mvc open pdf in browser : Convert pdf to jpeg application software tool html windows .net online export-restrictions-raw-materials-201424-part1137

7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES – 
241
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
The implementation of this principle has been monitored since 1994 by the Sustainable 
Budget Index (SBI), defined as the ratio of non-investment spending to recurrent revenues. An SBI 
value of more than one means that non-investment spending is being financed in part from mineral, 
or non-recurrent, revenues. If the SBI is less than one, mineral revenue is either being saved or 
spent on public investment, while recurrent spending is being financed from non-mineral (recurrent) 
sources; an SBI of one or less is therefore interpreted as being “sustainable”. In calculating the SBI, 
the normal budget classification of expenditure is adjusted slightly in that recurrent spending on 
education and health is classified as investment in human capital.  
It should be noted, however, that the SBI has no statutory basis. Neither the SBI nor the 
principle underlying it are mentioned in the current National Development Plan, NDP 10, which 
spells out the general policy objectives for a six-year period (Government of Botswana, 2009). It 
turns out that, for most of the period since 1983/4, the SBI has been less than 1; however, it 
remained above 1 between 2001 and 2005, after having been on an upward trend for many years, 
indicating that part of the recurrent spending was financed by mineral revenues. Since 2006, the 
SBI has been well below 1, as the share of development, including health and education, spending 
in the budget rose sharply.  
In recent years increased attention has been paid (particularly by the International Monetary 
Fund in Article IV reports and other economic assessments) to the non-mineral budget balance as 
an alternative indicator of sustainability. This indicator looks ahead to the post-mineral era. It rests 
on the Permanent Income Hypothesis, and implies that it is sustainable to run a non-mineral deficit 
the size of the permanent annuity that would be generated if mineral revenues were not spent but 
were invested so as to provide a permanent annuity income (Clausen, 2008).  
Figure 7.3. Non-mineral primary budget balance, Botswana 
% of non-mining GDP 
Source: Korinek (2014), calculations based on data from MFDP. 
The IMF estimates that, according to its methodology, the sustainable non-mineral primary 
balance is around 5% of non-mineral GDP (IMF, 2012a).
31 
Figure 7.3 shows that the non-mineral 
primary balance, as a percentage of non-mineral GDP, has been consistently and substantially 
above this level since the early 1980s. 
32
An important institutional mechanism of public financial management in Botswana is the 
National Development Plan (NDP) process. NDPs establish general policy objectives and include all 
public investment projects over a six-year period and must be approved by Parliament. Box 7.4 
describes the process whereby the content of each plan is established. Public funds cannot be 
spent on projects unless they are included in the NDP. The annual budget includes the provision of 
funds for recurrent spending for the year ahead, as well as the annual portion of development 
-40%
-35%
-30%
-25%
-20%
-15%
-10%
-5%
0%
Convert pdf to jpeg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert from pdf to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg
Convert pdf to jpeg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
.net pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg
242
– 7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
project funding for projects in the NDP. This also has to be approved by Parliament. Public finance 
discipline is reasonably effective and historically there has been little off-budget spending, although 
the amount of off-budget spending financed by various off-budget “levies” and dedicated funds has 
been increasing in recent years.
33
There is an important legal restraint on the accumulation of public debt. Under the Stocks, 
Bonds and Treasury Bills act, Government borrowing is subject to a statutory limit of 40% of GDP 
with sub-limits of 20% of GDP for each of domestic and foreign debt and guarantees.
34
An 
additional “fiscal rule” was introduced in the Mid-Term Review of NDP 9 in 2007, which sought to 
limit government spending to 40% of GDP on average throughout the economic cycle. It was, 
however, more of a guideline than an enforceable rule. According to sources in the MFDP, the 40% 
figure is to be brought down to 35% by the end of the NDP 10 cycle, and to 25% of GDP in the 
NDP 11.  
Box 7.4. Assessing development priorities: From Kgotla to Parliament 
The National Development Plan (NDP) establishes the policy objectives and outlines all public investment 
projects for the upcoming six-year period. Preparation of the NDP is overseen by a multi-sectoral Reference Group. 
This group consists of employees from the Ministry of Finance and Development Planning (MFDP), the Office of the 
President and representatives from the private sector, non-governmental organisations, the Vision Council and the 
Bank of Botswana. 
The District Planners Handbook explains the National Development Planning process as “... a ‘bottom-up’ 
approach whereby the people express their needs, and these needs, in turn, should be the basis for district and, 
eventually, national planning...”. The most important step in the process is consultations with local communities by 
the 16 local authority administrations. These local authority administrations include 10 district councils, two city 
councils and four kgotla or town councils. Part of this consultative process is based on a traditional structure: in pre-
colonial and colonial times, the kgotla was a public forum in which issues of public interest were discussed 
(Acemoglu et al., 2003). It is during these consultations that local issues are raised by the community and possible 
solutions are envisaged. In this process, all Batswana
1
, including those in remote areas, can have input in the NDP, 
at least theoretically. During consultations, workshops are held with the local Dikgosi (chiefs), Village Development 
Committee (VDC) members, Councillors, and representatives from the business community, religious groups, 
women’s organisations, youth, the disabled and farmers’ committees. 
After episodes of consolidation and refinement, issues raised by the community during the different workshops 
are then included in the Local Authority Key Issues paper (LAKIP). Each of the 16 local authorities prepares a LAKIP, 
which then feeds into both the local administration’s Development Plan and the Sectoral Key Issues Paper (SKIP) of 
the Ministry of Local Government. The latter in turn feeds into the Macroeconomic Outline and Policy Framework of 
the next NDP. Proposed projects during the NDP planning process will, after screening, make up the Development 
Budget of the NDP.  
The process of proposing projects for inclusion in the NDP is thus largely “bottom up”. However, not all projects 
proposed at the community or district level can be accepted for implementation. First, projects are screened to 
ensure that they comply with national policy guidelines. These mainly relate to the size of the local population and the 
type of facility proposed (e.g. a settlement or district with a small population may not get a full-scope secondary 
school or a tarred road, even if the community so desires, because the facility would be underused). Second, projects 
that meet policy guidelines are prioritised in accordance with the availability of financial resources at national level. 
Although detailed cost-benefit analyses are not carried out for some projects, this system has largely been driven by 
technical expertise and not political considerations (Pegg, 2010). 
The tension between local desires and national policies has become more acute in recent years. Many of the 
main national infrastructure priorities have been met (roads, schools, hospitals, water, electricity, etc.), and much of 
the remaining demand comes from communities where further infrastructure provision may not be cost-effective. This 
is particularly a problem in Botswana which has large and sparsely populated rural areas. While some such projects 
do proceed, they are justified in social or political terms, and yield little economic return. It has been argued that the 
bottom-up process has led to too much emphasis on social projects and not enough on projects that support 
business (e.g. internet bandwidth). 
However, not all projects included in the NDP are proposed by the community; some are “top-down” and driven 
by national policy needs (e.g. core utility and transport infrastructure such as the electricity grid and airports). 
Nevertheless, these “top-down” projects retain a democratic consensus because they are informed by national 
policies debated and passed in Parliament. 
________________________________ 
1. Botswana’s people are called Batswana. 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
advanced pdf to jpg converter; best pdf to jpg converter online
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf to jpg c#; batch convert pdf to jpg
7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES – 
243
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Public financial assets 
From 1983/4 up to 1997/8, the budget of Botswana was in surplus every year, although 
since 1998/9, there have been budget deficits in eight of the 15 years, most notably in the three 
worst years of the financial crisis (2008/9 to 2010/11). Public finance decision-making has generally 
been cognizant of the limits imposed by absorptive capacity constraints, and the government has 
felt under no obligation to spend all mineral revenues when there were concerns about overheating 
of the economy or when suitable investment opportunities could not be found. Therefore, over the 
period as a whole, there has been considerable accumulation of financial assets. It is important to 
note that these assets are accumulated as a fiscal residual rather than through any process of 
targeting specific amounts of financial savings.  
Historically the government has accumulated significant financial savings and undertaken 
very little borrowing. The government of Botswana’s net financial savings reached 88% of GDP in 
the late 1990s (Figure 7.4). These savings were then partially depleted in the early 2000s by the 
decision to establish a new pension fund for government employees, which involved financing the 
contingent liabilities accumulated under the previously unfunded government pension scheme. Net 
financial savings were partially rebuilt in the mid-2000s, recovering to around 40% of GDP, but were 
then substantially depleted during the deficit years of the global financial crisis, when the deficits 
were financed by a mixture of draw-downs of savings and new borrowing.  
Figure 7.4. Botswana: Net public assets 
Source: Authors’ calculations, based on data from MFDP and BoB.  
Because financial assets are accumulated as a residual from the budget surpluses that 
result once spending decisions have been made, there are no rules regarding the payment of any 
mineral revenues into this fund, nor any rules regarding withdrawals. As a result, the fund could in 
principle be depleted quite quickly. Although no interest is paid on government savings balances, a 
nominal return is calculated and this is paid into the general government budget as a “dividend” 
from the Bank of Botswana. 
The overall foreign exchange reserves are divided primarily into two parts: the Pula Fund 
and the Liquidity/Transactions Tranche. The latter is analogous to the foreign exchange reserves 
that central banks hold for the purposes of financing short-term foreign exchange needs for imports 
of goods and services, net income and capital outflows. The overall reserves change depending on 
balance of payment surpluses or deficits, and the size of the Pula Fund is determined as a residual 
once the Liquidity/Transactions portion of the reserves has been allocated, rather than through an 
-20%
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
% of GDP
Gross
Net of debt
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C# Example: Convert More than Two Type Images to PDF in C#.NET Application. This example shows how to build a PDF document with three image files (BMP, JPEG and
convert pdf file to jpg file; best way to convert pdf to jpg
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Besides raster image Jpeg, images forms like Png, Bmp, Gif, .NET Graphics, and REImage (an You can use this sample code to convert PDF file to Png image.
change from pdf to jpg on; changing pdf file to jpg
244
– 7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
active policy of maintaining a specific level of assets. There are no other rules prescribing the level 
of payments into or withdrawals from the Pula Fund.  
The Pula Fund is sometimes referred to as Botswana’s Sovereign Wealth Fund (SWF). It 
has some similarities with other SWFs in that it is managed for long-term investment returns rather 
than short-term liquidity purposes. However, unlike some other SWFs it is not an independent 
entity; although it was established in its present form under the Bank of Botswana Act 1996, the 
Pula Fund has no separate legal status or balance sheet of its own.  
Although the GRB’s savings have fallen as a percentage of GDP, both Pula Fund reserves 
and total foreign exchange reserves of the GRB have risen steadily with the except in the 2001-
2003 period, when a previously unfunded government pension liability was fully funded, and during 
the 2009 economic crisis (Figure 7.5). 
Figure 7.5. Botswana: Pula Fund and total foreign reserves 
Source: Bank of Botswana, authors’ calculations. 
Although the Pula Fund is not a separate legal entity, a nominal Pula Fund Balance Sheet 
and an Income Statement are included in the Notes to the Bank of Botswana’s Annual Accounts. 
The accounts do not however explicitly present the rate of return on the Pula Fund.  
The Bank of Botswana’s Annual Report and Accounts provides some information on the 
asset composition of the Fund, its notional balance sheet and an income statement. This 
information is provided annually, and the value of the Fund is published monthly as part of the 
Bank’s balance sheet. No reports are published specifically on the Pula Fund, and no information is 
provided on Fund transactions. As part of the foreign exchange reserves, the Pula Fund is invested 
entirely offshore. The detailed currency composition of investments is not published, but the Bank of 
Botswana uses an SDR benchmark for constructing the investment portfolio.  
The bulk of the Pula Fund is invested in bonds, with the second largest share in equities. 
Over the past four years (2008-2012), the composition of the Pula Fund has averaged 71.5% 
bonds, 25.9% equities, and 2.6% other assets. Fund managers have moved to invest a slightly 
higher percentage in the last year in equities, bringing the share to 65% bonds and 35% equities. 
No public information is provided on the identity of the Pula Fund managers or on their asset 
allocation, mandates or performance, or on detailed asset holdings. Half of the short- and long-term 
fixed income investment instruments of the liquidity portfolio and the Pula Fund are managed by the 
Bank and half are managed by its nine fund managers.  
0
10000
20000
30000
40000
50000
60000
70000
80000
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
P million
Pula Fund
Fx Reserves
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Resize converted Tiff image using VB.NET. Convert PDF file to Tiff and jpeg in ASPX webpage online. Online source code for VB.NET class.
change pdf to jpg; batch convert pdf to jpg online
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Convert PDF to HTML. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
convert pdf to jpg batch; best pdf to jpg converter
7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES – 
245
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Regarding the transparency of the Fund’s management, the SWF Institute lists a total of 69 
SWFs around the world as at mid-2013. Of these, a smaller number are rated in terms of the 
Linaburg-Maduell Transparency Index. The Pula Fund obtained a score of 6 in the second quarter 
of 2014, placing it joint 26th out of 51 rated funds. The SWF Institute recommends a minimum rating 
of 8 in order to claim adequate transparency. Although the International Working Group that 
developed the Santiago Principles does not publish any assessment of compliance of different 
SWFs with the Santiago Principles, the Oxford SWF project carried out an assessment of 
compliance with these principles in 2011. The Pula Fund was rated 22
nd
out of 26 SWFs, with only 
15% compliance.  
The Revenue Watch Institute compiles a Resource Governance Index (RGI) which 
measures the quality of governance in the oil, gas and mining sector of 58 countries.
35
The RGI 
incorporates various aspects, including an assessment of mineral revenue management and natural 
resource funds. Botswana’s overall assessment on the RGI was rated as “weak”, with a score of 
47/100, in part because of the poor quality of reporting for the Pula Fund. 
Botswana is not a member of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) 
although De Beers S.A. is a member. The GRB’s reluctance to subscribe to the EITI reflects a 
number of factors, including the historical secrecy of the diamond industry, the confidentiality of the 
revenue sharing agreements with De Beers, and a desire not to give away confidential commercial 
information to competitors.
36
Public expenditure patterns
37
Public expenditure in Botswana has generally been counter-cyclical relative to revenue 
streams. Botswana has therefore been able to smooth out government spending despite the 
volatility of natural resource revenues by accumulating reserves during periods of relatively high 
commodity prices and drawing them down when prices slacken (IMF, 2012c). Policies pursued in 
the context of the Medium Term Fiscal Framework are expected to enhance the certainty and 
stability of government expenditures from the volatile revenue streams. 
Expenditure on the different classes of assets can easily be traced, reflecting policy priorities 
as laid out in NDPs and other policy documents. Total mineral revenues at 2010 prices over the 
period 1983/4 to 2012/13 were P 347 billion. These can, in principle, be apportioned between 
spending on the different types of assets, or on recurrent spending in the case that the SBI 
constraint has not been observed. 
Figure 7.6. Botswana: Gross accumulated mineral revenues and public investment 
Source: Authors’ calculations, based on data from MFDP. 
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
1983/84 1985/86 1987/88 8 1989/90 1991/92 1993/94 4 1995/96 1997/98 8 1999/00 2001/02 2003/04 4 2005/06 2007/08 2009/10 0 2011/12
P billion (real, 2010 prices)
Education
Health
Infrastructure
Mineral revenues acc
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Convert PDF to HTML. |. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF SDK to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage in C# .NET Program.
change pdf to jpg online; c# pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Sometimes, to convert PDF document into BMP, GIF, JPEG and PNG raster images in Visual Basic .NET applications, you may need a third party tool and have some
change pdf to jpg format; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
246
– 7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Evidence presented in Korinek (2014) shows that, on average over the whole period, if not in 
individual years, mineral revenues were entirely devoted to investment in physical and human 
capital assets, and were not used to finance recurrent spending, which was financed by recurrent 
revenue (Figure 7.6). Public investment spending was allocated between physical assets (44%), 
education and training (42%) and health spending (14%).  
Physical investment, excluding health and education facilities, has been undertaken across a 
range of assets with the three largest areas of investment being electricity and water (18%); 
housing and urban infrastructure (15%) and roads (13%).  
Lessons from Botswana’s management of mineral revenues 
Botswana has risen from least-developed country status to that of an upper-middle income 
country, in large part due to its handling of revenue from the minerals sector. The over-riding 
principle motivating expenditure from mineral sector revenues has been that these revenues result 
from the sale of an asset and should therefore be used to finance investment in other assets. An 
examination of the expenditure of minerals sector revenue in Botswana over the last three decades 
confirms that it has been spent in its entirety on human and capital investment and has not been 
used to finance recurrent spending. It is all the more remarkable that this has occurred without any 
formal partitioning of government revenue streams, or earmarking of mineral revenue for particular 
uses.  
Use of mineral revenues for the purpose of investment in Botswana’s people and 
infrastructure has been monitored using Sustainable Budget Indicator (SBI). This has been the 
principal indicator of the use of revenue from mineral resources for investment in human and 
physical capital.  
Public investment spending over the last three decades has been divided between spending 
on infrastructure, and on education and training (roughly equal shares) as well as on health. 
Investment on non-health and non-education related infrastructure has been undertaken across a 
range of assets with the three largest areas of investment being electricity and water, housing and 
urban infrastructure, and roads. Education expenditure has also been substantial. In addition to 
expenditure on local schools and the University of Botswana and other tertiary training, the GRB 
finances tertiary education overseas for many of its eligible citizens. 
The decision-making process by which development priorities and expenditure on projects 
have been determined is an inclusive one. Expenditure on investment projects is determined within 
the National Development Plan process: no projects are financed outside the NDP process. The 
NDP process is bottom-up as well as top-down, and provides the forum where development 
projects are proposed and negotiated. Discussion about priorities takes place at all levels of 
government and civil society. Priorities and projects are proposed by inter-ministerial groups at the 
highest level of government; by local government authorities; by interest groups and representatives 
of different groups within the population; by the business community; and by local chiefs. Most of 
the projects retained in the six-year development plans come from bottom-up consultations, 
although not all projects proposed at that level can be accepted. 
This broadly based consultative system with consultations from the village level to the 
highest levels of government is a more open process than in many other countries. Stakeholders 
generally, therefore, feel committed to the resultant plan, with its outline of priorities and retained 
projects.  
As a result of these policies, Botswana improved its socio-economic performance 
considerably over the past three decades. Access to education, health services, sanitation, and 
clean water increased dramatically, despite a widely dispersed population and low initial levels. 
About 95% of the population had access to clean water by 2004. Virtually all Batswana children now 
attend junior-secondary school (as compared with only 100 secondary school graduates in total at 
independence) and the adult literacy rate is more than 85% (Maipose, 2008). 
7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES – 
247
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
The GRB has felt no obligation to spend all mineral revenues when there were concerns 
about overheating of the economy or when suitable investment opportunities could not be found. 
Expenditure patterns in Botswana have generally been counter-cyclical or acyclical relative to 
revenue streams. Botswana has therefore been able to smooth out government spending despite 
the volatility of natural resource revenues by accumulating reserves during periods of relatively high 
commodity prices and drawing them down when prices slacken or demand for diamonds drops.  
These tendencies have provided Botswana with relative macroeconomic stability and 
avoided the boom-slump cycles that characterise many mineral-based economies (Lewin, 2011). 
The periodic slowdowns in the diamond industry have thus by and large not been passed on to the 
rest of the economy.  
In order to save some of the revenues from its minerals assets for future generations and for 
shorter-term stabilisation purposes, the GRB created a long-term investment facility called the Pula 
Fund. The Pula fund is managed for long-term investment rather than short-term liquidity purposes. 
As part of the foreign exchange reserves, the Pula Fund is invested entirely offshore. The Bank of 
Botswana uses an SDR benchmark for determining the currencies in which the Pula Fund is 
invested. Investing offshore in foreign-denominated assets helps prevent pressure being exerted on 
the local exchange rate, an essential factor in preventing the “Dutch disease” phenomenon that 
besets many minerals exporters. Having said that, the lack of transparency surrounding this SWF 
raises questions as to whether its management could be improved further. 
7.4. 
Creating spillover effects: Development of mining-related activities 
Leveraging comparative advantage in extractives 
Beyond the direct impact on resources covered in the previous sections, the mining sector 
has the potential to create spillover effects by contributing to the development of mining-related 
activities that cater to domestic and international extraction firms, or by promoting the development 
and involvement of local firms in downstream, value-adding activity. There is an incentive to explore 
the scope for creating such spillovers in order to leverage a country’s comparative advantage in 
natural resources to expand into sectors that are vertically or horizontally close to the extractive 
industries. 
Mining sector participants in Chile do not believe that Chile has a comparative advantage in 
promoting downstream industries, i.e. increasing its capacity for further refining of copper.
38
In these 
industries, margins are lower, energy inputs are substantial, and further refining of products is 
thought to be undertaken more efficiently closer to final markets. Instead, Chile has opted for a 
strategy of supporting sectors that service its mining operations, both in terms of equipment and 
services.  
Chile has, therefore, focused on upstream or horizontal activities, which typically results in 
what is called a mining cluster. There are various successful examples of such clusters in other 
countries that, starting with mineral wealth or wealth in other natural resources, have developed 
services, capital goods and intermediate goods industries that support mining activities. In the 
United States and Canada, for example, a mining equipment industry emerged. In Australia, mining 
technology services have developed: over 60% of software used in mining globally is provided by 
Australian firms. Finland has also leveraged its comparative advantage in mining to develop mining 
services by fostering close collaboration between producing firms, the public sector and universities 
(see Korinek (2014) for more information). 
Botswana has chosen to concentrate on its processing sectors. The GRB has consistently, 
over the years, attempted to expand opportunities for Botswana firms down the diamond value-
chain in order to extract greater value from its diamonds and to create jobs. It calls this process 
“beneficiation,” a word that is used most commonly in Southern Africa and most commonly in 
reference to the diamond industry. Beneficiation entails undertaking more and more processing 
within the country where diamonds are extracted.  
248
– 7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Developing mining-related goods and services in Chile
39
Organisational change has made it more feasible than in the past to develop a cluster that 
serves local mining activities and exports goods and services to the global mining industry.
40
In 
mining in particular, firms have become more focused on their core business and have outsourced 
their remaining activities. In the past, mining companies were self-sufficient and supplied the 
majority of intermediate goods and services that they required. Thirty years ago, Codelco, the state-
owned copper enterprise, had one employee from a contracting company for every five employees. 
Currently, for every five Codelco employees, seven contracted employees provide services in 
company facilities. This is the same ratio found in large, private mining companies. The trend 
towards outsourcing in Chilean mining, and the role of service providers, is more pronounced than 
in other countries. In Chile, the proportion of contracted workers with respect to the total mining 
labour force is over 60%; in Australia and Canada, it is 24%, and in the United States, 8% 
(Fundación Chile, 2011). This evolution in mining companies’ organisation has allowed a number of 
Chilean companies specialising in the provision of services to develop competitively. Indeed, 
several of them have started to export their services. 
Apart from changes in company organisation, the demand for new technologies and 
knowledge has been growing and will continue to do so. Exploited minerals are of a lower grade 
with a more complex mineralogy, and they are deeper and will require underground mining, which is 
increasingly operated remotely. Also, environmental sustainability requirements demand more 
efficient use of basic resources like water and energy, and better treatment of waste and emissions. 
This poses new challenges and requirements, and opens up vast potential for technological 
development and the provision of specialised services. These are knowledge-intensive services due 
to their highly specialised nature and because of the need for continuous innovation and 
incorporation of technologies in order to find new, more efficient solutions for mining operations 
(Urzua, 2007).  
Using the size of the mining sector as an indication of the potential for exports of mining-
related goods and services suggests that compared to Australia, the United States or Canada, 
Chilean exports of mining-related goods and services could significantly surpass current levels. If 
Chile attained the same level of mining-related activity exports as a percentage of total mining 
exports that Canada has achieved, this would imply an increase of more than ten times the current 
level. 
Chile is in the process of developing its mining services industry. Historically, the first step 
was to substitute imports of intermediate goods and services.
41
The proportion of domestic 
intermediate goods rose from less than 25% in the 1950s to around 60% towards the end of the 
century.
42
This expertise led to greater exports of mining sector supplies. In the last 12 years, 
exports of products and equipment used in the extractive industries grew from less than five to 
almost USD 300 million. The main supplies currently exported are grinding rolls, machinery and 
equipment, spare parts for machinery, equipment for mineral processing, and machinery and tubes 
for perforation and drilling (source: National Customs Service).  
Exports of engineering services, which were approaching USD 10 million at the beginning of 
the 21
st
century, exceeded USD 200 million in 2011. Growth is even greater if we consider the 
previous import substitution of these services, which has fallen over the same period. The 
engineering of large mining projects built in the 1980s and 1990s was carried out abroad, while in 
the last 15 years, it has been carried out primarily in Chile. The activity of engineering companies, 
measured in person-hours, increased by 20% between 1992 and 2003, and between 2003 and 
2011 grew by 115%. The main growth by far has been seen in mining-contracted engineering, 
which represented more than 50% of the total in 2011.
43
According to a recent study of engineering services in the Americas by a team from Duke 
University, “[the] Chilean engineering sector is strongly positioned within the Americas to take 
advantage of new opportunities emerging in the region. Chilean engineers are widely recognised 
by leading global firms for their excellent technical skills and they are considered to be world 
leaders in engineering for mining” (Fernandez-Stark et al., 2010a and 2010b). Chile is host to a 
7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES – 
249
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
number of global Centres of Excellence and firms draw on their Chilean staff to make decisions on 
projects around the world. Starting in the 1990s, several international firms began subcontracting 
local Chilean firms or forming joint ventures. Fluor, Bechtel, SNC Lavalin, AMEC and SKM 
Minmetals are among the firms that established greenfield operations in Chile and grew their 
offices organically. Currently, there are around 16 000 professionals working in the engineering 
consulting industry in the country, 70% of them in mining projects. 
Developing a qualified workforce for the sector 
The level of qualification of the workforce is a critical factor in explaining the different 
degrees of success that countries have had in increasing the impact of mining on their 
development. A recent study of human resource needs commissioned by the association of large 
mining companies concludes that “the gaps (or projected deficits) of the qualified labour force 
constitutes probably the greatest challenge that Chilean large-scale mining is facing for the 2011-
2020 decade” (Fundación Chile, 2011). It is estimated that mining companies and large-scale 
mining contractors will have to increase their resources by 53% between 2012 and 2020, 
considering only extraction, processing and maintenance operations, a situation that becomes 
especially critical at specific levels and positions.  
Although Chile saw significant development in higher education during the 20
th
century, 
insufficient numbers of young people are enrolled in technological fields, and particularly in 
programmes related to mining, metallurgy and geology. This is a potentially serious limitation for 
the cluster's development and may even prove to be a limitation for existing mining operations. 
Chilean engineers are well qualified but insufficient in number to fulfil domestic and international 
demand. When Bechtel decided to hire extensively in 2007, for example, the labour pool for 
engineers in the mining sector did not meet the demand. Another factor is the international deficit in 
this area and the fact that many foreign companies recruit professionals in Chile.  
There is a clear need for higher education institutions to work in close contact with the 
industry to increase enrolment in this area. In order to increase the impact on the development of 
its mining resources, it will become necessary to raise one or two consortia of Chilean universities 
to a high level of excellence, bringing in the best students from Chile and from abroad. Master's 
and Doctoral programs related to mining increased from 14 in 2002 to 27 in 2006. However, this 
substantial increase was marked by an excessive multiplication of programmes and a 
fragmentation of efforts. It would be advisable to have one or two world-class programmes 
drawing both Chilean and foreign students.
44
Public-private initiatives for mining development 
In Chile, the government and the production sector have only recently begun promoting 
initiatives to foster the development of the mining cluster. During the first decade of the 21
st
century, 
a series of diagnostic studies were conducted on the current state and potential of this cluster and 
how to best promote it. A low level of cooperation among stakeholders was observed, as was the 
absence of a shared vision of how best to develop the sector (Boston Consulting Group, 2007). 
Moreover, it was considered that without the active participation of large mining firms the cluster is 
unlikely to develop (Meller and Lima, 2003). These studies suggest that export and development 
opportunities can be found in niches of the value-chain that are not being served by the large, 
global firms that currently supply the core goods for the mining industry. It was estimated that 
exports of such niche goods and services, if they were to be exploited by new or existing Chilean 
firms, could more than triple in five years to reach USD 1 billion (Boston Consulting Group, 2007).  
A substantial share of the innovation undertaken by Chilean firms is adaptive.
45,46
Local 
firms, working closely with teams in the large mining firms, solve the challenges they face during 
their operations on the ground. Such innovation by proximity is a niche that global firms that 
manufacture mining equipment cannot fill. A partnership between BHP-Billiton, Codelco and 
Chilean equipment and services providers is building on these opportunities. These two large 
mining concerns partner with smaller firms that offer goods or services that they need and that are 
chosen for their ability to find innovative solutions to well-identified problems facing the industry. 
250
– 7. MINERAL RESOURCE POLICIES FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
These partnerships are expected to develop local providers into world-class suppliers (see Box 7.5, 
for more details).  
Another example where proximity and adaptive innovation have synergised is in responding 
to challenges created by the specific geography or geology of each mine. For example, Codelco 
operates the El Teniente mine, which is by far the largest underground copper mine in the world. 
This has given Codelco comparative advantage in state-of-the-art technological expertise needed to 
operate such a large underground mine, and it has developed local research and development 
capacity in that area. Codelco signed an agreement with Rio Tinto, a leading international mining 
group, three years ago to invest jointly in such development to solve some common challenges.  
Box 7.5. BHP-Billiton, Codelco programme to develop world-class suppliers* 
This programme, originally designed by BHP-Billiton, aims to increase the capacity of domestic suppliers and 
contribute to Chilean economic development, while increasing the competitiveness of its own mining operations. 
World-class suppliers are defined by their ability to export knowledge-intensive services and technology to other 
mining countries and sectors of the Chilean economy. 
The programme brings together suppliers with development potential in order to solve, together with the mining 
firm, the problems that have been previously identified and prioritised by mining operational areas. In this way the 
programme seeks to create development opportunities in local firms, encouraging and preparing them to compete 
globally. 
After identifying needs for specific innovative solutions and selecting participants from among the potential 
providers, the programme provides a framework to test ideas within real-time operations. In addition, it provides 
external consulting to give suppliers advice and training on competencies required to achieve world-class business 
performance, and promote links with local research centres and universities. 
BHP-Billiton started this programme in 2008. Early in 2010, Codelco joined the programme. At the beginning 
of 2012, more than 60 suppliers were participating in the programme. By 2020, the programme aims to have 
developed more than 250 world-class suppliers. 
The 60 projects on which the suppliers are currently working address various kinds of challenges. These 
include: dust reduction and management, water, energy, equipment maintenance, human resources, and leaching. 
Nine of these projects are defined by the leaders of the programme as "disruptive", i.e. with a high level of 
complexity; the other 53 are classified as "incremental", implying a medium level of complexity. 
The programme builds on the commitment of mining firms to use their strong purchasing capacity to leverage 
the development of local providers, transforming or developing them into world-class suppliers. In order to do this 
the mining companies have had to partially modify their usual procurement process which is designed to obtain the 
lowest-cost goods and services efficiently and on a highly reliable basis. This system was not designed to purchase 
new solutions with less standardised specifications. It tended to avoid less well-known and less predictable 
suppliers, as may initially be the case with the providers that the programme aims to promote. These changes in 
procurement processes require commitment and trust from the leaders of the mining firms. 
Thus the programme aims to achieve a win-win result for the mining firm itself and for the development of the 
domestic economy. It seeks not merely to draw on the existing competences of suppliers but to strengthen both their 
innovative and wider business capacities. This process should enable these firms to capture a larger share of the 
rising demand for knowledge-intensive goods and services both in Chile and internationally. 
It is too early to evaluate the results of the programme. However, it is noteworthy that the programme is 
underway with 60 suppliers working with two of the world's largest mining firms using a methodology that was 
specially designed and successfully tested to identify specific demands and to select and support the potential 
suppliers. It is expected that other mining firms will take part in the programme as sponsors, and some of the large 
international providers of mining equipment could also sponsor part of this initiative. This process has required the 
collaboration of the mining firms’ operations teams, both in the production and procurement processes and has 
involved the participation of universities and technological centres. Also participating was a team of external 
advisers, mainly from Fundación Chile (a public- private institution that promotes innovation), which has developed 
capacity to support the new suppliers. 
__________________ 
* Osvaldo Urzua, who has led this programme, provided information about the progress made during the last two 
years. A policy note written by Barnett and Bell (2011) provides valuable information. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested