mvc open pdf in browser : Convert multi page pdf to jpg Library SDK class asp.net wpf html ajax export-restrictions-raw-materials-201422-part1135

6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST – 
221
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Agreement on Agriculture, 1995 
InnovationEx ante and cross-notification of restrictions is introduced. 
- Members should notify the Committee on Agriculture before instituting a prohibition or restriction and consult 
with other Members having a substantial interest as importers, providing the necessary information. The 
Committee on Agriculture reviews the implementation of Members’ commitments on the basis of their 
notifications and the Secretariat’s documentation prepared to facilitate the review process. Also Members 
should notify promptly on new domestic support measures or modifications for which exemption from 
reduction is claimed. Members may bring to the attention of the Committee those measures that they deem 
should be notified by another Member. 
Revised EC Submission on Export Taxes (TN/MA/W/101), 2008  
Innovation: Widespread publicity of notifications to WTO bodies is mandated. 
- Notifications pursuant to this Decision [on Procedures for the Facilitation of Solutions to Non-Tariff Barriers] 
should constitute regular items on the agenda of the relevant WTO Committees, giving adequate opportunity 
for an exchange of views amongst Members. 
OECD Recommendation, 2012 
Innovation: Active stakeholder engagement in rule making and consultation are mandated. 
- Governments should actively engage all relevant stakeholders during the regulation-making process and 
designing consultation processes.  
OECD Guiding Principles, 2005
 
Innovation: Stakeholders, actual and potential, national and international are encompassed. 
- Consult with all significantly affected and potentially interested parties, whether domestic or foreign, where 
appropriate at the earliest possible stage while developing and reviewing regulations, ensuring that 
consultation itself is timely and transparent, and that its scope is clearly understood.  
Canada-Colombia FTA, 2008
10  
Innovation: Measure consultation and dialogue as well as transparency cooperation are mandated.  
- Each Party should publish in advance the measure it proposes to adopt; and provide interested persons a 
reasonable opportunity to comment on it. 
- Each Party should notify the other Party of any proposed or actual measure that the Party considers might 
materially affect the other Party’s interests. 
- The Parties agree to cooperate in bilateral, regional and multilateral fora on means to promote transparency 
in respect of international trade and investment. 
EFTA-Hong Kong FTA, 2011
11  
Innovation: Procedures for preventative ad hoc consultations are introduced. 
- The Parties should publish, make publicly available, or provide upon request, laws, regulations, judicial 
decisions, administrative rulings of general application as well as relevant international agreements. 
- Parties agree to hold ad hoc consultations where a Party considers that another Party has taken measures 
that are likely to create an obstacle to trade, in order to find an appropriate solution in conformity with the SPS 
and TBT Agreements. Such consultations may be conducted in person or via videoconference, 
teleconference, or any other agreed method. 
OECD Recommendation, 2012  
Innovation: Comprehensive policy on consultation is mandatory. 
- Governments should establish a clear policy identifying how open and balanced public consultation on the 
development of rules will be. 
Agreement on Trade Facilitation, 2013 
Innovation: Conditions for consultation of measures with stakeholders should be set out. 
Opportunities and a reasonable time period should be provided to traders and other interested parties to 
comment on the introduction or amendment of laws and regulations. 
- Regular consultations between border agencies and traders or other stakeholders should be provided. 
Technical Barriers to Trade, 1995  
Innovation: Explanation and justification of measure are mandated. 
- Notifications of measures subject to the rules of the TBT Agreement must contain an explanation of the 
measure’s intended purpose. 
- Members introducing a technical regulation that may have a significant effect on international trade should 
explain to a requesting member the justification for its need. 
Convert multi page pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
bulk pdf to jpg; .net pdf to jpg
Convert multi page pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert from pdf to jpg; .pdf to jpg converter online
222
– 6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Import Licensing, 1995  
Innovation: Notification of purpose and rationale of measure are mandated. 
- Notifications of the institution of import licensing procedures should include, in the case of automatic import 
licensing procedures, their administrative purpose and, in the case of non-automatic import licensing 
procedures, indication of the measure being implemented through licensing. 
EU - Korea FTA, 2010
12  
Innovation: Regulatory cooperation and dialogue are mandated. 
- The Parties should endeavour to consider the public interests before imposing an anti-dumping or 
countervailing duty. 
- The Parties should strengthen their cooperation in the field of standards, technical regulations and 
conformity assessment procedures with a view to increasing the mutual understanding of their respective 
systems and facilitating access to their respective markets. To this end, they may establish regulatory 
dialogues at both the horizontal and sectoral levels. 
OECD Recommendation, 2012  
Innovation: Rationale and merit of measure should be made explicit.  
Governments should articulate regulatory policy goals, strategies and benefits clearly. 
ASEAN Trade in Goods Agreement, 2009  
Innovation: A multijurisdictional single reference point is open to the public online. 
- An ASEAN Trade Repository (ATR, set for full operation by 2015) containing trade and customs laws and 
procedures of all Member States is established and made accessible to the public through the internet. It 
contains trade related information such as tariff nomenclature; MFN tariffs, preferential tariffs offered under 
this Agreement and other Agreements of ASEAN with its Dialogue Partners; rules of origin; non-tariff 
measures; national trade and customs laws and rules; procedures and documentary requirements; 
administrative rulings; best practices in trade facilitation applied by each Member State; and list of authorised 
traders of Member States. 
APEC Model Chapter on Transparency, 2012 
Innovation: Regional transparency standard is introduced.  
- Parties should notify each other details of contact points, including those that provide assistance to the other 
Party and its interested persons. Also they should notify each other promptly of any changes regarding how to 
reach the contact points. 
- Parties should assist each other in finding and obtaining copies, on a timely basis, of published measures of 
general application.  
- Each Party should ensure that its contact points are able to coordinate and facilitate responses. 
Agreement on Trade Facilitation, 2013 
Innovation: Enquiry Points should respond to stakeholders at large. 
- Establishment of one or more Enquiry Points to answer reasonable enquiries of governments, traders and 
other interested parties as well as to provide the required forms and documents. 
1. Agreement on Trade Facilitation, WT/MIN(13)/36, WT/L/911, 7 December 2013. 
2Uruguay Round Ministerial Decision on Notification Procedures, 14 April 1994. 
3. Recommendation of the OECD Council on Regulatory Policy and Governance, 22 March 2012. 
4. Agreement on Import Licensing Procedures, 1 January 1995. 
5. Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade, 1 January 1995. 
6. Agreement on Agriculture, 1 January 1995. 
7. Agreement on Anti-dumping (Agreement on Implementation of Article VI of the General Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade 1994), 1 January 1995.  
8. NTB Textual Proposals, Draft Modalities for Non-Agricultural Market Access, Rev. 2, 20 May 2008. 
9. OECD Guiding Principles for Regulatory Quality and Performance, 2005. 
10. Canada-Colombia Free Trade Agreement, 2008. 
11. European Free Trade Association States (Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland) - Hong Kong China Free Trade Agreement, 
2011.  
12. European Union - Republic of Korea Free Trade Agreement, 2010. 
13. Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement between Japan and the Republic of India, 2011. 
14. APEC Model Chapter on Transparency for RTAs/FTAs, APEC Ministerial Meeting, Vladivostok, Russia, 5-6 September 
2012. 
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Gif, and REImage object to single or multi-page Tiff image Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C
change file from pdf to jpg; pdf to jpeg converter
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Using this .NET PDF to TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image Both single page and multi-page Tiff image
changing pdf to jpg on; change pdf to jpg
6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST – 
223
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Annex 6.B.  
Survey Questionnaire and Survey Responses 
Questions /  
Items 
Count of survey 
respondents  
endorsing the item 
Comments made  
(optional) 
Availability of information 
What kind of information should governments make publicly 
available about their policies/measures regulating the export 
of raw materials, once they have entered into force? 
What the specific measure is 
32 
If the measure is an export tax, the rate of the tax  
32 
If the measure is an export quota, the amount of the 
quota 
32 
Some way of tracking the 
consumption of the quota  
If applicable to the measure, the eligibility criteria and 
procedures (e.g. if export quota, the method used for 
allocating the quota) 
29 
The name of the product(s) to which the 
measure/policy applies 
32 
The Harmonised System (HS) code of the product(s)  
30 
The date when the measure/policy entered into force 
30 
How long the measure/policy will be in force 
30 
The title of the enabling law/regulation  
30 
Publication name, date, source, 
date coming into force, etc. 
The rationale or objective of the measure/policy 
30 
If a measure has been changed, the reason for the 
change 
30 
A description of applicable administrative procedures 
(eligibility criteria, document requirements, 
application procedure, if relevant) 
29 
If exemptions or derogations from the 
measure/policy exist 
29 
Name of the authority in charge of administering the 
measure/policy 
29 
Any other information that should be made public 
about the measure or policy? (Optional) 
Information about export bans 
Accessibility of information 
Making it easy to find and understand the information that is published 
Make information available through the Internet 
(government website) 
31 
C# Word - Convert Word to JPEG in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel component toolkit, C# developers can easily and quickly convert a large-size multi-page Word document
pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf into jpg format
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to JPEG in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET component toolkit, C# developers can easily and quickly convert a large-size multi-page PowerPoint document
batch pdf to jpg converter online; reader pdf to jpeg
224
– 6. INCREASING THE TRANSPARENCY OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS: BENEFITS, GOOD PRACTICES AND A PRACTICAL CHECKLIST 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Questions /  
Items 
Count of survey 
respondents  
endorsing the item 
Comments made  
(optional) 
Make the full text of the relevant law/regulation 
available 
29 
English (synopsis) version, too. 
Publish information about the measure/policy in at 
least one of the official languages of the World Trade 
Organisation (English, French and Spanish) 
32 
Three respondents noted 
English only 
Provide enquiry point 
29 
By electronic means  
(e-mail, chat, etc.) 
Make relevant information accessible through a 
centralised place / portal  
30 
Any other features that would be helpful? (Optional) 
RSS feed (news feed); a 
summary of measures in force 
C. Learning about a policy/measure before it enters into force 
Should information be made available in advance? 
31 
Notification service / newsletter 
by email distribution list 
If so, how long in advance of a measure’s entry into 
force, in a non-emergency situation? (please specify, 
e.g. 60 days) 
- no answer (3 respondents) 
- 15 days (1) 
- 60 days (4) 
- at least 60 days (15) 
- 90 days (5) 
- at least 90 days (1) 
- at least 60-90 days (1) 
- 6 months (2) 
D. Learning about a policy / measure before it has been decided?  
Should information be made available before a 
measure / policy is decided? 
31 
If so, what specific information should governments 
provide:  
What measure/policy is being considered, and for 
what products 
31 
With HS information 
Why the measure / policy is under consideration 
28 
Who decides the measure / policy 
28 
The date or time table set for a decision 
30 
An enquiry or contact point 
30 
Any other information that should be publicly 
available on a government’s website in advance of 
the entry into force of a measure / policy or 
before it has been decided? (Optional) 
Whether stakeholders have 
been consulted 
Notes: Sections A-B comprise the items of the tentative checklist developed in Section 6.5. The questions of Sections C-D 
cover additional items resulting from the expanded research described in Section 6.6. Survey results shown are for a total 
number of 32 respondents, not counting one respondent who sent an email message endorsing all items of the survey but did 
not return the completed survey itself.  
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
& pixel depth; Ability to convert single-page images between Select "Convert to PNG"; Select "Start" to start JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from
best convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg image
C# Excel - Convert Excel to JPEG in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel component toolkit, C# developers can easily and quickly convert a large-size multi-page Excel document
convert multiple pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg c#
7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES – 
225
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Chapter 7
MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT:  
GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES 
Jane Korinek
1
7.1.  Introduction
2
Previous chapters have documented the nature, frequency and impact of restrictions on 
exports of minerals and metals. It has been shown that the mining sector is the context for a large 
number of the export restrictions currently in place. Moreover, exporting countries use export 
restrictions on industrial raw materials to achieve a variety of stated policy objectives, including:
3, 4
 
Increasing revenue, in particular government revenue coming from the extractive industries. 
 
Offsetting exchange rate impacts caused by substantial exports of a small number of raw 
materials that are potentially volatile. 
 
Fostering spillovers to other sectors, particularly in order to promote the development of 
downstream or upstream industries. 
 
Controlling illegal exports or other activities, in response to concerns over lack of effective 
governance. 
 
Enhancing environmental protection, or protection of citizens’ health. 
 
Attempting to realise optimum mineral extraction levels, when conditions are deemed to create 
an incentive to extract too rapidly. 
However, it was shown in Chapter 2 that export restrictions are not necessarily effective 
tools for achieving these stated policy goals and are in most cases not the most efficient way of 
doing so.
5
Many countries with large mining sectors and important natural resource reserves prefer 
to regulate mining operations using alternative approaches that do not rely on border policies, but 
which seek to promote longer-term development and economic well-being by other means.  
The extent of the task, however, should not be underestimated. Mineral resources present 
not only a formidable source of wealth but also a formidable policy challenge in order to maximise 
social welfare from their extraction. Some resource-rich countries have been very successful in 
developing their economies and managing their revenue streams effectively; others have faced 
major challenges in doing so. One hypothesis suggests that mineral resources are the cause of 
slower or biased growth rather than increased growth and development (see Box 7.1 on the 
resource curse debate). Some further hypotheses suggest that weaker institutions, lower spending 
on education or the volatility that comes with relying on exports of mineral resources, are the 
intermediate link between resource wealth and low growth in some countries, and that dealing with 
these factors could help to diminish the correlation between resource wealth and low growth.  
Although there is some debate over the role of resource extraction in promoting or retarding 
growth, there is no debate about the importance of institutions and regulatory oversight to capitalise 
on the benefits of the mining sector for economy-wide growth and development. Natural resource 
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from PDF Images on Windows. Features and Benefits. Powerful image converter to convert images of JPG, JPEG formats to PDF files;
change from pdf to jpg on; .pdf to .jpg online
C# Imaging - Planet Barcode Generation Guide
bar codes on documents such as PDF, Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint and multi-page TIFF. BarcodeHeight = 200; barcode.AutoResize = true; //convert barcode to
change pdf file to jpg file; convert pdf to jpeg
226
– 7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Box 7.1. The resource curse debate 
Resource abundance does not always bring sustained economic growth and development; it can have the opposite 
effect. There are a number of reasons for this, relating to the ways in which natural resource wealth differs from other 
sources of wealth. Unlike other sources of wealth, natural resources do not need to be produced. They simply need to be 
extracted, although there is often nothing simple about the extraction process (Humphreys et al., 2007, p.4). The 
generation of income from natural resources can therefore occur quite independently of other economic processes, 
without major linkages to the rest of economic activity and with low participation of the local labour force.  
Resource-rich countries that experience a decline in previously buoyant sectors of the economy are said to suffer 
from the “Dutch disease”.
1
The “disease” spreads in the economy as follows. A sudden rise in the value of natural 
resource exports produces an appreciation in the real exchange rate. This, in turn, makes exporting non-natural resource 
commodities more difficult and competing with imports across a wide range of commodities almost impossible. Foreign 
exchange earned through resource exports is used to buy cheaper imports, at the expense of domestic manufactures 
and agricultural products (the “spending effect”). Simultaneously, domestic resources like labour and materials move to 
the natural resource sector (the “resource pull” effect). Consequently, the cost of these resources on the domestic market 
rises, thereby increasing costs to competing sectors (Humphreys et al., 2007, p. 5). In this way, the extraction of natural 
resources sets in motion a dynamic that favours two domestic sectors – the natural resource sector and the non-tradable 
sector. 
Many empirical studies have examined different aspects of the resource curse. In a pioneering study, Sachs and 
Warner (1995) find that resource-rich economies generally grow at a slower pace. Using a cross-section of 52 countries, 
they show that resource-rich countries had slower growth in manufacturing exports than those that were resource-poor, 
after holding constant the initial share of manufacturing exports in total exports. Stijns (2003) uses a gravity model to 
estimate the impact of a natural resources boom on real manufacturing exports and finds the resource curse hypothesis 
to be empirically relevant.
2
The resource curse seems to be more damaging in some contexts than in others. In attempting to explain these 
differences, theories stressing political economy considerations such as rent-seeking behaviour and the importance of 
institutions have gained prominence. Studies suggest that resource abundance can hamper economic growth in the 
presence of weak institutions such as poorly defined property rights, poorly functioning legal systems, weak rule of law 
and autocracy (WTO, 2010, p. 93). Sala-i-Martin and Subramanian (2003) show that natural resource extraction has a 
strong negative effect on long-term growth through its weakening of political and social institutions. Mehlum et al. (2006) 
find that in countries with institutions of sufficient quality there is no resource curse. The most severe manifestation of the 
resource curse is the onset or continuation of civil conflict where warring groups fund their violent action with the 
proceeds of resource extraction, or through extortion of the resource extraction industry. This has led to various initiatives 
including the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-
Risk Areas.
Another strain of the resource curse debate suggests that non-renewable resource rich countries that collect a 
substantial share of revenue from direct or indirect resource taxation may develop weaker non-resource tax systems. In 
some cases, this may be a rational choice whereby lower taxes are a means to share the wealth of natural resources with 
the current generation of taxpayers, but in others this may result from political economy considerations, in particular if the 
resource-extracting firms are small in number and incorporated abroad. It has been seen in some resource rich countries 
that personal income tax collected, for example, is lower than would be expected given the level of development and 
other factors (see, for example, Luong and Weinthal, 2006). 
Some of the empirical work supporting the resource curse hypothesis has been called into question on grounds of 
endogeneity (Alexeev and Conrad, 2009, Wright and Czelusta, 2007) or omitted variables (Manzano and Rigobon, 2007). 
Endogeneity may be an issue due to the two-way relationship between a country’s economic growth and its natural 
resources exports. The omitted variable argument suggests that the GDP to debt ratio has not been properly accounted 
for and that the problem is public debt and risk management rather than resource abundance. Some opposition to the 
resource curse hypothesis comes from economic historians. Wright and Czelusta (2004, 2007) cite in evidence the 
development of the United States, which was for decades based on resource extraction. Similar cases can be made for 
Australia, Canada, Finland, Norway and the two countries examined in this chapter: Chile and Botswana. 
Both proponents of the resource curse hypothesis and its detractors agree that the national context in which 
resources are extracted determines how and whether broader economic development takes place. The importance of 
strong institutions like balanced and enforced tax collection, oversight of the use of tax revenue, a climate of transparency 
and accountability, investment in education in order to allow economies to diversify, promotion of small and medium 
enterprise in order to foster backward and forward linkages, property rights including those of the natural resources, 
policy stability and political democracy cannot be overstated. 
_____________________________ 
1. This refers to the problem that beset the Netherlands in the 1970s after discovering natural gas in the North Sea. The Dutch 
manufacturing sector started performing more poorly than expect. 
2. There is too much relevant literature for this section to be exhaustive. For a more in-depth review of the empirical studies in 
this area see, for example, Humphreys et al. (2007) or WTO (2010). 
3. http://www.oecd.org/document/36/0,3746,en_2649_34889_44307940_1_1_1_1,00.html 
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from GIF Images on Windows. JPEG to GIF Converter can directly convert GIF files to JPG files.
bulk pdf to jpg converter online; convert pdf pages to jpg
7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES – 
227
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
wealth can benefit the countries in which it is found through appropriate taxation and use of tax 
revenue, linkages and spillovers into other sectors of the economy, and increasing investment 
flows. Understanding how some countries have managed to grow, in part thanks to their mineral 
resources sectors, can provide lessons for others.
6
It should be noted that this chapter is not a comprehensive overview of mining policies. It 
does not include many important aspects of mining regulation such as environmental policies, titling 
and allocation of natural resources, consultation with local communities, and health and safety 
requirements. This chapter includes some successful examples of policies in the mining sector that 
have been used to achieve the same objectives as those stated by users of export restrictions.  
This chapter looks in more detail at two such countries, Chile and Botswana. Both countries 
have enormous mineral wealth, which contributes a substantial share of their exports, and both are 
known for their high level of regulatory quality and institutional rigour. Nonetheless, once we 
examine the detail of these countries’ experience, it is apparent that no approach can be applied as 
a one-size-fits-all solution and hence it is instructive to examine both these cases, to identify what 
they have in common and how they have adapted some general best-practice principles to their 
own national context. 
Chile is a relatively small economy that has been growing swiftly for over two decades. Per 
capita growth was over 5% per year from 2010-13, well over the OECD average. The growth of the 
Chilean economy has been largely export driven and has in recent years been led by exports of 
mining products, mainly copper. Chile is the world’s leading copper producer and exporter with 
more than one third of the world’s copper production originating there. Chile accounts for 40% of 
total world copper trade. 
Botswana is a large, landlocked, semi-arid country in Southern Africa. At the time of its 
independence in 1966, Botswana was also one of the poorest countries in the world, with almost no 
infrastructure and low indicators of health and education levels. It was declared a least developed 
country by the United Nations. The country`s ability to manage revenues from its vast deposits of 
natural resources has contributed greatly to its outstanding economic performance. The contribution 
of diamonds, copper and nickel to Botswana’s total exports is over 80%. Botswana’s prudent 
natural resource management has resulted in investment in infrastructure, health and education and 
accumulation of funds for future use (African Development Bank et al., 2013; Acemoglu et al., 
2003). Botswana graduated from the list of least developed countries in 1995, one of only three 
countries to have done so (UN General Assembly resolution A/RES/49/133), and is now an upper-
middle income country with per capita GDP about USD 9 537 in 2011.  
The chapter is structured as follows. Section 7.2 contains a discussion of tax regimes and 
tax instruments in the context of the natural resource sector in both Chile and Botswana. 
Section 7.3 discusses how each country’s management of mineral resources tax revenue succeeds 
in stabilising the macro-economy, by offsetting the volatility that pervades global resources markets 
and dampening exchange rate impacts, and distributing the rents from their natural resources. 
Section 7.4 describes how both countries have sought to develop other sectors related to mining, 
capitalising on the comparative advantage in mining and creating additional jobs. Section 7.5 
introduces the issue of illegal mining, another policy objective for which some countries use export 
restrictions. Section 7.6 summarises the main policy lessons to be drawn from the experience of 
each country.  
7.2. Sharing the benefits of the mining sector through taxation 
Considerations regarding taxation of the extractive industries 
One of the main ways by which wealth from the mining sector is shared and can be used to 
promote growth throughout the economy is through taxation and subsequent investment and 
redistribution of tax revenue. An appropriate level of taxation implies that the government receives 
an equitable share of the profits from the mining sector while fostering a sustainable level of 
production and leaving room for sufficient investment in the sector. If the sector is taxed too heavily, 
228
– 7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
investment and production are sub-optimal; if it is not taxed enough, an important source of budget 
revenue is needlessly foregone. When deciding the level and design of a tax system for the mineral 
resources sector, it is important to keep in mind the costs to mining sector firms in other mining 
countries that compete not only for market share but also for the allocation of investment funding. 
Tax costs are one of the factors determining the yield of any new investment, and firms will 
compare yields across countries and regions. 
Natural resource taxation is particularly challenging, not only because of the potential for 
rent-seeking behaviour and political capture (see Box 7.1 for a reference to these issues in the 
context of the resource curse debate), but also because the extractive industries have certain 
characteristics that may make them more vulnerable to sub-optimal policies. Some of the relevant 
specificities of the resources sectors that must be borne in mind when reviewing taxation policy are 
given in the next paragraphs.
7
Extractive industries are characterised, firstly, by high sunk costs and long production 
periods. Exploration, development and exploitation of a mine can last decades and cost many 
hundreds of millions of dollars. Much of the investment occurs before any production has started. 
Once an enterprise has invested heavily, the investor has little choice should the tax regime 
change; as long as variable costs are covered, production is more profitable than ceasing activity. 
This problem of time consistency implies that investors in the extractive industries, wary of potential 
regulatory “hold up”, consider with particular importance the regulatory and political stability in host 
countries. 
Revenue, and profits, in natural resource extraction industries differ greatly over the lifecycle 
of a project. It may seem reasonable to tax away a large share of the excess of revenue over 
operating costs. It must be remembered, however, that a resource project’s life is divided into three 
stages: exploration, development and extraction. The first two stages require substantial 
investment; the first stage also implies uncertainty about the size and existence of potential 
deposits. Taxable income only occurs in the third stage, but tax design needs to recognise the 
exploration and development costs of the project, as well as the substantial risk involved in the 
exploration stage. Part of what looks like rent in the third stage is the return on these earlier costs. 
Even taking this into account, tax revenue can be substantial and can make a very 
significant contribution to government revenue. Given the sheer scale of potential government 
receipts, tax receipts are not simply a side benefit of resource extraction but one of the core 
benefits. Proper tax design is therefore even more important in the area of resource extraction than 
in other sectors.  
Firms in extractive industries are often multinationals based outside the country where they 
are operating and have sizeable market power. The relative scarcity of technical skills, access to 
funding and the ability to assume risk over the long term implies that few firms worldwide are able to 
compete in large mining ventures. International firms often face tax liabilities in numerous 
jurisdictions and whether they can obtain tax credit in their home country for taxes paid in the 
country of operation affects the potential return on a project. The interactions between the various 
tax systems will impact the way in which multinational firms structure their operations. 
One particular characteristic of the extractive industries is the exhaustibility of the non-
renewable natural resources. Although new deposits continue to be found, there is inevitably a 
trade-off between present and future production and consumption, and optimal extraction rates 
calculated at present are a function of optimal extraction rates in future. The design of the tax 
system affects firm behaviour and incentives, and thereby impacts the balance of this inter-temporal 
trade-off. 
In most countries, the mining sector is subject to a variety of different types of tax. What is 
important for motivating firm behaviour is their combined effect. Both the level and design of tax 
instruments influence mining firms’ decisions about future investments, the extent to which they 
undertake high-risk and high-reward exploration, the extent to which they develop operations, and 
exploitation decisions in the present and future. 
7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES – 
229
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Judging the optimal level of taxation (Otto et al., 2006) requires knowledge about current firm 
behaviour and potential trade-offs in future, as well as future revenue streams, which depend on 
future metal prices and production costs. Excessive taxes will dampen investment, resulting in sub-
optimal levels of activity in any one or all of the three stages of the project. On the other hand, taxes 
that are too low represent foregone income for the government of the host country. 
Box 7.2 summarises the different types of tax that are applied in the minerals sector. The 
optimal mix of these instruments involves finding a balance between advantages and 
disadvantages of each instrument with respect to economic efficiency, trade-offs between 
development at different stages of mining operations, and the optimal allocation of risks and 
rewards between the state and the exploiting enterprises. As for implementation of the tax regime, 
many other considerations come into play such as the ease of administration and the information 
gap between tax administrators and mining enterprise officials. 
The choice and design of tax instruments affect firms’ decisions in many ways. An output-
based royalty, for example, creates an incentive for firms to exploit mines that offer high-grade ore, 
but to stop exploitation once only lower-grade ores remain. Mining operations may therefore be 
closed sooner, and some mines be under-exploited, than if a profit-based tax is used. Depending on 
their structure, however, profit-based taxes can alter the economic attractiveness of new projects. 
They also give firms an incentive to avoid making any profit and have substantial compliance costs. 
Determining the basis on which to apply a profit-based royalty is more difficult than an output-based 
one. 
The design of tax instruments, including royalties, affects the distribution of risk between 
firms and the state. Mining is a very risky activity: the probability of finding new, exploitable deposits 
at the exploration stage is low; metals prices are volatile and can make a seemingly good 
investment unprofitable. The development of new mines is a long-term activity that requires making 
judgements about a number of risky elements, including the investment and regulatory climate, 
future production costs and political and economic stability in the host country. Royalties are 
generally used to share risk between the public and private sectors since they are only paid when 
mining actually occurs, thus the public sector bears risk. Within the royalties structures, unit-based 
or value-based royalties shift more of the risk related to market prices to exploiting firms whereas 
profit-based corporate taxes shift a greater share of the risk to the state (Otto, 2000).  
Different tax instruments affect mining operations along the life cycle of a project. Import 
duties on exploration and on development equipment tax mining firms before they are at the 
exploitation stage and therefore before they generate revenue. On the other hand, such taxes 
provide government revenue before the project reaches the exploitation stage. Revenue from unit- 
or value-based royalties commences as soon as operations enter the production stage. Profit-based 
royalties or corporate profit taxes provide revenue when exploitation is profitable. Each of these 
instruments offers different incentives for firms to invest and exploit deposits. 
Tax regime stability is an important factor in firms’ decisions to invest in a mineral project. Firms that 
are considering investing hundreds of millions of dollars or more in a new mine are very wary of 
possible changes in the tax burden after their investment is made (Otto et al., 2006). Nonetheless, 
they are well aware of the difficulties of promising tax regime stability. First, a new government may 
be voted in once the project has started. Second, the bargaining power of mining firms is inevitably 
reduced once they have invested in the exploration and development stages as invested capital is 
sunk and cannot be withdrawn from the country. This phenomenon is captured in the so-called 
obsolescing bargain model (Vernon, 1974) and is well-documented with respect to the mining 
sector. 
Tax stability may be somewhat easier to ensure if the fiscal regime includes an element of 
progressivity. “There may be circumstances – as with the very high oil and minerals prices of mid-
2008, perhaps – in which outcomes are so extraordinary, relative to what might have been 
conceived when tax arrangements were entered into, that some renegotiation is seen even by 
investors as generally reasonable” (Boadway and Keen, 2010, p. 57). The very substantial profits  
230
– 7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Box 7.2. Most common taxes levied in the mining sector 
Various different types of tax are levied on extracted minerals. Both the tax rate and the tax basis are important. 
Taxes are generally assessed either on the quantity of the mineral deposit or against the inputs or actions needed to 
exploit it, or on some definition of the net revenue extracted from the minerals, usually revenue minus qualifying costs 
(Otto et al., 2006). 
Income tax: not specific to the mineral sector, the tax rate is commonly uniform for all tax payers, or for all tax 
payers at a given level of profit. In many countries, commercial tax payers are subject to a uniform tax rate; some 
countries have a progressive tax regime that imposes a higher rate to commercial entities with higher levels of profit. 
Tax policy often evolves through changes in the tax base rather than the tax rate. 
Royalties: a payment made for use of a property or natural resource.
1
This can be in the form of a tax on the 
amount of minerals extracted, either per physical unit of production – a specific royalty, or a percentage of the value 
of the mineral extracted – an ad valorem royalty. In some cases, the government collects a percentage of the value of 
production on a sliding scale based on price, i.e. a higher commodity price triggers a higher tax rate, which is referred 
to as a graduated price-based windfall tax. In the wider definition of profit-based royalties, the government taxes a 
share of the project’s profit (Hogan and Goldsworthy, 2010). 
Surface rentals: in some countries, a fee is levied on economic activities like mineral extraction that use land. 
Such fees are often based on land area and are calculated by multiplying some standard rate for the type of activity 
by the land area being used. In some jurisdictions, this tax only applies to public land use (Otto, 2000). 
Withholding taxes: many countries impose a withholding tax on remitted dividends. This generally takes the form 
of a percentage of remittances and can be a significant percentage. Although some governments define a high 
withholding tax rate, perhaps with the objective of promoting reinvestment, many enter into bilateral investment 
treaties or dual tax treaties of special arrangements with enterprises headquartered in key partner countries (Otto, 
2000). Other types of withholding taxes are taxes paid on interest payments to foreign lenders and interest on 
payments for foreign services. 
Import duties: Mining operations are capital intensive and the sophisticated machinery and equipment necessary 
for exploration, development and production are manufactured in few countries and generally imported. Import duties 
on such machinery have a direct impact on project feasibility in the early years of a mining project, i.e. before the 
exploitation stage. 
Export taxes: In the middle of the last century, governments commonly imposed export duties on minerals in 
order to increase revenue and because their administrative reach did not allow estimates of profit or revenue (Otto, 
2000). Export taxes have become more widely used, in particular on products of extractive industries, in recent years 
for a number of reasons (see Chapter 1). 
Value-added taxes (VAT): Value-added tax is generally intended as a tax on final domestic consumption and 
should therefore have little impact on resource operations that are destined for export (Boadway and Keen, 2010, 
p. 44). In some countries, however, exported mining products are subjected to payment of VAT which is later 
reimbursed. Under some systems, VAT on inputs is also reimbursed. There have been cases of reimbursement that 
has not been done in a timely fashion, or cancelled for some products, which can be considered an indirect export 
restriction. 
___________________ 
1. In most countries, minerals are owned by the state. Royalties are often placed on extractive industry firms since 
they exploit a non-renewable resource that they do not own. Alternatively, the minerals are owned by the landowner 
of the land where they are found. Royalties can be seen as a form of compensation for the exploitation of the property 
right. 
that are made by firms, many of them multinationals, may bring a strong reaction from local 
populations for higher taxation. A progressive tax, or additional tax when profits are very high, may 
be one way of foreseeing such situations. Generating confidence in the stability of tax structures is 
very important for the sector, but is not always simple to achieve.  
Transparency of taxation systems and requirements are of great importance in the sector, as 
are guarantees that tax revenue is used for government services. The Extractive Industries 
Transparency Initiative (EITI) is a multi-stakeholder effort to strengthen governance by improving 
transparency and accountability in the extractive sector. Firms agree to publish all payments they 
make to governments and governments reveal all revenue that they have collected from extractive 
firms (www.eiti.org). Payments and revenues are reconciled by an independent auditor. Such 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested