mvc open pdf in browser : Convert pdf photo to jpg Library software component asp.net winforms windows mvc export-restrictions-raw-materials-201423-part1136

7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES – 
231
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
initiatives are of particular importance in countries where governance has been challenged in the 
past.
8
The administrative capability of the tax authorities determines in part the optimal tax design. 
Even for well-performing tax administrations, some tax instruments can prove challenging due to 
asymmetric information regarding revenue, marginal and fixed costs, and so on. Profit- and income-
based taxes are more difficult to implement than unit- and value-based royalties. In the case of 
profit-based taxes, auditors will be needed to confirm levels of revenue and of costs that can be 
deducted. Some of these procedures, such as assigning a value to depreciated capital, are 
complex, and require relevant competence on the part of the tax authorities. 
Since extractive industries are often dominated by large multinational firms, they will make 
investment decisions concerning their global operations cognizant of differing tax policies in 
countries in which they operate. Although this is only one of many inputs into such decisions, some 
countries have chosen to coordinate their taxation of extractive industries on a regional level. The 
West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) has adopted a mining code that specifies 
some tax benefits that may serve to limit members’ ability to compete by offering stronger tax 
incentives (Boadway and Keen, 2010). There has been discussion of adopting common limits on 
tax benefits in the South African Development Community (SADC). A case for coordination could 
also be made for enforcing maximum common rates, rather than minimum requirements. 
Taxation of the mining sector in Chile 
The tax regime 
Taxation of the mining sector in Chile falls into four main categories: tax on the profits of 
Codelco, the state-owned copper mining firm; corporate taxes on private mining firms; a mining tax 
instituted in 2006, from which the smallest firms are exempt; and a tax on copper exports of 
Codelco-owned mines that goes directly to the Ministry of Defence.  
Codelco is entirely state-owned and finances a substantial share of the government budget. 
In addition to the corporate profit tax and the mining tax, paid by all or most firms, Codelco is 
subject to an extra profit tax of 40% and a 10% tax on exports. Finally, Codelco pays dividends to 
the government, normally set at 100% of profits. As a result, Codelco has had to rely on debt 
financing to fund a significant part of its capital needs. Although Codelco does not benefit from an 
explicit government guarantee, it has access to preferential rates due to its high credit rating. Its 
current large investment programme may, however, be incompatible with the zero retained earnings 
policy that has prevailed in the past.
9
Corporate taxes apply to mining firms as they do to other firms operating in Chile. The 
corporate tax rate is 20%. This was increased from 17% after the 2010 earthquake, applicable on 
income in 2011 (Ernst and Young, 2011).
10
The tax is applied to accrued income on a yearly basis. 
It is paid on profit after acquittal of the specific mining tax. An additional tax of 35% is applied to 
income that is withdrawn, distributed as dividends or remitted abroad by non-resident individuals or 
legal entities. However, the legal entity receives a tax credit for the tax paid as corporate tax.  
The tax base in Chile allows for deduction of accelerated depreciation and cumulative losses 
as well as interest payments in the total tax bill. Since the mining industry uses expensive capital 
inputs, the accelerated depreciation deduction is significant. This deduction allows capital-intensive 
enterprises to recoup a portion of their equipment costs by claiming large depreciation deductions in 
the early years of the expected life of the equipment. Allowing deductions for interest payments 
gives firms the incentive to finance projects with debt rather than equity.  
The mining tax was instituted in 2006 and applies to metallic and non-metallic mining. 
Previously, there was no specific tax or royalty levied on the mining sector. The tax is progressive 
and is paid on profit, or operating income. The tax is between zero and 14% depending on the firm’s 
profit. This tax is not paid by “small” mining firms. The size categories of firms are defined according 
to the volume of their annual sales of refined copper: small mining firms have sales of 12 000 tons 
Convert pdf photo to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
conversion of pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg
Convert pdf photo to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change pdf into jpg; c# convert pdf to jpg
232
– 7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
or less, medium-sized firms have between 12 000 and 50 000 tons per year, and large firms have 
annual sales of more than 50 000 tons. 
The rate of the mining tax is progressive, ranging from 0.5 to 4.5% between 12 000 and 
50 000 tons. For firms producing more than 50 000 tons of refined metal equivalent or more, the 
rate is 5% if their operating margin is less than or equal to 35%, and increases progressively. The 
tax is applied in to reach a maximum of 14% for firms whose operating margins exceed 85%. These 
rates for large firms apply since the 2010 mining tax law, before which (from 2006 to 2010), the tax 
rate varied from 4 to 9% depending on the firm’s profit share.  
With the passage of the 2010 mining tax law (Ley no. 20.469), firms were allowed to 
continue with the previous tax rates for eight years. If they chose to apply the new tax rates 
immediately, however, they would pay the higher tax rate of 5% (in the lower profit margin bracket) 
for three years, and then revert to the previous sliding scale of 4-9% for the next eight years. This 
complicated arrangement is a compromise between Chile’s foreign investment statute,
11
which 
guarantees (under certain conditions) that tax conditions remain invariable after a contract is 
signed, and the pressing need for government revenue after Chile’s disastrous earthquake in 2010. 
Finally, the tax of 10% on Codelco’s exports is procured directly by the Ministry of Defence 
(see Box 7.3, and Marcel (2012) for its implications). After several years’ discussion over reform of 
this law, the Chilean Congress decided in June 2014 that part of the proceeds of this tax would be 
paid directly into the government budget, earmarked for the reconstruction of Valparaiso (recently 
devastated by fire) and of the northern region (also recently hit by earthquakes).
12
Box 7.3. Ley Reservada del Cobre
1
The Chilean legal system includes some unpublished laws.
2
One such law is No.13.196, the Ley Reservada del 
Cobre (LRC). The Ley Reservada commandeers 10% of Codelco’s sales abroad in foreign currency to be disbursed 
directly to the Ministry of Defence for use in financing equipment. In addition, the law establishes a minimum financial 
transfer of USD 180 million. If 10% of Codelco’s exports are not enough to cover this minimum threshold, the shortfall 
must be provided by the State. 
The tax revenue, in US dollars, is deposited yearly in three separate accounts (used by the army, air force and 
navy) at the Central Bank of Chile. These accounts are maintained outside the treasury single account and are not 
subjected to congressional oversight.
3
In the 20 years since the return to democracy in Chile, many congress delegates, political leaders and analysts 
have recognised the need to repeal or reform the Ley Reservada del Cobre. An initiative was proposed in 2009 which 
was to finance the armed forces on a yearly basis through the general budget but it was not approved. A new legal 
initiative was announced on 11 May 2011 to overturn this law and replace it with a multi-annual budget for the armed 
forces. In his 21 May 2012 public address, President Piñera pledged to repeal the law by the end of his term in office 
(www.gob.cl/destacados/2012/05/21/mensaje-presidencial-21-de-mayo-2012-chile-cumple-y-avanza-hacia-el-
desarrollo.htm). 
_____________________________ 
1. Note that the information included in this box is the best available but cannot be confirmed due to the secret nature 
of the legislation described. 
2. In August 2003, legislators introduced a bill that would declassify the secret decrees and laws enacted between 
11 September 1973 and 10 March 1990. A year later, it was approved by the lower house and passed on to the 
Senate but has been held up in a Senate commission since that time. The bill however includes some exceptions to 
the declassification process, among them the Ley Reservada del Cobre. A somewhat puzzling section of the bill calls 
for declassifying these exceptions by 7 July 2014 (http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/chile/090317/chiles-secret-
laws?page=0,1). 
3. A 2004 OECD publication indicated this practice was “highly inappropriate from a budgetary point of view”, while 
recognising that this is “a very sensitive area” (Blöndel and Curristine, 2004). 
Chile’s taxation of the mining sector: International comparisons 
Mining operations are often undertaken by large, multinational firms. In the headquarters of 
these firms, investment decisions regarding operations in their different subsidiaries are based on a 
comparative assessment of the availability and quality of the ore, future production costs, various 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
.pdf to jpg; convert online pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
batch convert pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg
7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES – 
233
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
risk factors, and the regulatory environment, of which the tax system is one element. Firms try to 
compare potential projects in one jurisdiction with those in another, and they evaluate taxation 
alongside all the other factors that affect their estimate of potential returns from, and risks of, the 
various projects.  
Comparing different countries’ and jurisdictions’ tax systems is a challenging undertaking. 
Tax rates in different countries are applied to different tax bases. Deductions can be substantial, 
particularly capital depreciation and interest payments. The amount of taxable income can depend 
on how much firms invest and how much they pay in dividends. Some taxes can be used as credit 
against others. The tax burden faced by a foreign firm may depend on the terms of a bilateral tax 
treaty between its home country and the country of operations.  
Having said this, various estimates have been made of the effective tax rate in the mining 
sector. Korinek (2013) reports estimates based on private interviews with analysts and advisors to 
the industry in the range 25-35% of profits, depending on how much firms invest and the extent to 
which they distribute dividends. Interviews with representatives of mining firms suggested higher 
estimates of the effective tax rate, up to 39-40%.  
Furthermore, these representatives stressed that some costs other than tax requirements 
(including energy,
13
water and labour) were considerably higher in Chile, which firms would offset 
against a lower effective tax rate.
14
Cochilco, Chile’s copper advisory body, reports the unit 
production cost of producing copper cathode in different regions using a similar methodology, 
finding that Chilean costs are indeed higher on average than those in other Latin American 
countries and Asia, but lower than those facing copper producers in North America, Oceania, Africa 
and Europe (see Korinek, 2013, Table 2, p.27). 
Chile’s taxation of the mining sector: an appraisal 
An overview of Chile’s system of taxation of its mining sector suggests that it is transparent, 
predictable, balanced and within a range acceptable to the firms with international reach that inhabit 
the sector. The corporate income tax rate of 20% currently applies to all firms in Chile. Firms are, 
however, allowed accelerated depreciation deductions, which are particularly important to the 
mining sector. The mining tax, although a tax on operating income, functionally replaces a royalty 
and applies only to the mining sector. The structure of this tax is progressive, including higher tax 
rates during times of very large profits (14% in cases where the profit margin is 85% or more of total 
revenue). This probably makes the tax more politically acceptable in times of very high copper 
prices, and forestalls political economy concerns when metals prices are high that the state, 
although the ultimate owner of the minerals, does not obtain a “fair share” of profits.  
The mining tax is also progressive in that it does not apply to small mining firms, thus giving 
support to small firms that do not benefit from economies of scale, and may not hold concessions. 
These firms are also supported through technical assistance initiatives from ENAMI. One of the 
results of this support is that the mining sector (particularly the smaller less capital-intensive firms) 
offers employment opportunities in some remote regions of Chile where few job alternatives exist. 
It is difficult to compare effective tax rates across countries. Firms, however, do not look at 
the tax system in isolation: they compare the whole package of production costs in the different 
jurisdictions where they operate. It seems that unit costs of production of copper mining firms in 
Chile are neither the most nor least onerous compared to those in other countries, but that higher 
costs may serve to offset potentially lower tax rates. 
Suffice it to say that taxation of the mining sector, including the changes enacted in 2010, 
has not curtailed foreign investment in the sector. Mining received 38% of FDI entering the country 
in 2010, and significantly more than other countries in the region. Surveys of the mining industry 
confirm that Chile remains an attractive country in which to invest in mining. At the same time, the 
mining sector contributes significantly to government revenue, providing 21% of all tax revenue in 
2010 (of which CODELCO contributed 13.1% of total government revenue), which is proportionately 
higher than its contribution to GDP The contribution of mining to government revenue is 
VB.NET Image: How to Save Image & Print Image Using VB.NET
and printing multi-page document files, like PDF and Word different image encoders, including tif encoder, jpg encoder, png VB.NET Code to Save Image / Photo.
pdf to jpeg; change format from pdf to jpg
VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Flipping Image Using Our .NET Image SDK
SDK, an image (including BMP, PNG, JPG, etc) can be becomes a mirror reflection of the photo on the powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
convert pdf pictures to jpg; changing pdf to jpg file
234
– 7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
substantially higher than earlier: the mining sector contributed only 5.8% of government revenue on 
average during1995-2003. 
Chile’s good governance is recognised globally. Quality of governance is probably enhanced 
by the overlapping institutional structure (see Annex 7A) where the Ministry of Mining and 
COCHILCO, the copper advisory body, are in close contact with private mining firms as well as 
ENAMI and SONAMI through the Mining Council. They are required to “have an ear to the ground” 
when decisions are made regarding the internal price of copper (at which ore is purchased by 
ENAMI, for example). The fact that the largest firm is state-owned, as well as the “invariability 
clause”, which implies certain tax stability, may facilitate the relatively consensual process 
undertaken by regulators of the Chilean mining sector. This approach is exemplified by the 2010 
mining tax, which allows firms either to opt in to the tax changes voluntarily, or to continue with 
previous rates for a number of years.  
One area where Chile’s tax collection procedures warrant review is the Ley Reservada del 
Cobre, where the state-owned enterprise awards 10% of its export earnings to the Ministry of 
Defence. The emergency modification to this law in 2014, referred to in the previous section, does 
not remove the need for it to be radically reformed in order to ensure the degree of oversight and 
public scrutiny of this income stream that would be expected in Chile’s present-day vibrant 
democracy.  
Taxation of the mining sector in Botswana 
The mining sector in Botswana is taxed through three separate instruments: a corporate 
profits tax, a royalty, and withholding tax on dividends. All private firms pay a corporate profits tax; 
mining firms, however, are subject to a specialised tax regime. The general corporate tax rate in 
Botswana has been 22% since 2011, whereas mining profits tax is calculated according to a 
formula: 70-1500/x, where x is the ratio of taxable income to gross income in percent (subject to a 
minimum of the general corporate tax rate). Mining firms may deduct capital expenditures made in 
the same year, with unlimited carry forward of losses. This formula effectively leads to a variable 
rate income tax, which increases with the profitability of the mining company. It is well designed, 
therefore, to capture mineral rents. It is also transparent and provides a degree of certainty to 
investors.  
Royalties are calculated on the gross value of minerals as they leave the “mine gate”. 
Diamonds and other precious stones are subject to a 10% royalty rate; precious metals 5% and all 
other metals 3%. Payment of royalties commences when a mine goes into production, and, if the 
value of the goods produced is easily ascertained, this is a fairly straightforward tax to collect. There 
may be a problem, however, identifying the market price of rough diamonds as the market is very 
small and specialised and, within the De Beers network, quite firmly controlled. The issue of proper 
valuation of diamonds has been considered by the Botswana authorities and will be examined more 
fully later on in this paper.  
Finally, investors pay withholding tax on dividends distributed to residents and non-residents 
of Botswana alike. Withholding tax is now 7.5% of the value of dividends. 
In the case of Debswana, the joint venture between de Beers S.A. and the government of 
the Republic of Botswana (GRB), remaining profits are distributed equally between the GRB and De 
Beers SA within the terms of their joint venture (see Annex 7.B for a full description of the 
institutional structure of the mining sector). While the exact agreement between De Beers and the 
Government of Botswana is confidential, it is believed that the Government receives between 80 
and 82% of the revenue after cost (including capital expenditure) of Debswana.
15
A very substantial 
portion of the revenue from the diamond sector therefore goes to the GRB.  
Botswana’s taxation of the mining sector: An appraisal 
A major challenge facing many countries is proper implementation of their tax code. The tax 
system of some countries is very complex, and in some cases, contradictory. For example, high tax 
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature remove multiple or all images from PDF document.
convert multi page pdf to jpg; convert pdf pages to jpg online
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature or all image objects from PDF document in
bulk pdf to jpg converter; batch pdf to jpg online
7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES – 
235
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
rates and generous tax incentives often lead to low compliance and high administrative costs 
(Barma et al., 2012). A simplified tax code is therefore preferable. Botswana’s tax policy falls into 
this category: it is clear and relatively transparent, not least of all in its implementation.
16
Many lower-income, resource-dependent countries have weak tax-collecting capacity and 
face governance challenges with regard to their revenue administrations. Foreign firms or investors 
may have access to accounting and tax expertise that allows them to reduce their tax liability. One 
reason the GRB entered a joint mining venture with De Beers and, years later, obtained two seats 
on the Board of Directors of De Beers S.A., was to gain experience and understanding of the 
diamond mining industry in a globally competitive, state-of-the art setting. This knowledge has been 
of critical importance for Botswana and has allowed the country to benefit greatly through its 
understanding of the constraints and the potential of diamond mining in Botswana. Most important, 
however, for the purpose of this discussion, it has helped the GRB to design and revise its tax 
policy and more generally its minerals policy in a balanced fashion.  
One of the most important issues facing mining investors is the stability and predictability of 
policies that affect them, including taxation policy. On this criterion, Botswana performs well: its tax 
code has remained stable and changes have been instituted in stages. Botswana benefits from a 
strong reputation for good governance and transparency so that changes in the tax regime when 
necessary can often be made without damage to investor confidence.  
Generally, the business environment in Botswana is considered to be relatively free from 
corruption. Mining firms rank the legal process in Botswana highly in terms of fairness, 
transparency, absence of corruption, timeliness and efficiency.
17
In fact, Botswana’s legal system 
outperforms those of two Canadian provinces (Quebec and Ontario), eight US states (Alaska, 
Montana, Minnesota, Idaho, Colorado, New Mexico, California and Washington) and several 
European countries (including Finland and France) as regards mining activities.  
This issue is of prime importance as regards the extractive industries since investors are 
wary of making the substantial investments necessary up front without being relatively sure of future 
revenue. For investors, the extractive sector is risky: it is capital-intensive and long term, and with a 
high degree of uncertainty and unpredictability in demand and production, price volatility, and 
varying extraction costs as higher grade ores are exhausted. For host governments, exploration and 
extractions risks, as well as commodity price volatility, make the revenue flow highly variable and 
cyclical. Both investors and government, therefore, benefit from stable fiscal policies (Barma et al., 
2012). 
The De Beers-GRB joint venture has aligned the interests of the GRB and its private sector 
partner. It has allowed the GRB to benefit from global private sector expertise in all aspects of the 
management and strategy of the company while retaining ownership of the resources being 
extracted. There are, however, substantial risks involved in such public-private partnerships. The 
GRB assumes a large part of the risk by being an equal (or even minority) shareholder. For reasons 
of credibility, the government may not choose to let a mining firm in which it has equity fail. The 
GRB has opted for a 15% equity share in some mining firms in the past in accordance with its 
equity option that is available at the time of granting of mining licences. It has in the past stepped in 
and invested additional funds to ensure continuous operation in some of these cases. This sort of 
undertaking can quickly become very onerous; additionally, the government is probably not best 
placed to manage this type of operation. 
Maintaining close contact with private sector ambitions and processes has also given the 
GRB the potential to influence its minerals policies to its advantage. One issue that has arisen 
regarding tax and royalty payments is correct valuation of rough diamonds. The value attributed to 
rough diamonds is of utmost importance for calculating the amount of royalty due, whereas within 
the De Beers system rough diamonds are valued through a controlled process using information 
from buyers under contract with DTC, its selling operation (see Annex 7.B for an overview of this 
process). Since the GRB has been closely involved in the overall management of the joint venture, 
and cognizant of the fact that valuation is of utmost importance to it, it has started to sell some of its 
rough diamonds through a parallel system outside the De Beers network. This new arrangement will 
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
pasting and cutting from adobe PDF file in image formats, including Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif and cut vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature
change pdf to jpg file; convert pdf to jpg batch
VB.NET Image: Create Image from Stream; Stream to Image Converter
to capture image from web url, convert image to like image sharpening and old photo effect adding powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
convert .pdf to .jpg; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
236
– 7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
be explored in more detail in a following section; its implications for royalty revenue are not 
negligible. 
7.3. Sharing the benefits of the mining sector: Tax revenue management 
General principles 
It is commonly accepted that mineral production can either promote or hinder economic 
growth, depending in part on how governments manage and use the tax revenue they receive from 
the mineral sector (Otto et al., 2006). Therefore, although much of the public debate over mineral 
taxes focuses on the appropriate level of taxation, equally important for economies with rich natural 
resource endowments are the questions of tax revenue management and distribution. This section 
concentrates on revenue management, and principally on strategies to prevent revenues from the 
mining sector destabilising or distorting the country’s economy.  
The main management challenges to economies relying on income from natural resource 
extraction stem from volatile metals prices and the presence of potentially substantial rents from 
mineral extraction. Volatile international prices for metals imply that profits from mineral extraction 
are subject to large fluctuations, with government tax revenue from the sector also cyclically linked 
to world market prices of metals. If high revenues in boom times allow governments to benefit from 
more favourable lending conditions on international markets, these revenue swings can be 
amplified. Surges in revenue create a strong incentive to increase government spending 
significantly, but money spent in this way is often poorly spent. Moreover, marked cycles in 
government expenditure can de-stabilise the economy as a whole, leading to greater consumption 
and over-heating during the boom, and low consumption and high unemployment during the bust. In 
general, the economic costs of such macroeconomic volatility are high (Humphreys et al., 2007, 
p.325). In order to dampen these cycles, strong mechanisms for revenue management are 
essential.  
One way of countering these effects is for government to engage in counter-cyclical 
spending. This is facilitated by the use of a stabilization fund, which accumulates excess 
government revenue in boom periods and is drawn down to make up the shortfall in mining tax 
revenue in slack periods, thereby helping to smooth government expenditure. These funds might be 
held in foreign currencies (which avoids exacerbating the demand for local currency in boom 
periods) or other forms of shorter-term asset. If such funds are to be effective, however, “incentives 
need to be built in so that political leaders are not tempted to raid them” (Humphreys et al., 2007, 
p. 325).  
Another risk that is strongly related to the threat of macroeconomic instability in economies 
that are heavily reliant on their metal exports is that their exchange rate may be strongly affected by 
substantial fluctuations in the value of their exports. When the international price of a metal 
increases steeply, the quantity of the metal demanded on the world market may fall, but if demand 
is inelastic, total export value increases. If these exports represent a major share of total export 
value, and they are valued in a reserve currency like the US dollar, the local currency will be 
affected, strengthening during the boom times and weakening during the bust. A strong local 
currency makes it more difficult to export other products, and therefore exports of sectors unrelated 
to the extractive industries will fall. This fall in demand, coupled with a potential rise in demand from 
the mining sector for additional services to fuel the boom means that other sectors of the economy 
are “crowded out” in the short term. When commodity prices fall and the national income generated 
from the extractive industries falls, fewer export sectors remain on which the economy can rely. In 
this way, rapid exchange-rate appreciation can set in motion the onset of “Dutch disease” (Box 7.1), 
permanently reducing the diversification of the domestic economy and leading to long-term 
distortions.  
There are a number of ways that governments can counter-act exchange rate fluctuations, 
namely curbing excess spending and building up reserves in foreign currency (ideally in a 
stabilisation fund) or in other foreign assets during times of high commodity prices.
18
To attack 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Use .NET Converter to Convert PPT to Raster
so it is not widely used for digital photo. If temp IsNot Nothing Then temp.Convert( imageStream, ImageFormat & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf picture to jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg online
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
gif, jpeg, bmp and tiff) and a document file (supported files are PDF, Word & TIFF to decide the output barcode image format as you need, including JPG, GIF, BMP
convert pdf file to jpg online; reader convert pdf to jpg
7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES – 
237
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
directly the effect of Dutch disease, government revenue can be invested “in alternative export 
sectors, in agriculture, and in education [to] help sustain growth and diversify risk” (Humphreys 
et al., 2007, p.325). However, engaging in strong expenditure domestically during the boom period 
can exacerbate the exchange problem, so investments need to be spread over time. 
In all cases of tax revenue management, it is important to ensure that it is distributed with a 
high degree of transparency. This is particularly important where potential rents are very large. 
Better information on how the proceeds from extractive rents are distributed and according to what 
aims is of great importance, particularly when revenue falls again. The EITI, mentioned earlier in 
this chapter, gives guidelines for the reporting of revenue from the extractive industries and 
suggests how stakeholders can be more closely involved in the often contentious debate about their 
distribution. 
Regarding the governance of funds established from government-owned financial assets or 
sovereign wealth funds (SWF) there are two sets of internationally sponsored principles, the 
Linaburg-Maduell Transparency Index and the Santiago Principles. The Linaburg-Maduell 
Transparency Index was developed by the Sovereign Wealth Fund Institute.
19
It awards one point 
for compliance with each of ten principles. Currently, 51 funds are rated in terms of this index and 
the ratings are published, although not the details of which principles are met and which are not. 
The SWF Institute recommends a minimum rating of 8 in order to claim adequate transparency. 
The Santiago Principles were developed by the International Working Group (IWG) on 
Sovereign Wealth Funds with the support of the IMF. The IWG agreed on a set of generally 
accepted principles and practices (GAPP) in 2008.
20
The IWG does not publish any assessment of 
compliance of different SWFs with the Santiago Principles. However, the Oxford SWF project 
carried out an assessment of compliance in 2011.  
Edwin Truman of the Peterson Institute of International Economics developed a scoreboard 
for SWFs. It uses 25 questions falling into four categories (1) structure, (2) governance, 
(3) transparency and accountability, and (4) behaviour, with the answers based on publicly available 
information. The rating was first carried out in 2007 (for the latest available update, see Bagnall and 
Truman (2013)). These different transparency indexes will be used in later sections. 
Management of tax revenue in Chile 
Chile adopted a structural balance rule in 2001, which involves estimating the fiscal income 
that would be obtained net of the impact of the economic cycle, and in particular of commodity price 
cycles, and spending only the amount that would be compatible with that level of income. In 
practice, this means saving during economic highs, when revenues known to be of a temporary 
nature are received, and spending the revenue in situations when fiscal income drops (Marcel et al., 
2001, Rodríguez et al., 2007). 
The 2006 Fiscal Responsibility Law (FRL) was an important step towards strengthening 
Chile’s fiscal framework (de Mello, 2008). The FRL created a legal framework for the structural 
balance rule, created a Pension Reserve Fund (PRF) to address pension-related contingencies; 
transformed the previous Copper Stabilization Fund into a broader sovereign wealth fund called the 
Economic and Social Stabilization Fund (ESSF) and introduced explicit, formal mechanisms for 
capitalizing the central bank. Responsibilities are allocated between the Ministry of Finance and the 
Central Bank of Chile: the former sets the investment policy for tax revenue with advice from a 
Financial Committee, and reports each month on the investments undertaken, return on 
investments, and the positions of the funds, whereas the latter is delegated as asset manager.
21
The structural balance indicator used in Chile calculates a measure of government revenue 
net of the cyclical impact of three variables: the level of economic activity and the prices of copper 
and molybdenum, a by-product in the production of copper. Thus, the structural balance reflects the 
tax revenue that would have accrued in a particular year if GDP were at its medium-term trend, and 
copper and molybdenum prices were on their longer-term (10-year horizon) trend level. These 
projections are determined by an independent rotating panel of 20 persons from the private sector 
238
– 7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
and academia and (for the copper price) representatives of COCHILCO, the copper advisory 
agency, and CODELCO.
22
This rule imposes discipline on government expenditure in times of high revenue intake, 
providing for stable sources of revenue during periods of low government income. From 2001-07, 
successive governments held themselves to budget surpluses of 1% of GDP. In 2008, the surplus 
was 0.5% of GDP. In 2009, when the financial crisis was most strongly felt, the budget was in an 
actual deficit of about 4%.
23
The fiscal saving rule implies that government revenue is allocated to different funds, 
depending on the extent of the fiscal surplus. If the current fiscal surplus is 0.5% or less, it is 
allocated to the Pension Reserve Fund (PRF); surpluses from 0.5 to 1% could serve to re-capitalise 
the Central Bank of Chile (through 2011); revenue from surpluses above 0.5% are deposited in the 
ESSF since 2012 (Figure 7.1).  
Figure 7.1. Chile: Allocation of fiscal savings by destination 
% of GDP 
Note that the recapitalisation of the Central Bank of Chile ended in 2011. 
Source: Ministry of Finance of Chile. 
The aim of the PRF is to provide back-up for the government’s guarantee of basic old-age 
and disability solidarity pensions and solidarity pension contributions. In other words, this fund acts 
as a supplementary source for funding future pension contingencies. The fund seeks to spread over 
time the future projected increases in these expenditures and explicitly incorporate this 
responsibility into state finances. No withdrawals of principal are allowed on the PRF before 2016 
when it is estimated the capital accumulation will have reached sufficient levels.
24
The ESSF is intended to ensure that a part of the fiscal surplus is saved during times of high 
growth and strong commodity prices in order to finance the budget during times of lower than 
average growth and low commodity prices. In this way, the fund insulates social spending from the 
swings of the economic cycle and of the prices of copper and molybdenum, while harnessing public 
saving in order to strengthen the Chilean economy’s competitiveness (Rodriguez et al., 2007). 
The ESSF was established in 2007 with an initial contribution of USD 2.58 billion, much of 
which came from its predecessor, the Copper Stabilisation Fund.
25
As of December 2012, the 
market value of the ESSF was USD 15 billion. Contributions to the ESSF since its creation totalled 
USD 21.2 billion and withdrawals from the fund totalled USD 9.4 billion. The investments have 
generated additional resources for the total amount of USD 3.2 billion since the fund’s inception.  
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
-0.5
0
0.2
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
Contributions
Effective fiscal balance
PRF
Capitalisation BCCh
ESSF
7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES – 
239
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
At the end of 2009, the two sovereign wealth funds represented around 48% of total financial 
assets held by the central government and were equivalent to about 125% of the country’s public 
debt (Marcel and Vega, 2010). Measuring the net position of government finances is key for the 
management of fiscal policy. Since 2003 Chile has used IMF’s 2001 Government Finance Statistics 
Manual (GFSM 2001). The GFSM 2001 integrates in a consistent manner stocks and flows, using 
the accrual basis criterion for assessing government transactions. It strengthens the methodology 
behind government accounting and increases consistency with private accounting practices and 
national accounts (Marcel and Vega, 2010).  
Withdrawals from the ESSF to cover budget deficits in times of lower government revenue 
require approval from the Chilean Congress. Some withdrawals were made in 2009 to counter the 
negative effects of the financial crisis. Congress approves withdrawals and spending from the 
ESSF. 
Until January 2012, the sovereign wealth funds (PRF and ESSF) were exclusively invested 
abroad in low-risk asset classes, similar to those used for international reserves. The strategic asset 
allocation for the ESSF is made up of 66.5% in sovereign bonds, 30% in money market 
instruments, and 3.5% in inflation-indexed sovereign bonds. As of 2012, the portfolio composition of 
the PRF is 15% in global stocks, 20% in global corporate bonds and 65% in global sovereign 
bonds. The currency composition of the funds is broken down as follows: 50% USD, 40% Euro, and 
10% Japanese Yen.
26
It should be noted that revenue from the mining sector is not earmarked for the jurisdictions 
(municipalities, regional governments) of the territories where the mining industries are based, as is 
found in some other natural resource rich countries. The distribution of revenue at a national level in 
Chile may help to increase its efficiency, flexibility and strategic use.  
In 2013, the ESSF was ranked third (with a score of 91) on the scoreboard of SWFs 
compiled by the Peterson Institute (Bagnall and Truman, 2013). In the second quarter of 2014, it 
shared top ranking with nine other SWFs according to the Linaburg-Maduell Transparency Index.
27
Lessons from Chile’s tax revenue management 
By implementing its structural balance rule, Chile has stabilised its government expenditure, 
saving during boom years and spending its excess tax revenue during years of lower revenue. This 
makes expenditure more predictable over the medium term. Its success is a consequence of tying 
expenditure to structural rather than effective income which is far more volatile.
28
The benefit of the 
stabilization fund was proven in 2009 when the Chilean government used part of the fund to cover 
its expenses due to lower tax income during the global financial crisis. The existence of the fund 
has ensured the financial sustainability of social policies, facilitating their long-term planning.  
Curbing excess spending during boom years also helps to hold down the exchange rate of 
the peso which would tend to appreciate during such times. The sovereign wealth funds that receive 
excess tax revenue during times of high commodity prices are held in assets denominated in 
foreign currencies, thereby partially offsetting the upward pressure on the peso. This helps to avoid 
“crowding out” of other industries and exports that may have trouble competing globally if they 
undergo a high exchange rate. Investing in sovereign wealth funds abroad also helps to diversify 
risk.
29
The legal framework of the Fiscal Responsibility Law and the checks and balances that are 
in place help to ensure that the structural balance policies are followed. The Fiscal Responsibility 
Law institutes a formula, based on independent projections of GDP growth trend and long-term 
prices of copper and molybdenum, for determining a long-term sustainable level of government 
revenue and the corresponding sustainable level of government spending. During surplus years, 
excess tax revenue and profits from CODELCO are put into the two sovereign wealth funds.  
These mechanisms encourage the sharing of political responsibilities and make it easier for 
policymakers to bear the political burden of not being able to meet social demands in a low-revenue 
environment and to limit the benefit of spending revenue windfalls in boom years (Arellano, 2006). 
240
– 7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
By setting a formal budget target, the budget rule reduces discretion. The automatic nature of the 
rule has helped to lock counter-cyclical rigour into Chile’s finances. 
“Chile’s SWFs are being managed transparently, and the government is committed to best 
practices in this area” (IMF, 2008, p.19). The authorities publish monthly reports on the size and 
portfolio composition of both funds, and more extensive quarterly reports discussing performance 
relative to financial market developments and established benchmarks. Moreover, both the Chilean 
authorities and their Financial Advisory Committee are committed to public discussion of the funds’ 
strategies, and all asset income and use of assets are included in the annual budget reports.  
Chile’s counter-cyclical fiscal policy has reduced both uncertainty as to its medium-term 
performance and its need for foreign financing, as well as reducing the sovereign risk premium it 
has to pay when it does borrow on international markets. These are direct benefits that Chile has 
experienced from its sound management of tax revenue.  
Chile’s counter-cyclical policies with respect to the exchange rate have helped to decrease 
volatility, especially during years when copper prices were high (Figure 7.2). Chile was rated highly 
(eight out of ten) in terms of currency stability in the Behre Dolbear 2011 ranking of countries for 
mining investment. 
Figure 7.2. Chilean peso nominal exchange rate and copper prices 
Source: IMF and OECD. 
The stable, predictable, balanced policies put into place by Chile have been reflected in its 
high ranking in surveys of mining firms and investors. Chile received the highest score in the Behre 
Dolbear 2011 ranking of countries for mining investment, along with Canada and the United States. 
Chile was ranked number one out of 79 countries in terms of their absence of uncertainty 
concerning the administration, interpretation and enforcement of existing regulation by the Fraser 
Institute survey of mining companies in 2010/11. 
Management of tax revenue in Botswana
30
Fiscal institutions and policies in Botswana 
Revenues from the minerals sector in Botswana are not institutionally segregated but are 
included in the general government revenue pool. Historically, the public expenditure policy 
framework specified that revenues derived from minerals, as they result from the sale of an asset, 
should be used to finance investment in other assets. The intention is twofold--both to preserve the 
country’s overall asset base, and to provide a basis for generating income that can replace mineral 
income when it eventually declines. A corollary to the asset replacement principle is that recurrent 
non-investment spending must be financed from recurrent, i.e. non-mineral, sources.  
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000
6000
7000
8000
9000
10000
Copper, grade A cathode, LME spot price, CIF European ports, USD per metric tonne
Currency exchange rate, CLP per USD (monthly average), nominal
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested