31
WWW.EXPORTSTARTGUIDE.COM
4.2 PREPARING FOR THE MARKET
When your company has decided its most 
suitable route to market is via a local partner 
or distributor, the next step is to identify which 
one. Keep in mind, this organisation will  
effectively be representing your brand in the 
market. Choosing the right partner is possibly 
the single most important decision you will 
make when exporting.
BENEFITS
Your route into a new market can o晴en be 
smoother when you have a local partner and 
this usually leads to higher levels of sales – even 
if you may need to sacrifice margin to bring 
them on board. Any commercial terms with a 
partner should be agreed in advance and stated 
clearly in any contract. 
The benefits of a good local partner or  
distributor are many:
► Where your products or services are  
complementary, they can provide access  
to an existing customer base in a brand-new 
market
► They will have well-established networks of 
contacts
► They may be able to help you navigate  
complex bureaucratic procedures, or  
provide guidance on the local  
business culture.
FINDING THE RIGHT PARTNER
Research consistently shows that the correct 
choice of partner in your overseas market is one 
of the most critical success factors for SMEs. 
Setting and agreeing expectations is the key to 
establishing a strong relationship with a partner 
from the outset. The types of details you may 
want to consider include sales objectives and 
shared marketing plans, exclusivity, pricing, 
margins, discounts and payment terms.
DUE DILIGENCE
It’s important to conduct thorough checks  
into your chosen partner. In many markets, it’s  
possible to conduct formal due diligence to  
establish the company’s credit history.  
Where this option is not available, use business 
networks or existing contacts in the market.  
In some cases, if you have already made  
contact with a customer, you could ask them if 
they have a preferred partner or supplier with 
whom they do business, but this may  
not always yield results.
MAKING THE RELATIONSHIP WORK
Exporters say that if possible, you should  
look to work with your preferred partner or 
distributor on a fixed-period trial basis to test 
the working arrangements in practice. Like any 
good relationship, it needs regular work. To  
get the most from this arrangement, your  
company should support the partner by  
visiting the market regularly and engaging 
in joint marketing activities. It’s also wise to 
include a ‘get out’ clause if targets are not being 
met or the arrangement is not working.
HOW TO: 
find a partner
or distributor in 
export markets
.Pdf to jpg converter online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert multipage pdf to jpg; to jpeg
.Pdf to jpg converter online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
.pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter for
32
A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO DOING BUSINESS IN OVERSEAS MARKETS
4.2 PREPARING FOR THE MARKET
CASE STUDY:
COMBILIFT
Combili晴 (www.combili晴.com) knows what 
it takes to export successfully. The Monaghan- 
headquartered company has sold more than 
24,000 materials handling and specialist  
forkli晴 units in more than 75 countries.  
Combili晴 co-founder and Managing Director  
Martin McVicar, shares some tips about making 
the relationship with a distributor or partner  
successful in export markets.
BASED ON YOUR EXPERIENCE, WHAT’S 
THE BEST WAY TO START WORKING WITH 
PARTNERS IN A NEW MARKET?
Combili晴’s general approach to a new market is to  
focus on finding end-users of our product before  
we put any serious effort into finding a distributor  
or partner. We find this method effective as the  
distributor can be hesitant to do anything until they 
know the market for your product. A customer is  
more likely to recommend a distributor that they have 
had first-hand experience of working with in another 
capacity. Seeing a Combili晴 product in operation at a 
customer’s facility o晴en gets the interest of a distrib-
utor and they will contact us. The customer can then 
give us good advice as to who we could work with.
We’ve found that a lot of the customers we already 
deal with are bringing us into new markets, which is a 
very cost-effective way of entering a new market. Our 
experience is, that if you appoint a distributor without 
already having one or two customers in the market, 
there is added pressure on the distributor to find 
new customers. This results in the distributor losing 
interest very quickly. You can put a lot of energy into 
motivating a distributor and if they don’t already see 
where the market is, you don’t see the results.
HOW DO YOU MAKE YOUR FINAL DECISION 
ABOUT WHICH DISTRIBUTOR TO WORK 
WITH?
We purposely don’t look for the distributor that 
has the biggest name: success will depend on the 
distributor’s salespeople on the ground and whether 
they understand and believe in your product – rather 
than the name of the company. We like to work with 
a distributor that already sells either direct or indirect 
competitors’ products as these distributors will have a 
better understanding of our market.
Many exporting companies are resistant to going 
down the route of using distributors with links to  
competitive products. I believe that if you are  
confident your product is innovative, and if the 
distributor can appreciate the value of what you are 
offering, they can get you off the ground the fastest. 
You don’t have to spend time educating them, they 
already know the target market and they already know 
customers using similar products so they know the 
type of customers to target.
: FIND PARTNERS/DISTRIBUTORS
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi; .pdf to jpg converter online
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert pdf photo to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg online
33
WWW.EXPORTSTARTGUIDE.COM
4.2 PREPARING FOR THE MARKET
WHAT’S THE KEY TO SUPPORTING THE  
DISTRIBUTOR, AND MAKING THE  
RELATIONSHIP WORK?
Our most effective way of training distributors is what I refer to 
as “spending windshield time” with them. That means going on 
the road with their salespeople, knocking on doors and visiting 
customers in their market. We are continuously learning from 
this. You need to spend as much time as possible with that  
distributor. Obviously that depends on your budget and how 
near they are to you. We find that once a year is not enough. 
Twice a year is better, but if you can be with them four times  
a year, you will have more success.
As our products are concept products, if distributors are not 
known, sales don’t come anyway – even if a market is booming. 
For any company entering a new market, a distributor, unless 
it’s an exceptional case, is going to sell other product lines.  
The distributor’s business will have been surviving on those 
products before you began dealing with them so what you want 
to do is get the distributor to spend more time on your product. 
When you’re not with the distributor, other suppliers will be. 
If you’re on the road with the salesperson for a week, you will 
see a clear rise in activity in the following month, however this 
dwindles until you have a repeat visit.
Also, having a salesperson dedicated to the market gets the 
distributor more focused and gets the brand more established. 
As our business has grown, we are now employing sales  
support people in local markets, and they generally have the 
local language. As of today, we have 35 sales people based 
abroad in the key export markets, and their role is to support 
the distributors in the larger markets.
“We like to work with a distributor 
that already sells either direct 
or indirect competitors’ products 
as these distributors will 
have a better understanding 
of our market.”
Martin McVicar,
Combili晴
: FIND PARTNERS/DISTRIBUTORS
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Converter; String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
convert pdf image to jpg online; change pdf file to jpg file
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. using RasterEdge.XDoc.Converter; String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.dcm"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert dicom to
best way to convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf picture to jpg
34
A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO DOING BUSINESS IN OVERSEAS MARKETS
4.3 ENTERING THE MARKET
Setting your prices correctly when selling  
overseas is critical to building a sustainable 
export business. Being price-competitive is  
important, but SMEs are strongly advised not  
to compete on this factor alone. Experienced  
exporters say that it’s best to avoid lowering 
your prices in the hope of winning market 
share; it’s better to enhance your product or 
service in order to move the discussion from 
one of cost to one about value.
CALCULATING THE COST
As an exporting company, you automatically 
incur more costs when doing business inter-
nationally. These include travel, research, 
developing marketing material, certification 
if required. You may also need to adapt your 
product or service to suit market conditions. 
All of these issues should be factored in to your 
decision making process when setting prices.  
If you plan to do business in multiple markets,  
it is good practice to calculate separate pricing 
for individual countries to allow for different 
costs and mark-ups.
CULTURE AND PRICING
Providers from this island usually don’t  
compete on price, and this can work in their  
favour when exporting. In many markets, 
uniqueness, innovation and service levels are 
more important to buyers. This can be a point 
of differentiation for exporters in markets that 
can be price-sensitive, and it can lead to higher 
prices. Good intelligence gained from time 
spent on the ground will allow you to  
establish what features your target  
customers value most. 
Pricing doesn’t have to be your only point of 
differentiation. You can offer other incentives to 
your customer, such as better credit terms, fast-
er delivery, tailored warranty, enhanced levels 
of a晴er-sales service and so on. For more advice 
on developing a pricing strategy, visit www.
nibusinessinfo.co.uk/content/developing- 
pricing-strategy. 
CHECKING THE COMPETITION
In setting your prices, you will need to consider 
your competitors’ prices, the level of existing 
competition in the market, your customers’ 
perception of the price/quality relationship, 
production and distribution costs and  
overheads and the extent to which your  
customers can afford the price. 
TIPS FOR EXPORT SUCCESS
► Understand your costs, in order to be able to set 
your pricing appropriately 
► Set different prices for different markets, be-
cause mark-ups and routes to market will vary 
► When negotiating, consider other incentives 
such as product samples or marketing material 
instead of lowering prices 
► Many customers are prepared to pay extra 
for a quality product; if that is part of your 
USP, don’t compromise on it by reducing 
your prices
► Find out the tax implications of selling your 
product in a particular market, as this could 
affect your final price.
HOW TO: 
set pricing in 
export markets
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
Features and Benefits. Powerful image converter to convert images of JPG Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after
reader convert pdf to jpg; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
An advanced PDF converter tool, which supports to be integrated in .NET to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
changing pdf to jpg file; .net convert pdf to jpg
35
WWW.EXPORTSTARTGUIDE.COM
4.3 ENTERING THE MARKET
Blackthorn Foods (www.blackthornfoods.co.uk) 
is a family business specialising in award- 
winning gourmet handmade fudge produced in 
the artisan way, in a range of natural flavours. 
Established in 2004 by three sisters, the company 
now employs a further six people. Having started 
exporting in 2013, Blackthorn already sells to the 
Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden, Germany, the 
United Arab Emirates and Spain. Exports are  
now 25 per cent of all sales for the company. 
Dorothy Bittles, co-founder and Partner,  
shares her experience of how to set pricing  
in new markets.
WHAT’S THE KEY TO SUCCESSFULLY 
PRICING IN NEW MARKETS?
I think every country appreciates good food, and we 
provide a premium product and it’s priced at that. 
People are always prepared to pay for quality: we 
always keep the quality. Our product was always 
handmade, and now we have moved to being flow 
wrapped. We invested a lot in that system. Apart from 
improving our production capacity, another reason 
was to improve the product’s shelf life properties.
HOW YOU DO DECIDE ON A PRICING  
MODEL FOR YOUR EXPORT BUSINESS?
People always try to force your prices down, on 
account of transport costs. Our export business is 
all about volume orders, because the fudge is being 
shipped out per pallet. When we initially started 
exporting, we tried to build our transport costs into 
our price, but it varies so much by country to country, 
so we now just quote prices ex works. Some large 
companies might have good carriage infrastructures 
in their countries and it’s cheaper for them to collect 
the product themselves.
It also means that if you’re at a trade show and 
someone from Spain, for example, asks about your 
pricing, it’s much easier to quote an ex works price. 
Some countries do have a sugar goods tax so there 
are other things to consider, too. They might pay an 
extra heavy Vat on it.
IF YOUR PRODUCTION COSTS ARE FIXED, 
HOW CAN YOU ENSURE YOUR EXPORTS 
ARE SUFFICIENTLY PROFITABLE?
As opposed to offering a discount on the price, if 
shopkeepers in a particular country say they don’t 
really know fudge very well, we would offer more 
point of sale material and support of the brand, as 
opposed to lowering our price. In a case of 32 bars, 
we would offer three or four wrapped differently, so 
that the shopkeepers can sample it, and we include 
information about the product’s unique selling 
points. We have a shelf-ready case and we would get 
a sticker made in the appropriate language, telling 
the customer about the product.
WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE ABOUT  
PRICING A PRODUCT CORRECTLY IN  
A NEW MARKET?
Ours is such an artisan product that we can’t sell it 
cheaply even if we wanted to: we would just be busy 
fools. We have a cost and we’re not going to make it 
for less than that, so we’re quite rigid on our pricing. 
We don’t discount.
As an exporting company, you do need to support  
the brand, and there is a cost involved – but it doesn’t 
have to be on the product. There are advertising 
costs, but it’s so the product can continue to sell  
at the price you’ve set. What we have done in some 
countries, where they weren’t familiar with fudge, if a 
retailer doesn’t want to commit to a full pallet, for the 
initial order, we contributed to the transport costs 
and reduced the amount on a full 
pallet, and that was a good 
enticement. 
: SET PRICING IN EXPORT MARKETS
CASE STUDY:
BLACKTHORN 
FOODS
“Remember price 
isn’t your only 
point of 
negotiation”
Dorothy Bittles,
Blackthorn 
Foods
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Features and Benefits. High speed JPEG to GIF Converter, faster than other JPG Converters; Standalone software, so the user who is not online still can use
batch pdf to jpg online; convert pdf to jpg
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage. .NET converter control for
convert pdf photo to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter for
36
A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO DOING BUSINESS IN OVERSEAS MARKETS
4.3 ENTERING THE MARKET
Once your company has built up experience  
of exporting indirectly, the next step may be  
to set up a more permanent presence in a  
particular country or region. Depending on  
the prevailing business culture, or just your 
customers’ preference, you might find that it 
improves your chances of increasing sales.
Some customers will welcome a local office as  
a sign that you’re committed to their market  
for the long term. Many also prefer the  
reassurance of a local presence for handling 
post-sales support. This section looks at the 
issues to consider when establishing a  
presence in the market.
LEGAL ENTITIES
In many countries, the possibilities range from a 
single-person sales office to full manufacturing 
operations. You don’t always have to set up a 
fully separate legal entity to start with; it might 
be sufficient to set up a representative office, 
and graduate to another company form later.
REPRESENTATIVE OFFICES
Keep in mind that your choice will dictate  
what functions the office is allowed to carry  
out. A representative office usually has  
limited authority to carry out some business 
development, but contracts can only be signed 
with the company’s head office. On the other 
hand, its tax liability might be much less oner-
ous than that of a legally registered branch.
BRANCHES AND SUBSIDIARIES
More permanent options such as branches or 
limited subsidiary companies usually have a  
lot more autonomy when it comes to doing 
business and employing staff. However, they 
will most likely be liable to pay tax on their 
activity in that country.
JOINT VENTURES/ACQUISITIONS
Joint ventures are another possible option; 
the advantage in this case is that the risk is 
shared with a local company. What’s more, if 
the partner company has been established for 
some time, it also potentially brings an existing 
customer base to the table. Acquisitions are 
another option if you prefer not to dilute the 
shareholding in your business.
QUESTIONS TO ASK
► What company forms are available and 
which is the most suitable for your business?
► What restrictions, if any, does your intended 
market put on foreign ownership?
► Will your business require permits to operate?
► Who should head up the office: someone 
from HQ who is familiar with your company 
ethos, or a local with experience in your 
sector?
► How will you manage the operation –  
especially if there is a time difference  
involved?
► What support services will you need: can 
you use your own professional services firm 
to register the business and file accounts, 
or will you need to retain local legal and tax 
advisors?
► Where’s the best location to set up the office?
HOW TO: 
set up a company
overseas
37
WWW.EXPORTSTARTGUIDE.COM
4.3 ENTERING THE MARKET
First established in 1975, Irish-owned H&K International 
(www.hki.com) supplies kitchen equipment to some of 
the world’s biggest fast food and casual dining chains 
including McDonalds, Burger King and Subway. It  
supplies 20,000 restaurants in 70 countries annually, 
with an annual turnover in excess of $500m with  
most of its business coming from the US. It has  
manufacturing facilities in Mexico, USA and the UK,  
and recently acquired a facility in Indonesia. It has 
service – warehouse operations in a further 10 countries 
with the headquarters based in Dublin. CEO David 
Bobbett shares the secrets of what it takes to set up 
successfully in foreign markets.
WHAT ARE YOUR CRITERIA FOR DECIDING 
TO SET UP IN A PARTICULAR MARKET?
I think everything has to be dictated by the customer. You 
have to decide where the customers are and what their needs 
are. We make about 7,000 different items and therefore we 
work very closely in offering total solutions to our custom-
ers, to support their brand. In our case, it’s a lot of project 
management, it’s a lot of drawings and knowing what’s in 
each individual restaurant. Why you go into a market has to 
be dictated by what the customer’s needs are. Having Mexico 
so close to the US was without doubt the most logical step 
because that is our biggest market. Indonesia was also logical 
because it’s easier to do business there than in China where 
there are more challenges. Because of legislation, China is a 
difficult market to operate in.
WHAT’S KEY TO MAKING OVERSEAS  
OPERATIONS WORK, IN YOUR EXPERIENCE?
If you are going to go abroad, you need to have the man-
agement structure. You can’t devote the resources away 
from what you’re doing well. You have to have a very solid 
foundation and you need a very strong level of operational 
control: you need to have operations excellence which can 
be easily transferred to other locations. That’s a huge factor 
in our mind as to why you would go into a market. But it 
really is customer driven.
The big thing about anything like this – opening a new plant 
is like an acquisition. Mexico is a very bureaucratic country 
and there are always risks and rewards which you have to 
balance and you have to realise what those are. We had 
a partner in Indonesia who understood the local require-
ments, so we didn’t rush in. We moved in with them and 
over time, took a greater percentage of the business. You 
have to do an evaluation and understand that no market 
is perfect. There is a need for a long-term vision, it needs 
investment.
HOW DO YOU GO ABOUT SETTING UP IN A  
NEW MARKET?
We’re very clear that our Irish-based tax advisors manage 
our business worldwide. We actually get our audits done 
worldwide, other than in Sydney and Mexico, by the advisors 
in Dublin. And they send their audit teams from Ireland. 
Obviously, tax is handled differently per country. We have 
a tax partner at who deals with that. Our job is to serve the 
customer in the most efficient way and our audit and tax 
support we get is excellent. I come from an accounting back-
ground myself and I think it’s an excellent broad education.
: SET UP A COMPANY OVERSEAS
CASE STUDY:
H&K INTERNATIONAL
38
A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO DOING BUSINESS IN OVERSEAS MARKETS
4.3 ENTERING THE MARKET
SPEAKING OF THAT BACKGROUND, HOW DO 
YOU APPLY WHAT YOU LEARNED TO DOING 
BUSINESS IN INTERNATIONAL MARKETS?
I think information drives decision making. The ability 
to plan, organise and control, to implement boundary 
controls – if you control what goes in, then you control 
what goes out. What I learned was invaluable, such as 
the discipline of meeting deadlines. In our case, four 
of our seven-strong management team worldwide 
are chartered accountants and two are management 
accountants. I think in any team you have someone in 
any team who is more entrepreneurial but it’s important 
to manage a business well and have a cross-section of 
views.
The other thing I learned form my audit days was that 
culture is important. You build the right culture in your 
business, and if you do that, you’ll get more opportuni-
ties with your customer. We won the worldwide supplier 
of the year award with McDonalds – we set the industry 
standard.
I think culture is king. In our business, there’s no 
politics. You focus on the customer. It’s about pride in 
performance and that can take time to achieve in new 
markets. That’s the most important thing: to bring that 
culture from your business into the new business you 
move into. Our approach when we open an office in a 
new market is that it will be led by people who are from 
our business for quite some time. They then pass on the 
reins when that operation has been going for a while. 
When we recruit, or do an acquisition, we do a very clear 
evaluation of all employees – what we call a person  
assessment. They have to fit the culture of our company.
: SET UP A COMPANY OVERSEAS
OpenJaw Technologies (www.openjawtech.com
delivers online retailing solutions to the travel indus-
try, including airlines, loyalty programs, online travel 
agents and hotel groups. In 2005 it began selling in 
Spain through a subsidiary in Madrid, which now 
employs 40 people. The Spanish and Latin American 
markets now represent 20 per cent of OpenJaw’s 
total turnover. Ricardo Navarro Ales, Regional 
Director of OpenJaw Iberica and Latin America, talks 
us through the steps to setting up in a new market.
WHY DID OPENJAW CHOOSE SPAIN AS A 
LOCATION TO SET UP AN OFFICE?
Spain is a well-recognised market in the travel space, 
being one of the top destinations in the world and of 
course it has a powerful travel industry. In 2005, Open-
Jaw was growing internationally with projects in several 
different countries, and they saw in Spain an opportunity 
for growth and expansion, investing in a market that had 
relevant players in terms of size. The fact that Spain was 
a relevant and attractive market to invest, and also that 
Spain is a natural bridge with Latin America – a huge 
market with strong growth – were the main reasons to 
establish a subsidiary in Madrid and delegate the man-
agement of those markets, including sales, operations 
and support, to a regional director.
CASE STUDY:
OPENJAW 
TECHNOLOGIES
“You have to do an 
evaluation and 
understand that no 
market is perfect. 
There is a need for 
a long-term vision, 
it needs investment”
David Bobbett
H&K International
39
WWW.EXPORTSTARTGUIDE.COM
4.3 ENTERING THE MARKET
: SET UP A COMPANY OVERSEAS
HOW DID YOU GO ABOUT SETTING 
UP THE OFFICE IN PRACTICE?
We started small, with a minimum team,  
with a little office in a shared business centre, 
with a clear budget to invest and giving us a 
couple of years in mind to prove the return 
on investment. We closed the first deal six 
months a晴er we started, which was a great 
success. Since then, the subsidiary has  
been profitable and did not require further  
investment from the matrix company. The 
initial projects were developed in Dublin,  
but then we realised that a local team was 
necessary to answer some of the market 
needs, like support in the local language, 
more frequent contact with customers –  
not only at C-level – and also the cost of the 
implementations. This is how we planned to 
increase the headcount in Madrid that forced 
us to move offices and rent our own space.
DID IT TAKE LONGER TO GET BECOME 
ESTABLISHED IN THE MARKET THAN 
YOU EXPECTED, AND WAS THE  
PROCESS EASY OR COMPLICATED?
The establishment took longer than expected, 
primarily because in 2005 there was a lot  
of bureaucracy to resolve, mostly when the 
investors were foreigners. It is very important 
to have a good partner that can guide you  
on the legal and financial path to make  
the process smooth. The process was easy  
but that’s just because we were very well 
counselled. We have two very important 
partners: a law firm that helped us since  
inception to establish the company, create 
contracts, manage all legal requirements for 
taxes, and transfer pricing, and so on. We also 
work with a financial advisory firm that helps 
us in the day-by-day work related to account-
ancy, labour, payroll, etc. These two partner-
ships allow us to focus in the business.
OPENJAW EMPLOYS 30 PEOPLE IN 
SPAIN. HOW DID YOU MANAGE THE 
RECRUITMENT PROCESS?
All of them have been recruited locally. The 
recruitment process is costly but because we 
want to make it internally and we do not del-
egate this important task to externals, it takes 
time to select the right candidates and it takes 
time for the interviews and selection process. 
We are a very small company so we try to 
keep our standards very high when recruiting. 
Something that has been proven successful 
is internal recommendations and part of 
our team has been recruited via employee 
referrals.
WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE 
TO EXPORTERS THINKING ABOUT 
SETTING UP OFFICES IN A NEW 
MARKET?
We made a lot of mistakes, and got a lot of 
decisions right. The balance, though, is very 
positive. Maybe if I had to start today I would 
be more focused on our ‘sweet spot’ custom-
ers because we lost a lot of time trying to get 
customers that will never use our technology. 
But when you are trying to get customers, 
sometimes you don’t correctly define what 
your target is. Another important piece of  
advice is to appoint somebody you trust  
locally. At the beginning this is a very  
important factor to know that your business  
is being well cared for.
“It is very important to have a 
good partner that can guide you 
on the legal and financial 
path to make the 
process smooth”
Ricardo Navarro Ales, 
OpenJaw
40
A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO DOING BUSINESS IN OVERSEAS MARKETS
4.3 ENTERING THE MARKET
Deciding to export carries significant costs 
for your company, because by definition 
your target customers are much further 
away than at home. Moreover, your  
company is unlikely to be paid until a晴er 
delivery, so your business will incur many 
of those costs upfront – potentially putting 
a strain on your cash flow. Investigate your 
options for financing your move to export.
START-UP COSTS
At the very least, you will need to send rep-
resentatives to the new market on a regular 
basis for up to a year or longer. You may 
also need to work with consultants or retain 
professional services providers in your 
chosen market. You may need to develop 
tailored marketing materials or provide 
sample products. Depending on the nature 
of those products, the cost to ship them  
will vary. Some costs can be predicted  
in advance, such as:
► Office rent
► Shipping and import duties.
Other costs are not fixed, and they include:
► Staffing costs
► Currency fluctuations.
A thorough export plan (see section 5)  
will help you to budget for all of these 
elements.
PLANNING YOUR EXPORT FINANCE
Planning your export finance broadly  
revolves around the costs involved  
in setting up and running an export  
operation and the approach you need to 
take to managing payment risk. Credit  
management, export credit insurance, 
letters of credit, invoice discounting and 
factoring are just some of the issues to  
consider. You also need to consider the 
lead-time before receiving your first  
order and the length of your sales cycle, 
which can vary from market to market. For 
example, what are the cash implications for 
funding a sales cycle of 18 to 24 months? 
Consult your financial advisor or bank  
for advice on this.
FINANCIAL SUPPORTS 
FOR EXPORTERS
There are several options available to you 
when looking to fund an exporting strategy:
► Retained cash reserves in the business
► Your business bank may be able to assist 
you with letters of credit
► Export-focused agencies such as Invest 
Northern Ireland and Enterprise Ireland.
TIPS FOR EXPORT SUCCESS
► Discuss facilities with your bank to en-
sure credit when exporting
► Be aware of potential payment delays 
when exporting – test how this could af-
fect your cash flow.
HOW TO: 
finance a move 
to overseas 
markets
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested