2008 
2008 
Argentina 
Export Tax (variable rate, switched 
to 25%, lowered to 20%) 
Argentina 
Export Tax (20% on various coarse grains) 
China 
Export Tax (5%, then to 0%) 
China 
Export Tax (20% on rye, barley buckwheat 
and oats); (5% on grain sorghum, millet and 
others 
India 
Export Ban 
Russia 
Export Tax (30% but not less than 
EUR 70/tons, on barley) 
2009 
2009 
Argentina 
Export Tax, Export License 
Requirement  
Argentina 
Export Tax (20% on various coarse grains) 
China 
Export License Requirement  
China 
Export Tax (eliminated) 
2010 
2010 
Argentina 
Export Tax 
Argentina 
Export Tax (20% on various coarse grains) 
China 
Export License 
Kyrgyz 
Republic 
Export Tax (local currency 5/kg) 
Kazakhstan 
Export Ban (buckwheat) 
Russia 
Export Ban 
Russia 
Export Ban (barley and rye) 
Ukraine 
Export Quota (2 million tons) 
Ukraine 
Export Quota (barley 200,000 tons; 
buckwheat 1 000 tons; rye 1 000 tons) 
2011 
2011 
Argentina 
Export Tax 
Argentina 
Export Tax (20% on various coarse grains) 
China  
Export License 
Russia 
Export Ban 
Russia 
Export Ban (barley and rye) 
Ukraine 
Export Quota (3 million raised to 
5 million tons) 
Export Quota (barley 200,000 tons; 
buckwheat 1 000 tons; rye 1 000 tons) 
Ukraine 
Export Quota (eliminated on barley) 
converted to Export Tax (14% but not less 
than EUR 23/tons) 
Other coarse grains 
This category includes barley, buckwheat, millet, oats, rye and sorghum; a number of 
varieties of these grains are treated differentially as export policies here tend to be defined at very 
detailed level. Although the category encompasses several different crops, they tend not to be 
widely traded and fewer countries applied export restrictions. The preferred instrument was an 
export tax, although quotas and bans were also used. Table 4.4 summarises the timeline for the 
period 2007-11. 
Soybeans 
Export restrictions for soybeans were less prevalent than for rice and wheat, with only four 
countries using them in one year or more between 2007 and 2011. Argentina applied restrictions in 
each of the five years with a second country (either China, Kazakhstan or the Russian Federation) 
doing so after 2007. Only two measures were used: an export tax (variable or fixed rate) and an 
export ban, with the tax used more often. Table 4.5 summarises the timeline of the export 
restrictions used for soybeans. 
Change pdf into jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
pdf to jpeg; to jpeg
Change pdf into jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi; change pdf to jpg image
122
– 4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Other oilseeds 
This product group includes cottonseed, linseed, mustard seed, rapeseed and sunflower 
seed. Policies are specified for a large number of varieties at a very detailed level. As in the 
soybeans case, relatively few governments used export restrictions for these commodities. 
Although export quotas and bans were employed, the most frequently used instrument was an 
export tax. Table 4.5 summarises the timeline of these measures in the period 2007-2011. 
Table 4.5. Timeline of export restrictions for soybeans and other oilseeds for selected countries, 2007-2011 
Soybeans 
Other oilseeds 
2007 
2007 
Argentina 
Export Tax (24% increased to 28%, 
increased to 35%; converted to Export 
Ban converted to, Export Tax) 
Argentina 
Export Tax (linseed 24%; sunflower seed 
24% raised to 32%; rapeseed and other 
oilseeds 10%) 
2008 
2008 
Argentina 
Export Tax (variable rate switched to 
35%) 
Argentina 
Export Tax (linseed 24%; sunflower seed 
variable rate converted to 32%; rapeseed 
and other oilseeds 10%) 
China 
Export Tax (5%) 
Kyrgyz 
Republic 
Export Tax (sunflower seeds local currency 
20/kg) 
2009 
2009 
Argentina 
Export Tax 
Argentina 
Export Tax 
China 
Export Tax (5%, then eliminated) 
2010 
2010 
Argentina 
Export Tax 
Argentina 
Export Tax 
Kazakhstan Export Ban 
Belarus 
Export Ban (rapeseed) 
Kazakhstan  
Export Ban (sunflower seed cottonseed and 
others not elsewhere specified 
2011 
2011 
Argentina 
Export Tax 
Argentina 
Export Tax 
Belarus 
Export Ban (linseed and rapeseed) 
Russia 
Export Tax (20% but not less than 
EUR 35/t) 
Russia 
Export Tax (rapeseed and sunflower seed, 
20% but not less than EUR 35/t, mustard 
seed 10% but not less than EUR 25/t) 
Vegetable oils 
This product category includes cottonseed oil, linseed oil, maize oil, rapeseed oil, soybean 
oil, sunflower seed oil, groundnut oil, coconut oil, palm kernel oil, palm oil, sesame oil and others, 
but the number of varieties specifically concerned is larger as export policies tend to be defined at a 
very detailed level. 
Vegetable oils, like wheat and rice, are for human consumption – unlike coarse grains or 
oilseeds – which appears to make their domestic availability (and disruptions to their international 
markets) more sensitive issues. Nine countries restricted exports of at least one vegetable oil in at 
least one year. Two instruments, export taxes and export bans, were by far the most frequently 
used in these markets. According to the count methodology described above, 2007 was the most 
restrictive year with a total of 49.5 annual restrictions on the various vegetable oils. Argentina used 
an export tax for most or all oils for every year during 2007-11. During the first two years, there were 
several rate changes and switches between fixed and variable rates; for a period during 2007, 
Argentina replaced taxes by an export ban for the oils listed. From the end of 2008 onwards, 
Argentina’s taxes and rates remained unchanged. The Republic of Myanmar also maintained an 
export ban for groundnut and sesame oil throughout the period.  
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour. If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in
convert multiple pdf to jpg; convert pdf pictures to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
PDF document can be easily loaded into your C# String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF
convert pdf images to jpg; convert .pdf to .jpg online
4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES – 
123
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
As the summary in Table 4.6 shows, the other seven countries using export restrictions for 
vegetable oils at some point during the period are not the same from year to year. There is also 
considerable variation between countries regarding the type of oil or oils whose exports are 
restricted. For example, Indonesia’s export tax (2009-11) targets palm oil, the ban exercised by 
Belarus (2010-11) concerns rapeseed oil, and Pakistan’s ban (2008-9) is for vegetable ghee and 
cooking oil. At the other extreme, India’s and Kazakhstan’s bans, when in operation, cover most of 
the oils in this category. This heterogeneous pattern reveals contrasting national concerns and 
objectives underlying the use of these policy measures. 
Table 4.6. Timeline of export restrictions for vegetable oils for selected countries, 2007-2011 
2007 
Argentina 
Export Tax (soybean oil, 24% raised to 32%, sunflower seed oil and cottonseed oil, 20% raised to 
30%, linseed oil, maize oil, and other oils not elsewhere specified 10%) 
Export Tax converted to Export Ban on all the above plus groundnut oil 
Export Ban lifted 
China 
Rebate on Export Taxes 5%  
Myanmar 
Export Ban (groundnut oil sesame oil) 
Pakistan 
Export Ban (vegetable ghee and cooking oil) 
2008 
Argentina 
Export Tax (variable rate on soybean oil switched to 32%; variable rate on sunflower seed oil switched 
to 30%, variable export tax on maize oil switched to 15%) 
India 
Export Ban (soybean oil, groundnut oil, olive oil, palm oil, sunflower seed oil, cottonseed oil, coconut 
oil, palm kernel oil, rapeseed oil, linseed oil, maize oil, sesame oil, and others 
Kyrgyz 
Republic 
Export Tax (sunflower seed oil and cottonseed oil, local currency 100/kg) 
Myanmar 
Export Ban (groundnut oil sesame oil) 
Pakistan 
Export Ban vegetable ghee and cooking oil 
2009 
Argentina  
Export Tax 
India 
Export Ban (soybean oil, groundnut oil, olive oil, palm oil, sunflower seed oil, cottonseed oil, coconut 
oil, palm kernel oil, rapeseed oil, linseed oil, maize oil 
Indonesia 
Export Tax (variable rate on palm oil from 0% to 25% and on palm kernel oil from 0% to 23% 
depending on reference price) 
Myanmar 
Export Ban (groundnut oil sesame oil) 
Pakistan 
Export Ban (removed) 
2010 
Argentina  
Export Tax 
Belarus 
Export Ban (rapeseed oil) 
India 
Export Ban (soybean oil, groundnut oil, olive oil, palm oil, sunflower seed oil, cottonseed oil, coconut 
oil, palm kernel oil, rapeseed oil, linseed oil, maize oil) 
Export Ban (removed) 
Indonesia 
Export Tax (variable rate on palm oil and on palm kernel oil from 0% to 25% depending on reference 
price) 
Kazakhstan 
Export Ban (Soybean oil, sunflower seed oil, cottonseed oil, rapeseed oil, and linseed oil) 
Myanmar 
Export Ban (groundnut oil sesame oil) 
2011 
Argentina  
Export Tax 
Belarus 
Export Ban (rapeseed oil) 
Indonesia 
Export Tax (variable rate on palm oil from 0% to 13% and on palm kernel oil from 0% to 10% 
depending on reference price) 
Kazakhstan Export Ban (Soybean oil, sunflower seed oil, cottonseed oil, rapeseed oil, and linseed oil, then lifted)  
Myanmar 
Export Ban (groundnut oil sesame oil) 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in from local file or stream and convert it into BMP, GIF Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET
convert multi page pdf to jpg; change file from pdf to jpg on
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp Component for combining multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file in C#
convert pdf into jpg format; convert pdf file into jpg
124
– 4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
4.4. 
Market developments 
Overall trade 
The Inventory of Export Restrictions covers the period of the financial crisis and the 
subsequent recession, which affected economic activity generally in most countries, with 
implications for global food demand. The export policies recorded in the Inventory were not the only 
factors affecting agricultural supplies on world markets; in addition, several key agricultural markets 
were negatively affected by weather-related disturbances (droughts and floods) that reduced output 
in major producing regions. This section looks at the resulting effects on trade. 
From 2004 to 2008, total merchandise trade increased by more than 80% from USD 6.9 
trillion to USD 12.5 trillion.
10
The onset of the financial crisis and subsequent recession resulted in a 
drop in trade of almost USD 3 trillion (-24%) in 2009. Although merchandise trade rebounded in 
2010, the level was still below that of 2008.  
The general economic climate affected the agricultural sector in a similar way. The trend in 
total agricultural trade followed quite closely that of total merchandise trade. Between 2004 and 
2007, total agricultural exports (WTO definition) expanded by 80%, from USD 426 billion to 
USD 768 billion. Agricultural trade seems, however, to have been less vulnerable to the financial 
crisis—the magnitude of the fall in agricultural exports in 2009 was smaller, with a 13% drop in trade 
to USD 664 billion. Furthermore, the rebound in agricultural trade in 2010 was more robust, 
increasing by 18% and resulting in exports of USD 786 billion, USD 20 billion more than in 2008.  
These trends are shown in Figure 4.1, where the left axis relates to total merchandise trade, 
and the right axis refers to agricultural commodity trade.  
Figure 4.1. Total merchandise and agricultural trade, 2004-2010 
Agricultural markets 
World market price of selected products 
Figure 4.1 provides a broad overview of developments in the volume of agricultural trade 
immediately before and during the period covered by the Inventory. Developments in world market 
agricultural and food prices provide another glimpse of market conditions during the period. These 
prices, just like those of other primary commodities, have been fluctuating considerably since the 
mid-2000s. Food prices, as captured by the IMF’s world market food price index,
11
after remaining 
flat during the early 2000s, started rising in 2004—slowly at first, but then climbing quickly from the 
end of 2005 and reaching a peak in June 2008. After a steep fall to below the level suggested by 
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
0
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
USD billion
USD billion 
Total
Agriculture (right axis)
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
convert online pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg on
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
change pdf to jpg; .pdf to .jpg converter online
4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES – 
125
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
the previous trend, prices began to climb again in 2009 reaching a new peak in April 2011 before 
once again retreating somewhat (Figure 4.2).  
Figure 4.2. Monthly world market food price index, January 2000-January 2013 
Source: IMF Primary Commodity Prices, monthly data. 
The following discussion of world market prices concentrates on the major grains, oilseeds 
and vegetable oils, since they are products for which many countries have applied export 
restraining measures and that play a crucial role in global diets. The prices come from the IMF’s 
primary commodity price series and are benchmark prices that are representative of the respective 
global market.  
Figure 4.3 shows monthly world market prices for the first four of these commodities since 
2000.
12
The hike in prices from the beginning of 2007 was dramatic. Prices for rice, wheat and 
soybeans more than doubled during this period, and within a few months of each other, each 
commodity reached record highs (in nominal terms). Wheat was the first commodity to reach its 
peak in March 2008, followed by rice in April 2008, while soybean prices reached a record high in 
July 2008. Prices for rice and wheat fell back from these peaks to pick up the trend they were 
following before 2006. The rise in the maize price was less extreme; it reached what was at the time 
a record high in June 2008, but after a short respite, its price continued increasing, reaching new 
heights in 2011 and in mid-2012. The soybean price also reached a new high in July 2012. The July 
2012 price peaks for maize and soybeans are thought to reflect the severe drought in the United 
States during the spring/summer. 
Figure 4.3 shows that prices not only exhibited an upward underlying trend during this 
period, but were also relatively volatile with large monthly price swings. For example, between 
March and April 2008, the rice price jumped almost 51%, only to retreat by 17% between May and 
June 2008. During the course of 2008, the rice price surged from USD 393/t in January to 
USD 1 015/ton in April, but was down to USD 551/ton in December. A contributing factor in this 
price fall was the Japanese government’s announcement that it would release rice from its stocks 
onto the market. In a similar way, the rapid price rises during 2007-08 are thought to have been 
fuelled partly by the news that some developing countries were suspending their grain exports. 
Vegetable oil prices
13
followed a similar pattern to that of crop prices. Prices for soybean and 
rapeseed oils reached new highs in June and July 2008, respectively (Figure 4.4). Since then, their 
prices have fallen back to what looks like their pre-2007 underlying trend. As for palm oil, its price 
reached what was a new high in March 2008, but after a steep decline later in 2008, its price began 
0
50
100
150
200
250
April 2011
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff Turn multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file.
convert pdf file to jpg online; bulk pdf to jpg converter
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
XDoc.Tiff for .NET, which can be stably integrated into C#.NET string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List
convert multiple pdf to jpg online; changing pdf to jpg on
126
– 4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
to climb again, reaching an even higher peak in February 2011, after which it again fell to a level 
about twice that of the pre-2007 level.  
Figure 4.3. International rice, wheat, maize and soybean prices: January 2000 to January 2013 
Source: IMF Primary Commodity Prices, monthly data. 
Several factors have been suggested for the surge in world prices during the 2007-2008 
period (see, for example, McCalla (2009) and Trostle 2008), including export restrictions and other 
policy responses by various governments. According to some experts, export restrictions 
exacerbated the situation by causing severe disruptions and collapse in confidence on international 
markets (FAO, OECD, et al., 2011; Dollive, 2008; Mitra and Josling, 2009).  
The first wave of rising food prices saw social unrest in several countries (Trostle, 2008). 
Their governments responded by instituting policies to insulate domestic markets from rising prices. 
The OECD surveyed the policy responses by ten developing or emerging economies for two basic 
food staples (wheat and rice) (Jones and Kwiecinski, 2010) and carried out scenario analysis to 
assess the impacts of three specific policy interventions – export taxes, consumption subsidies and 
public stockholding (Thompson and Tallard, 2010). The survey found that Argentina, China, India, 
Indonesia, the Russian Federation and Viet Nam introduced or increased export taxes or reduced 
export incentives, while Ukraine imposed export quotas to limit the rise in food prices. For the same 
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
USD/ton
Rice
April 2008
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
450
500
USD/ton
Wheat
March2008
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
USD/ton
Maize 
July 2012
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
USD/ton
Soybeans
July 2008
July2012
4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES – 
127
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
set of countries, Thompson and Tallard (2010), using the Aglink-Cosimo model, examined three 
scenarios including each country imposing an export tax to prevent a surge in domestic prices. 
They found that while such a policy can have a large effect in curbing the increase of domestic 
consumer prices, it typically has a smaller effect on quantities consumed. They also found that such 
a response has a “beggar thy neighbour” effect as the trade measures introduced by some 
countries to offset rising international grain prices causes those prices to rise even more in other 
countries. 
Figure 4.4. International soybean oil, rapeseed oil and palm oil prices: January 2000 to January 2013 
Source: IMF Primary Commodity Prices, monthly data. 
A variety of reasons, as already mentioned, motivate countries to impose export restrictions, 
including food security concerns, domestic food price stability and holding down input prices for 
downstream industries. But sudden export restrictions can contribute to spikes in international food 
prices. They thus exacerbate supply shocks for food buyers in the rest of the world. Typically, they 
are also not in the economic interests of the countries imposing them, as there are almost always 
more efficient ways to achieve the stated objectives of the restriction. Moreover, they are of concern 
to all trading nations because they reduce the stability and predictability of trade opportunities.  
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1600
USD/ton
Soybean oil
June 2008
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
USD/ton
Palm oil
February 2011
March 2008
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1600
1800
2000
USD/ton
Rapeseed oil
July 2008
128
– 4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
World production and consumption 
During the period under review, underlying trends in global production and consumption of 
key food commodities both increased more or less in balance, with most annual fluctuations coming 
from the production side. During the 2004-11 period, rice consumption exceeded production only in 
2004 with production greater than consumption in each of the following years. Years in which global 
demand exceeded supply for other commodities were: soybeans (2007, 2008), wheat (2006, 2007, 
and 2010), and maize (2005, 2006, 2010 and 2011). Thus, 2006 and 2010 were years in which 
international markets for both wheat and maize were under particular pressure.
14
Figure 4.5. Stocks-to-use ratio for selected commodities: 2004-2011 
Source: USDA, FAS, PS&D. 
Annual differences between global production and consumption are reflected in Inventory 
changes, with stocks increasing when production exceeds consumption and decreasing when the 
opposite occurs. Figure 4.5 shows the variability in the stocks-to-use ratio for the eight major 
commodities, which is considered a good indicator of the tightness of world supply. Some evidence 
suggests that an abnormally low level of this ratio for a particular commodity can unleash 
speculative activity in that market, which increases the pressure on price already caused by the 
excess of consumption over production.  
0.1
0.15
0.2
0.25
0.3
0.35
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Rice
Wheat
Maize
Soybeans
0
0.02
0.04
0.06
0.08
0.1
0.12
0.14
0.16
0.18
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Soybean oil
Rapeseed oil
Palm oil
Sunflower oil
4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES – 
129
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Global production of food crops is relatively concentrated. For example, the top ten rice or 
maize-producing countries provide 85-86% of world supply, while the ten largest wheat producers 
account for about 83% of global output. Soybean production is the most concentrated of the four 
crops, with the top ten producers providing almost 98% of the total. Some countries in the Inventory 
– Argentina, China, Kazakhstan, India, Pakistan, the Russian Federation, Ukraine and Viet Nam – 
are among the leading producers of one or more of these crops. Vegetable oil production is also 
heavily concentrated, with the ten leading producers providing about 93% of world supply for 
soybean and sunflower seed oil, and at least 96% of world supply for rapeseed and palm oil. 
Among the leading ten producers of one or more of these vegetable oils are Argentina, China, India, 
Indonesia, Pakistan, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. 
World exports of selected products 
Rice is the least traded of the four crops analysed here; rice tends to be consumed where it 
is produced and, on average during the eight-year period reviewed, only 7% of production (about 
31 million tons) was traded annually. In volume terms, wheat is the most traded with an annual 
average of more than 125 million tons, or close to 20% of production. However, in terms of 
production share, soybeans were the most traded crop with on average 35% of global output 
entering the world market.  
Export volumes for all eight commodities followed an upward trend, except for soybean oil 
which remained rather flat and ended the period slightly below its 2004 level. However, there were 
marked fluctuations around these trends. In particular, exports in 2008 were below 2007 levels for 
soybeans (2%), rice (nearly 9%) and maize (more than 14%). Wheat exports followed a somewhat 
different pattern, reaching a peak in 2008, falling in 2009 and 2010, and picking up thereafter. 
Among the vegetable oils, palm oil is the most traded both in absolute terms and as a share 
of world production: about 75% of production is exported. Consumption of the other vegetable oils 
mainly occurs domestically but to different extents, with rapeseed oil the least traded. However, the 
exported share of rapeseed production increased substantially during the period, doubling from 8% 
in 2004 to 16% in 2011. The share of sunflower oil production traded also increased somewhat 
while that of soybean oil declined, with more output remaining in the domestic market. 
Movements in the value of traded supplies depend on both price and volume changes. Data 
on the value of trade for selected commodities from the BACI database,
15
which is bilateral trade 
data detailed at the HS6 digit level, and focusing on the total value of trade for the selected 
commodities, make it clear that the value of exports continued to rise for all four crops to reach a 
peak in 2008, followed by a significant fall. Thus, although the exported volumes of rice, maize and 
soybeans peaked a year earlier in 2007, their price peaks in 2008 were sufficient to fuel a continued 
rise in their total value. Wheat exports turn out to have the highest value up to 2008, but from 2009 
onwards they are surpassed in value by soybeans. 
The export values of the four vegetable oils all peak in 2008, fall in 2009, and then start to 
rise again. Palm oil is by far the most valuable exported vegetable oil; although its exported 
volumes are the smallest of the four oils, its total exported value dominates the three, consistently 
more than double that of soybean oil. 
Exports are even more concentrated over exporting countries than production. The leading 
ten rice exporting countries shipped more than 90% of the total each year. Among the countries in 
the Inventory that imposed restrictions on rice exports during the period, India, Pakistan and 
Viet Nam are consistently among the ten largest exporting countries. China was in that group but 
dropped out in 2010 and 2011, whereas Argentina dropped out of the top ten exporting countries 
during 2007-9 but qualified for it again in 2010. Egypt was in this category during 2004-7 and again 
in 2009, whereas Myanmar was among the ten leading exporters in 2007-8 and again in 2010-11. 
The world wheat market is also dominated by relatively few exporting countries. The ten 
leading wheat-exporting countries supplied about 94% of total wheat exports during the period. 
Among the countries in the Inventory with restrictions on wheat exports in any year during the 
130
– 4. HOW EXPORT RESTRICTIVE MEASURES AFFECT TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
period, Argentina, Kazakhstan and the Russian Federation figure in top ten exporting countries 
every year, as does Ukraine in every year except 2007. India was among the top ten exporters only 
in 2004, whereas China appeared in this group during 2005-7, as did Pakistan in 2007 and 2008. 
The top ten maize-exporting countries supply 95-7% of the world market, depending on the 
year. Argentina and Ukraine were among the top ten in every year of the period, whereas India 
joined the group in 2005 only and the Russian Federation entered the ranks in 2008 and again in 
2011. China was among the ten largest exporters until 2006, but since 2006 its maize exports have 
fallen sharply. As Table 44 shows, in 2007 and 2008, China was not restricting maize exports, but 
began doing so in 2009. 
The ten largest soybean-exporting countries provide essentially 100% of exported volumes, 
with more than 95% supplied by the top four or five exporters. Given the very skewed distribution of 
exports over exporting countries for this commodity, a country can be among the leading ten 
exporting countries with a market share of less than one-tenth of a percent. Of the countries in the 
Inventory using export restrictions for soybeans, Argentina, China and Ukraine are among the ten 
leading soybean-exporting countries, but other than Argentina, they are not significant exporters; 
indeed, exports from China and Ukraine counted together often provide less than 1% of world total.  
Vegetable oil exports are also very concentrated over source countries. In any year, the 
leading ten exporters of each of the four vegetable oils exported at least 95% of world volume. Of 
the countries in the Inventory with an export restriction during the period, Argentina was the leading 
exporter of soybean oil in each year with more than half of all exports. Rapeseed oil exports are 
dominated by one country, Canada, which supplies more than 60% of the volume traded in any 
year. Among countries in the Inventory, Belarus was placed in the top ten rapeseed oil exporters 
each year, despite providing only about 1% of world total, and this was also true of India in 2009 
and 2010. Ukraine and Argentina head the list of exporters of sunflower seed oil, together providing 
more than 60% of world’s total in any given year. Other than Argentina, none of the main exporters 
of sunflower seed oil are in the Inventory of countries using export restrictions. Exports of palm oil 
are dominated by two countries – Indonesia and Malaysia – which together supply more than 80% 
of traded volume each year. Indonesia is the only country among the leading exporters that used 
export restrictions for palm oil (2009-11). 
On the import side, the markets for these commodities are less concentrated, as importers 
are more numerous with smaller shares. Liapis (2012) calculated Hirschman-Herfindahl indexes 
using bilateral trade data from the BACI database so as to measure market concentration of 
exporters and importers of various products. Unsurprisingly, the results show that export markets 
are more concentrated than import markets. The implication is that many more countries rely on 
world markets for their imports compared to the number of exporters supplying their needs. 
Disruptions in the export supply from any provider therefore have the potential to affect adversely a 
large number of importers. This is more likely when several exporters restrict exports in the same 
year.  
The data presented so far suggest that in most cases, total volumes exported did not shrink 
when export restrictions were in force. Most of these markets are dominated by a few major 
suppliers, many of whom did not restrict their exports. It may still be the case, however, that certain 
individual importers were adversely affected if their traditional supplier restricted its export supply.  
4.5. 
Aggregated production and export share of countries with export restrictions 
The picture of developments in world markets presented so far may mask relevant 
information about individual countries. Establishing links between the restrictions of an individual 
country and the world market, however, is not straightforward, since in most years, several 
countries applied export measures on the same commodity. Therefore, it is more useful to focus on 
the combined effects of these policies on their aggregated exports, while taking into account the 
countries’ domestic supply and by inference their potential export supply
16
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested