1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
31
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
and metals shipped to specific countries, which it then periodically adjusted. Indonesia applies a 
minimum price regime for wood exports and the Russian Federation does the same for diamonds. 
Pakistan in 2008 and Viet Nam in 2008, 2009 and 2010 used similar measures for rice exports.  
In yet other cases, firms in India are required to pay a 20% congestion surcharge for all 
traffic to Bangladesh and Pakistan. The government also awards mining rights preferentially to 
companies that use domestically sourced iron and steel, manganese and coke in their own 
domestic processing operations. As captive mining concessions increase their share of production, 
less material is available for sale on the free market, including for destinations abroad. Procedures 
can, by themselves, hamper or discourage export activity. The Russian Federation reportedly has in 
recent times designated the customs points through which certain exports must clear. This affected 
more than 25 countries importing items like refined copper products and iron and steel scrap from 
the Russian Federation.  
The picture of restrictions and the resulting distortions of international trade is more complex 
still because the majority (34) of countries with restrictions in the OECD Inventory made use of 
more than one type of measure when restricting industrial raw materials exports. Over the period 
2009-12, Indonesia and the Russian Federation, followed by Canada, China, and India employed 
the greatest variety of different measures: six different measures for Indonesia and the Russian 
Federation and five for India, Canada, and China, respectively. Eight other countries used three 
measures (Afghanistan, Belarus, Benin, Ghana, Rwanda, Thailand, Ukraine, and Uruguay) and 20 
countries employed two types of measure.  
1.4. 
Analysis by sector 
As for products affected by export restrictions, two industrial sectors stand out as ones 
where restrictive export policies flourish: steelmaking raw materials, and metals waste and scrap. 
These sectors are examined more closely in this section, along with a group of non-ferrous minor 
metals, which merits attention because many of these metals are critical inputs for products at the 
technology frontier. Finally, the situation in the markets of rice and wheat is presented. The cereals 
markets (mainly maize, rice and wheat) comprise some of the most traded agricultural products and 
provide much of the caloric requirements for a large segment of the world’s population. 
It is striking that, in the following sector-specific analysis, the same countries appear as both 
major exporters of industrial raw materials and as regular users of various kinds of export restriction 
for these exports. Yet it would be far too simplistic to categorise trading partners in raw materials 
markets as consisting of, in one camp, exporting countries that are willing to use restrictions to 
further domestic policy objectives but with insufficient regard for any market disruptions and 
artificially high prices they may cause, and in the other camp, importing countries that are passive 
recipients of the consequences of these policies, with little leverage over the situation either 
individually or (so far) collectively. As Table 1.6 shows, large exporters who make regular use of 
restrictions in markets for some minerals are often heavily reliant on imports of other minerals, 
where they may face a restricted supply due to the use of similar trade instruments by other 
countries. This suggests that a collective tightening of discipline concerning export restrictions for 
these tradeables may create surprisingly few ‘losers’, and that a multilateral consensus in this 
direction may be more achievable than many expect. Chapter 3 presents results from a simulation 
exercise that support this view. 
Best pdf to jpg converter for - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpeg on; convert pdf file to jpg on
Best pdf to jpg converter for - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert .pdf to .jpg; convert .pdf to .jpg online
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
32
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table 1.6. Industrial materials exports and imports, of selected countries using export restrictions 
(million USD) 
Country 
Export restrictions applied in 2012 
Exports of 
minerals (2012) 
Imports of 
minerals (2012) 
Argentina 
Export tax for most goods, including minerals  
Export licensing requirement for iron, copper and cobalt  
2 223 
992 
China 
Export quota for bauxite, magnesium, molybdenum, 
phosphates, rare earth metals and other 
Export tax for copper, cobalt, iron, manganese, rare earth 
metals, tungsten, zinc and other 
Export licensing requirement for bauxite, molybdenum, 
phosphates, talc, thorium and tin  
3 180 
140 939 
India 
Export tax for chromium, iron, manganese, mica 
Export licensing requirement for chromium, manganese, 
silica sands 
Captive mining policy for coke, iron and steel, and 
manganese 
6 083 
24 524 
Indonesia 
Export prohibition for silica sands 
Export licensing requirement for precious metals and 
stones 
Qualified exporters list for diamonds 
5 151 
1 206 
Kazakhstan 
Export tax for aluminium products 
4 605 
688 
Russia 
Export tax on coke, molybdenum, tungsten and diamonds 
Export licensing requirement for bauxite, antimony, cobalt, 
copper, sulphur, tin and other 
Domestic market obligation for certain precious metals and 
diamonds 
Minimum export price measure for precious metals and 
stones 
9 043 
2 835 
South Africa 
Export licensing requirement for antimony, cadmium, 
chromium, copper, lead, molybdenum, precious metals 
and other 
Export tax for diamonds 
13 650 
921 
Note: Trade figures refer to the countries’ total exports and imports of all unprocessed minerals and metals surveyed 
for the OECD Inventory. Semi-processed minerals and metals, and metal waste and scrap, are excluded. The export 
restrictions and products mentioned are not exhaustive.  
Source: UN Comtrade HS2007. 
Iron and steel and steelmaking raw materials 
Steel is one of the most widely produced industrial products in the world, with around 
90 countries producing it (World Steel Association, 2013). The steelmaking sector depends heavily 
on a range of minerals and metals – around 18 materials (such as iron ore, coke, iron and steel 
scrap manganese, chromium, tin and zinc) are used as inputs for steel.  
The 38 economies that imposed export restrictions on these steelmaking raw materials in 
both 2009 and 2012 accounted for a total of one billion metric tons of crude steel production and 
one billion metric tons of hot-rolled production in 2012, or 68% and 71% of the world total, 
respectively (OECD, 2014b). Many of these countries are either very small steel producers or have 
such limited production that data are not even available. There are, however, several very large 
producers of steel on the list, including China, India, Japan, the Russian Federation, as well as a 
number of medium-sized producers such as Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, South Africa, 
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf to jpg; convert multi page pdf to jpg
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
batch pdf to jpg online; reader pdf to jpeg
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
33
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Thailand, Ukraine, the United Arab Emirates, Venezuela and Viet Nam. The actions of these larger 
players can strongly influence the global markets for coke, iron ore and other primary inputs. As 
major producers of steel, they are also among the leading countries generating steel scrap and their 
export policies influence global scrap prices and supply.  
Figure 1.3 shows that in 2012 raw material export policies were generally more restrictive 
than in 2009 for iron ore, coke and ferrous scrap, the three main steelmaking raw materials that, by 
weight and volume, represent the vast majority of raw materials used in steel production. 
Developments since 2012 have led to less restrictive policies in a few cases, while in most other 
cases policies have become more restrictive. The OECD Inventory also monitors measures 
affecting trade in semi-processed ferrous metals products. Here, export restrictions appear to play a 
more limited role and their use fell slightly from 2009 to 2012.  
Figure 1.3. Count of measures restricting exports of steelmaking inputs and iron and steel products 
(2009, 2012) 
Note: A count of measures was made per HS6 product line. As many products comprise more than one HS6 line 
and the number of lines per product varies, the simple count was adjusted by dividing counts at the product level by 
the number of HS lines constituting each product. 
Source: OECD inventory, as of June 2014. 
Various types of measure are used to restrict exports of steelmaking raw materials. For iron 
ore, coke and ferrous scrap, the three main steelmaking raw materials, export licensing 
requirements have been the most frequently used measure in recent years. Such licensing 
requirements were applied by 20 governments on ferrous scrap exports in 2012, by five 
governments on their iron ore exports and by two governments on coke exports, according to the 
OECD Inventory data. As shown in Figure 1.4, export taxes were the next most frequent measure. 
In 2012, 14 countries imposed taxes on ferrous scrap exports, five countries on iron ore exports, 
and two countries on coke exports. Over the period surveyed, the incidence of export prohibitions 
for steel scrap increased noticeably.
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
Iron & steel - ferrous metals (semi-processed)
Iron & steel waste & scrap
Iron ore
Coke
2009
2012
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Best PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful .NET WinForms application to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
convert pdf to jpg for; convert pdf file to jpg online
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Best PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET for converting PDF to image in C#.NET Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
convert multipage pdf to jpg; conversion of pdf to jpg
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
34
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Figure 1.4. Restrictions on exports of core steel making inputs in 2009-2012, 
by share of types of measure 
Note: The calculation covers the following products: coke, iron ore, iron and steel waste and scrap and iron and 
steel ferrous metals (semi-processed). Based on counts adjusted for the number of lines per product. 
Source: OECD Inventory, as of June 2014. 
Metal waste and scrap 
Export restrictions have proliferated in recent years for metal waste and scrap. This is a 
relatively young but fast growing industry dominated by ferrous scrap used in steel production. 
Exports have become extensively regulated in many regions of the world and almost the full range 
of secondary products is affected. 
Official trade statistics are particularly sketchy for this sector. According to UN Comtrade 
figures, world exports of metal waste and scrap totalled 84 billion USD in 2012. Some 60% of this 
trade is conducted by OECD countries, and OECD countries import predominantly from other 
OECD countries, especially from Europe and North America, which lead the rest of the world in 
generating and consuming scrap and which trade freely.  
Exporters in other regions, however, have increased their use of restrictions. According to 
the OECD Inventory data, Argentina, China, India, Morocco and four other countries introduced or 
tightened export controls in 2009. In 2010, twelve countries took such action, and five and seven 
other countries followed in 2011 and 2012, respectively. As Figure 1.5 shows, by 2012 conditions of 
trade had deteriorated for almost every type of metal waste and scrap. Few governments had 
moved to lift restrictions already in place in 2009, and exports of some 30 different types or groups 
of scrap were under restriction in 39 countries. Exports of ferrous waste and scrap used in 
steelmaking, the largest segment of the world scrap market, were restricted most often, i.e. by 
34 countries. This was followed by aluminium and copper (29 countries each), lead and zinc (26), 
antimony and magnesium (23), and beryllium, nickel, tin, and tungsten (22). While export restraints 
are used almost exclusively by emerging economies and developing countries, the question of 
safeguarding scrap supplies for local industries is also being debated today in some developed 
countries. 
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
2012
2011
2010
2009
Export prohibition
Export quota
Export tax
Licensing requirement
Minimum export price / price reference for exports
Other export measures
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Best and professional C# image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
convert pdf to high quality jpg; c# convert pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Best WPF PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful PDF converter. PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
change pdf to jpg on; reader convert pdf to jpg
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
35
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Figure 1.5. Count of measures restricting exports of metal waste and scrap (2009, 2012) 
Note: A count of measures was made per HS6 product line. As some types of metal scrap comprise more than one 
HS6 line and the number of lines per type of scrap varies, the simple count was adjusted by dividing counts at the 
product level by the number of HS lines constituting each product. The figure does not show some items like Hafnium, 
Mica, Other ash and residues. 
Source: OECD Inventory, as of June 2014. 
As Figure 1.6 shows, metal waste and scrap is a sector where outright export prohibitions 
are gaining in importance relative to other types of measure. In fact, OECD Inventory records 
suggest that export prohibitions account for a much higher share of total export restrictions in this 
industry (8% in 2009 and 23% in 2012) than in the primary minerals and metals industry (5% in 
2009 and 14% in 2012). Of course, export taxes, export license regimes and other measures, too, 
can make exporting prohibitively costly. In Mauritius, for example, to qualify for a scrap metal export 
licence a company must be Mauritian-owned, have a specific site plan, have been in the business 
for at least 12 months before the date of application for the license, and have undergone an 
inspection of its scrapyard. Moreover, the licence is valid for six months only and costs MUR 50 000 
(approximately USD 1 650). These onerous conditions did not stop exports, but they plunged by 
44% in 2009 when the measure was introduced. 
The high and growing incidence of outright export prohibitions is confirmed for ferrous waste 
and scrap, which has seen trade surge from a mere 9.3 million tons in 1990 to 103 million tons in 
2012 (World Steel Association, 2013). In 2012, prohibitions (mostly adopted by small exporting 
countries) accounted for 28% of all restrictions in place in this sector, up from 18% in 2009. This 
gives the wrong signals in a global market where supply is struggling to keep up with demand. An 
estimated 490 million tons of ferrous scrap was produced worldwide in 2011, while industry figures 
put world consumption at 570 million tons, up 7.6% from 2010.
18
Of the world’s leading regions 
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
Antimony
Tin
Tungsten
Iron and steel
Magnesium
Molybdenum
Beryllium
Nickel
Tantalum
Copper
Cadmium
Chromium
Cobalt
Titanium
Zirconium
Manganese
Bismuth
Lead
Zinc
Aluminium
Thallium
Gold
Platinum
Silver
Arsenic, mercury, thallium
2009
2012
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Best and professional image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
.pdf to jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Best adobe PDF to image converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap
convert pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf picture to jpg
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
36
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
generating ferrous scrap (EU, China, United States, Japan, the Russian Federation), the Russian 
Federation and China have erected export tariff walls for the benefit of domestic user industries. 
Exports from the Russian Federation have declined significantly over the last decade. Increasing 
generation of scrap within China and the discouragement of its exportation are working to diminish 
the country’s reliance on imported steel scrap.
19
As demand from steel producers around the globe 
for ferrous scrap continues to grow but trade becomes ever more regulated, global competition over 
access to this material will grow fiercer. 
Figure 1.6. Restrictions on metal waste and scrap exports in 2009-2012, 
by share of types of measure 
Note: Based on counts adjusted for the number of lines per product. 
Source: OECD Inventory, as of June 2014. 
Non-ferrous minor metals 
Traditionally, the term “minor metals” denotes metals that are not traded on formal 
exchanges, although cobalt and molybdenum are now traded on the London Metal Exchange along 
with major base metals. Non-ferrous minor metals share certain other characteristics. They are 
often extracted as by-products of non-ferrous base metals and, compared to aluminium, copper and 
other major base metals, have a relatively low annual production volume but high unit value. They 
serve as crucial inputs for high-technology industries and their use is typically very specialised – for 
example, for filaments in light bulbs, electronic pastes, semi-conductors, components in mobile 
phones and tablets, and as alloying agents in specialty steels for the automotive and aerospace 
sectors. Metals such as neodymium (a rare earth element), lithium, indium and gallium are therefore 
also called “technology metals”. As technology progresses, new applications are found, thereby 
creating new supply and demand patterns, as demonstrated by the growth in renewables 
technology.
20
Of the 14 metals shown in Figure 1.7, which range from antimony and beryllium to titanium 
and zirconium, none was traded freely in 2009 and conditions deteriorated thereafter. By 2012, 
export restrictions had tightened for more than half the metals listed (germanium and other 
materials with semi-conductor properties, tungsten, cobalt, molybdenum, magnesium and 
tantalum). Exports from eight countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, China, India, the Russian 
Federation, South Africa, Viet Nam), several of which are major players in the world market, faced 
restraint. Four and three of the top 5 producers of antimony and tungsten, respectively, restricted 
their exports in 2012. This includes China, which is a leading world producer of 11 minor metals and 
which uses export taxes, export quotas, licensing requirements or some combination of these 
measures extensively across the minor metals sector.  
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
2012
2011
2010
2009
Export prohibition
Export quota
Export tax
Licensing requirement
Minimum export price / price reference for exports
Other export measures
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
37
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
The list of products shown here is not exhaustive and, depending on the source, can include 
other items. The Minor Metals Trade Association, for example, covers some 34 products, including 
certain precious metals (ruthenium, rhodium, osmium), and chemicals and compounds such as 
lithium and rare earth elements. Lithium and its compounds have traditionally been used in the 
production of ceramics, glass and aluminum but demand growth in recent years has come from 
lithium batteries and applications in cell phones and other portable consumer goods, as well as in 
hybrid and electric vehicles. The OECD Inventory shows one country, Argentina, collecting export 
taxes on lithium compounds. Argentina stands out among countries imposing export restrictions 
because the range and number of raw materials and other products that are taxed when exported is 
by far the largest. Across all countries in the Inventory, export taxes and non-automatic licensing 
requirements are easily the dominant types of export measures employed (Figure 1.8). 
Figure 1.7. Count of measures restricting exports of non-ferrous minor metals (2009, 2012) 
Note: A count of measures was made per HS6 product line. As many products comprise more than one HS6 line 
and the number of lines per product varies, the simple count was adjusted by dividing counts at the product level by 
the number of HS lines constituting each product. *Refers to germanium, vanadium, gallium, hafnium, indium, 
niobium and rhenium. 
Source: OECD Inventory, as of June 2014. 
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Antimony
Manganese
Germanium*
Tungsten
Cobalt
Molybdenum
Magnesium
Bismuth
Tantalum
Zirconium
Titanium
Beryllium
Cadmium
Chromium
2009
2012
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
38
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Figure 1.8. Restrictions on non-ferrous minor metals in 2009-2012, by share of types of measure 
Note: The minor metals are: antimony, beryllium, bismuth, chromium, cobalt, germanium, vanadium, gallium, hafnium, 
indium, niobium, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum. Titanium, tungsten, zirconium. Based on counts adjusted for 
the number of lines per product. Based on counts adjusted for the number of lines per product. No export prohibitions 
were reported for non-ferrous minor metals in 2009-2012. 
Source: OECD Inventory, as of June 2014. 
Rare earth metals
21
are other metallic elements critical for high-technology manufacturing, 
ranging from wind turbines and cell phones to defence applications. Although known deposits are 
more dispersed around the world, China has over the last decade come to occupy a near-monopoly 
position at all stages of the supply chain of rare earth materials (raw ores, oxides and alloys) with 
the result that many countries depend critically on this source. Economic growth and consumer 
demand have increased the needs of China’s own manufacturing industries for these metals, 
prompting the government to restrict the outflow of domestic production. Export quotas have been 
introduced and successively tightened. In 2009, allocations were cut by 40%, followed by a further 
reduction in 2010. Export duties were increased for all rare earth elements. These actions, by 
raising export prices and placing non-Chinese downstream manufacturers at a competitive 
disadvantage, caused friction with trading partners and provoked concern about reliability of supply. 
Since then, tight supply and high prices have prompted companies around the world to restart or 
initiate mining and processing operations for some of the rare earth elements outside China (e.g. in 
Australia, United States).  
Other industrial raw materials 
Precious metals and stones, and wood, are other sectors affected by export restrictions. In 
the case of gold and other precious metals, restrictions are mostly applied to already processed 
products, whereas restrictions affect diamonds only when traded in their raw form. In total, 
13 countries applied restrictions in 2012, including three major producers (China for silver, and the 
Russian Federation and South Africa for diamonds and precious metals). 
Eleven of the 21 countries surveyed by the OECD Inventory for wood products applied 
restrictions. These consisted mostly of non-automatic licensing requirements but also outright 
export bans, applied to industrial roundwood (i.e. logs) and/or sawnwood and veneer. All the 
countries surveyed are leading world producers of the respective categories of roundwood and 
semi-processed products of interest (sawnwood, plywood, veneer). With the exception of Indonesia, 
which expanded the range of wood products subject to export controls, the governments of the 
countries surveyed did not change their policies between 2009 and 2012. 
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
2012
2011
2010
2009
Export quota
Export tax
Licensing requirement
Minimum export price / price reference for exports
Other export measures
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
39
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Agricultural and food products: Rice and wheat
22
Agro-food products are produced and consumed throughout the world, but many countries 
do not produce enough to feed their populations due to climatic and other resource constraints. 
Rice and wheat are crucial for human survival, providing many of the calories consumed in the 
developing world while also being among the key targeted commodities for export restrictions. 
About 89 countries produce rice and 75 countries produce wheat, whereas rice is a staple food in 
116 countries and wheat, in 119 countries. Countries that either do not produce them at all, or do 
not produce enough at competitive prices, rely on the international market to satisfy domestic 
needs.  
(a) Rice 
More countries applied a larger variety of export restrictions for rice between 2007 and 2008 
than in the other years covered by the inventory. During this period, eight (Argentina, China, Egypt, 
India, Indonesia, Myanmar, Pakistan and Viet Nam) of the 16 countries had export restrictions in 
place. Four countries (Argentina, China, Egypt and Viet Nam) taxed rice exports and four (Egypt, 
India, Myanmar, and Viet Nam) banned them. Three of the four countries imposing export bans had 
other measures in effect as well. Licensing requirements and minimum export price provisions were 
also in force. By 2010, five countries still had active export restrictions. Egypt and India imposed 
quotas and bans, while Argentina continued to impose export taxes on agricultural commodities. 
Viet Nam maintained its minimum export price policy, first introduced in 2008, while China and 
Indonesia continued their export license requirement. In 2011, only four countries were actively 
restricting their rice exports. Argentina continued its export tax, Egypt its export ban and China its 
export license while Myanmar introduced an export ban.  
Export supply of rice is highly concentrated. In 2008, 35 countries exported some of their 
production but the top five exporters provided 78% of the total and the leading ten exporters 
supplied 92% of the market. Three of the eight countries restricting their rice exports in 2008 
(Viet Nam, Pakistan and India) were among the top five exporters and two more (Myanmar and 
China) were among the top ten leading exporters (Box 1.3). Total rice exports in 2008 fell below the 
2007 level by some 2.5 million tons. 
It is not clear, however, that the entire shortfall in exports relative to 2007 was a result of the 
export restrictions. The largest rice exporter in 2008, Thailand, did not adopt export restrictive 
policies, yet its exports were 1.4 million tons below 2007 levels, while exports from Viet Nam, the 
second leading exporter and Myanmar, the sixth largest exporter, both with export restrictive 
measures, were some 1.3 million tons and 500 thousand tons, respectively, higher than in 2007. 
Exports from India, the fifth largest exporter, contributed the most to the export shortfall with exports 
almost 2.6 million tons below 2007 levels.  
Box 1.3. Export measures in the rice markets in 2008 
In 2008, a total of eight countries imposed measures to restrain their rice exports, with China, Egypt, 
Indonesia, the Republic of the Union of Myanmar and Pakistan joining three countries (Argentina, India and 
Viet Nam) that imposed restrictions in 2007. Argentina continued imposing a 10% export tax and India continued 
banning exports conditional on a minimum export price, but exempting some countries with country-specific 
quotas. China imposed an export tax of 5% while Viet Nam changed the export ban initiated in July 2007 to, 
initially an export quota of 4.5 million tons and a minimum export price which was later switched to a variable 
export tax from USD 30/ton to USD 175/ton, depending upon the free on board (fob) price. Egypt initially imposed 
an export tax of Egyptian pounds 300/ton but subsequently banned all exports, while in Pakistan’s case, a 
minimum export price ranging from USD 750/ton to USD 1 500/ton depending on the variety was established. In 
May 2008, Myanmar temporarily banned exports of rice until November of 2008. Indonesia, although a large net 
importer, imposed licensing requirements on exporters. 
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
40
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
(b) Wheat 
2008 saw a higher incidence of export restrictions also for wheat (Box 1.4). In 2008, 
61 countries supplied surplus wheat to the international market. However, as is the case for rice, the 
international wheat market is highly concentrated, with the top five exporting countries supplying 
73% of the world’s import demand, and the ten leading exporters providing 94% of the total. Eight 
countries imposed export restrictions on wheat. Of these five (Argentina, Kazakhstan, Pakistan, the 
Russian Federation and Ukraine) were among the ten leading exporters in 2008 while China 
dropped out of the top ten in 2008 as exports were 2.1 million tons below 2007 level. Exports were 
below 2007 levels also in Argentina (4.4 million tons) and Kazakhstan (1.8 million tons). But exports 
from the Russian Federation (5.8 million tons) and Ukraine (11.8 million tons) were above 2007 
levels. Overall then, despite a higher incidence of restrictions in 2008 compared to 2007, total 
exports in 2008 were still more than 27 million tons above 2007 levels.  
The main instruments that countries used to restrict wheat exports during the period 2007-
2011 were export taxes, quotas and outright bans. In 2008, the year with the highest number of 
recorded restrictions, eight countries imposed either an export tax or banned exports altogether. 
China and Argentina applied quota restrictions to exports on certain wheat products. The situation 
relaxed in 2009 but then deteriorated again in 2010. While in 2009 existing export prohibitions were 
discontinued and no new bans were introduced, three countries – India, Pakistan and the Russian 
Federation – resorted to these measures in 2010. Pakistan and Ukraine applied export quotas, and 
wheat exports from Egypt could only leave from a single port. In 2010, the only country that used 
export taxes was Argentina. 
Box 1.4. Export restrictive measures in the wheat markets in 2008 
Eight countries imposed various restrictions on their wheat exports in 2008. India continued its export ban 
initiated in 2007. Wheat exports were also banned by Kazakhstan, Pakistan and the Russian Federation. 
Argentina changed its export tax to a variable rate based on government-issued formulae. This was later revised 
to a fixed rate of 23% or 28% depending on the variety. An export quota of 4.4 million tons was also fixed. China 
set an export tax of 20%, while the Kyrgyz Republic, albeit a net wheat importer, set an export tax of local 
currency (soms) 15/kg and Ukraine continued the 3 million ton export quota initiated in 2007. Most of these 
policies were relatively short term. By 2009, only three countries still had export restrictions for wheat. China first 
lowered its export tax to 3% and then eliminated it, replacing it by an export license requirement. India replaced its 
export ban with an export quota of 900 thousand tons with an additional 300 thousand tons allocated to three 
specific firms, and Argentina continued its export tax and export license requirement. 
1.5. 
The policy context of export restrictions 
Why do governments use export restrictions? 
When governments restrict exports, they have specific policy objectives in mind. Although 
not all governments publicly articulate the reason for their actions and the OECD Inventory has 
gaps in its records, the information available there shows that the justifications offered are very 
diverse. This holds especially for the measures affecting industrial raw materials.  
Whatever the rationale given, it does not appear to depend on the type of mineral. At the 
same time, the reasons given for restricting the same mineral can vary widely over countries. 
Agricultural commodities are different: food security and the fight against inflation are very 
frequently cited policy objectives and are specific to export restrictions in this sector.  
As might be expected, a prime motive cited by countries for the use of export taxes is their 
capacity to generate revenue. But export taxes are at times also justified as being essential to 
conserve natural resources or to promote downstream processing or value-adding at home. Non-
automatic licensing requirements have the widest range of cited objectives, with control of illegal 
export activity and promotion or protection of local processing/value addition heading the list. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested