1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
41
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
A high proportion of the exports of developing countries are concentrated in primary, 
unprocessed commodities. These countries want to add more value to production and export. 
Advancing to higher stages of processing is advantageous because prices of processed products 
usually are higher and do not fluctuate as much as primary commodities, processed products can 
be used locally as well as exported, the local workforce acquires new skills and more links are 
created with other sectors of the economy.
23
As Table 1.7 shows, export restrictions are often 
intended to promote processing and value addition at home or reserve domestic supply (including 
food supplies) for local consumption. However, precisely because export restrictions lower the 
domestic price relative to the world market price and act as an indirect subsidy for downstream 
industries, they have been criticised for artificially protecting domestic raw material-using industries 
against foreign competition.
24
Whether downstream industries actually become successful players 
in the domestic or global marketplace because of export restrictions is a matter of empirical study. 
Some governments justify export taxes by their need to generate revenue. For developing 
countries, and the least-developed countries in particular, it is often easier to raise revenue by 
collecting a tax at the border than through income and other taxes (Piermartini, 2004, p.14). For 
some cases where government revenue is one of the stated reasons for export taxes, Table 1.8 
shows information about user countries’ income, how much the taxes collected on exports actually 
contribute to total tax revenue and how much taxes on exports and imports combined contribute to 
central government revenues. In a few countries export taxes appear to have earned very little for 
the government. Evidence across countries also shows that tax rates are unrelated to income level: 
the poorest countries do not levy the highest rates. 
Other reasons that are evoked less often for the use of export restrictions on metals, 
minerals or wood are the aim to conserve natural resources, to protect human health or the natural 
environment. In such cases, the measure mostly takes the form of non-automatic licensing 
requirements. 
With respect to metal waste and scraprising scrap prices over the last decade have caused 
rampant theft and smuggling, including across borders. Global demand for secondary material has 
also risen sharply, driven by steelmaking, which increasingly relies on scrap material. In many 
cases where governments took steps to regulate the export activities in this sector, the stated 
objective was to prevent theft and sales abroad of material that has been acquired illegally or to 
ensure availability of secondary material for local user industries.  
The information available for export restrictions applied to agricultural commodities shows 
that some of the reasons for adopting these measures coincide with those provided for raw 
materials, with some countries giving the same rationale for restrictions on both (see Table 1.7). 
However, as agricultural goods are essential for human survival, some countries cited the need to 
ensure food security for their population. Domestic price stability and curbing food price inflation 
during periods of rising international prices are also cited for this sector only. Food expenditure in 
developing and low-income countries takes a large share of household income and rising prices 
create social and political pressures. Hence, concerns about supply and price stability, food price 
inflation and food security were the most frequent rationales governments cited for restrictive 
action(s), where this information was available.  
Motives given for export restrictions do not differ markedly according to the processing stage 
of the product, although promotion of domestic value addition and natural resource conservation 
seem to motivate export restrictions for semi-processed goods somewhat more than for primary 
commodities.  
Change file from pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert multiple pdf to jpg; bulk pdf to jpg converter
Change file from pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
best pdf to jpg converter for; convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
42
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table 1.7. Justifications for export restrictions 
Control foreign exchange 
Protect local industry 
Philippines 
Kazakhstan 
Ukraine 
Malaysia 
Viet Nam 
Rwanda 
Generate revenue 
Promote or protect further processing/value added 
Argentina 
Argentina  
Azerbaijan  
India 
Belarus 
Indonesia  
Benin 
South Africa  
Namibia  
Zambia  
Philippines 
Zimbabwe 
Sierra Leone 
Production considered strategic for the economy 
Syria 
Mauritius 
Ukraine 
Food security* 
Conserve natural resources 
Indonesia* 
Australia**  
Kyrgyz Republic* 
China* 
Ukraine* 
Ghana** 
Viet Nam* 
India 
Safeguard domestic supply 
Indonesia 
Argentina* 
Thailand 
Canada** 
United States ** 
Egypt* 
Protect health and/or the environment 
Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia* 
China 
India 
India 
Malaysia 
Indonesia 
Republic of Moldova* 
South Africa  
Republic of the Union of Myanmar* 
Malaysia 
Nigeria** 
Fight inflation and stabilise domestic prices
*
Paraguay 
Argentina* 
South Africa 
Egypt*
Thailand 
Republic of the Union of Myanmar* 
Uruguay 
Monitor / control export activity 
Viet Nam 
Afghanistan 
Other*** 
Argentina 
Brazil 
China 
China 
Fiji 
India 
Ghana 
Tajikistan 
Indonesia 
Philippines 
Ukraine 
Viet Nam 
Note: Industrial raw materials: Restrictions on exports of metal waste and scrap are not taken into account. * The measure 
relates to agricultural commodity exports. ** The measure relates only to wood products. ***Other = e.g. reduce congestion, 
chemical that directly or indirectly may be designated to elaborate illicit narcotics, psychotropics or cause physical 
dependence, public interest not further defined, implementation of the 2006 Softwood Lumber Agreement between Canada 
and the United States, national security. Measures recorded as having been eliminated during 2009-12 for industrial raw 
materials, and during 2007-11 for agricultural commodities, are included. 
Source: OECD Inventory, as of June 2014. 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the PDF files with the
convert pdf image to jpg online; convert pdf file into jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
best convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf document to jpg
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
43
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table 1.8. Export taxes and government revenue 
Country 
Level of 
income
† 
Export tax/surtax/ 
fiscal tax
‡ 
% of tax revenue 
generated by  
export taxes* 
(2012) 
% of total government 
revenue generated  
by taxes on exports  
and imports **(2012) 
Afghanistan 
5-15% 
0.2 
4.2 
Argentina 
5-40% 
15.3 
15.8*** 
Azerbaijan 
1-2.75% 
n.a. 
2.6 
Belarus 
50-85 EUR/ton 
13.7 
16 
Benin 
3% 
0.1 
23.4 
Namibia 
10% 
n.a. 
14.8**** 
Sierra Leone 
5-15% 
n.a. 
9.5 
Tunisia 
90-270 TND/ton 
0.1 
5.9 
Ukraine 
27% 
0.1 
2.5 
Notes: †Level of income refers to World Bank income classification as of 1 July 2013, by GNI per capita 
(https://wdronline.worldbank.org/worldbank/a/incomelevel). 1 = low income economies, 2= lower middle-income economies; 
3 = upper middle-income economies. ‡The tax rates shown are for products surveyed by the OECD Inventory; the 
government may collect taxes also on exports of other products. * Taxes on exports - all levies on goods being transported 
out of the country or services being delivered to non-residents by residents. ** Refers to taxes on international trade, 
including import duties, export duties, profits of export or import monopolies, exchange profits and exchange taxes;  
*** Data is for 2004; **** Data is for 2011.  
Sources: World Bank, World Development Indicators, as of August 2014.  
Factors determining the effect of export restrictions 
Export restrictions unequivocally affect countries that import from the restricting country 
negatively and can have significant costs also for the restricting country. The impact depends on 
several factors. When the restricting country is a small export supplier, the action does not affect the 
commodity’s price or world market supply. When individual large exporters or several producers 
with joint market power resort to these measures, supply on the world market falls and world market 
price rises. The production costs of countries sourcing their material needs abroad, and ultimately 
the price paid by the consumers of finished products made in these countries, rise. Chapter 2 
provides a detailed analysis of the economic effects of export restrictions under different 
assumptions. 
Measures taken by large producers capable of influencing world supply 
When one or several countries that either individually or jointly command a large share of 
traded output impose export restrictions, foreign consumers have few alternative supply sources 
and will have to compete for a lower quantity of higher priced supply available on the world market. 
An often cited case concerns rare earth metals, overwhelmingly controlled by China. When the 
Chinese government decreased export quotas and increased export taxes on rare earth materials, 
their price on world markets skyrocketed, trading partners protested and a formal complaint against 
China was filed at the WTO. Another mineral where export restrictions affect a large share of global 
production is tungsten, where China, again, leads world production, followed at some distance by 
the Russian Federation, Canada and Bolivia. Jointly accounting for 91 % of world production of 
tungsten ores and concentrates in 2012 (some 75,000 tons), China, the Russian Federation and 
Bolivia all have restrictions in place on mined and semi-processed tungsten, as do other countries 
with very limited or no known tungsten production facilities (Dominican Republic, Grenada, 
Malaysia, Philippines, South Africa and Viet Nam). In 2012, the restrictions of all these countries 
combined affected well over 50% of world exports totalling USD 1.7 billion. Antimony is yet another 
mineral where three producers (Bolivia, China and the Russian Federation) together control about 
90% of world production; all three had export restraints in place in 2012. With China alone 
accounting for half of world antimony exports in 2012 and the Russian Federation and Bolivia jointly 
for another 12%, their actions affected 62% of global trade of primary mined and semi-processed 
antimony. 
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
image with adjusted width & height; Change image resolution JPEG image from local folders in "File" in toolbar JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from
change pdf file to jpg online; convert pdf file into jpg format
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C# program. This demo code convert TIFF file all pages to bmp images.
pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg image
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
44
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table 1.9. Share of world production and exports of major producer countries  
with restrictions in place in 2012 
Product 
Restricting  
country/countries 
Share of world 
production 
Share of world 
exports 
Products restricted by one of the top 5 producers in the world 
Garnet 
India 
48 
46 
Magnesite 
China 
65 
44 
Rare earths* (oxides) 
China 
91 
41 
Vanadium 
China 
53 
36 
Vermiculite 
China 
^22 
26 
Fluorspar 
China 
62 
24 
Nickel 
Russia 
14 
16 
Sulphur 
Russia 
10 
14 
Phosphates 
China 
44 
13 
Molybdenum 
China 
42 
10  
Wheat 
Russia 
Titanium 
China (ilmenite) 
10 
Maize 
Ukraine 
Zirconium 
China 
Products restricted by two of the top 5 producers in the world 
Graphite 
China, India 
92 
66 
Barytes 
China, India 
63 
62 
Talc 
China, India 
44 
43 
Chromium 
India, South Africa 
56 
40 
Alumina + Aluminium 
China, Russia 
46 
23 
Barley 
Russia, Ukraine 
12 
22 
Cobalt 
China, Russia 
20 
Coke  
China, Russia 
n.a. 
20 
Rye 
Russia, Ukraine 
12 
19 
Products restricted by 3 or more of the top 5 producers in the world 
Magnesium 
Brazil, China, Russia 
92 
68 
Antimony 
Bolivia, China, Russia 
90 
62 
Industrial roundwood (coniferous) 
Canada, Russia, United States 
46 
57 
Tungsten 
Bolivia, China, Russia 
91 
42 
Industrial roundwood (non-coniferous, 
tropical) 
Indonesia, India, Malaysia 
47 
32 
Industrial roundwood (non-coniferous, 
non-tropical) 
Australia, Canada, United States 
48 
28 
Manganese 
China, India, Gabon 
36 
^^13 
Note: Products are shown ranked by share of world exports (last column). The table reflects the situation of 2012 for 
industrial raw materials and 2011 for primary bulk commodities. With the exception of rare earth oxides, vanadium, alumina 
and aluminium and a few other metals, production data for minerals are for ores and concentrates. Export data include 
unprocessed and semi-processed materials. A few products, such as mica, tantalum and coking coal, are omitted because of 
missing or highly unreliable production or trade statistics. * In 2009 only three countries were found to produce this product, 
and those three countries are surveyed by the Inventory for export restrictions. A country may produce only a small amount 
of a product but still rank among the global top 5 producers, or it may account for a much higher share of world exports than 
its share in global production. For methodological issues related to the OECD datasets, the agricultural commodities listed 
may not be exhaustive. ^ Figure is for 2011. ^^ Export data not available for Gabon. n.a - Not available. 
Sources: OECD Inventory, as of June 2014; US Geological Survey; British Geological Survey. For agricultural products – 
FAOSTAT. For wood – FAO (2014); ITTO, Annual Review Statistics Database; UN Comtrade. 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
change pdf to jpg file; convert pdf pictures to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
convert pdf page to jpg; change file from pdf to jpg
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
45
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Table 1.9 identifies other cases where countries from among the top five producers and 
using export restrictions in 2012 were large exporters. Their share of global export supply is high in 
the presence of restrictions and would probably be higher without them. The actions of these 
countries must have had a discernible effect on world supply and prices. Three countries (China, 
India and the Russian Federation) stand out in the list because they occur so often. Across all 
29 products or product groups shown, China has the most restrictions (18 products). The second 
most often represented country is the Russian Federation (12 products), and then India 
(7 products). Other major producers with export restrictions were Bolivia, Brazil, Gabon, South 
Africa and Ukraine for certain minerals and bulk agricultural commodities and Australia, Canada, 
Indonesia, Malaysia and United States for wood. 
Some measure of the restrictiveness of export taxes  
This section focuses on taxes, because the effects of other measures are either self-evident 
(by definition, export prohibitions ban exports), hard to assess from the data in the OECD Inventory 
(export licensing requirements and their administration are most often not explained) or the 
measure is little used (export quotas were used only by China for minerals, metals, waste and 
scrap, and only by Ukraine and Argentina for certain agricultural bulk commodities).  
Export taxes (including fiscal taxes and surtaxes) account for one third of export restrictions 
on raw materials in 2012 and 16% of restrictions on agriculture products in 2011. In 2012, 86% of 
the export taxes on minerals and metals were in ad valorem terms. In contrast, three countries 
imposed export taxes on agricultural products in 2011, the last year for which OECD Inventory data 
are available, of which only 45% were ad valorem taxes, 29% were specific tax rates, the rest being 
a mix of the two. 
Ad valorem export tax data for industrial raw materials available in the OECD Inventory were 
examined in order to gauge the heights of the tax walls, which determine the trade effect.  
The range and average tax rates for individual products are shown in Figure 1.9. Between 
2009 and 2012, less than 3% of ad valorem taxes on metals and minerals were so-called 
“nuisance” taxes, a term that has been used to refer to (generally import) tariffs of 3% or less that 
are considered more difficult to implement and collect than actually distorting.
25
Likewise, all 
ad valorem export tax rates on agriculture products (not shown) exceed this level in the same 
period. This means that most of these taxes are expected to raise the export prices of the affected 
products enough to discourage or even prevent overseas sales. 
Export taxes are high also in comparison with import tariffs on industrial raw materials, which 
averaged 3.2% in 2012 and their processed products, which faced an average import tariff of 
4.6%.
26
The average ad valorem export tax for minerals and metals was 10.9 % in 2012. 
Unprocessed products had a trade-weighted average tax rate of 8.6% compared to 11.8% of semi-
processed items. At the product level, the relationship holds for certain products. For iron and steel, 
for example, the average tax rate of iron ore (12.8%) is lower than that of semi-processed iron and 
steel (15.1%). However, for others, antimony, cobalt and copper for example, the higher average 
tax rate is on the unprocessed form. 
By contrast, the maximum tax rates were consistently higher for raw metals and minerals 
than for the same materials after some processing. For example, the highest tax rate of 
unprocessed antimony, cobalt, copper and zinc were 20%, 20%, 30%, and 20%, respectively, but in 
a semi-processed form these same metals had maximum rates of 12.5%, 10%, 21%, and 15%, 
respectively. 
Exports of waste and scrap products also are taxed at trade-distorting levels (not shown 
here). Compared to minerals and metals, export taxes on waste and scrap have less variation, both 
in terms of the range as well as the average tax rate applicable. The average export tax rates for 
waste and scrap products was around 11%, with aluminium and copper scrap each having the 
widest ranges, of 5%-50%.  
C# TIFF: How to Use C#.NET Code to Compress TIFF Image File
C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object. List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); / Step1: Load image to REImage object. foreach (string file in
convert multiple page pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg file
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with PDFDocument(images.ToArray()); / Save document to a file.
pdf to jpeg; conversion pdf to jpg
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
46
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Figure 1.9. Rates of export taxes for select minerals and metals 
a. 2012 Export taxes for unprocessed minerals and metals 
b. 2012 Export taxes for semi- processed minerals and metals 
Note: Numbers in brackets next to the product name are the count of restrictions within each category. Restrictions are 
counted at the HS6 level. Average export tax rates includes only ad valorem tariffs and are weighted using the average 
gross export trade from 2010-2012. If a country or product did not have trade data, the OECD average was used. The 
figure does not include fiscal or export surtax. Export taxes not in force for the entire year were also weighted by the 
number of days in effect. Only export taxes greater than 0 are included in the averages. 
* Gold” includes gold, platinum, iridium, osmium, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium. 
**  “Niobium” includes niobium, tantalum, and vanadium. 
*** Iridium, osmium, ruthenium. 
Source: OECD Inventory of Restrictions on Exports of Raw Materials, UN Comtrade. 
Range
Weighted Average
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
47
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
The bandwagon phenomenon 
Export measures may promise benefits to the downstream industry. However, this would 
appear to have a chance only if a given restriction is imposed without evoking similar policies in 
other countries. Experience shows that export controls can trigger similar actions in other supplier 
countries, driving up prices further, making price volatility worse, and creating a crisis of confidence 
that spreads from one resource to the next. Examples of markets where “snowball-like” rounds of 
increasingly tighter export restrictions choking global trade flows appear to have occurred in recent 
year are:  
 
In 2010, in addition to restrictive export policies for copper waste and scrap already being in 
place in China, India and Viet Nam (the only country adjusting export barriers downward - by 
cutting its export tax from 37% to 33% that year), several other countries moved to discourage 
or prevent shipments of this product abroad. In January, Belarus reportedly introduced an 
export quota for copper scrap alongside an export licencing requirement for copper-containing 
ash and residues. In April, Guyana banned export of copper scrap and, three months later, 
Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda took the same action. Finally, Afghanistan imposed a 
tax on exports of copper scrap in July 2010.  
 
In 2008, China introduced an export tax of 5%, Egypt introduced a specific export tax of 300 
Egyptian pounds per ton but subsequently banned all exports, India imposed an export ban 
(conditional on a minimum export price and country-specific quotas), Myanmar imposed an 
export ban, Indonesia required export licenses, Pakistan imposed a minimum export price and 
Viet Nam imposed a minimum export price coupled with an export quota which was 
subsequently replaced by a variable export tax ranging from USD 30/ton to USD 175/ton, 
depending on the FOB price. 
 
In 2008, Argentina imposed a variable export tax on wheat, which was later converted to either 
28% or 23%, depending on the wheat variety, as well as an export quota. Ukraine also 
imposed an export quota, while China and the Kyrgyz Republic imposed export taxes of 20% 
and 15 Kyrgyzstani som per kg, respectively. Export bans were imposed by India, Kazakhstan, 
Pakistan and Russian Federation.  
While RTAs, especially those concluded more recently, have made headway in 
circumscribing the use of export restrictions, this is not always the case. RTAs can create 
momentum leading in the opposite direction, when one member manages to persuade its other 
RTA partners to join forces and adopt a common restrictive stance. This appears to have happened 
in 2010 when all five members of the East African Community moved to ban shipments of many 
types of metal scrap destined for third markets.  
Practices adding to uncertainty in markets 
Lack of transparency in the use of export restrictions, evidenced by the relative paucity of 
information published on governmental websites and the fact that not all measures are notified to 
the WTO, is one factor creating uncertainty for markets and trading partners. Another factor is 
specific to export restrictions in the agro-food sector: most of the restrictions recorded between 
2007 and 2011 were temporary, with many lasting less than a year. These measures create market 
confusion and uncertainty because they were often announced suddenly with no clear indication of 
how long they would last. 
Ad hoc policy changes also render the business environment uncertain. The OECD 
Inventory shows that governments sometimes adjust their export policies from one year to the next 
and that, in some cases, this occurs within an even shorter period of time.  
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
48
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
For example: 
 
India adjusted its distance-based charge for iron ore transport (intended for other than 
domestic consumption) four times in 2010 and at somewhat longer time intervals in the 
following years.  
 
China repeatedly tightened its regime of export quotas over the years and reportedly not 
always with advance notice to trading partners. For coke, where China is the world’s largest 
producer, export quotas were tightened starting in 2004 and this process continued over the 
course of subsequent years. For example, allocations of 12 million tons in place in 2008 
were cut in 2009 to 11,910,000 metric tons, then reduced further, to 9,000,913 tons in 2010 
and to 8,419,249 tons in 2011. Along with the export quota, China introduced an export tax 
on coke in 2006, which it subsequently also raised several times.
27
 
At the beginning of 2009, Indonesian exporters of furnishing material consisting of varieties 
of rattan had to pay a 15% or 20% export tax, depending on the variety, which the 
government replaced in July 2009 by export quotas whose allocation varied according to the 
type of rattan. These quotas were subsequently replaced by an export ban, which in turn 
was replaced in December 2009 by export taxes. 
 
In March 2008, Egypt imposed a specific export tax of Egyptian pounds 300/t on the 
exportation of various rice varieties. In April, the tax was replaced by a ban, scheduled to 
expire in October but then extended to April 2009. In July 2009, this ban was replaced by an 
export tax of Egyptian pound 2 000/t, which was replaced by another ban in October 2009. 
Although the ban was scheduled to end in October 2010, in January 2010 the authorities 
opened an export quota. Another quota followed in September but in the same month 
another export ban was decreed, scheduled to expire in October 2011.  
Preferential arrangements and other exemptions 
Distortions are introduced in international trade when countries apply trade policies in a 
discriminatory manner. When governments apply export restrictions, do they observe the WTO’s 
fundamental principles of non-discrimination?  
From the limited information available in the OECD Inventory, export restrictions are not 
always applied even-handedly. There are two kinds of preferential approach. Sometimes 
governments exempt or apply special rules for specific firms or types of market actors, such as 
state enterprises. The other approach involves granting exemptions from export restrictions to 
certain trading partners, such as other parties belonging to a shared regional trade agreement 
(RTA). The Russian Federation reportedly does not apply restrictions to Belarus and Kazakhstan, 
with which it shares a custom union. Similarly, members of the Eurasian Economic Community are 
reported to be exempted from Kazakhstan’s export restrictions for aluminium, copper, iron and 
steel. Trade between members of the West African Economic and Monetary Union (UEMOA) is 
excluded from (unverified) export restrictions that the Inventory reports for Senegal.  
Exemptions from export restrictions or differential treatment of trading partners appear to be 
more common for agricultural products. When India banned rice exports in 2008, the Russian 
Federation and the Maldives were exempted and country-specific quotas were allocated to 
Madagascar, Comoros, Mauritius, Sierra Leone and Bangladesh. Similarly, an export ban for dried 
beans and other products in 2008 excluded the Maldives, and when Argentina banned wheat 
exports in 2007, up to 100,000 tons destined for Brazil were exempted. China too, in 2007, provided 
specific export quotas for various live animals destined for its autonomous regions of Hong Kong, 
China and Macao, China. Such differential treatment can compound the distortions that export 
restrictions introduce in the international market.  
Today, the vast majority of countries belong to at least one regional trade agreement. 
Chapter 5 of this volume presents evidence on how over the last decade a number of regional and 
bilateral free-trade initiatives have explicitly included export restrictions on their negotiating agenda, 
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
49
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
leading to some tightening of conditions on their use vis-à-vis other parties to these RTAs. 
Unfortunately, when governments notify or publish information about restrictions planned or in force, 
they seldom state whether and how their RTA participation affects their use of these measures. 
Hence, the OECD Inventory contains little information on this and cannot be used to verify how 
common the preferential practices described here are.  
1.6. 
Conclusions 
This chapter has provided evidence that export restrictions are widely used in some sectors 
and that usage has risen in recent years. Data collected by the OECD for many countries and many 
industrial and agricultural raw materials shows that from 2007 to 2012 various temporary and 
longer-term export restrictions have been applied to raw material products, which has undoubtedly 
affected a sizeable share of world export supply. The extent of the disruptions that can be inferred 
from the evidence presented on the use of restrictions is probably under-estimated because we only 
report ex post (i.e. with-restriction) export performance, and because the OECD Inventory dataset 
does not capture the whole universe of export restrictions. Because of the specific methodology 
used for collecting information for the OECD Inventory in the industrial raw materials sector, not all 
countries included in the survey are surveyed for each of the 80 different primary minerals, metals 
and wood products. As a result, the full scope of industrial raw materials subject to export 
restrictions in a country is not known. This is not the case for agricultural products, where the 
Inventory captures the policies of a more limited number of countries and only a subgroup of 
products was included in this chapter’s analysis. 
This chapter has not tried to measure the economic impact of the measures reported. 
Instead, it prepares the ground for such work by documenting relevant features of measures and 
product markets, such as the degree of export concentration, the magnitude of export tax rates 
across products and the structure of taxes along the continuum from unprocessed to semi-
processed raw materials. The chapter also discusses the diverse rationales stated by governments 
for their use of export restrictions. Some convergence can be seen among export tax-using 
countries around the objectives of revenue collection and promoting food security in the case of 
restrictions on agricultural exports, but the otherwise large differences between countries raise 
questions about whether export restrictions can be effective first-best or even second-best 
instruments for achieving such heterogeneous objectives.  
Seen against the achievements of the rules-based multilateral trading system in lowering 
and controlling import barriers, the spread of export restrictions is a worrying development. Equally 
disconcerting is their lack of transparency, which the OECD Inventory is helping to remedy. As this 
chapter has demonstrated, there remain many gaps in our knowledge about the use of these 
instruments. Trade itself is inevitably affected by the measures, but it also matters how these 
measures are being applied. For example, little is known about the consistency and even-
handedness with which government agencies administer export licenses. This is one of many 
aspects of export restrictions that merit further research. 
Notes
1.  Barbara Fliess is a Senior Trade Policy Analyst, Christine Arriola is a Statistician and Peter Liapis is a 
Senior Agricultural Policy Analyst in the OECD’s Trade and Agriculture Directorate. The authors would 
like to thank Jane Korinek and the Working Party of the OECD Trade Committee for very helpful 
comments on earlier versions of this chapter. 
2. See for example US Department of Energy (2010), Commission of the European Communities (2008), 
Japan METI (2008), House of Commons, Science and Technology Committee (2011). 
3. Unless otherwise stated, the import and export figures presented in this chapter do not include intra-EU 
trade. “Exports” include re-exports of a product. Similarly “imports” include re-imports.  
1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE USE OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE – 
50
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
4. For another empirical examination of how trade measures like export restrictions affected world markets, 
with a focus on the 2005-8 surges in world agricultural prices, see Martin and Anderson (2012). 
5.  In 2011, the United States, European Union and Mexico won a WTO case against China on its export 
quotas on nine industrial raw materials. China's appeal to the WTO appellate body was rejected, and it 
subsequently removed its export restrictions on these materials. A second case challenging China's use 
of export quotas and tariffs for rare earths, molybdenum and tungsten as an industrial policy tool 
consistent with WTO rules was brought against China in 2012. In August 2014 the WTO Appellate Body 
confirmed that China’s export restrictions on rare earth as well as tungsten and molybdenum were in 
breach of WTO rules.  
6.  Export restrictions are recorded at the HS6 level of product classification, along with qualitative 
information about the legal basis for the measure, introduction and ending dates (where applicable), the 
agency in charge, implementation procedures, and references with links to official sources of information 
about the measure. The Inventory and a methodological note explaining how the data were collected are 
available at: http://www.oecd.org/tad/benefitlib/export-restrictions-raw-materials.htm. 
7.  The industrial raw materials surveyed by the OECD Inventory and discussed in this Chapter comprise 
the following chapters of the Harmonised System (HS 2007): (1) Minerals and metals: ferrous metals 
(HS 72), non-ferrous metals (base metals HS 74-80, minor metals HS 81), metal ores and minerals HS 
25-26, excl. 2620, chemicals and compounds HS28; (2) Metal waste and scrap HS 72-81, 2620, 252530; 
and (3) Wood consists of subheadings of HS 44. Primary (unprocessed) forms of materials refer to metal 
ores and minerals (HS codes from the chapters HS 25 and HS 26), semi-processed forms belong to HS 
chapters HS 71-72, HS 74-76, HS 78-81, except diamonds. 
8.  Chapter 4 of this volume provides more comprehensive analysis of the Inventory’s information on 
agricultural commodities. 
9.  Examples are the Basel Convention on the Control of Trans-boundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes 
and their Disposal, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and 
Flora (CITES) and the Kimberley Process. 
10.  Primary bulk products (e.g. wheat and rice), horticultural products (e.g. fruit and vegetables), semi-
processed products (e.g. vegetable oils) and processed products. 
11.  Intra-OECD trade includes trade between EU members that are part of the OECD. 
12. This is a minimum value since the OECD Inventory is not an exhaustive survey of all producers and all 
products.  
13.  In compliance with the 2012 WTO rulings in China – Measures Related to the Exportation of Various 
Raw Materials (WT/DS394, WT/DS395, WT/DS398), the application of export duties to certain reforms of 
magnesium, as well as of bauxite, coke, fluorspar, manganese, silicon metal and zinc, and the export 
quotas for certain forms of bauxite, coke, fluorspar, silicon carbide and zinc, which were found 
inconsistent with the WTO rules by the Panel and the Appellate Body in these disputes, have been 
removed since January 2013. In August 2014, the WTO Appellate Body confirmed an earlier ruling that 
China’s export restrictions on rare earth, tungsten and molybdenum, were in breach of WTO rules. 
14.  US Geological Survey, Mineral Commodity Summaries, January 2013, p. 99. 
15.  US Geological Survey, Mineral Commodity Summaries, January 2013 p. 123. 
16. Azerbaijan Egypt, Kuwait and Trinidad and Tobago are excluded from the count because for these 
countries the OECD Inventory does not have data available for the years 2009 and 2012.  
17. When total Chinese exports of goods slowed down and then fell in 2008 and 2009 as a result of the 
global financial crisis, China reacted by initially raising VAT rebate rates for many goods, including 
certain steel products and semi-finished materials from minerals and metals, giving exporters higher 
rebates as an incentives to supply export markets rather than domestic markets. See Evenett et al. 
(2012). 
18.  2011 consumption figures are from the Bureau of International Recycling, 2011, production figures are 
from the Japan Ferrous Raw Materials Association. 
19.  According to UN Comtrade statistics, the Russian Federation’s exports of ferrous scrap declined from 
12 million tons in 2004 to just over 4 million in 2012. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested