1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
21
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table 1.1. Production for selected raw materials 
Product 
Major producers, by share of  
world production (2012) 
Top 5 
producers’ 
share 
Figures in parentheses are percentage shares 
Minerals and metals 
Antimony 
China (82), Tajikistan (4), Russia (4), Bolivia (3), South Africa (2) 
95 
Chromium 
South Africa (44), Kazakhstan (20), India (12), Turkey (9), Oman (2)  
87 
Cobalt 
Democratic Republic of Congo (68), China (5), Zambia (4),  
Australia (4), Cuba (3) 
84 
Copper 
Chile (32), China (10), Peru (8), United States (7), Australia (5) 
62 
Iron ore 
China (44), Australia (18), Brazil (13), India (5), Russia (4) 
84 
Lithium 
Chile (49), Australia (30), Argentina (9), United States (5), China (4) 
97 
Nickel 
Philippines (17), Russia (14), Indonesia (13), Australia (13),  
Canada (11) 
68 
Platinum group metals 
South Africa (59), Russia (27), Canada (5), United States (4), 
Zimbabwe (4) 
99 
Rare earth oxides 
China (91), United States (4), Australia (3), Russia (2) Brazil (0.2), 
Malaysia (0.1) 
100 
Tin 
China (40), Indonesia (31), Peru (9), Bolivia (7), Brazil (4) 
91 
Tungsten 
China (83), Russia (6), Canada (3), Bolivia (2), Rwanda (1) 
95 
Wood products 
Coniferous industrial 
roundwood 
United States (23), Canada (13), Russia (10), China (7%), Brazil (4) 
54 
Non-coniferous tropical 
industrial roundwood 
Indonesia (28), Brazil (14), Malaysia (10), India (9), Thailand (5) 
66 
Agricultural commodities 
Maize 
United States (32), China (24), Brazil (9), European Union (7), 
Argentina (3) 
74 
Palm oil 
Indonesia (51), Malaysia (35), Thailand (4), Colombia (2), Nigeria (2) 
93 
Rice (milled) 
China (30), India (22), Indonesia (8) Bangladesh (7), Viet Nam (6) 
73 
Soya beans 
United States (31), Brazil (31), Argentina (18), China (5), India (4) 
89 
Soya oil 
China (27), United States (21), Brazil (16), Argentina (1),  
European Union (5) 
84 
Wheat 
European Union (20), China (18), India (14), United States (9), 
Russia (6) 
68 
Note: Figures for shares are rounded up. Production figures for minerals and metals are for ores and concentrates or, where 
applicable, further processed materials. 
Source: Production figures - Minerals and metals: British Geographical Survey (2014). Tropical industrial roundwood: ITTO 
(2012). Coniferous industrial roundwood: FAO (2014). Agricultural statistics from the US Department of Agriculture, Foreign 
Agriculture Service, Production, Supply and Distribution, on line http://apps.fas.usda.gov/psdonline/psdQuery.aspx
Export restrictions stand out in the conduct of trade policy not only because the WTO 
disciplines regulating their use are less developed, but also because of the opaque way they are 
used by governments, which makes it difficult to follow and predict what governments are doing or 
planning to do. Accurate, timely and accessible information about policy measures is a necessary 
condition for predicting supply and managing production risk. Opacity itself can be a formidable 
Convert pdf to high quality jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
.net convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg converter
Convert pdf to high quality jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change pdf file to jpg; convert pdf into jpg
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
22
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
barrier to trade. Because the use of market-distorting export restrictions is less systematically 
notified to trading partners through the WTO system, making these policies more transparent is a 
challenge in its own right. 
To contribute to greater transparency, the OECD began collecting detailed information on 
export restrictions in the raw materials sector in 2009 (see the following section). Promoting more 
transparent use of these measures at national government level is another area where the OECD 
has been actively working. Some of the results of that work are presented in Chapter 6 of this 
volume. 
1.3. 
Profiling the presence and spread of export restrictions 
In the past, comprehensive and up-to-date information on export restrictions has not been 
readily available. The WTO maintains databases of notifications that members must make when 
they use some types of export restraints, but these notification obligations are insufficiently 
enforced. Some industry associations have begun to monitor export restrictions for their members, 
but this is usually done for the specific sectors in which they operate. Some governments include 
export restrictions in their regular exercises of monitoring trade policies abroad that are of interest to 
their countries.  
In order to fill this information gap, the OECD started collecting information on export 
restrictions in 2009, systematically surveying a large set of countries and raw materials. The 
analysis in this chapter draws on this unique database. The OECD Inventory of Restrictions on 
Trade in Raw Materials (OECD, 2014a) (hereafter called the OECD Inventory) covers both 
industrial raw materials and primary agricultural and food commodities
6
. The structure of each of the 
two parts of the Inventory is tailored to the type of information it contains and its availability. For 
industrial materials, the Inventory records restrictive trade measures for more than 80 industrial raw 
materials in their primary and semi-refined/processed state, and in waste and scrap form.
7
For this 
information, the survey aims to cover 84 countries (considering the EU as a single region) and data 
for the entire period 2009 to 2012 are currently available for 72 countries. The survey covers around 
80% of world production volume of minerals, metals and wood in their primary state and a large 
share of related global trade (67% of 2012 total value of exports of primary materials, 45% of total 
exports of primary and semi-processed materials combined, and over 90% of exports of metals 
waste and scrap). For agricultural products, 16 countries are surveyed for export restrictions 
covering the whole range of agricultural commodities as defined by WTO. The most complete set of 
data for agricultural products covers the years 2007 to 2011, although for some countries available 
data extend outside this period. The list of surveyed countries and products is provided in 
Annexes 1.C and 1.D.  
Since many more countries were surveyed for industrial raw materials than for agricultural 
products, the analysis presented in this chapter uses the former part of the Inventory more 
extensively, complemented by selective information about export restrictions from one sector of 
agriculture, namely primary bulk commodities.
8
Overview 
The list of measures surveyed by the OECD Inventory is comprehensive, ranging from 
export taxes, prohibitions and non-automatic licensing requirements, to price and tax measures 
(Box 1.1). These measures are known to restrain export activity. They typically increase the relative 
price of exported products, decrease the quantity of exports supplied or change the terms of 
competition among suppliers. The different types of measures are explained further in Annex 1.B. 
The Inventory does not report export restrictions that are expressly sanctioned by international 
agreements in well-defined circumstances.
9
The OECD Inventory documents widespread use of export restrictions for industrial raw 
materials in recent years. Some of the measures recorded as being in force in 2012 (at HS6 level) 
have been in place for many years or even decades, but three quarters of them have been 
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
What you need to do is just click the convert button, sort the imported file, and then JPEG to GIF Converter will give you JPG files with high good quality.
.pdf to .jpg converter online; change pdf to jpg on
JPEG Image Viewer| What is JPEG
RasterEdge Image products support for high-quality JPEG, JPEG interface enabling you to quickly convert your JPEG including Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
reader convert pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter online
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
23
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
introduced since 2007. More than half the measures in effect in 2012 were introduced after 2009 
and almost a quarter in 2012. Expressed as simple counts of measures recorded at the HS6 
product level, 466 of over 2000 measures recorded as being in effect in 2012 were introduced in 
that year (Figure 1.2).  
Box 1.1. Types of measures surveyed and recorded by the Inventory 
Export tax 
Dual pricing scheme 
Export surtax  
VAT tax reduction/withdrawal 
Fiscal tax on exports 
Restriction on customs clearance point for exports 
Export quota 
Qualified exporters list 
Export prohibition 
Domestic market obligation 
Export licensing requirement 
Captive mining 
Minimum export price/price reference for exports 
Other measures 
Figure 1.2. Year of introduction of measures present in 2012 
Note: Measures are counted at the HS6 level of product classification. The measures are restrictions on industrial raw 
materials. Restrictions that expired and then were reintroduced in the following year were counted as a new 
introduction of a measure. 
Source: UN Comtrade. 
Of the 72 countries with data available for 2009-2012, 12 countries did not apply restrictions 
in 2012 for any of the surveyed products. The other 60 countries applied at least one restriction 
between 2009 and 2012. OECD Inventory entries exist for nearly all the 90 minerals, metals and 
wood products at the HS6 product level covered by the survey (see Annex 1.C) and this large 
number of products affected by restrictions has not changed since 2009.  
The agriculture and food section of the OECD Inventory covers numerous products, many of 
which were subject to export restrictions at least once during 2007 to 2011. Grouping these 
products into four general categories
10
, horticultural products were the least affected by export 
restrictive measures, while semi-processed products were restricted the most often. Over this five-
year period, among the 16 countries whose agricultural trade data are recorded in the Inventory, 
there was a 58% probability that an individual country would impose an export restriction on at least 
one bulk product in any given year, relative to a 50% probability for semi-processed products. 
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
450
500
Number of measures
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats Create PDF from images in both .NET NET converter control for exporting high quality PDF from images in
conversion pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Tiff files are exported with high resolution and no loss in quality in .NET framework. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images.
change from pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
24
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
However, there were nearly twice as many individual restrictions in place on export of semi-
processed products (532 restrictions at HS6 level) relative to those of bulk products (278 restrictions 
at HS6 level). The measures applied covered the whole gamut of instruments listed in Box 1.1, with 
outright bans the most common (used by 13 of the 16 countries in the database), followed by export 
taxes (9 countries) and export quotas (9 countries). At times, countries used a combination of these 
measures, either concurrently or sequentially. 
Certain trends and patterns regarding the use of export restrictions and products affected 
can be seen:  
 Export restrictions are broadly applied across all raw materials sectors, from minerals and 
metals, and metal scrap, to wood and agricultural commodities. The majority of restrictions are 
applied by emerging and developing countries. 
 The period between 2009 and 2012 witnessed the introduction or tightening of over 900 
measures at the HS6 product level in the industrial raw material sector. By comparison, only 
400 measures in the Inventory were eliminated or relaxed during that period, and many of these 
resulted from the liberalisation commitments of countries such as Tajikistan, Ukraine and 
Viet Nam under their WTO accession protocols. As for primary agricultural bulk commodities, 
some 337 new or tighter measures (at HS6 level or higher) were added during 2007-2011, and 
some 70 measures were removed or liberalised.  
 Many export restrictions imposed between 2007 and 2011 on agricultural commodities were 
temporary, sometimes lasting less than a year. For industrial raw materials, on the other hand, 
interventions tend to be medium- to long-term. It was rare that a measure in force in 2009 was 
discontinued in the course of the next three years. 
Governments use a variety of measures. A summary of the number of measures recorded in 
the OECD Inventory for 2012 is provided in Table 2. Non-automatic export licensing requirements 
and export taxes are particularly widespread across all three categories of industrial raw materials – 
minerals and metals, metal waste and scrap, and wood. Governments also impose quantitative 
restrictions (prohibitions and quotas), notably on exported waste and scrap and primary bulk 
agricultural commodities, or resort to other policies that restrain export flows.  
While a detailed description of international trade patterns is beyond the scope here, it is 
useful to provide information on the size of the trade flows corresponding to the four categories of 
raw materials, the leading importers and exporters, and amount of trade affected by the export 
restrictions in the OECD Inventory. Worldwide imports of the more than 80 minerals and metals 
surveyed for the Inventory amounted to USD 1.2 trillion in 2012. OCED members, led by the EU 
and the United States, accounted for 44% of these imports. Moreover, 65% of the imports into the 
OECD area were sourced from other OECD member countries.
11
Seven per cent
12
of the 2012 total gross trade value of minerals and metals were subject to 
export restrictions in 28 countries with available trade data. While at this high level of 
product
aggregation the incidence seems quite small, a more nuanced picture emerges for individual 
products within the minerals and metals sector. 
Metals account for the lion’s share of exports value in this sector, with a large share of 
exports subject to restriction at the individual product level. They comprise 43 products and were 
exported to the value of USD 1 trillion in 2012. Metal products include aluminum, copper and other 
base metals widely used across industrial applications, but also the so-called technology metals 
that are critical inputs to many high-technology industries. More than a third of the exports of metals 
like thorium (63%), the metal group niobium, tantalum, vanadium (54%), tungsten (52%), and 
magnesium (46%) were subject to some form of export restrictions in 2012.
13
VB.NET Imaging - Generate Barcode Image in VB.NET
Create high-quality ITF-14 valid for scanner reading on any pages in a PDF or TIFF documents as well as common image files such as png and jpg.
best program to convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg format
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C# Image Convert: Tiff to Gif. How to achieve high quality Tiff to Gif image file conversion.
batch convert pdf to jpg online; convert pdf image to jpg
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
25
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table 1.2. Incidence of export restrictions by type of measure and sector  
Minerals and 
metals 
Metal waste  
and scrap 
Wood 
Primary bulk 
agricultural 
commodities 
2012 
2012 
2012 
2011 
Domestic market obligation 
Export prohibition 
129 
25 
Export quota 
20 
Export tax 
144 
141 
Licensing requirement 
172 
226 
27 
Other export measures 
27 
47 
9  
Total 
371 
552 
53 
44 
Note: Counts of measures are at the HS6 level of product classification. For the categories minerals and metalsmetal 
waste and scrap, and wood: Since many products comprise more than one HS6 line and the number of lines per product 
varies, the simple count was adjusted by dividing counts at the product level by the number of HS lines constituting each 
product. This adjustment removes the bias inherent in simple counts of HS6 product lines. ‘Other export measures’ 
include such items as restrictions on customs clearance points for exports, qualified exporters lists, the setting of minimum 
export price/price references and captive miningFor primary bulk agricultural commodities: the counts of measures 
shown are not adjusted. Argentina collects export duties of 5% on agricultural products. The OECD Inventory records only 
exceptions or changes to this policy. Only licenses related to export quotas are recorded for agriculture products. 
Source: OECD Inventory, as of June 2014. 
The impact of export restrictions is larger and more extensive when they are imposed on 
products whose world market are dominated by a few exporting countries trading with many 
importing countries. For example, the top 5 exporting countries account for 92% of 
the
USD 1.9 
billion magnesium export supply in 2012. China alone produced 85% of this metal
14
and accounted 
for about two-thirds of the value of magnesium exports whereas the shares of nine of the top ten 
importers ranged between 1% and 8%. South Africa, Rwanda, and Brazil made up three-quarters of 
total exports for the metal group niobium, tantalum and vanadium, which was mainly imported by 
China (38%), the EU (33%), and Thailand (14%). In instances where the source of trade is 
concentrated, like magnesium, the impact of export restrictions employed by one exporter is 
distributed across a larger number of importing countries. 
The remaining items in the industrial raw materials section of the OECD Inventory are 
41 mostly non-energy industrial minerals. While at USD 183 billion they account for a minor share of 
the total trade in minerals and metals, some minerals are vital for every economy around the globe. 
Potash and phosphate rock materials, for example, are used in fertilizers, which are critical inputs 
for food production. According to US Geological Survey data
15
, Canada and the Russian Federation 
together account for the bulk of world potash production but significant amounts are also produced 
in other countries, including Belarus and China, both of which have restricted exports in recent 
times. In 2012, 18% of potash exports were subject to restrictions by these two countries. For 
phosphates, the figure of restricted trade (of China and Malaysia) is 5%. 
Potash is a highly concentrated export market, where the top 5 exporters (Canada, Russian 
Federation, Belarus, United States and Jordan) account for almost all the trade (92%). 
Over
111 countries are recorded as having imported potash in 2012. For some countries, particularly 
those with a large agricultural sector, it is a significant part of their raw mineral imports. For 
example, potash represents 24% of Brazil’s 2012 mineral and metal imports.  
World imports of wood products in the OECD Inventory totalled USD 56 billion in 2012. Led 
by the United States and Japan, OECD imports accounted for 51% of world imports. The largest 
importers were China (26%), Japan (15%), United States (12%), and the EU (11%), and the top 
10 importers accounted for 80% of world imports. Heading the list of suppliers were Canada (14%), 
the EU (13%), the Russian Federation (12%), the United States (11%), and China (11%). Exports 
are heavily restricted. Overall, 39% of the value of world exports of wood products surveyed for the 
OECD Inventory were subject to export restrictions in at least 11 countries, by countries that were 
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer: Convert and Export PDF.
convert pdf to gif or jpg; convert pdf file to jpg
C# Imaging - Generate Barcode Image in C#.NET
Create high-quality ITF-14 valid for scanner reading on any pages in a PDF or TIFF documents as well as common image files such as png and jpg.
change pdf to jpg online; advanced pdf to jpg converter
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
26
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
for the most part leading producers and exporters in this sector. Exports of non-coniferous tropical 
plywood are both highly restricted and concentrated. The top two producing countries, Malaysia and 
Indonesia, applied export measures in 2012.  Malaysia alone accounted for almost half (49%) of the 
total trade value and Indonesia over a third (37%). In contrast, the top 5 exporters of non-coniferous 
tropical sawnwood make up only 65% of world trade and only one of the top 5 exporters applied any 
restrictions. In the case of non-coniferous tropical plywood, the export policies have a larger effect, 
since a total of 111 countries import the product from a highly concentrated and highly restricted 
market.  
At some USD 84 billion in 2012, global trade in metal scrap and waste materials is just a 
fraction of trade in primary minerals and metals extracted from the ground. The largest importer of 
scrap was China (27%), then European Union (14%), Turkey and South Korea (11% each), and the 
United States and India (each 9%). The top 5 exporters were all OECD countries, led by the United 
States (24%), the EU (22%), Japan (7%), Canada (6%) and Australia (2%). The OECD Inventory 
reports that in 2012 restrictive policies targeting one or more scrap or waste items were in place in 
39 (mostly developing) countries. Some 7% of exports of metals waste and scrap totalling USD 5.8 
million (according to UN Comtrade) were affected in 2012.  
In fact, only a third of the products classified under waste and scrap were found in the UN 
Comtrade database. Aluminium, copper, platinum and steel are items where trade flows are 
reported more consistently across countries. For these items, the share of 2012 exports affected by 
the measures in the OECD Inventory ranged from 3 to 8%. In this sector, approximately 64% of 
trade was intra-OECD, and OECD countries sourced almost 80% of their imports from other 
members, a much higher share than their imports of primary minerals and metals. But with 
production of scrap being concentrated in OECD countries and twelve developing countries 
imposing bans on exports of waste and scrap, these trade patterns are not surprising. 
Total agriculture imports, as defined by the WTO, were valued at USD 914 billion in 2011, of 
which primary bulk commodities were 27%. Top importers of bulk commodities were China (18%). 
followed by EU (16%), Japan (7%), United States (6%) and Mexico (4%). Overall, non-OECD 
countries accounted for half of the imports. The non-OECD countries supplied about half of total 
exports as well. The leading exporters were the United States (25%), Brazil (15%), Argentina (7%), 
Canada and India (6% each). The 15 countries for which at least one export restriction was 
recorded during the 2007-2011 period are all non-OECD countries.  
Among the bulk agricultural commodities, wheat, barley and rye were the subject of export 
measures in the Russian Federation, Argentina and Ukraine in 2011 (the latest year of available 
OECD Inventory data on export restrictions for agriculture). These countries were also among the 
top ten exporters of these primary products and accounted for 20% of the total trade. Of the three 
commodities mentioned, barley had the largest share of exports sourced from these countries with 
export restrictions (34%), while only 19% of wheat and rye exports came from these sources. Rice 
was also restricted in 2011, by Argentina, China, Egypt and Myanmar, which accounted for 4% of 
total exports. 
As is shown in the following sections, the situation occurring in 2011 and 2012 represents a 
point on a trend in export policy that already became apparent much earlier. Many restrictions were 
already in place in 2009. Especially in the minerals and metals sector, measures have been seldom 
discontinued, and many individual products have seen the number of export restrictions in force 
grow between 2009 and 2012. 
What measures do governments use? 
1. Non-automatic export licensing requirements 
At the HS6 product level, non-automatic export licensing requirements are the measure most 
frequently reported by the OECD Inventory for minerals and metals. Exporters must obtain prior 
approval, in the form of a license or permit, to export the product. By reviewing applications for a 
licence on a case-by-case basis, governments can control who exports and how much. The process 
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
27
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
of applying for a license generates extra transaction costs for exporting firms, in time and 
sometimes monetary terms. Moreover, when processing times are long or unpredictable, this 
hinders the ability of firms to react quickly to sales opportunities in foreign countries. 
In 2009, these measures were applied by 25 countries, including 8 countries that were 
among the top 5 world producers for at least one of the products affected. The number of countries 
was slightly higher in 2012 (26) and included more leading producers (9). They affected the trade of 
some 240 different primary and semi-refined or processed minerals and metals products, at the 
HS6 level of product classification. Table 1.3 lists the products most frequently subject to non-
automatic licensing requirements in 2012, along with the countries imposing them. China, the 
Dominican Republic, Malaysia, the Philippines and the Russian Federation figure prominently as 
countries where for many or even all of the products shown businesses must obtain a license to sell 
abroad. Apparently countries apply export licensing requirements to many products simultaneously 
or sequentially, rather than targeting particular products selectively. 
Table 1.3. Minerals and metals most frequently subject to export licensing requirements, 2012 
Product 
HS6 lines, 
adjusted 
HS6 lines, 
simple 
count 
Number of 
countries 
Countries applying the measure 
Antimony 
8.5 
11 
China, Grenada, Malaysia, Philippines, Russia,  
South Africa 
Molybdenum 
8.4 
21 
China, Grenada, Malaysia, Philippines, Russia,  
South Africa 
Cobalt 
10 
Argentina, China, Grenada, Malaysia, Philippines, 
Russia 
Tungsten 
7.5 
13 
China, Grenada, Malaysia, Philippines, Russia,  
South Africa 
Tin 
7.25 
14 
China, Grenada, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, 
Russia 
Note: Excludes metal waste and scrap. The products comprise primary and semi-processed metals and minerals. The list of 
products shown is not exhaustive. Since many products comprise more than one HS6 line and the number of lines per 
product varies, the simple count was adjusted by dividing counts at the product level by the number of HS lines constituting 
each product. This adjustment removes the bias inherent in simple counts of HS6 product lines. 
Source: OECD Inventory, as of June 2014. 
Of the 22 different product groups comprising agricultural bulk commodities, exports of three 
products – maize, rice and wheat – were subject to licensing requirements in 2009 involving two 
countries, Argentina and Indonesia. The OECD Inventory contained no records for non-automatic 
export licensing requirements for agricultural commodities for either 2010 or 2011, the latest years 
for which it has data.  
2. Export taxes 
In minerals and metals trade, export taxes are the second most frequently reported type of 
export restriction. In 2009, 22 countries, including 10 leading (top 5) producers, imposed such taxes 
on at least one product exported.
16
The total number of export-restricting countries increased by 
one in 2012. At least 55 types or groups of minerals and metals (excluding waste and scrap) were 
affected. In fact, all the products shown in the previous Table 1.3 with a high incidence of non-
automatic export licensing requirements are also among the products listed in Table 1.4 as being 
taxed most frequently.  
Export taxes are applied either ad valorem, calculated as a percentage of the value of the 
export, or as a specific tax, with the exporter paying a given amount of money per unit of the export. 
Some governments collecting ad valorem taxes also prescribe a minimum monetary amount that 
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
28
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
exporters must pay per ton of material shipped (e.g. 25% or EUR 330/ton, whichever is greater). 
Ad valorem taxes will be examined in greater detail in a later section of this chapter. The rationale 
for taxing exports often has to do with governments’ need for revenue.  
Some governments tax exports of primary mineral commodities only, others only exported 
semi-processed materials. Sometimes export duties are applied to materials both in their primary 
and semi-processed forms, and with systematically different rates depending on their processing or 
fabrication stages. This is sometimes observed with import tariffs: to encourage value-addition to be 
carried out locally, lower import tariffs are imposed on raw materials while higher rates are levied for 
imported products competing with local producers at further stages of processing. As illustrated in 
Box 1.2, governments may decide to cascade the taxation of exports in order to encourage 
transformation of local raw materials at home. 
Table 1.4. Products most frequently subject to export taxes, 2012 
Product 
HS6 lines, 
adjusted 
HS6 lines, 
simple count 
Number of 
countries 
Countries applying the measure 
Copper 
9.47 
88 
Argentina, China, Colombia*, Dominican 
Republic, Malaysia, Russia, Ukraine, 
Viet Nam, Zambia 
Tungsten 
9.00 
18 
Bolivia, China, Dominican Republic, Russia, 
Viet Nam  
Cobalt 
8.00 
10 
Argentina, China, Dominican Republic, 
Viet Nam  
Antimony 
7.50 
10 
Bolivia, China, Dominican Republic, Viet Nam  
Manganese 
7.00 
China, Dominican Republic, Gabon, India, 
Viet Nam  
Molybdenum 
6.40 
17 
China, Dominican Republic, Russia, Viet Nam  
Tin 
6.25 
13 
Bolivia, China, Dominican Republic, Ukraine, 
Viet Nam  
Silver 
5.00 
11 
China, Dominican Republic, Fiji, Malaysia, 
Viet Nam  
Zinc 
4.38 
14 
China, Dominican Republic, Malaysia, 
Viet Nam 
Titanium 
4.00 
China, Dominican Republic, Viet Nam  
Zirconium 
4.00 
China, Dominican Republic, Viet Nam 
Lead 
3.86 
China, Dominican Republic, Malaysia, 
Viet Nam 
Iron and steel 
3.63 
73 
Argentina, China, Dominican Republic, India, 
Ukraine, Viet Nam 
Note: Excludes metal waste and scrap. The term ‘export tax’ refers to export taxes, export surtaxes and fiscal taxes on 
exports. The products comprise primary and semi-processed metals and minerals. * Columbia – applies to polymetallic 
concentrates. The list of products shown is not exhaustive. Since many products cover more than one HS6 line and the 
number of lines per product varies, the simple count was adjusted by dividing counts at the product level by the number of HS 
lines constituting each product. This adjustment removes the bias inherent in simple counts of HS6 product lines. 
Source: OECD Inventory, as of June 2014. 
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
29
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Box 1.2. Examples of export tax variation according to degree of processing 
Viet Nam 
A multi-tiered taxation regime is applied to exports from the mining sector. The policy includes the following 
features. Exporters of iron ore and concentrates, the raw material in its least processed form, must pay a 40% 
export duty. For iron and steel scrap, the government charges a lower tax of 15-17% on shipments abroad 
whereas exporters of iron ingots and other semi-finished products made from alloy and non-alloy steel pay just 
2%. For copper, a 30% tax must be paid for ores and concentrates, a 22% tax for copper waste and scrap and 
10-20% for copper that is semi-processed (copper mates, etc.). For other materials including nickel, cobalt, 
aluminium, lead and zinc, the government collects a 22% tax on ores and concentrates, 22% for waste and scrap 
and 5-15% for semi-processed material. For molybdenum, it charges a 20% tax on ores and concentrate, a 22% 
tax on waste and scrap and a 5% tax on semi-processed material. 
Argentina 
Although not stated as the rationale for the tax structure used, Argentina’s export taxes favour exports of 
processed products over primary raw materials, and hence are supportive of local processing activities. Exporters 
pay a 10% export tax when exporting iron ores and concentrates, which falls to 5% for semi-processed items. Iron 
and steel waste and scrap is also taxed at 5%. The same export policy and rates are applied to the different 
processing stages of copper and cobalt. In the case of borates, the export of the primary natural borate and 
concentrate is taxed at 10% whereas the rate on borate-related chemical compounds is 5%. The 5% tax rate for 
waste and scrap applies to a long list of different types of metal; these metals are not taxed if exported as primary 
or as semi-processed materials. 
Federation of Russia 
The Russian Federation is one of the world’s leading exporters of wood products. In recent years the 
government has applied tax rates ranging from 25 to 80% on exports of raw logs (roundwood in the rough), 
reportedly in order to slow down the shipping of raw logs and encouraging more domestic lumber manufacturing 
in the Russian Federation (Hamilton, 2008). For wood in more processed form, such as sheets for veneering, a 
lower rate of 5% applies. 
Source: OECD Inventory, as of June 2014; Hamilton (2008). 
Some governments collect other kinds of export taxes. According to the OECD Inventory, 
four countries collected fiscal taxes or royalties on certain exported raw materials during 2009-2012: 
Afghanistan (rare earth elements), Colombia (polymetallic concentrates), the Dominican Republic 
(aluminium, chromium and other metals) and Guinea (bauxite). Two other countries imposed 
special surtaxes: Bolivia (many base, minor and other metals), and China (phosphates and potash).  
The share of world exports subject to all types of export taxes recorded by the OECD 
Inventory exceeded 40% for several products: graphite (66% of world exports), tungsten (51%), 
thorium (49%), magnesium (45%) and barytes (41%). These are conservative estimates, since due 
to its methodology for screening countries the Inventory has probably not captured all export 
restrictions in force for each product. Moreover, since export restrictions dampen trade flows, the 
figures for restricted exports are lower than what they would be without the restriction.  
Four agricultural bulk commodities were taxed in 2011: barley, oil seeds, soybeans and 
wheat. Of these, oilseeds were most frequently targeted, and the countries applying export taxes 
were Indonesia and the Russian Federation. This was followed by wheat with two items taxed by 
Ukraine. Soybeans and barley each had one restriction, imposed by the Russian Federation and 
Ukraine, respectively. For agricultural products, governments preferred export taxes, followed by 
quantitative restrictions. 
3. Quantitative export restrictions  
Perhaps because the multilateral rules of the WTO set strict conditions for their use, 
quantitative export restrictions (export prohibitions and, occasionally, export quotas) are less 
common. As can be seen from Table 1.5, five countries applied these measures to exports of wood 
products. Among the countries in the OECD dataset only China used quotas to control the export of 
minerals and metals in the period 2009-12. China applied these measures to 44 products (at the 
HS6 level) in 2012, slightly down from some 46 products in the previous three years. The products 
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
30
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
cover a range of ferrous and non-ferrous base, minor and precious metals in ore, concentrate and 
further processed forms, and also as waste and scrap. The share of world exports subject to 
quantitative export restrictions was highest for antimony (50% of world exports), tungsten (45%), 
magnesite (44%), fire-clay (43%) and rare earths (39%). 
As will be shown later, quantitative restrictions appear to be more often the instrument of 
choice for governments that wish to restrain the international trade of waste and scrap. This is also 
true for agricultural products. 
Table 1.5. Industrial raw materials most frequently subject to export quotas and prohibitions, 2012 
Product 
HS6 lines, 
adjusted 
HS6 lines, 
simple count 
Number of 
countries 
Countries applying  
the measure 
Sawnwood, coniferous 
3.0 
Canada, Indonesia, United States  
Industrial roundwood, coniferous 
2.5 
Indonesia, Russia, United States  
Industrial roundwood, non-
coniferous tropical 
2.0 
Indonesia, Nigeria  
Molybdenum 
2.4 
China  
Tin 
2.0 
China  
Antimony 
2.0 
China  
Tungsten 
1.5 
China  
Note: Excludes waste and scrap. The products comprise primary and semi-processed products. The list of products 
shown is not exhaustive. Since many products comprise more than one HS6 line and the number of lines per product 
varies, the simple count was adjusted by dividing counts at the product level by the number of HS lines constituting 
each product. This adjustment removes the bias inherent in simple counts of HS6 product lines. 
Source: OECD Inventory as of June 2014. 
Regarding agricultural bulk commodities, Ukraine resorted to quotas in 2011 in order to 
restrict export of barley, maize, rye, wheat and other grain. Argentina, too, curbed wheat exports 
through quotas. The number of countries applying export bans was higher, and the bans affected 
more products. Myanmar and the Russian Federation restricted the most products. Myanmar 
banned exports of cotton, peanuts and rice, and export bans for maize, rye and wheat were in place 
in the Russian Federation, for grain flour and groats in Macedonia, for oil seeds in Belarus, for rice 
in Egypt, and for wheat in Moldova.  
4. Other measures 
Some governments use other types of instrument that restrict exports in less obvious ways. 
One way is to refuse reimbursement of value-added tax (VAT) on exports. Governments with VAT 
systems usually reimburse VAT on exports, and by denying such reimbursements, in part or in full, 
they make it less attractive to export a product as opposed to selling it locally. This was a tactic 
used by China in 2010, when the government decided to withdraw the VAT rebate for some 20 
minerals and metals. According to OECD Inventory data, China has also used this policy to 
discourage sales abroad of agricultural products. Thus, in recent years exporters of 93 different 
horticultural, semi-processed and processed agricultural products at HS6 level have found their 
VAT rebates being cut or disappearing. The bulk of these actions occurred in 2007. 
17
In some other cases, firms that wish to export specific commodities are obliged to register 
with government authorities. In Ghana, exporters of certain wood products reportedly must pay to 
obtain a registration certificate that is valid for a limited period of time. Similarly, Indonesia keeps a 
qualified exporters’ list for precious metals and plywood. As part of China’s extensive export control 
regime, MOFCOM has, for several raw materials, lists of enterprises that are allowed to export (see 
American Scrap Coalition, 2008, p.10-11). These practices resemble export licensing requirements. 
Argentina, Indonesia and the Russian Federation appear to restrict exports by, inter alia, 
stipulating minimum export prices or issuing reference prices that exporters are expected to 
observe. In 2010 Argentina started to enforce reference export prices for a wide range of minerals 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested