5. MULTILATERALISING REGIONALISM: DISCIPLINES ON EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN REGIONAL TRADE AGREEMENTS – 
181
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Annex 5.C 
RTAs eliminating key WTO export quantitative restriction exceptions 
Agreement 
Eliminates 
domestic 
stabilisation 
exception 
Eliminates 
shortage 
exception 
Eliminates 
GATT XX(j) 
restrictions for 
“products in  
general or local 
short supply” 
Eliminates 
natural 
resources 
exception 
Adds WTO-
minus  
specific goods 
exceptions 
EC-Albania 
EC-Bosnia 
EC-Croatia 
EC-FYROM 
EC-Montenegro 
EC-Turkey 
EC-Mexico 
EC-South Africa 
EC-CARIFORUM 
EC-Côte d’Ivoire 
EC-Israel 
EC-Lebanon 
EU Convention 
ASEAN 
EFTA-Jordan 
EFTA-Morocco 
EFTA-Tunisia 
EFTA-Korea 
EFTA-FYROM 
EFTA-Israel 
EFTA-Egypt 
EFTA-Chile 
EFTA Convention 
CEFTA 2006 
CARICOM 
US-CAFTA-DR 
US-Colombia 
US-Israel 
Japan-Mexico 
SADC 
SACU 
African Economic 
Community 
Pdf to jpeg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert multipage pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg image
Pdf to jpeg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpeg on; convert from pdf to jpg
182
– 5. MULTILATERALISING REGIONALISM: DISCIPLINES ON EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN REGIONAL TRADE AGREEMENTS 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Agreement 
Eliminates 
domestic 
stabilisation 
exception 
Eliminates 
shortage 
exception 
Eliminates 
GATT XX(j) 
restrictions for 
“products in  
general or local 
short supply” 
Eliminates 
natural 
resources 
exception 
Adds WTO-
minus  
specific goods 
exceptions 
Russia-Ukraine 
Ukraine Belarus 
CIS 
PATCRA 
ANZCERTA 
Thailand- 
New Zealand 
MERCOSUR-
Chile 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
pdf to jpeg converter; change from pdf to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert multi page pdf to single jpg; convert pdf file to jpg
6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST – 
183
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Chapter 6 
INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS:  
BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST
Barbara Fliess and Osvaldo R. Agatiello
1
6.1. 
Introduction 
Despite their increasing use, notably for minerals and other raw materials, international 
disciplines on the use of export restrictions
2
are less developed than those for import barriers. With 
rare exceptions, most of these restrictions are not systematically monitored at the global level. 
Difficulty in obtaining accurate and timely information about this form of government intervention 
compounds the increasing uncertainties from other sources that are currently experienced by 
participants in markets for raw materials. 
International markets for mineral resources and foodstuffs are subject to three systemic risks, 
widely identified as critical, which may lead to failures in global governance. One of these risks is 
technological or climatological in nature, namely supply vulnerability. The other two are economic: 
extreme volatility in energy and agriculture prices, and the (often unforeseen) negative consequences 
of trade-distorting regulations.
3
This chapter concentrates on transparency in the context of the third of these risks, focussing 
particularly on regulations that aim to restrict exports. It reviews relevant guidelines from the WTO and 
from other agreements or standards in order to identify the best practices currently in use to inform 
stakeholders and the general public about policies affecting them. From these transparency 
standards, a checklist of information elements is compiled.  
The intention is not to advocate the use of export restrictions. On the contrary, regardless of 
whether they are applied for economic, social or political reasons, export restrictions always have 
economic costs for user countries that can easily outweigh achievable benefits. Moreover, export 
restrictions hurt trading partners and distort the global market. They raise the price of the products 
affected for foreign consumers and importers and potentially reduce global supply (see Chapter 2). 
Alternatives to the use of export restrictions that avoid these costs are available, which some 
governments have pursued with impressive results (see Chapter 7 for two examples). 
Having said this, if export restrictions are in use, transparency can help mitigate some of their 
negative effects. The principles and standards of the checklist have been elaborated with the minerals 
sector in mind; however, they are applicable to all types of export restrictions,
in any goods sector.
4
The list can serve as a practical and pragmatic tool for self-evaluation by governments and for 
promoting better and more consistent transparency practices across countries. It is proposed without 
prejudice to transparency commitments that countries may have adopted in this regard through their 
membership in the WTO, regional or other preferential trade agreements. 
The chapter is organised along the following lines. Section 6.2 outlines the concept of 
transparency. Section 6.3 explains how importing and exporting countries can each benefit when 
trade policies, including export restrictions in the raw materials sector, are transparent. Section 6.4 
reviews applicable rules and commitments in GATT/WTO and elsewhere, showing the cumulative 
path over time towards greater transparency and distilling best-practice rules specifically aimed at the 
provision of information. Section 6.5 applies a checklist based on these standards to the study of 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
This example shows how to build a PDF document with three image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG). // Load 3 image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG).
change pdf into jpg; convert pdf page to jpg
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Raster
from stream or byte array, print images to tiff or pdf, annotate images C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer supports various images formats, including JPEG, GIF, BMP
batch pdf to jpg online; best pdf to jpg converter for
184
– 6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
information that governments from 33 countries using export restrictions in the minerals sector publish 
on governmental websites.
5
Section 6.6 goes one step further and expands the initial checklist to 
cover the entire policy process, from the stage of planning an export restriction policy to the 
implementation of the measure once adopted. Section 6.7 concludes. 
6.2. 
The concept of transparency 
The meaning and purpose of transparency is not always understood. Nor is the term always 
clearly defined (Lejárraga, 2013). In public policy, transparency is about effective communication on 
policy matters between governments, businesses and other civil society stakeholders (OECD, 2003a, 
p.2). In the trade policy field, the WTO glossary refers to transparency as the “degree to which trade 
policies and practices, and the process by which they are established, are open and predictable.”
6
In 
practice, this usually implies making relevant laws and regulations publicly available, letting concerned 
parties know when laws change, and ensuring uniform administration and application (Box 6.1). 
WTO/GATT and other trade agreements usually include general as well as measure-specific 
transparency rules to which members formally subscribe.  
Box 6.1. Core transparency requirements of international trade agreements 
[E]nsuring “transparency” in international commercial treaties typically involves three core requirements: (1) to 
make information on relevant laws, regulations and other policies publicly available; (2) to notify interested parties of 
relevant laws and regulations and changes to them; and (3) to ensure that laws and regulations are administered in a 
uniform, impartial and reasonable manner. 
Source: WTO (2002a), Transparency. Note by the Secretariat. Working Group on the Relationship between Trade 
and Investment, WT/WGTI/W/109, 27 March, Geneva. 
In a more advanced form, promoted inter alia by the OECD’s work on good public governance, 
transparency implies that rulemaking involves some form of public consultation and that procedures 
are in place that allow stakeholders to file complaints. Certain WTO agreements seeking to ensure 
that domestic regulation does not create unnecessary barriers to trade also use this enhanced 
definition (e.g. the TBT and SPS Agreements). In practice, in many areas of regulatory activity 
affecting international trade there has been a tendency over the past decade for national transparency 
procedures to become increasingly sophisticated. Systematic public consultation during the 
development of laws and regulations, the use of prior notice and comment procedures, and 
procedures that allow stakeholders to file complaints are all long-standing practice in many OECD 
countries and are becoming more widely used in non-OECD countries as well.  
While openness to public scrutiny of rulemaking procedures is undoubtedly part of good 
economic governance in the trade policy arena, the focus of this chapter is on the provision of 
information. Transparency in this sense refers to the systematic availability and accessibility of 
information on trade policies or measures (here, export restrictions) for all interested parties. These 
terms are further explained in Box 6.2. This more limited focus has to do with data constraints. 
Examining national policy processes would require information going beyond the data on actual 
transparency practices of governments that were available from the OECD Inventory of Restrictions 
on Exports of Raw Materials.  
Finally, it is important to note what transparency is not about. Transparency does not 
compromise governments’ “right to regulate” or to intervene in the economy or individual markets. It 
does not imply eliminating or watering down existing regulation. It does not prevent governments from 
pursuing multiple objectives. It does not aim at curtailing government discretion in policymaking, nor 
does it “lock in” policy regimes or regulatory regimes.
7
It simply seeks to enhance predictability. 
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Jpeg, Png, Bmp, Gif Image to PDF. Jpeg to PDF Conversion in C#. In the following C# programming demo, we will firstly take Jpeg to PDF conversion as an example.
convert pdf to high quality jpg; change pdf file to jpg online
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Our XDoc.PDF allows C# developers to perform high performance conversions from PDF document to multiple image forms. Besides raster image Jpeg, images forms
batch convert pdf to jpg online; conversion pdf to jpg
6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST – 
185
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Box 6.2. Making information available in accessible ways 
Availability refers to the content and overall quality of the information that is disseminated. It means that the 
information is clear and comprehensive. This implies, for example, that the objective and rationale of a policy or 
measure is published and explained (including, where applicable, the nature of urgent problems and the reasons why 
rules are being changed). It also means that stakeholders have access to all relevant documents (decisions, 
decrees, legislation, regulation, administrative guidance) in order to fully understand government decisions and 
policies.  
Accessibility refers to governments making information about their policies and practices, including laws, 
regulations and procedures, available to the public. Information should be provided in a timely manner and well in 
advance of the actual implementation of a policy, the information should be up-to-date, and national enquiry points 
should be available for obtaining information. The mechanisms themselves for disclosing information cannot be 
expected to be the same for all countries. Rather, the choice of channels depends on factors like the country’s 
capacity to implement information technology solutions and the characteristics of the political system (e.g. whether 
central or sub-central government authorities have jurisdiction). Another aspect of accessibility is that information is 
made available in a non-discriminatory manner. It is increasingly common for governments to publish the texts of 
trade-related laws, regulations and decrees on the internet. Dissemination on line has the advantage of universal 
availability to all (online) stakeholders, nationals and non-nationals alike, and regardless of geographic location. 
There are of course other delivery mechanisms. At a minimum, decisions taken by government authorities should be 
published in the government’s legal gazette. 
6.3. 
On the benefits of transparency or costs of non-transparency 
Availability of accurate and timely information is essential for markets to function effectively and 
efficiently. It enables market participants in the public and private sectors to base economic decisions 
on rational assessments of potential costs, risks and market opportunities. Consequently, making 
relevant information readily available is an important policy objective in its own right.  
From a trade perspective, transparency is particularly valuable to foreign traders and firms, 
who tend to face greater difficulties than domestic market participants in obtaining information in a 
regulatory and business environment characterised by opacity, whether originated in government 
action or business sector practices. Transparent trade legislation, policies and practices also reduce 
the prospect of trade frictions with trading partners. 
If mineral export restrictions are being used by national governments, stakeholders and 
economies benefit from greater transparency in the following ways: 
 
Transparency lowers transaction costs in terms of both time and expense of obtaining 
information (‘search costs’), and reduces uncertainty about conditions of access to materials 
supplies by diminishing information asymmetry and hence high-risk premiums (OECD, 2009a).  
 
Reducing information asymmetries, which create opportunities for discretionary behaviour, also 
allows hidden discrimination to be revealed and counteracted.  
 
Last-minute, ad hoc or ex post disclosure of newly introduced measures makes it difficult for 
firms to react and adjust optimally to changes in rules and practices. For example, if a firm can 
anticipate a government’s decision to ban the export of a raw material, it can take preventive 
measures such as diversifying its sources of supply or recombining inputs.  
 
Better information flows help to abate the extent and perniciousness of principal-agent 
problems in governments, firms and civil society institutions, revealing vested and conflicting 
interests (Bellver and Kaufmann, 2005). 
While some of these benefits point to the more static aspect of information availability, others 
refer to the dynamic aspect of public consultation, emphasising due process and good governance. 
As Stoeckel and Fisher (2008, p.24) put it, “to develop better policies that serve the national interest it 
is necessary to assess the national interest. Good transparent review of policy does that”. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Sometimes, to convert PDF document into BMP, GIF, JPEG and PNG raster images in Visual Basic .NET applications, you may need a third party tool and have some
advanced pdf to jpg converter; convert .pdf to .jpg online
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
This VB. NET example shows how to build a PDF document with three image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG). ' Load 3 image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG).
batch convert pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter
186
– 6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Governments are more likely to be forthcoming with information about export restrictions if they 
see how it will help them meet their own policy objectives. Governments of exporting countries can 
benefit from transparent export rulemaking in the following ways: 
 
Transparency of trade policies reduces trade-related uncertainty, which is associated with 
lower investment and lower growth, and with a resource shift towards non-tradables, lower 
value-added goods, and even rent-seeking activities by firms and individuals (Francois, 2001). 
 
Transparency improves the stability of the business environment. Less transparent policy 
regimes pose higher risks for businesses, thereby incurring higher capital costs since investors 
demand a (higher) risk premium on funds invested in jurisdictions perceived to have economic 
or regulatory unpredictability. 
 
Transparency regarding government action and local business practices, which creates an 
“enabling environment”, helps to attract foreign direct investment and reinvestment, which in 
turn means technology transfer and diffusion, and improved total factor productivity.
8
In the 
mining sector, investments are long-term and capital-intensive, and there is often a strong 
need for foreign capital and technology participation. In these sectors, the risk assessment 
made by companies before committing investment funds looks at how frequently regulatory 
measures change, whether or not advance notice is given and whether opportunity for 
consultation exists. Business surveys rank transparency as a top priority for foreign investors 
(World Bank, 2012). The companies investing are often leading exporters of the extracted 
commodities as well, implying that transparency of national trade regulatory frameworks 
matters as much as transparent investment rules do. 
 
Transparency can simplify and accelerate business procedures, lead to greater efficiency 
within government and avert corruption and similar criminal behaviours. The use of internet 
solutions multiplies administrative efficiency gains (OECD, 2009b). 
 
Governments that engage in open policymaking can implement policies and regulations more 
easily. This is because compliance is facilitated when stakeholders have more information, 
especially when they have been consulted in advance. They are then better equipped and 
more willing to support implementation. 
 
Transparent export policies can be strategically important for the national growth and 
development agendas of importing countries, especially when predictable access to raw 
materials is at stake. Shared transparency standards bring reciprocal benefits to trading 
countries. No economy in the world is self-sufficient in all the raw materials that are essential 
for manufacturing. Exporting countries that use export restrictions are invariably importers as 
well (see, for example, Chapter 1 of this volume, Table 1.6). If lack of transparency of their 
actions creates uncertainty for their trading partners, their own economies can also be 
harmed by opaque and erratic export policies that countries supplying them with needed raw 
materials might adopt. There would seem to be incentives for all countries to work towards 
shared transparency practices. 
Of course, enhanced transparency entails costs and new challenges for governments. There 
are financial and human resource costs linked to establishing and operating efficient mechanisms for 
disseminating accessible information to all stakeholders, and these costs may seem daunting to some 
developing-country governments. Nevertheless, the trend seems inescapable. Well-planned 
stakeholder involvement consistently contributes to identifying ways aimed at reducing administrative 
burdens, generating savings and avoiding an uneven distribution of benefits (Möisé, 2011).  
6.4. 
Transparency rules applicable to export restrictions 
This section reviews GATT/WTO transparency provisions covering export restrictions. 
Because opacity has negative effects regardless of the direction of the trade flow, this review also 
includes transparency rules for some symmetric measures on the import side (for example, import 
tariffs). Besides multilateral rules, this stocktaking takes account of the findings of ongoing OECD 
6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST – 
187
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
research on Regional Trade Agreements (RTAs).
9
It also extends to some non-binding 
recommendations or guidelines, notably the OECD Guiding Principles for Regulatory Quality and 
Performance of 2005 and the Recommendation of the OECD Council on Regulatory Policy and 
Governance of 2012, both of which treat transparency as one of the fundamental principles for 
ensuring the open market orientation of domestic regulation.  
The goal is to learn from these different rules and recommendations about principles, 
standards and tools that are consistent with a high level of transparency. They will be used in 
Section 6.5 to assess actual practices in the use of export restrictions as recorded in the OECD 
Inventory of Restrictions on Exports of Raw Materials.
10
No attempt will be made to evaluate the 
performance of existing transparency provisions in the WTO or elsewhere. Other substantive issues, 
such as the consistency of export restrictions with WTO agreements per se, or the question of actual 
restraints of export measures through WTO or other disciplines, also exceed the scope of this 
exercise.  
Transparency mechanisms in the WTO framework 
Many GATT and WTO agreements require governments to disclose their policies and 
practices in at least one of two ways: 1) by public divulgence within the country, which if done through 
publication in the official gazette or on the internet, means to everyone, nationally and internationally, 
or 2) by notifying members. In principle, while the publication of laws and regulations reinforces their 
generality and obligatoriness, notification may be more limited in reach and scope. However, the 
notification obligation is crucial when countries are parties to international agreements, including 
GATT/WTO. Notifications provide basic information regarding members’ adherence to relevant 
agreements. It is a guarantee of trust that members abide by the agreements they have entered into. 
Another benefit of notification is that it reduces many potentially costly disputes and their settlement 
since they make discussion possible at the appropriate WTO level or committee at an early stage. 
This in turn helps to clarify all aspects of the measure concerned and their interpretation, and to 
enhance understanding and dialogue. Information by notification also reduces uncertainty for traders, 
investors and service providers, and increases the predictability of trade policy when made publicly 
available. 
There are various stipulations and guidelines regarding transparency embedded in the GATT 
texts and the various other agreements between WTO members. They are listed below.  
1. General obligation to publish policy measures affecting trade 
a. GATT Article X 
GATT transparency disciplines, whose overarching tenets are found in GATT 1947 Article X, 
include the obligation to publish all regulations and subordinate measures, including judicial decisions, 
administrative guidelines and rulings of general application that affect trade in goods in a prompt 
manner so as to enable relevant parties to become acquainted with them. According to Article X:2, 
trade rules cannot be enforced before they have been officially published. Article X requires a party to 
1) publish its trade-related laws, regulations, rulings and agreements promptly and in an accessible 
manner; 2) abstain from enforcing measures of general application before they are published; and 
3) administer laws, regulations, rulings and agreements in a uniform, impartial and reasonable 
manner. Although the paramount objective of this article is transparency, it does not include specific 
notification obligations. Article X does, however, set out disciplines on the administration of the 
members’ regulatory framework, requiring uniformity, impartiality and reasonable administration, as 
well as the availability of an appeals or review mechanism. Besides the horizontal obligations set out 
in Article X, there are some measure-specific transparency rules, e.g. on quantitative restrictions (see 
below).  
The Agreement on Trade Facilitation (WT/MIN(13)/36, WT/L/911, 7 December 2013) updates 
and strengthens the provisions of GATT 1947 Article X. These new disciplines require the prompt 
publication, in a non-discriminatory and easily accessible manner, of all import, export and transit 
procedures, the applicable duties and taxes, fees and charges, the norms on rules of origin, the 
188
– 6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
import, export or transit restrictions or prohibitions, the penalties for breaches of import, export or 
transit formalities, the appeals procedures, the agreements reached with other countries relating to 
importation, exportation or transit, and the administrative procedures relating to the imposition of tariff 
quotas. Also, members are expected to make information available via the internet, in one of the 
official languages of the WTO, and to operate one or more enquiry points (EPs). The notification must 
identify the official place where the published information can be found, as well as of the website(s) of 
the EPs. Publication is expected to occur as early as possible prior to the entry into force of new or 
amended regulations. Traders and other interested parties should have opportunities, and a 
reasonable time period, to comment on such rule changes and the possibility to engage in regular 
consultations with border agencies, among other provisions.  
The Uruguay Round Decision on Notification Procedures (1994) established the general 
framework in terms of notifications.
11
It established a Central Registry of Notifications (CRN) under the 
responsibility of the WTO Secretariat, which cross-references its records by member and by 
obligation. CRN annually reminds members of their regular notification obligations for the following 
year and prompts them in case of noncompliance. CRN information is available upon request to any 
member entitled to receive the notification. An indicative list of measures subject to notification 
includes tariffs (including range and scope of bindings, GSP provisions, rates applied to members of 
free-trade areas/customs unions, other preferences), tariff rate quotas and surcharges, quantitative 
restrictions, including voluntary export restraints and orderly marketing arrangements affecting 
imports, other non-tariff measures such as licensing and mixing requirements, variable levies, rules of 
origin, technical barriers, safeguard actions, anti-dumping actions, countervailing actions, export taxes 
and subsidies, tax exemptions and concessionary export financing, export restrictions, including 
voluntary export restraints and orderly marketing arrangements, other government assistance, 
including subsidies, tax exemptions, and foreign exchange controls related to imports and exports. 
2. Transparency provisions of specific WTO/GATT agreements 
a. Quantitative restrictions (QRs) 
While GATT 1947 Article XI rules out all prohibitions or restrictions on any imports or exports 
through quotas, import or export licences or other measures, it lists a number of exceptions, including 
those temporarily imposed to prevent or relieve critical shortages of foodstuffs or other essential 
products, those necessary to the application of standards or regulations for the classification, grading 
or marketing of commodities in international trade, and import restrictions on agricultural or fisheries 
products necessary to the enforcement of governmental measures under special circumstances.  
The rules provide for QR notifications and reverse notifications.
12
Implementation of the 
instructions issued in December 1995 by the WTO Council for Trade in Goods (WTO, G/L/59 of 
10 January 1996) has generally been poor. One problem is that some members notify that they have 
no QRs, interpreting the obligation as relating only to WTO-inconsistent QRs, while other members 
have notified details of many existing QRs for transparency purposes, although these measures could 
be justified as exceptions under Articles XX (General exceptions) or XXI (Security exceptions) of 
GATT 1994. Similarly, the reverse notification procedure has rarely been used, suggesting an 
absence of interest among WTO members. Although information regarding notified QRs and reverse 
notifications is recorded in a WTO database and is available to WTO members, it could only be 
consulted upon request to the WTO. Thus, non-members and private parties could not access the 
information; the WTO Secretariat simply issued a list periodically of members having made a 
notification. This was in stark contrast to the Goods Schedules and most other notifications, which are 
openly available to the public through the WTO website. 
When the Council for Trade in Goods revised the notification procedures for QRs in 2012 
(WTO, G/L/59/Rev.1), it decided that availability of the overhauled database, which records notified 
QRs in force by 30 September 2012 and taken thereafter, should be extended to the public. 
Notifications have to be submitted in electronic form. If a notification lacks any of the information 
elements required, the Secretariat alerts the member, and developing and least-developed countries 
can request technical assistance in the preparation of their notifications.  
6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST – 
189
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
The 2012 revisions generally seek to improve the reporting situation. Members are required to 
make complete notifications of all QRs in force at biennial intervals.
13
The information required since 
the 2012 revisions includes a full description of the products and tariff lines, a precise indication of the 
type of restriction and the grounds for it, the WTO justification for it, a description of the national legal 
basis and entry into force and, where applicable, other information such as how a measure is 
administered and what modifications have been made to previously notified measures. The same 
information requirements apply to reverse notifications. Members shall also notify any changes made 
to QRs as soon as possible, but not later than six months after their inception. Notifications are 
circulated in a document series and automatically included in the agenda of the Committee on Market 
Access.  
b. Export duties and price controls 
Export duties and price controls are by and large not covered under the existing WTO 
notification obligations, with the exception of the Uruguay Round Ministerial Decision on Notification 
Procedures of 14 April 1994, which expressly mentions export taxes and restrictions as subject to 
notification. Both developed and developing countries use them to pursue economic and extra-
economic objectives. According to WTO Trade Policy Review Mechanism (TPRM) data, export duties 
on agricultural products and raw materials are the most frequently used export restriction, and are 
predominantly imposed by small economies (Bonarriva et al., 2009). They are easy to administer and 
more certain in their operation than other restrictions (Devarajan et al., 1996). Governments can 
impose export price controls in the form of minimum export prices, often in conjunction with export 
duties. Sometimes minimum export prices are not binding but used as reference prices. 
The issue of export taxes was raised by a proposal tabled in 2006 in the Non-Agricultural 
Market Access (NAMA) working group within the DDA negotiations, and subsequently amended. The 
draft text, which only received limited support among members, would have committed them to a 
process leading to the elimination of existing export taxes on non-agricultural products and to 
maintaining or introducing new export taxes only under specified circumstances, including the general 
and security exceptions of GATT Articles XX and XXI. As for transparency, export taxes would have to 
be recorded in members’ schedules of concessions, and be bound at a negotiated level. Any new 
export tax or increase thereof would have to be notified to the WTO Secretariat 60 days before entry 
into force. The notification format would include a description of the export taxes in question, the 
products involved, and the volume of trade likely to be affected. Other members would be able to 
request consultations and information on the reasons for the measure, its potential effects and on 
other matters of interest or concern. Also, a reasonable time between the adoption of the measure 
and its entry into force would have to be observed (WTO, 2008).  
A number of regional trade agreements go beyond GATT/WTO provisions and include 
decisions to ban export taxes (Piermartini, 2004; Korinek and Bartos, 2012; and Chapter 4 of this 
volume). 
d. Agricultural export restrictions 
The WTO Agreement on Agriculture has been in force since 1995. Notification requirements 
are set out in Articles 12 and 18 of the Agreement. Members should notify the Committee on 
Agriculture before instituting a prohibition or restriction, and should consult with other members having 
a substantial interest as importers, providing them with necessary information. In addition, members 
should consult annually in the Committee on Agriculture as to their participation in the normal growth 
of world trade in agricultural products within the framework of the commitments on export subsidies. 
Members may make reverse notifications. 
The notification requirements and formats have been developed in detail since 1995 (WTO, 
G/AG/2 and G/AG/2/Add.1). The Committee on Agriculture reports semi-annually on compliance with 
notification obligations. A comprehensive Handbook on Notification Requirements under the 
Agreement on Agriculture was published by the WTO Secretariat in May 2010.
14
190
– 6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
e. Pre-shipment inspection (PSI) 
The WTO Agreement on Preshipment Inspection (PSI), in force since 1995, falls under the 
responsibility of the Committee on Customs Valuation. The Agreement covers all activities relating to 
verification of the quality, quantity, price, or customs classification of goods to be exported to a 
member. Both importers and exporters are required to publish all changes in their laws and 
regulations relating to PSI activities promptly, and no changes in the laws and regulations relating to 
pre-shipment inspection can be enforced until they have been officially published (Article 5). The 
Secretariat informs the members of the availability of this new information.  
f. Import licensing 
Import licensing is also subject to specific WTO disciplines since the Agreement on Import 
Licensing Procedures entered into force in 1995. It requires that import licensing be neutral in 
application and administered in a fair and equitable manner, and procedures kept as simple as 
possible. For example, governments have to publish sufficient information for traders to know how, 
and for what, licences are granted. It also describes how countries should notify the WTO when they 
introduce new import licensing procedures or change existing procedures. The agreement offers 
guidance on how governments should assess applications for licences. 
Some licences are issued automatically. The Agreement sets criteria for automatic licensing so 
that the procedures do not restrict trade. Other licences are not issued automatically. Here, the 
Agreement tries to minimise the importers’ burden in applying for licences, so that the administrative 
work does not in itself restrict or distort imports. It stipulates that agencies handling licensing should 
not normally take more than 30 days to deal with an application. 
Members must indicate where the rules and information concerning import-licensing 
procedures are published, submit copies of such publications, and notify the full texts of their relevant 
laws and regulations (Articles 1.4(a), 8.2(b)). They also have to notify the Committee within 60 days of 
publication of any laws or regulations pertaining to new or changed import licensing procedures, with 
specific information about the nature of the licensing procedures, its expected duration and the 
products affected, the contact point for information on eligibility, the administrative body to which 
applications are submitted, and so on. Members should also respond to the annual questionnaire on 
import licensing procedures (Article 7.3). The ad hoc WTO Committee on Import Licensing reports 
biennially on the implementation and operation of the Agreement and informs the WTO Council for 
Trade in Goods of developments during the period covered by the reviews. 
A proposal on Enhanced Transparency on Export Licensing, tabled by a group of countries in 
the NAMA negotiations of the Doha Development round and revised to serve as a draft text for an 
Agreement on Increased Transparency on Export Restrictions merits mention here (see WTO, 
TN/MA/W/15/Add.4/Rev.1, 11 April 2008). The draft text defined export restrictions as “administrative 
procedures used for the operation of export restriction regimes requiring the submission of an 
application or other documentation (other than that required for customs purposes) to the relevant 
administrative body as a prior condition for exportation …”. The proposal, which its co-sponsors 
argued would better inform traders and facilitate trade but other members viewed as imposing a heavy 
administrative burden, sought to minimise harmful use of these administrative procedures through 
improved transparency. Members would have to notify existing export restriction procedures, and 
changes to existing measures within 60 days of the effective date of the new measure. This 
notification would contain information about the product(s) concerned, the procedures for submitting 
applications, the eligibility criteria and contact point for questions, the name of the authority for 
submission of application, the date and name of the publication where the procedures had been 
published, and any applicable exceptions or derogations from an export restriction requirement. The 
draft text also provided for a consultation process that other Members could use if a measure gave 
rise to concerns.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested