mvc open pdf in browser : Convert pdf to gif or jpg control Library system azure asp.net .net console export-restrictions-raw-materials-201421-part1134

6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST – 
211
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
are illustrated in Box 6.11 for trade procedures that can impose high time and money costs on 
businesses and may also be a source of administrative arbitrariness, discrimination, red tape and 
corruption. Transparency may require commitments that make it visible to stakeholders or the public 
exactly how agencies handle specific regulatory requirements and administrative formalities. Another 
general norm is that governments are expected to operate enquiry points; for this to be effective, the 
checklist includes the provision of contact information for the Enquiry Points so that interested parties 
can fully avail themselves of this service.  
A majority of business survey respondents endorsed these items. One respondent suggested 
that a means of tracking the fill-rate of a quota (on exports) should be provided.
26
Clearly, information 
needs, and the best ways of meeting them, could be tailored to each type of measure, which is not the 
aim of this checklist.  
Box 6.10. Handling applications 
Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (1995), Article 5  In cases where a positive assurance of 
conformity with technical regulations and standards is required, Members shall ensure that ‘the standard 
processing period of each conformity assessment procedure is published or that the anticipated processing 
period is communicated to the applicant upon request…’ Article 7 states that Members shall take such 
reasonable measures as may be available to them to ensure compliance with this obligation also by local 
government bodies within their territories such bodies.  
Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (1995), Annex C (Control, Inspection and Approval 
Procedures) – Members shall ensure with respect to any procedure to check and ensure the fulfilment of sanitary 
and phytosanitary measures, that … ‘the standard processing period of each procedure is published or that the 
anticipated processing period is communicated to the applicant upon request …’ 
Decision on Disciplines Relating to the Accountancy Sector (1998), Article VII  Licensing requirements 
(i.e. the substantive requirements, other than qualification requirements, to be satisfied in order to obtain or renew an 
authorization to practice) shall be pre-established, publicly available and objective.” Article XI (Licensing 
Procedures) – Licensing procedures (i.e. the procedures to be followed for the submission and processing 
of an application for an authorisation to practise) shall be pre-established, publicly available and objective
and shall not in themselves constitute a restriction on the supply of the service.” 
Source: Based on a review of the texts of the agreements and guidelines found on the internet. 
Box 6.11. Publishing obligations with respect to administration 
Agreement on Import Licensing Procedures (1995), Article 1.4(a)  “The rules and all information 
concerning procedures for the submission of applications, including the eligibility of persons, firms and 
institutions to make such applications, the administrative body(ies) to be approached, and the lists of 
products subject to the licensing requirement shall be published, in the sources notified to the Committee on 
Import Licensing… Such publication shall take place, whenever practicable; 21 days prior to the effective date of the 
requirement but in all events not later than such effective date. Any exception, derogations or changes in or from the 
rules concerning licensing procedures or the list of products subject to import licensing shall also be published in the 
same manner and within the same time periods as specified above.” Article 5 (b) – Members administering quotas by 
means of licensing shall publish the overall amount of quotas to be applied by quantity/or value, the opening and 
closing data of quotas, and any change thereof, within the time periods specified in paragraph 4 of Article 1 [above].’ 
Agreement on Trade Facilitation (2013), Article 1  Publication and Availability of Information: Each Member 
shall promptly publish … in a non-discriminatory and easily accessible manner ... importation, exportation 
and transit procedures … penalty provisions … appeal procedures, … procedures relating to the 
administration of tariff quota. Article  Advance Rulings: A Member shall publish at the minimum (a) the 
requirements for the application for an advance ruling, including the information to be provided and the 
format; (b) the time period by which it will issue an advance ruling; and (c) the length of time for which the 
advance ruling is valid…A Member shall endeavour to make publicly available any information on advance ruling 
which it considers to be of significant interest to other interested parties, taking into account the need to protect 
commercially confidential information. 
Source: Based on a review of the texts of the agreements and guidelines found on the internet. 
Convert pdf to gif or jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf into jpg online; best pdf to jpg converter for
Convert pdf to gif or jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
best way to convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf file into jpg
212
– 6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
For purposes of clarity, these items have been grouped in the final version of the checklist 
under the heading “Information about procedures and rules of administration”. They refer to 
publication of: 
 
Applicable procedures, decisions and rulings for applying the measure (e.g. the criteria and 
methodology used to allocate quotas, or grant licenses, permits or other authorisations). 
 
Application procedures and document requirements, appeals procedures, and the like. 
 
Contact information for authority in charge of administration. 
It is recalled that the information requirements do not extend to determinations or rulings made 
in administrative or judicial proceedings that apply to a particular person or a particular product in a 
specific case, or to rulings that adjudicate with respect to a particular act or practice. Such information 
is intended for individual stakeholders, is not automatically made available, and is not intended for the 
general public.  
6.6. 
Conclusions 
Transparency of export restrictions involves effective public communication, opportunity for 
stakeholder involvement in the decision process and procedural fairness of administration. This 
chapter presents the final version of a checklist covering transparency aspects at all stages of policy 
development, including the decision process leading up to adoption of a measure and making it 
operational. For transparency at the stage of discussing whether to introduce an export restriction, a 
government should publish sufficient information alerting stakeholders to the initiative and allowing 
them to react—by adjusting their decisions to the potential policy change, expressing their views to the 
government—and the government should take their views into consideration. Following enactment of 
an export restriction, information should be published well in advance of its entry into force. The 
measure should be implemented and enforced in a transparent manner assuring all stakeholders 
affected equal treatment and include a right to contest decisions and procedures.  
From the business perspective, transparency is clearly important. Research on what 
governments publish online about export restrictions already in place suggests that there is 
considerable room for improvement. The checklist offers a blueprint for achieving a high level of 
ex ante and ex post transparency, elaborating information requirements for making measures public 
once taken at a high level of specificity that have been validated by a survey of business 
representatives. The result is a coherent framework of actions throughout the policy cycle and flow of 
information from which private operators and governments, and ultimately global markets, all can 
benefit.  
The checklist can be used in various ways. It facilitates self-evaluation, serving as a diagnostic 
tool for governments to appraise their own transparency practices and take steps to address 
underlying weaknesses. It could also, however, support peer reviews and multi-stakeholder dialogue 
on transparency of policies that restrict exports. 
Addressing underlying weaknesses requires resources that developing countries in particular 
may not have at their disposal. The checklist does not offer guidance on capacity building issues; 
however, governments can decide which parts of the transparency framework they wish to upgrade as 
a priority. A feasible starting point could be to close information gaps relative to the specific 
information requirements for publishing information. These requirements respond to concrete 
information needs of market operators and are formulated in clear terms that facilitate implementation. 
Efficiency gains through wider use of information technology are also low-hanging fruit for some 
countries.  
Public consultation mechanisms, on the other hand, are decisions that governments usually 
take years to consider and implement. The appropriateness of any standards for consultations in the 
public policy field is not necessarily universally recognised. Some governments may not see value in 
open and transparent decision-making processes. Ex ante transparency therefore needs strong 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Convert a JPG to PDF. the files, try out some settings and then create the PDF files with we believe in diversity and won't discriminate against gif, bmp, png
convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi; best pdf to jpg converter online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
batch pdf to jpg converter; change pdf file to jpg
6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST – 
213
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
advocates for it to be adopted. Governments using consultative mechanisms when considering export 
restrictions should publicise this widely and share their experience with trading partners that do not. 
As with their own practices, governments can use the criteria of the checklist to scrutinise how other 
countries handle transparency when they adopt export restrictions. The checklist could support the 
organisation of peer reviews where governments can learn from each other’s experiences. 
The checklist could make a contribution to a range of ongoing activities. For example, the 
recently concluded WTO Agreement on Trade Facilitation requires members to make information 
available on a range of trade measures that include export restrictions. The principles and precise 
information requirements of the list could help members to operationalise these obligations. Other 
settings where the list could serve as a reference tool are the various bodies and fora which RTAs 
have set up to oversee and help signatory countries to implement the transparency rules of their 
treaties. Finally, the possibility that countries, with the aid of the checklist, negotiate and reach 
agreement on multilateral transparency disciplines for export restrictions over and above those 
currently applied under the WTO should not be ruled out.  
Because the regulatory field of export restrictions is broad and the checklist applies to all goods 
sectors, the list may also be able to contribute to policy dialogues in WTO, APEC, OECD and other 
fora, especially at the regional level, that seek to promote greater transparency as part of better 
governance in public policy more generally and with an open market perspective firmly in mind.  
Notes 
1. Barbara Fliess is a Senior Trade Policy Analyst in the OECD’s Trade and Agriculture Directorate and 
Osvaldo R. Agatiello is Professor of International Economics and Governance, Geneva School of 
Diplomacy and International Relations. The authors wish to thank numerous colleagues in the OECD 
Trade and Agriculture Directorate and members of the Working Party of the OECD Trade Committee for 
helpful comments received at various stages of this work. Special thanks also to Gregory Bounds, formerly 
with the OECD Directorate for Public Governance and Territorial Development and Robert Wolfe of 
Queen’s University, Canada. Discussions by participants at the OECD Workshop in May 2012 on 
Regulatory Transparency in Trade in Raw Materials providing impetus for this study. The Business and 
Industry Advisory Committee to the OECD helped carry out the business survey. 
2. Export restrictions are measures that raise export price, limit export quantity or place conditions on 
exporting. Examples are: export tax, fiscal tax on exports, export surtax, export quota, tariff rate quota, 
export prohibition, export licensing requirement, minimum export price/price reference scheme, dual 
pricing scheme, discriminatory VAT tax rebate regime, and domestic market obligation. 
3. World Economic Forum, Global Risks 2012. 
4. The OECD is contributing to greater ex post transparency of export restrictions that governments apply 
through its Inventory of measures that restrict the export of raw materials. The Inventory (see Chapter 1) 
provides a comprehensive account of export taxes, export quotas, export bans and other types of export 
restriction 
in 
the 
raw 
materials 
sector, 
including 
agricultural 
commodities 
(http://qdd.oecd.org/subject.aspx?subject=8F4CFFA0-3A25-43F2-A778-E8FEE81D89E2). 
5.  The issue of transparency has also been raised in other areas of the raw materials sector. For example, 
transparency surrounding mineral extraction and the use by governments of the related revenues is also 
advocated, for example by the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) and the Extractive Industries Transparency 
Initiative (EITI), among whose aims are to curb corruption and to enable citizens to hold their governments 
accountable for the use of raw materials revenues. Various initiatives also aim to promote adherence of 
the extractive industries to environmental and social minimum standards in countries where governance is 
weak. The OECD Directorate for Financial and Enterprise Affairs has developed specific guidance on 
responsible investment through enhanced due diligence for managing the supply chain of key minerals in 
conflict zones and fragile states. The Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS), established in 2003 
to prevent diamond purchases from financing violence by rebel movements seeking to undermine 
legitimate governments (http://www.ethicaltrade.org/www.kimberleyprocess.com/web/kimberley-
process/kp-basics, Collins-Williams and Wolfe, 2010).  
6. WTO Glossary (www.wto.org).  
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to gif images. // Define input and output files path.
convert pdf image to jpg image; convert pdf to jpg file
C# Image Convert: How to Convert MS PowerPoint to Jpeg, Png, Bmp
to Jpeg, PowerPoint to Png, PowerPoint to Bmp, and PowerPoint to Gif. RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code just convert first Excel page to Jpeg image.
convert pdf images to jpg; pdf to jpg
214
– 6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
7. Simon Evenett, “Transparency, information disclosure and trade policy. Keynote speech at the OECD 
Workshop on Regulatory Transparency in Trade of Raw Materials, 10-11 May 2012 in Paris. 
8. It seems that no matter how ‘investor friendly’ the inducements offered by a recipient country may be, there 
is a point on the transparency/opacity continuum beyond which most (serious) investors are unwilling to 
make FDI. The same logic applies to trade. See OECD (2002a), Chapter X, and pp. 176-184. 
9.  See Lejárraga, 2013; OECD, 2012a. 
10. For further background information in respect to the collection of data for and the content of the Inventory, 
see Fliess and Mård, 2012. 
11. This decision does not supersede those notification procedures sanctioned in other multilateral and 
plurilateral trade agreements. 
12. A reverse notification is a notification by one member of a non-notified measure undertaken by another 
member.  
13. Every two years after 30 September 2012. Decision on Notification Procedures for Quantitative 
Restrictions, WTO, G/L/59/Rev.1, 3 July 2012. 
14.  See WTO, G/AG/GEN/86/Rev.11, 10 September 2012. 
http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/agric_e/ag_notif_e.pdf 
15. See WTO, G/MA/W/23/Rev.8, 23 April 2012. 
16.  See Note by the Secretariat (WTO, G/MA/NTM/W/3/Rev1) on Notifications Under the Decision on Reverse 
Notification of Non-Tariff Measures (G/L/60), 23 January 2001. 
17.  APEC Ministerial Meeting, Vladivostok, Russia, 5-6 September 2012, Joint Statement Annex A: APEC 
Model 
Chapter 
on 
Transparency 
for 
RTAs/FTAs 
(www.mid.ru/bdomp/ns-
dipecon.nsf/0/b2af77c62b39055c44257a71003d811c/$FILE/2012%20AMM%20Declaration%20Annex%2
0A.doc).  
18.  See Leaders’ statement to implement APEC transparency standards. Los Cabos, Mexico, 
27 October 2002 (www.apec.org/Meeting-Papers/Leaders-
Declarations/2002/2002_aelm/statement_to_implement1.aspx). 
19.  Algeria, Argentina, Benin, Botswana, Brazil, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana, 
Guinea, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Lesotho, Malaysia, Morocco, Namibia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russian 
Federation, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Syria, Ukraine, Uruguay, Venezuela, 
Viet Nam, Zambia and Zimbabwe. 
20.  These types of measure account for most of the export restrictions recorded and non-energy minerals 
represent the bulk of product entries. “Export taxes” comprise export tariffs, export royalties and fiscal 
taxes on exported goods. The quantitative restrictions consist of export quotas and prohibitions. 
21. The survey was carried out in the summer and autumn of 2013. The completed questionnaire was 
returned by a total of 32 firms and associations from OECD and non-OECD countries, some of which apply 
export restrictions. BIAC emailed the survey to its member organisations and to its observer organisations 
based in non-OECD countries. Because the African region was not represented among the organisations 
approached, the OECD Secretariat also mailed the survey to major industry/business organisations based 
in Botswana, Kenya, Tanzania, Zimbabwe and South Africa for dissemination to their members. Countries 
represented by survey respondents include Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, eight European countries, 
Japan, Russian Federation, South Africa and United States. 
22. WTO Glossary (www.wto.org). Emphasis added. The IMF Code of Good Practices on Transparency in 
Monetary and Financial Policies of 2000 gives a similar definition: ‘Transparency refers to an environment 
in which the objectives of policy, its legal, institutional, and economic framework, policy decisions and their 
rationale, data and information related to monetary and financial policies, and the terms of agencies’ 
accountability, are provided to the public in a comprehensible, accessible, and timely manner’ 
(www.imf.org/external/np/mae/mft/sup/part1.htm#appendix_III). 
23. Optimal transparency would be achieved through a combination of a well-functioning public consultation 
process and the systematic availability of information allowing anyone to follow the policy initiative as it 
moves forward. 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
change file from pdf to jpg on; .net convert pdf to jpg
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from GIF Images on Windows. JPEG to GIF Converter can directly convert GIF files to JPG files.
convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi; .pdf to .jpg converter online
6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST – 
215
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
24. Anecdotal evidence is slowly accumulating. For example, for an account of public consultations held by 
South Africa’s International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC), starting in early 2013, on a new 
proposal 
for 
controlling 
scrap 
metal 
exports, 
see 
ITAC 
website 
www.itac.org.za/search_page.asp?search=scrap
25. See WTO (2002a, 2002b).  
26. The information to which this comment refers appears to be available to governments through the WTO, 
since WTO procedures on notification of quantitative restrictions require Members to regularly report 
information about the degree of utilisation of quotas in force. This includes quantitative restrictions on the 
export side (G/MA/NTM/W/1/Rev.1 of 3 November 1995). However, this notification is retrospective. 
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
control able to batch convert PDF documents to image formats in C#.NET. Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap
convert pdf file to jpg file; convert pdf to jpg for online
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object. Use C# Code to Convert Gif to Tiff.
convert pdf image to jpg online; convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg
216
– 6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
References 
ASEAN Trade in Goods Agreement, 2009. 
www.fta.gov.sg/afta/atiga_asean%20trade%20in%20goods%20agreement%20cha-
am%20thailand%2026%20february%202009.pdf.  
APEC (Asia-Pacific Cooperation) (2012), Annex A – APEC Model Chapter on Transparency for 
RTAs/FTAs, Ministerial Statement, 2012 APEC Ministerial Meeting, Vladivostok, Russian Federation, 
5-6 September, www.apec.org/Meeting-Papers/Ministerial-
Statements/Annual/2012/2012_amm/annex-a.aspx
APEC (Asia-Pacific Cooperation) (2002), Leaders’ Statement to Implement APEC Transparency 
Standards, Los Cabos, Mexico, 27 October. www.apec.org/Meeting-Papers/Leaders-
Declarations/2002/2002_aelm/statement_to_implement1.aspx
Bellver, A. and D. Kaufmann (2005), “Transparenting Transparency’: Initial Empirics and Policy 
Applications”, World Bank Discussion Paper presented at the IMF Conference on Transparency and 
Integrity, 6-7 July. Preliminary draft, September. 
Bonarriva, J., M. Koscielski and E. Wilson (2009), ‘Export Controls: An Overview of their Use, Economic 
Effects, and Treatment in the Global Trading System’, Office of Industries Working Papers, No. ID-23, 
US International Trade Commission, Washington, D.C., August. 
Canada–Colombia Free Trade Agreement, 2011. www.international.gc.ca/trade-agreements-accords-
commerciaux/agr-acc/colombia-colombie/can-colombia-toc-tdm-can-colombie.aspx
CARICOM–Costa Rica Free Trade Agreement 2004. 
www.sice.oas.org/Trade/crcrcom_e/crcrcomind_e.asp#EIF.  
Collins-Williams, T. and R. Wolfe (2010), ‘Transparency as a Trade Policy Tool: The WTO’s Cloudy 
Windows’, World Trade Review, Vol. 9, No. 4, pp. 551-582. 
Colombia United States Trade Promotion Agreement, 2006 
www.sice.oas.org/Trade/COL_USA_TPA_e/Index_e.asp.  
Côte d'Ivoire–European Community Stepping Stone Economic Partnership Agreement, 2009. eur-
lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2009:059:0003:0273:EN:PDF
Devarajan, S., Go, D., Schiff, M. and Suthiwart-Narueput, S. (1996), ‘The Whys and Why Nots of Export 
Taxes’, World Bank Policy Research Working Paper 1684, 1-25, January.  
Evenett, Simon (2012), Transparency, information disclosure and trade policy, Keynote speech at the 
OECD Workshop on Regulatory Transparency in Trade of Raw Materials, 10-11 May 2012 in Paris. 
www.oecd.org/tad/non-tariffmeasures/50335357.pdf.  
Fliess, B. and T. Mård, (2012), ‘Taking Stock of Measures Restricting the Export of Raw Materials: Analysis 
of OECD Inventory Data’, OECD Trade Policy Papers, No. 140, 5 October, OECD Publishing, Paris, 
http://dx.doi.org/0.1787/5k91gdmdjbtc-en. 
Francois, J. (2001), ‘Trade Policy Transparency and Investor Confidence: The Implications of and Effective 
Trade Policy Review Mechanism’, Review of International Economics, Vol. 9, No. 2, pp. 303-16. 
Iida, K. and J. Nielson (2001), Transparency in domestic regulation: Prior consultation, in OECD Trade in 
Services: Negotiating Issues and Approaches, OECD Publishing, Paris, 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264194960-en. 
Karapinar, B. (2012), “Defining the Legal Boundaries of Export Restrictions: A Case Law Analysis”, Journal 
of International Economic Law, Vol. 15, No. 2, pp. 443-479. 
Korinek, J. and J. Bartos (2012), ‘Multilateralising Regionalism: Disciplines on Export Restrictions in 
Regional Trade Agreements’, OECD Trade Policy Papers, No. 139, OECD Publishing, Paris, 
http://dx.doi.org/0.1787/5k962hf7hfnr-en
Lejárraga, I. (2013), “Multilateralising Regionalism: Strengthening Transparency Disciplines in Trade”, 
OECD Trade Policy Paper No. 152, OECD Publishing, Paris, http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/18166873. 
6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST – 
217
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Lejárraga, I. and Shepherd, B. (2013), “Quantitative evidence on transparency in Regional Trade 
Agreements”, OECD Trade Policy Paper No. 153. OECD Publishing, Paris. 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5k450q9v2mg5-en. 
Möisé, E. (2011), “Transparency Mechanisms and Non-Tariff Measures: Case Studies”, OECD Trade 
Policy Papers, No. 111, 18 March, OECD Publishing, Paris, http://www.oecd-
ilibrary.org/trade/transparency-mechanisms-and-non-tariff-measures_5kgf0rzzwfq3-en.  
New Zealand–Malaysia Free Trade Agreement, 2009, www.mfat.govt.nz/Trade-and-Economic-Relations/2-
Trade-Relationships-and-Agreements/Malaysia/index.php
OECD (2012a), Inventory of Restrictions on Exports of Raw Materials (database), 
http://qdd.oecd.org/Subject.aspx?subject=1189A691-9375-461C-89BC-48362D375AD5 
OECD (2012b), Recommendation of the Council on Regulatory Policy and Governance, OECD Publishing, 
Paris, http://www.oecd.org/gov/regulatory-policy/49990817.pdf.  
OECD (2009a), Transparency in the Design of Non-Tariff Measures and the Cost of Market Entry: 
Conceptual Framework. 20 November, Paris (unpublished). 
OECD (2005), Guiding Principles for Regulatory Quality and Performance, OECD Publishing, Paris. 
www.oecd.org/fr/reformereg/34976533.pdf.  
OECD (2003), Stocktaking project on transparency: Background information and proposed work
Unpublished, 14 March 2003. 
OECD (2002a), Foreign Direct Investment for Development: Maximising benefits, minimising costs, OECD 
Publishing, Paris, http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264199286-en
Piermartini, R. (2004), “The Role of Export Taxes in the Field of Primary Commodities”, WTO Discussion 
Papers, No. 4, Geneva. 
Stoeckel, A. and Fisher, H. (2008), Policy Transparency: Why Does It Work, Who Does It Best, Rural 
Industries Research and Development Corporation, Barton, A.C.T., Australia. 
United States–Australia Free Trade Agreement (2004) http://www.sice.oas.org/Trade/US-
AusFTAFinal/USAusind_e.asp.   
World Bank (2012), ‘Doing business in a more transparent world’, in: Doing Business 2012. Washington, 
D.C.,www.doingbusiness.org/~/media/GIAWB/Doing%20Business/Documents/Annual-
Reports/English/DB12-FullReport.pdf
World Economic Forum (2012), Global Risks 2012. Seventh Edition. Cologny, Switzerland. 
WTO Glossary (www.wto.org). 
WTO, TBT Information Management System, http://tbtims.wto.org.  
WTO (2013), Agreement on Trade Facilitation WT/MIN(13)/36, WT/L/911, 7 December, Geneva.  
WTO (2012), Decision on Notification Procedures for Quantitative Restrictions. Adopted by the Council for 
Trade in Goods on 22 June 2012. Revision. G/L/59/Rev.1, 3 July, Geneva. 
WTO (2012), Draft Consolidated Negotiating Text. 2012, Fourteenth Revision. World Trade Organization,
Negotiating Group on Trade Facilitation. TN/TF/W/165/Rev.14, 17 December 2012, Geneva.  
WTO (2010), Handbook on Notification Requirements under the Agreement on Agriculture, May 2010, 
Geneva. 
WTO (2008), Draft Modalities for Non-Agricultural Market Access. 2008, Fourth Revision. World Trade 
Organization,
Negotiating Group on Market Access, TN/MA/W/103/Rev.3, 6 December, Geneva. 
WTO (2002a), Transparency. Note by the Secretariat. Working Group on the Relationship between Trade 
and Investment, WT/WGTI/W/109, 27 March, Geneva.  
WTO (2002b), Core principles, including transparency, non-discrimination and procedural fairness. 
Background Note by the Secretariat. Working Group on the Interaction between Trade and 
Competition Policy, WT/WGTCP/W/209, 19 September, Geneva. 
WTO (2001a), Accession of the People’s Republic of China. Decision of 10 November 2001, WT/L/432, 23 
November, Geneva. 
218
– 6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
WTO (2001b), Decision on Implementation Related Issues and Concerns taken at the Fourth Ministerial 
Conference in Doha, Qatar (WT/MIN(01)17), 14 November, Geneva. 
WTO (2001c), Notifications Under the Decision on Reverse Notification of Non-Tariff Measures (G/L/60), 
Note by the Secretariat, G/MA/NTM/W/3/Rev1, 23 January, Geneva. 
WTO (1996), Decision on Notification Procedures for Quantitative Restrictions. Adopted by the Council for 
Trade in Goods on 1 December 1995. G/L/59, 10 January, Geneva  
WTO (1996), Information on Discussions Being Held in Various WTO Committees related to Topics Under 
Examination in the Working Group, Working Group on Notification Obligations and Procedures, 
G/NOP/W/13, 10 May 1996, Geneva.  
WTO (1996), Information on Notifications Made Under the Agreements in Annex 1A of the WTO 
Agreement, Working Group on Notification Obligations and Procedures, G/NOP/W/14, 20 May 1996. 
G/L/112, 7 October 1996, Geneva. 
WTO (1996), Report of the Working Group on Notification Obligations and Procedures, Working Group on 
Notification Obligations and Procedures, G/L/112, 7 October, Geneva. 
WTO (1994), Uruguay Round Decision on Notification Procedures. Adopted by the Trade Negotiations 
Committee on 14 April 1994, Geneva. 
6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST – 
219
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Annex 6.A. 
Best Practices in Transparency 
Examples of best practices in transparency contained in GATT-WTO Agreements,  
Regional Trade Agreements, and the OECD Recommendation on Regulatory Policy 
What information needs to be published? 
GATT Article X, 1947 - Original text  
- Laws, regulations, judicial decisions and administrative rulings of general application as well as agreements 
affecting international trade policy that are in force between governments.  
GATT Article XI, 1947 - Original text 
- Any contracting party applying restrictions on the importation of any product should give public notice of the total 
quantity or value of the product permitted to be imported during a specified future period and of any change in such 
quantity or value. 
GATT Article XIII, 1947 - Original text  
- In applying import restrictions to any product, contracting parties should give notice of them. When fixing quotas, 
the contracting party applying the restrictions should give public notice of the total quantity or value of the product or 
products that will be permitted to be imported. 
- When quotas are allocated among supplying countries, the contracting party applying the restrictions should 
promptly inform all other contracting parties having an interest in supplying the product concerned of the shares in 
the quota currently allocated, by quantity or value, to the various supplying countries and give public notice of them. 
- This applies to any tariff quota instituted or maintained by any contracting party, as well as to other export 
restrictions. 
WTO Members’ tariff schedules, ongoing 
Innovation: Introduces communication format that is compulsory for all Members. 
- Each schedule contains the following information: tariff item number, description of the product, rate of duty, 
present concession established, initial negotiation rights (such as main suppliers of product), concession first 
incorporated in a GATT Schedule, INR on earlier occasions, other duties and charges. For agricultural products 
special safeguards may also be defined. 
Uruguay Round Ministerial Decision on Notification Procedures, 1994
2
Innovation: Introduces exhaustive detail in Member notifications. 
- The WTO Secretariat’s Central Registry of Notifications (CRN) cross-references its records of notifications by 
Member and obligation. An indicative list of measures subject to notification includes tariffs (including range and 
scope of bindings, GSP provisions, rates applied to members of free-trade areas/customs unions, other 
preferences), tariff quotas and surcharges, quantitative restrictions, including voluntary export restraints and orderly 
marketing arrangements affecting imports, other non-tariff measures such as licensing and mixing requirements; 
variable levies; rules of origin; technical barriers; safeguard actions; anti-dumping actions; countervailing actions; 
export taxes; export subsidies, tax exemptions and concessionary export financing; export restrictions, including 
voluntary export restraints and orderly marketing arrangements; other government assistance, including subsidies, 
tax exemptions; and foreign exchange controls related to imports and exports; and others. 
Ministerial Decision on Procedures for the Facilitation of Solutions to Non-Tariff Barriers 
(TN/MA/W/103/Rev.1),8 2008  
Innovation: Enhances specificity of notification requirements. 
WTO members should notify the introduction of export taxes. Also they should undertake to schedule export taxes 
on non-agricultural products in their Schedules of Concessions and bind the export taxes at a level to be negotiated, 
with some exceptions.  
Japan - India CEPA, 2011
13  
Innovation: Public identification of government authorities in charge of norms is mandated. 
- Each Party shall make available to the public the names and addresses of the competent authorities responsible 
for laws, regulations, administrative procedures and administrative rulings. 
OECD Recommendation, 2012  
Innovation: Overarching transparency principle, implicitly encompassing foreign stakeholders. 
- All regulations should be easily accessible by the public.  
220
– 6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
When does it need to be published / notified? 
GATT Article X, 1947 - Original text  
- Promptly, to enable governments and traders to become acquainted with them. 
Anti-dumping, 1957  
Innovation: Stakeholders are given ample time and relevant information to act. 
- All interested parties in an anti-dumping investigation shall be given notice of the information that the 
authorities require and ample opportunity to present in writing all evidence that they consider relevant. 
Exporters or foreign producers receiving questionnaires used in an anti-dumping investigation shall be given 
at least 30 days for reply. 
Import Licensing, 1995  
Innovation: Precise terms for applications and institution of procedures are sanctioned.  
- The rules and all information concerning procedures for the submission of applications are to be published 
21 days prior to the effective date of the requirement. Members that institute licensing procedures or changes 
should notify the Committee on Import Licensing within 60 days of publication. 
OECD Recommendation, 2012  
Innovation: A comprehensive, punctilious publication standard is introduced. 
- A complete and up-to-date legislative and regulatory database should be freely available to the public in a 
searchable format through a user-friendly interface over the Internet. 
Agreement on Trade Facilitation, 2013  
Innovation: Article X disciplines are expanded and deepened.  
- Information is to be published in a non-discriminatory and easily accessible manner in order to enable 
governments, traders and other interested parties to become acquainted with them.  
- Information available through the internet. 
- The duty of notification will comprise the identification of the official publication(s) and website(s) of the 
Enquiry Points.  
- Publish information as early as possible before a new or amended law or regulation enters into force, and 
elicit comments from interested parties. 
- Advance rulings in a reasonable, time bound manner will be provided to applicants submitting a written 
request prior to the importation of a good. 
Technical Barriers to Trade, 1995
5
Innovation: WTO circulates relevant notified information in three official languages and operates 
database.  
- The Secretariat is responsible for circulating to all members and interested international standardizing and 
conformity assessment bodies copies of the notifications it receives. To that end it administers the Technical 
Barriers to Trade Information Management System. All information is made available in English, Spanish and 
French. 
ASEAN Trade in Goods Agreement, 2009  
Innovation: Fixed term of minimum 60 days of prior publication is introduced.  
- Member States should notify any action or measure that they intend to take which may nullify or impair any 
benefit to other Member States, directly or indirectly. 
- They should notify the ASEAN Secretariat before effecting such action or measure, at least 60 days before it 
takes effect and provide adequate opportunity for prior discussion with Member States having an interest in it. 
APEC Model Chapter on Transparency, 2012
14 
Innovation: Regional transparency standard is introduced.  
- Proposed and final measures should be published in an official journal for public circulation, be it physical or 
online, encouraging their distribution through additional outlets, including an official website. 
- Enquiries may be addressed through enquiry or contact points or any other mechanism as appropriate and 
responded to within a reasonable period of time not exceeding 30 days. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested