2. ECONOMICS OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS AS APPLIED TO INDUSTRIAL RAW MATERIALS – 
71
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Export tax 
Assume that X1 imposes an export tax t. With an integrated international market, the price in 
the importing country, p
2
, equals the price in the exporting country, p
1
, plus the export tax t, i.e.  
p
1
+ t = p
2
Denoting the demand in the two countries by D
1
(p
1
) and D
2
(p
2
), respectively. Substituting 
X1’s price into X2’s demand schedule gives D
2
(p
1
+ t). Summing these demands horizontally yields 
total output Q. This relationship shows that X1’s price p
1
is a function of total industry output Q and 
the export tax t, i.e. P
1
(Q, t). Furthermore, since X2’s price is simply X1’s price plus the export tax, it 
follows that P
2
(Q, t). From this market integration feature, therefore, other things being equal, a rise 
in the export tax will lower the price in X1 but raise the price in X2. In other words, an export tax 
directly raises the export price, thereby reducing export demand. To restore equilibrium, X1’s price 
must fall to stimulate domestic demand. 
How do these changes in the raw materials markets affect the two Cournot-Nash firms? The 
exporting firm’s profit consists of revenue from the domestic market p
1
d
1
and from exports p
2
x
1
, with 
the costs being c
1
d
1
, c
1
x
1
and tx
1
, where c
1
denotes the constant marginal cost of production in X1. 
Recognising that p
2
= p
1
+ t, the profit of X1’s firm can be written as:  
B
1
= p
1
q
1
– c
1
q
1
and X2’s firm has profit B
2
, which is given by B
2
= p
2
q
2
– c
2
q
2
, where c
2
is the constant marginal cost 
of production in X2. 
For a given export tax t, profit maximization by the exporting firm yields B
1
q1
= 0, where the 
subscript now denotes partial differentiation with respect to the strategic output variable q
1
. B
1
q1
= 0 
is also the exporting firm’s reaction function, which denotes this firm’s profit-maximising choice of q
1
for any given level of q
2
. As is standard, this Cournot-Nash reaction function in q
2
-q
1
space is 
downward-sloping. 
Similarly, maximising the profit of X2’s firm, for a given t, yields B
2
q2
= 0. This first-order 
condition provides the reaction function of X2’s firm, with a best-reply q
2
for any q
1
. For each firm’s 
set of conditional optima, we assume that the second-order conditions hold. In a graph with q
2
on 
the vertical axis and q
1
on the horizontal axis, again the Cournot reaction curve for X2’s firm, B
2
= 0, 
is downward-sloping. The X1 reaction function will also be steeper than the X2 reaction function, 
yielding a stable equilibrium. 
The Cournot-Nash equilibrium occurs at the point where the two firms’ reaction functions 
intersect, which can be expressed as (q
1
CN
, q
2
CN
, t), thus determining the output levels of the two 
firms, given a particular rate of the export tax. An increase in the export tax shifts the X1 firm’s 
reaction curve towards the origin, i.e. the X1 firm produces for every level of q
2
, whereas it shifts the 
X2 reaction curve outwards, since with a higher export tax the X2 firm will produce more for every 
value of the q
1
 
We maintain the standard assumptions typical of this type of model, in particular that the two 
outputs q
1
and q
2
are strategic substitutes, and that the usual stability condition holds. With these 
standard conditions, the after-tax equilibrium implies less output in X1 and more output in X2 than 
without the tax. These outcomes hold for straight-line demand functions and other well-behaved 
demands. When the export tax increases and the X1 firm’s exports fall, the price of this mineral on 
the world market is simply the price prevailing in X2, since we assumed that X2 does not impose 
any trade barriers and there are no transport costs or other kinds of transaction cost. The world 
price, p
W
, is just p
1
+ t = p
2
. Clearly, the world price rises with an increase in the export tax.  
There are various welfare implications of an export tax in this international Cournot-Nash 
oligopoly model. First, we consider domestic consumer surplus, bearing in mind that some 
consumers may be downstream firms that use these resources as production inputs. Because the 
domestic price falls with an increase in the export tax, domestic consumer surplus, and possibly the 
profit of downstream producers, rises. Another way to view this improvement in domestic welfare is 
Change format from pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
.pdf to .jpg converter online; batch pdf to jpg converter
Change format from pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change pdf into jpg; convert pdf to jpg converter
72
– 2. ECONOMICS OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS AS APPLIED TO INDUSTRIAL RAW MATERIALS 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
to consider the distortions introduced by the firms with market power in our model. As it is 
oligopolistic, the domestic firm will typically charge a price above marginal cost, which creates a 
deadweight loss in the domestic economy. An increase in the export tax lowers p
1
and reduces the 
inefficiency due to this distortion. In addition, the world price of the exported product rises, so there 
is a terms-of-trade gain for the exporting country, but a deterioration in the terms of trade for the 
importing country. For Cournot-Nash firms, profit is positively related to output and market share, 
and since domestically produced output decline with an increase in or imposition of an export tax, 
the domestic firm’s profit shrinks. By contrast, the profit of the foreign firm increases as its output 
increases. So profit is shifted away from the domestic firm to the foreign firm. This profit-shifting 
(rent-shifting) effect is standard in international oligopoly, but it is new to the literature on export 
restrictions of minerals or metals which has until now used models that assume perfect competition. 
A novel conclusion is that the government using the trade policy actually shifts rents away from its 
own firm and reduces its profit. Finally, the welfare implications of the new (or higher) export tax 
revenue are that public sector welfare, or the welfare of public spending beneficiaries, increases in 
the exporting country.  
In summary, the export tax means that the producer in X2 gains and consumers or 
downstream industries in X2 lose. Assuming that the producer continues to sell only to its domestic 
market, there is also a terms-of-trade loss. By contrast, the X1 producer loses, consumers or 
downstream industry in X1 gains, there is a terms-of-trade gain and tax revenue also increases. 
There may be, therefore, an export tax that optimises domestic welfare (despite reducing global 
welfare).
11
Expressing X1’s welfare as:  
W
1
= B
1
+ S
1
+ T, 
where S
1
is domestic consumer surplus and is a function of p
1
, T is tax revenue, which is equal to 
tx
1
and B
1
is the profit of the domestic producer. The optimal export tax is implicitly defined by W
1
0, where the subscript refers to differentiation with respect to the export tax t. Again, we assume 
that the second-order condition holds. 
So far it has been assumed that there are producers and consumers in both X1 and X2. If 
production in X1 only and consumption takes place only in X2, an export tax imposed by X1 
improves the welfare in X1, the world market price of the raw material rises and welfare in X2 falls. 
In general, the welfare of the global economy will decline. 
A richer welfare analysis can be obtained by incorporating into the model some additional 
characteristics of the international mineral industry. First, suppose there is a downstream firm that 
uses these raw materials as inputs in its production process. We denote the profit of the 
downstream firm in X1 by V
1
(z
1
, p
1
), where z
1
is the output of the downstream firm and p
1
is the 
price of the mineral used by the downstream firm. For a given p
1
, the downstream firm maximises 
its profit by choosing z
1
so that V
1
Z1 
= 0. It has been shown already that an increase in export tax 
lowers the domestic price of this input, which increases the profit of the downstream firm, i.e. V
1
P1 
< 0. With a lower marginal cost of production, the downstream firm expands its output and thus 
employment. These results still hold if there is also a downstream firm in country X2. Denoting its 
profit by V
2
(z
2
, p
2
), profit maximization by this firm yields V
2
Z2 
= 0. If the two downstream firms also 
engage in strategic rivalry, then we have a two-stage static (one-shot) game. In the first stage, the 
mineral sector engages in oligopolistic rivalry, yielding Cournot-Nash equilibrium prices p
1
and p
2
Given these input prices, the two Cournot-Nash downstream firms compete, leading to equilibrium 
z
1
and z
2
. An increase in the export tax shifts these games to a new equilibrium. This means that, in 
the second-stage game, X1’s downstream firm has a lower marginal cost of production. Hence, its 
output, employment and profit are all higher. The downstream firm in X2, by contrast, has a higher 
marginal cost of production, and therefore its output, employment and profit decline. 
When the X1 firm is a multinational affiliate, its profit is at least partially repatriated overseas. 
If so, the government of X1 may not want to include the profit of the multinational firm in its welfare 
calculation. This situation could partly explain the willingness of some governments to impose 
export taxes even though these taxes shift profit away from the firm located in their country.  
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
try out some settings and then create the PDF files with the button at the bottom. The perfect conversion tool. JPG is the most widely used image format, but we
change file from pdf to jpg on; convert pdf photo to jpg
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
You can also directly change PDF to Gif image file in C# program. // Load a PDF file. Description: Convert all the PDF pages to target format images and
best pdf to jpg converter online; convert multiple pdf to jpg
2. ECONOMICS OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS AS APPLIED TO INDUSTRIAL RAW MATERIALS – 
73
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
If jobs and employment are a major issue in X1, the government may include a labour 
component in its objective welfare function, i.e.  
W
1
= wL + B
1
+ S
1
+ T, 
where w is the wage rate and L is employment. Assuming that w is fairly fixed in the short run, then 
the scope for improving value of the government objective function depends on employment alone. 
Notice that in our model, employment may be shifted downstream in the supply chain. This can be 
seen by noting that an increase in (or the imposition of) an export tax will increase employment in 
downstream firms, even though there is a drop in the employment in the upstream extraction sector. 
If the downstream firm is more labour-intensive, then the net impact will tend toward increasing total 
employment in the exporting country and decreasing employment in the importing country. The 
actual net effect will depend on the size of each sector. 
Export quotas 
Using the same model as for the export tax, we examine the impacts of an export quota and 
compare them with those of the export tax. We assume that the X1 firm pays the government of X1 
for a license to export. Specifically, it pays a maximum of (p
- p
1
)x
1
for a licence to export up to the 
limit of the quota.
12
The firm’s profit can be written:  
B
= p
1
d
- c
1
d
1
+ p
2
x
1
- c
1
x
1
– (p
- p
1
)x
=(p
- c
1
)q
1
which corresponds exactly to the payoffs under the export tax case. The profit of the firm in X2 is 
also the same as in the export tax case, given as:  
B
2
= p
2
q
2
- c
2
q
2
.  
If x
1
is fixed at the level given by an export quota (which corresponds to the after-tax level of 
output in the previous export tax case), and assuming that q
2
is at q
2
CN
, the best response of the X1 
firm is to choose d
1
so that q
= d
1
+ x
1
, which equals q
1
CN
. Similarly, if the X1 firm chooses q
1
CN
then the best response by the firm in X2 is q
2
CN
. Since these quantities are mutually optimal, we 
obtain a Cournot-Nash equilibrium. Thus, with an export quota that limits exports to the same extent 
as a given level of export tax, the resulting Cournot-Nash equilibrium will yield the same output 
levels. Apart from the costs of administration and the distribution of the quota rents, the welfare 
implications are also the same. For X2, price increases and output is higher. The profit of the X2 
producer rises and X2 consumers lose, as in the case of the export tax. If there is a downstream 
firm in X2, it loses competitiveness since the price of the mineral input in X2 is higher. Thus, the 
profit and employment of the downstream firm in X2 are reduced by the export quota. 
The economic impacts of the export tax and export quota on producers and consumers of 
the raw material in the Cournot-Nash oligopolistic theoretical model are therefore broadly similar. 
The surplus created by the quota rent, however, may not be distributed in the same way as the tax 
revenue. In the case of the export tax, the tax revenue goes to the government that has introduced 
it. The recipient of the quota rent depends how the quota is attributed or administered. The quota, or 
license to export, may be auctioned in an open bidding process or may be attributed according to 
firms’ previous export shares or some other criterion. When firms compete to buy a share of the 
quota, in theory they bid the price of the license up to the level of the corresponding export tax, and 
the quota rent goes entirely to the authority administering the policy. If, however, the quota is 
attributed according to firms’ export shares in the past, for example, or according to another 
criterion, the quota rent may be distributed among all exporting firms or a subset of them, or shared 
between firms and the government authority. 
So far, we have assumed that the quantity-setting Cournot-Nash model is more typical of 
trade in mineral resources. However, there may be some specific product markets where other 
types of behaviour – and hence other models – apply. In these situations, an export quota can be 
more distorting than an export tax. There are two known situations where this may occur. First, if 
there is an unexpected increase in the demand for the raw material in the importing country, an 
export tax will allow an increase in exports as a response. In the case of a binding export quota, 
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
JPG is the most common image format on the internet. The outputs of our conversion service are always JPG files to even if pictures are saved in a PDF in other
convert pdf file to jpg on; change pdf to jpg file
JPEG Image Viewer| What is JPEG
JPEG, JPG. enabling you to quickly convert your JPEG images into other file formats, including Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word, etc More Format Information.
convert pdf to jpg; change pdf file to jpg file
74
– 2. ECONOMICS OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS AS APPLIED TO INDUSTRIAL RAW MATERIALS 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
however, there will be no change in exports. The higher unmet demand will push the price of the 
raw material up further and create a greater distortion in the world market.  
In the second example, under certain market conditions, an export quota creates a potential 
for collusive behaviour between oligopolistic market participants. This may occur if firms compete 
on the basis of price (i.e. Bertrand-Nash duopoly) rather than quantity as in the Cournot-Nash case 
outlined here. It is well established in the literature that in Bertrand-Nash international duopoly 
models, a quantitative restriction can serve as a “facilitating practice” or a “collusive device” (see 
Krishna 1989, Grossman and Rogoff 1995, p. 1435). In the Bertrand-Nash case, as firms compete 
on the basis of price, their prices are driven down close to their marginal cost. Their profits are 
therefore theoretically close to zero. The effect of a trade restraint is to draw the oligopolistic firms 
into a collusive partnership as a reaction to an unsustainable drop in profit. A quantitative restriction 
will therefore generate more distortions than a tax in the case of a price-competing oligopoly.  
Bertrand-Nash equilibria in oligopolistic international trade have been studied in the 
literature, albeit in the context of import – not export – restrictions. Nevertheless, some insight can 
be drawn. The “collusive” properties associated with quotas are well documented in the literature. If 
the firms are Bertrand players, Krishna (1989) has shown that an import quota can yield a mixed 
strategy equilibrium. As elaborated in Helpman and Krugman (1989), with the quota imposed by the 
importing country, the home firm can opt to charge a higher price, taking advantage of the 
protection. But if the exporting firm chooses to raise its price sufficiently, the home firm will switch to 
adopt an aggressive strategy and charge a much lower price to undercut the rival. At equilibrium, 
both firms’ profits are higher so the quota acts like a “collusive” or “facilitating” device.  
In some cases, if the export tax is set high enough, exports will cease and the tax acts like 
an export ban. Empirically, the threshold level at which an export tax becomes an export ban varies 
in different raw material industries. One relevant factor is the elasticity of demand for the industrial 
material: if consumers react strongly to price changes (i.e. the elasticity of demand is high), then 
imposing an export tax will lower demand more sharply and the rate of tax at which export flows 
cease is lower than when demand elasticity is low.  
It is well established in the literature that an import tax is equivalent to an import quota in 
models of perfect competition. Once we deviate from perfect competition, the “equivalence” result 
does not necessarily hold. In the case of a domestic monopoly, for example, an import quota leads 
to a higher domestic price and lower domestic output compared with an equivalent import tariff (see, 
for example, Helpman and Krugman, 1989, p.33). Where the domestic firm faces a foreign 
monopoly, import quotas are also worse than import tariffs for the home country (see Helpman and 
Krugman 1989, p.56).  
These established results concerning import taxes and import quotas can provide some 
general insights as to why export quotas may be welfare-inferior to export taxes. For example, 
where a monopoly in the importing country is faced with a perfectly competitive world market, both 
export taxes and export quotas can shield the monopoly from competition and increase the 
monopolistic power of the firm. For export quotas, they allow the competitive threats to be 
eliminated and allow the firm in the importing country the freedom to choose its monopolistic price. 
With effective export taxes, on the other hand, the implicit “threats” of imports that will swamp the 
importing market still exist and under some conditions the firm restrains its behaviour. Export quotas 
will create more distortions than export taxes. In particular, quotas will lead to a higher price and 
lower quantity consumed in the importing country. 
Taking another example, where an exporting country has an export monopoly, the monopoly 
firm when faced with an export quota can charge a higher export price (such that what is demanded 
at this price coincides with the quota limit) and thereby capture all the quota rent. In contrast, an 
export tax that yields the same level of exports will provide the government in the exporting country 
with tax revenue equivalent to the quota rent.  
In sum, there are numerous instances where quantitative restrictions on trade flows are more 
distorting than border taxes. For example, in the case of an increase in the demand for the raw 
material, an export tax will allow an increase in exports as a response, thereby alleviating pressure 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in C#
change pdf file to jpg online; changing pdf to jpg on
C# Image: How to Download Image from URL in C# Project with .NET
If you want other format, you can use the image you can also save a gif, jpeg / jpg, or bmp provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
convert multi page pdf to single jpg; best pdf to jpg converter for
2. ECONOMICS OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS AS APPLIED TO INDUSTRIAL RAW MATERIALS – 
75
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
on world prices. In the case of a binding export quota, however, there will be no change in exports. 
Additionally, as illustrated above, there are other cases where quotas can lead to greater consumer 
welfare losses. 
2.4 
The Cournot-Nash model applied to export restrictions: The three-country model 
The basic three-country model 
This section extends the two-country model already presented. It describes and applies a 
theoretical model that highlights the implications of an export restriction on a globally traded 
industrial raw material in a three-country context, where countries X1 and X2 both produce, 
consume and export their mineral resource, whereas country M has no domestic production and 
must rely on imports. This model allows a greater range of insights than in the previous model, 
which did not include a non-producing country.  
As before, the model is a static, one-shot game in a partial equilibrium framework, 
representing an international oligopoly. Since mineral ores tend to be homogeneous, the upstream 
sector is considered to produce identical products. The structure and assumptions of the model are 
inspired by the global chromite industry, where Indian and South African producers (countries X1 
and X2 respectively) extract the mineral ore for domestic consumption as well as for export, with a 
large share of exports going to China. The main use of chromite is in the production of ferrochrome. 
India began imposing export restrictions on its chromite in 2006. For more details, see Fung and 
Korinek (2013, Box 2, p.28). In China (country M), domestic production of chromite is virtually non-
existent.  
In country X1, the firm produces d
1
for home consumption and x
1
for export to country M. 
Total production of mineral ore from country X1 is q
= d
1
+ x
1
. Similarly, the firm in country X2 
produces d
2
for domestic use and x
2
for export to M. Total production in X2 is q
= d
2
+ x
2
. Mineral 
ore q
1
and q
2
are assumed to be identical. This reflects the general observation that most industrial 
raw materials are undifferentiated. The international market for the mineral ore clears so that total 
global supply equals total global demand. The world price of the mineral ore is p
W
, while the 
domestic price in X1 is p
1
and the domestic price in X2 is p
2
. With perfect arbitrage, p
+ t
1
= p
W
and 
p
2
+t
2
= p
W
, where t
1
is the export tax imposed by country X1 and t
2
is the export tax adopted by 
country X2, which is assumed to be set to zero for most of the analysis below. Assuming that there 
are no trade measures in country M, the world price p
W
is the domestic price in M. Taking the export 
taxes into account, the law of one price applies to the mineral ore upstream sector.  
Each firm’s marginal production cost is assumed to be constant. As in the previous model, 
the firms in each country behave like Cournot-Nash producers, setting outputs so as to maximise 
profit. Output-setting behaviour is less competitive, and more feasible, for the firms than setting 
prices (Bertrand behaviour). In the Cournot-Nash setting with firms producing identical products, 
even the higher-cost firms can survive and produce positive outputs.  
In the context of this model, when X1 imposes or increases an export tax, it effectively adds 
to the marginal cost of the firm in X1, thereby reducing the competitiveness of its own firm. Other 
things being equal, ore production from country X1 goes down and production in country X2, the 
competitive exporting country, goes up. The world price rises, the domestic price in country X1 
declines, and exports from country X1 fall. X2’s raw materials exports to country M rise, while the 
domestic price of the raw material in X2 increases. 
Thus, a rise in an export tax in one exporting country displaces the source of the non-
producing country’s imports to its competitor. Profit falls for the ore producer in X1 and rises for the 
producer in X2. Economic rent is thus shifted from the producer in the country imposing the tax to 
the producer in the other country. This can be illustrated using a reaction curve that shows the 
optimal or profit-maximizing output responses of a firm for any given output decision implemented 
by a rival firm. The export tax shifts the reaction curve of the firm in X1 towards the origin and shifts 
the reaction curve of the firm in X2 outwards from the origin, resulting in lower production in X1 and 
higher production in X2 (Figure 2.3).  
VB.NET Word: Word to JPEG Image Converter in .NET Application
Word doc into high quality jpeg / jpg images; Convert a be converted into Jpeg image format and then powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf file into jpg; convert pdf pages to jpg online
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Powerful .NET control to batch convert PDF documents to tiff format in Visual C# .NET program. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images.
convert .pdf to .jpg online; changing pdf to jpg
76
– 2. ECONOMICS OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS AS APPLIED TO INDUSTRIAL RAW MATERIALS 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
Figure 2.3. Shift in reaction curves of mineral producing firms  
due to an export restriction in country X1 
The higher output of the firm in X2 leads to a rise in its profit while the lower output of X1’s 
firm results in a smaller profit. These results are similar to those in Fung and Korinek (2013). In this 
extended and modified three-country export competition scenario, however, there are also some 
new results regarding prices and quantities that cannot be generated in the two-country context. 
With the three-country model, we see that X1’s export tax has spillover effects on the competing 
exporting country. The domestic price of the mineral ore in the other exporting country rises, exports 
and total output rise and the profit of the upstream mineral ore firm rise as well. The world price of 
the mineral ore also increases. The terms of trade improve for both the raw materials exporters and 
worsen for the importing country.  
Like the mineral ore sector, many processed or refined downstream metals sectors are also 
dominated by a few global producers. It again seems appropriate to adopt an imperfectly 
competitive market structure for downstream activity. This implies three oligopolistic downstream 
producers, one in each of the three countries. The processing firms in X1 and X2 export to country 
M, while the processing firm in M competes in its domestic market with imports from both X1 and 
X2. The downstream outputs are assumed to have different grades since different types of 
processing are performed on the mineral ore in different countries.  
This set-up parallels the current global ferrochrome situation. Despite having no home 
production of chromite, China (M) has substantial domestic production of ferrochrome. Although it is 
now the world’s largest single producer of ferrochrome, China is still a net importer. South Africa 
and India both export ferrochrome to the Chinese domestic market. The grades of ferrochrome 
vary, depending on whether it is processed in South Africa, India or China. Theoretically, this is a 
three-stage game. In the first stage, the Indian government sets the export restriction. In the second 
stage, the upstream ore producers in India and South Africa set their outputs. The market clearing 
prices in the first-stage game become the input prices for the downstream processed mineral 
sector. In the third stage, the three international downstream firms set the quantities they will 
produce to compete in the import market in country M. 
VB.NET Image: How to Create Visual Basic .NET Windows Image Viewer
If you need a format conversion, it is also available including png, jpeg, gif, tiff, bmp, PDF, and Word from that, you are entitled to change the orientation
convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi; .pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Export PDF to TIFF file format. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP
convert pdf to jpg for online; bulk pdf to jpg converter
2. ECONOMICS OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS AS APPLIED TO INDUSTRIAL RAW MATERIALS – 
77
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
As before, downstream firms compete in a quantity-driven fashion. In this theoretical setting, 
an increase in the export tax by country X1 in the upstream ore sector lowers the input price to the 
downstream firm in country X1 while increasing the input price for the downstream firms in countries 
X2 and M. It follows that in the third stage of the game, X1’s processed metal exports increase, 
exports of the processed metal decrease from X2 and M’s domestic output of the processed mineral 
is reduced. Downstream industry profit is higher in country X1, but lower in X2 and in M. 
Thus, the export restriction imposed by country X1 in the upstream ore sector shifts rents 
from the upstream firm in X1 towards the upstream firm in X2. At the same time, the export tax 
increases profit of the downstream firm in X1 at the expense of the downstream firms in X2 and in 
M. This suggests that India’s export tax harms its upstream chromium ore industry, but helps its 
downstream ferrochrome industry. In South Africa, the upstream chromium ore sector profits from 
the Indian export restriction but its downstream ferrochrome industry is hurt, as is the Chinese 
ferrochrome sector as a result of the Indian export restriction (see also Fung and Korinek, 2013; 
Fung 1995, 2002). 
Now we consider an export quota imposed by country X1 on its mineral ore sector. For ease 
of comparison, we assume that the quota restricts the mineral ore export to the same level as does 
a given export tax. Starting from the initial Cournot-Nash equilibrium, the domestic output of mineral 
ore in country X1 is affected in exactly the same way as with the export tax, and the resulting 
Cournot-Nash equilibrium outputs remain the same for either policy for all players. As in the two-
country model, however, an important difference is the administration and ownership of the quota 
rents. The possibilities have been discussed in the previous section. 
Since outputs are the same for either an export tax or an export quota, prices also change in 
the same way, as do profits. Profit declines in X1’s upstream mineral ore industry, and in 
downstream processing industries of X2 and M, whereas profit rises in X1’s downstream processing 
industry and in X2’s upstream mineral ore industry. Nonetheless, although an export quota is 
broadly equivalent to an export tax, there are many instances where an export quota can be more 
distortionary than an export tax as elaborated in Fung and Korinek (2013).
13
In particular, the rents associated with a quantitative export restriction in country X1 accrue 
largely to the exporting firm in country X2 due to higher world prices, whereas in the case of an 
export tax, they generally accrue to the public administration in country X1 through tax revenue 
(Fung and Korinek, 2013). In addition, the imposition of a quantitative restriction on raw materials 
may imply a higher world price than the use of an equivalent export tax. In an oligopolistic model, 
raw materials exporters in X2, shielded from competition by exporters in X1 regardless of the level 
of the world price, may sell their materials at a higher price since they will not need to compete 
against raw materials producers in X1 over and above the exports included in X1’s quota. They may 
therefore take advantage of their position as sole exporter to raise prices further in the face of rising 
demand. 
Race to the bottom: Competitive export restriction strategies 
When country X1 imposes an export tax, as described in the previous section, simply 
adjusting output according to its outward-shifted reaction function is not the only action open to X2. 
If the downstream processed metal sector is more important to X2 than its primary sector, it has an 
incentive to respond to its competitor’s export restriction policy with a similar policy change. Indeed, 
after India imposed an export tariff on chromite exports in 2006 (and then increased it in 2008), the 
South African government seriously considered imposing a tax on its own chromite exports in 
response, but finally decided against it at the time (Korinek and Kim, 2010; Fung and Korinek, 
2013). Imposing an export tax as a response would have lowered the input ore price in South Africa 
and potentially raised its national welfare, mitigating the negative beggar-thy-neighbour effects of 
the Indian export tax on its own downstream sector.  
In general, such a reaction is not a straightforward option. There may be legal consequences 
in the case of quantitative export restrictions that are not allowed under WTO rules, although 
exceptional situations exist where quantitative export restrictions are permitted. In the case of 
78
– 2. ECONOMICS OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS AS APPLIED TO INDUSTRIAL RAW MATERIALS 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
export taxes, some countries are bound by recent accession agreements to the WTO (Chapter 5 of 
this volume; Karapinar, 2011). Legal or economic consequences to the use of export taxes may 
also be felt in cases where export taxes are prohibited or regulated in a preferential trade 
agreement. In the case of the United States, export taxes are prohibited in the Constitution. 
Leaving these considerations aside, our model allows us to study the optimal response by 
country X2 to a restriction placed by X1 on its raw materials exports. We assume that each country, 
X1 and X2, sets its export tax rate so as to maximise its own economic welfare. Following the 
standard literature, and simplifying for the purposes of this model, total welfare of country X1, W
1
, is 
defined as the sum of the profit of the upstream ore firm B
1
, plus that of the downstream processing 
firm V
1
, plus the export tax revenue T
1
(Bagwell and Staiger, 2009a, 2009b). It was shown above 
that all three components are functions of X1’s tax rate (B
1
falls, whereas V
1
and T
1
rise, when X1’s 
export tax rate increases). We denote by t
1
* the optimal tax rate that maximises W
1
. Similarly, t
2
denotes the export tax that maximises the national economic welfare of country X2.  
If the downstream firm is more important to X2’s government, a rise in t
1
will negatively affect 
W2, since a rise in t
1
raises the ore input price in country X2. Note that both countries have vertically 
linked firms, each with market power. From the standpoint of economic efficiency throughout the 
value chain, the input ore price is excessively high given that this is an oligopolistic situation. In 
other words, the input is provided at a price above marginal cost. An increase of the ore price in X2 
due to X1’s export tax exacerbates the existing inefficiency due to imperfect competition, moving 
the input price still further away from marginal cost and lowering the total economic efficiency of the 
value chain. Thus, W
2
can be negatively affected by increasing t
1
. Similarly, in the contrary case, 
the welfare of country X1 would decrease if country X2 imposed or increased an export tax. This 
particular case highlights the potential for strategic export policy interdependence. This is a situation 
where each country’s own welfare increases with the imposition or increase of its own export tax, 
but the welfare of the competing exporting country declines. Relative to a free trade equilibrium 
situation, an export tax is thus a beggar-thy-neighbour policy, where the national welfare of each 
exporting country rises with its own export tax and declines with the export tax of its competitor.  
Now consider the following three-stage game: in the first stage, the governments in both X1 
and X2 set their export taxes t
1
and t
2
independently, each maximizing its own national economic 
welfare W
1
and W
2
. In the second stage, for given export taxes t
1
* and t
2
*, each upstream industrial 
raw material ore firm chooses its own output, maximising its profits B
1
and B
2
. The equilibrium 
prices of the mineral ores in the second stage become the input prices for the processed metal 
sectors. Given these input prices, in the last stage the downstream processed metal firms set their 
output levels, maximizing their respective profits in countries X1, X2 and M.  
When the two governments in X1 and X2 set their export taxes independently, each ignoring 
the impact of its export tax on the other, it is a non-cooperative export tax game. This game is 
structurally similar to the prisoners’ dilemma game, and as in that case, there exists a co-operative 
outcome in which both countries would be better off. In theory, governments X1 and X2 can escape 
the non-cooperative suboptimal outcome through negotiated agreement which would include a 
maximum level of export tax allowed by each country. If the agreement is considered to be legally 
binding the outcome can be characterised by Nash bargaining. The Nashian arbitrator can be seen 
as choosing the level of export taxes in order to maximise weighted joint welfare (W
1
)
a
(W
2
)
b
, where 
a is the bargaining power of country X1 and b is the bargaining power of country X2. Cooperation in 
the form of adopting cooperative export taxes would raise both countries’ welfare. Co-operative 
export taxes would normally involve maximizing joint national welfare of both countries. 
This raises the question as to the potential form of agreement or collusive negotiation. In 
some cases, export restrictions are disciplined in regional or preferential trade agreements (see 
Chapter 5 for a full discussion of options currently used to discipline export restrictions in regional 
trade agreements). In order for a trade agreement to be binding under WTO rules on preferential 
trade agreements, however, it must include a substantial amount of each country’s trade, which 
would go well beyond the scope of one product or sector. Alternatively, a smaller, commercial 
agreement between two firms or governments may be difficult to obtain since the raw materials 
producers in the two countries are competitors as are the downstream, processed product 
2. ECONOMICS OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS AS APPLIED TO INDUSTRIAL RAW MATERIALS – 
79
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
exporters. Such agreements may not be fully legally binding nor are such collusive practices 
accepted in many countries. Therefore, in the real world, the cooperative solution may not be 
feasible, and when it is available, each country will be strongly tempted to revert to a non-
cooperative export tax, increasing its national welfare at the expense of the other, while its partner 
continues to behave co-operatively. In a static, one-shot game (Figure 2.4), it is more probable that 
each government applies its non-cooperative export tax, ignoring the welfare of the other country. 
Figure 2.4. Cooperative and non-cooperative outcomes in the case of an export tax 
One way that a sub-optimal “export tax war” can be avoided is if the commercial agreement 
is self-enforcing. For a self-enforcing agreement to work, the static game characterization of the 
export tax is extended to a situation where the game is played repeatedly. For simplicity, in this 
infinitely repeated game, governments set their export taxes in each period over an infinite time 
horizon. Here too, one outcome is for the governments to set the non-cooperative export taxes t
1
*
and t
2
in each period forever. This will yield non-cooperative national welfares W
1
(t
1
*
) and W
2
(t
2
*
), 
which are sub-optimal for each period.  
If, on the other hand, both governments choose their cooperative export taxes t
1
C
and t
2
C
to 
maximise the joint welfare W
1
+ W
2
, their cooperative national welfares will be W
1
(t
1
, t
2
C
) and W
2
(t
1
C
, t
2
C
), which are higher than their respective non-cooperative welfares. Furthermore the case 
when country X1 cheats while the other country cooperates can be characterised as country X1 
choosing t
to maximise W
1
given that the export tax of the country X2 is at t
2
C
. The export tax 
chosen in the cheating situation is denoted as t
1
CH
. Similarly the cheating export tax for country X2 
is t
2
CH
. For the trade agreement to be self-enforcing, it is necessary that W
1
(t
1
CH 
, t
2
c
) – W
(t
1
, t
2
C
< 1/r
1
[ W
1
(t
1
, t
2
C
) – W
1
(t
1
*
, t
2
*
)] and W
2
(t
1
C
, t
2
CH
) – W
(t
1
C
, t
2
C
) < 1/r
2
[ W
2
(t
1
C
, t
2
C
) – W
2
(t
1
*
, t
2
*
)], 
where r
1
and r
2
are the discount rates for country X1 and country X2. In other words, in order to 
Country  X1
Country  X2 
W
2
(t
1
CH
, t
2
C
)
W
1
(t
1
CH
, t
2
C
)
W
2
(t
1
*
, t
2
*
)
W
1
(t
1
*
, t
2
*
)
W
1
(t
1
C
, t
2
CH
)
W
2
(t
1
C
, t
2
CH
)
W
1
(t
1
C
, t
2
C
)
W
2
(t
1
C
, t
2
C
)
Export tax 
No tax 
Export tax 
No tax 
80
– 2. ECONOMICS OF EXPORT RESTRICTIONS AS APPLIED TO INDUSTRIAL RAW MATERIALS 
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS IN RAW MATERIALS TRADE: FACTS, FALLACIES AND BETTER PRACTICES © OECD 2014 
escape the sub-optimal equilibrium, the one-time gain of cheating needs to be dominated by the 
future discounted loss of cooperation, or alternatively the future discounted punishment. 
In summary, an export tax by country X1 negatively affects the national economic welfare of 
country X2; similarly, an export tax by country X2 affects negatively the economic welfare of country 
X1. Country M, the importer of raw materials, experiences lower welfare due to the actions of both 
exporters. Non-cooperative export tax rates lead to a sub-optimal outcome. Trade or commercial 
agreements that are legally binding or are self-enforcing can in principle be designed to escape this 
prisoner’s dilemma situation, leading to higher cooperative national welfares for both countries. 
However, in practice, trade and commercial agreements may be difficult to obtain. In the longer 
term, it is mainly the threat of future discounted lack of cooperation either through retaliation or a 
“punishing” reaction on the part of trading partners that may mitigate the sub-optimal policy 
outcome. In any case, such collusive export taxes would, however, harm third countries and would 
move the world market farther from a free trade equilibrium in raw materials trade. 
Note that an export tax by either country raises the world price of the mineral ore, which 
confers a terms-of-trade gain on the exporters. It also represents an increase in the input price to 
the downstream firm in country M, the importing country. The terms-of-trade loss by country M 
leads to lower economic welfare in country M. Moreover, if the downstream firms in country M 
relocate to a raw-materials exporting country in order to access raw material inputs more easily, the 
welfare losses for country M will be even greater than described above. As mentioned earlier, 
caution should be exercised when applying simplified models to actual situations. The model can, 
however, provide some insights and can contribute to understanding the complex impacts of 
exports restrictions as applied to global industrial raw materials markets. 
Alternative reactions available to countries that face export restrictions 
The previous sub-section focuses on trade policy responses to export restrictions by 
competing exporting countries. This sub-section considers what reactions if any are available to 
countries like country M, characterised as an importer of the raw material with no domestic 
production of the mineral resource, but with a downstream industry that uses the mineral as an 
input. As seen above, export restrictions raise world prices and reduce the global supply of raw 
materials, thus affecting trading partners that previously imported the raw material in question. In 
the past, trading partners that have experienced diminished access to supply, or access to raw 
materials at higher prices due to restrictive export policies, have contemplated various actions in 
order to counter their distortive effects. Some of the options that have been discussed in different 
fora are outlined below:  
 
Reduce or remove any remaining import tariffs on the raw materials that are subject to 
export restrictions. 
 
Promote and fund research into alternative technologies with the objective of using a more 
diversified set of minerals and metals as inputs in strategic industries. 
 
Facilitate exploration of new sources of raw materials that are subject to export restrictions, 
for example in regions that are potential exporters. 
 
Facilitate the development of technologies that recycle metals from discarded final-use 
products. 
 
Increase cooperation between producers and consumers affected by restrictions to facilitate 
information flows, improve access to existing supply channels and alleviate short-term 
supply disruptions. 
 
Develop measures to alleviate the most distorting effects of export restrictions in a multi-
lateral context. Some suggestions as regards the agriculture sector have been put forward 
including “using multilaterally agreed definitions and criteria … to interpret the meaning and 
scope of exceptions” to the ban on export quotas” (Howse and Josling, 2012), implementing 
disciplines on food aid such as those outlined in DDA discussions,
14
and outlining a 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested