mvc open pdf in browser : Convert pdf image to jpg online Library control class asp.net azure html ajax Exporting%20Basics%20Final%20With%20Pegination%20for%20Wafer%20Drive0-part1155

Exporting Basics 
The Why’s, How-To’s and To-Do’s for New Exporters 
By 
Maurice Kogon 
President, Kogon Trade Consulting 
mkogon@socal.rr.com 
www.tradecomplianceinstitute.org 
Convert pdf image to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file into jpg format; convert pdf to jpeg
Convert pdf image to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg for; to jpeg
© Copyright 2015 Maurice Kogon 
5th Edition, February 2015 
All rights reserved. 
Except where specifically indicated, no part of this publication may be 
reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form, by any 
means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the 
written permission of Maurice Kogon. 
Printed in USA 
ISBN: 978-0-578-15774-0 
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you. JPG is the most common image format on the internet.
.pdf to .jpg converter online; convert pdf document to jpg
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Convert a JPG to PDF. the files, try out some settings and then create the PDF files with JPG is the most widely used image format, but we believe in diversity
change from pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter online
Contents 
Introduction  
About the Author  
Page 
I. Is Exporting For Me 
1-13 
A. What is Exporting?  
1 
B. A Huge World Market Awaits Exporters  
C. Myths about Exporting – Why More Companies Don’t Export 
D. Exporting Compared with Domestic Marketing 
E. Benefits, Costs and Risks of Exporting 
F. Costs of Exporting – Can I afford Them 
G. Risks of Exporting – Can I Reduce Them  
H. Four Stages of Export Development  
10 
II. Build Export Capacity  
14-20 
A. Assess Your Product’s Export Potential 
14 
B. Assess Your Company’s Export Readiness  
16 
C. Learn the Fundamentals of Exporting  
18 
D. Know Where to Go for Export Help  
18 
III. Develop Export Markets 
21-32 
A. Develop an Overall Export Market Plan 
21 
B. Identify Best Markets for Export 
21 
C. Sources of Market Potential Data  
23 
D. Develop Market-Specific Entry Plans 
24 
E. Market & Promote in Best Markets  
26 
F. Find Foreign Buyers and Distributors 
29 
IV. Make Export Sales & Get Paid  
33-38 
A. Respond to Export Inquiries  
33 
B. Screen Potential Buyers 
34 
C. Negotiate Terms of the Export Sale  
34 
D. Select Method of Export Payment  
36 
E. Protect Against Buyer Default 
38 
V. Comply with Regulatory & Documentary Requirements  
39-43 
A. Comply with Trade Laws & Regulations  
39 
B. Comply with Documentary Requirements  
41 
VI. Deliver the Goods 
44-45 
A. Prepare Goods for Delivery  
44 
B. Get Cargo Insurance  
45 
C. 
Transport the Goods  
45
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf images to jpg; change from pdf to jpg on
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
batch pdf to jpg online; change file from pdf to jpg on
Appendices 
Resources and Tools for Exporters 
Page 
A. Export Start-Up Aids  
46-50 
1. Export Readiness Assessment System 
46 
2. Four Stages of Export Development  
50 
B. Commodity Classification Codes 
51 
C. Market Research & Planning Aids  
52-68 
1. ITCI Trade Information Database  
52 
2. Export Market Plan Template  
55 
3. Sample Export Market Plan  
58 
4. Market Potential Matrix Worksheet  
62 
5. Market Potential Statistics Worksheets 
63 
D. Matchmaking Aids 
69-99 
1. Export Offer Template 
69 
2. Sample Agent/Distributor Search Letter 
70 
3. Agent/Distributor Qualifications Checklist  
71 
4. Sample Export Sales Representative Agreement 
72 
5. Sample Foreign Representation Agreement  
86 
E. Sales Aids  
100-104 
1. Sample Responses to Inquiries from Prospective Buyers
100 
2. Sample Responses to Inquiries from Prospective Agents/Distributors 
101 
3. Template for Responding to a Foreign Request for Quote (RFQ)  
102 
4. Sample Export Quotation  
103 
5. Export_Quotation_Worksheet 
104 
F. Trade Finance Aids 
105-107 
1. Sample Letter of Credit (L/C)  
105 
2. Sample L/C Instructions 
107 
G. Regulatory Aids  
108 
1. U.S. Trade Regulatory and Enforcement Agencies  
108 
2. U.S. Agencies that Regulate/Enforce Product-Specific Exports 
108 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg. C# sample code for TIFF to jpg image conversion.
convert pdf file to jpg file; best way to convert pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
PDF. Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage. Turn
convert pdf document to jpg; convert multipage pdf to jpg
Introduction 
When I first got into the export assistance field over 50 years ago, I was struck by a truly 
puzzling phenomenon. Over 85% of American manufacturers did not export, even though the 
U.S. had the world’s largest economy and was by far the world’s largest manufacturer and 
exporter. Sadly, in the half-century since, we have the same 85% ratio of non-exporting 
manufacturers. Not all, but many non-exporting manufacturers in the 85% have the potential to 
export, especially those with already strong domestic track records. If they have survived and 
succeeded in the world’s most competitive market, our own, essentially against the same 
competition they would face as exporters, they should be able to compete anywhere.  
As noted in my 2012 testimony before the House Committee on Small Business, this is our 
national export paradox – “We are a very large exporting nation, but not a nation of exporters.” 
Why is it that so many U.S. manufacturers sell solely to the U.S. market, with only 5% of the 
world’s population, when they potentially could make much more money by also exporting to 
the nearly 200 countries outside the U.S., with 95% of the world’s population?  To try to 
encourage more non-exporters to overcome their resistance and give exporting a try, I decided to 
update and 
expand
Exporting Basics as a 
companion to my 
Export FAQ
s and Export Readiness 
Assessment System. 
Exporting Basics is intended as a 
practical guide to exporting for small-
business manufacturers and intermediaries who are not yet exporting, but could be.  
Chapter I, Is Exporting for Me, is for non-exporters who are thinking about exporting as a new 
revenue stream, but are not sure if it’s for them. It deals with why exporting might make sense in 
their situation; how exporting is both similar to and different from selling domestically; the 
benefits, costs and risks of exporting; and the four developmental stages a non-exporter would 
typically go through to become an export success. Also covered in this Chapter are the myths 
that deter more companies from exporting at all or to their full potential. 
Chapter II, Build Export Capacity, is for non-exporters willing to give exporting a try, but are 
not sure how. It covers how to assess the export potential of their products and the export 
readiness of their company; what they’ll need to know and be able to do at each export stage; and 
where they can get the advice, training and assistance they’ll need along the way. 
Chapter III, Develop Overseas Markets
,
is for newly export- capable companies that are now 
ready to test the export waters. It lays out 5 key steps to (1) plan for export; (2) identify high 
potential export markets; (3) determine the best strategies for market entry; (4) foster greater 
recognition and demand for their products in target markets; and (5) find interested, qualified and 
reputable foreign buyers and distributors. 
Chapter IV, Make Export Sales & Get Paid, is for companies ready to convert their newly-
developed presence in target markets into actual export sales. It describes 5 key steps to closing 
the deal, from (1) responding to general and specific foreign inquiries; (2) vetting potential 
buyers and distributors; (3) negotiating the terms of sale (price, credit, delivery; (4) selecting 
payment options; and (5) protecting against buyer default. 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get JPG, JPEG and other high quality image files from PDF document. Able to extract vector images from PDF. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework
convert pdf page to jpg; change pdf to jpg image
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Scan high quality image to PDF, tiff and various image formats, including JPG, JPEG, PNG, GIF, TIFF, etc. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework
convert pdf file to jpg on; pdf to jpg converter
Chapter V, Comply with Regulatory and Documentary Requirementsis for companies that 
have closed the deal and now need to assure compliance with any applicable trade regulations or 
documentary requirements. These could include U.S. export controls for national security or 
health and safety purposes; any tariff and non-tariff barriers imposed by the importing countries; 
and the host of documents commonly required for any export shipment. 
Chapter VI, Deliver the Goods, is for companies that are now ready for the final step to get the 
goods from here to there. It covers preparing the goods for shipment, insuring the cargo against 
potential loss in transit; and transporting the goods to the destination country. 
About the Author 
Maurice Kogon established Kogon Trade Consulting (KTC) in 
2012, after a 52-year career in international business as a U.S. 
Government official, Director of the El Camino College Center 
for International Trade Development (CITD), business executive, 
educator, and consultant. As KTC President, Maurice also serves 
on advisory boards and volunteers much of his time to counsel 
and train companies on exporting, guest-lecture at Los Angeles 
area universities, and maintain the Trade Information Database 
on his International Trade Compliance Institute Website.  
Maurice’s U.S. Government career spanned over 33 years (1961-
94) with the U.S. Department of Commerce in Washington, DC, where he initially served as a 
Country Desk Officer (Taiwan, Hong Kong, Philippines, and Germany) and later directed 
Commerce’s international trade information, strategic planning, and program evaluation offices. 
As director of the market research and trade information office in the early 1990s, he oversaw 
many of the export assistance services offered at U.S. Export Assistance Centers nationwide. In 
1978, Maurice was selected to develop and manage the Worldwide Information & Trade System 
(WITS), Commerce’s first real-time trade information system. 
Maurice’s consultancy work over many years has focused on export capacity building, strategic 
planning, and program evaluation. For the UN’s International Trade Centre (ITC) in Geneva in 
1999, Maurice co-consulted on an evaluation of ITC’s trade information programs. Under a 
contract with the Egyptian Government in 1999, he conceived and oversaw implementing of a 7-
step Export Enabler program for Egyptian small businesses. From 2007-09, under a U.S. State 
Department grant, he directed a CITD project to institutionalize small business export 
development centers in Nicaragua and train and assist over 90 Nicaraguan small businesses on 
how to export. 
Throughout his career, Maurice has written and lectured on international trade and has developed 
numerous, widely used Web-based export tools, including his Exporting Basics guide, Export 
FAQsExport Readiness Assessment diagnostic and Internet Export Search Wizard. In 
2011, Maurice was invited to testify on national export strategy before the House Committee on 
Small Business. Maurice has a BA and MA in Foreign Affairs from George Washington 
University and did Doctoral work in International Relations at American University. He has 
taught international business courses at Cal State University Northridge, George Washington 
University, and Virginia Tech. Maurice is a long-time member of NASBITE’s Board of 
Governors, served as NASBITE President in 2008-09, and was actively involved in developing 
NASBITE’s Certified Global Business Professional (CGBP) credential and national exam. He 
was honored in 2013 as the recipient of NASBITE’s John Otis Lifetime Achievement Award. 
1 | Page 
Chapter 
Is Exporting For Me? 
A. What is Exporting? 
An export occurs when you sell your product or service to a buyer in another country or to a 
visitor from another country (e.g., a tourist). For example, if you sell your U.S. product to a 
buyer in Mexico, that’s an export. If you sell the same item to a Mexican tourist, that too is an 
export. The key is whether the buyer purchases the product with U.S dollars initially converted 
from the buyer’s local currency (e.g., Mexican Pesos). 
B. A Huge World Market Awaits Exporters 
Did you know that the U.S. is a world leader in manufacturing and exporting, but that only 1% of 
all U.S. businesses export, and only 15% of all U.S. manufacturers export? Not only that. Over 
half of the 15% of the exporting manufacturers sell only to two countries – Canada and Mexico. 
This abysmally low ratio of U.S. exporters to non-exporters is hard to fathom, given that the U.S. 
accounts for only 4% of the world’s consumers and only 1/3
rd
of the world’s purchasing power. 
That’s right. The nearly 200 other countries in the world have 96% of the world’s consumers and 
2/3
rds
of the world’s purchasing power. If you are one of the 85% of U.S. manufacturers selling 
only to the U.S. market, or one of the 8% of manufacturers exporting to only 2 of 200 potential 
countries that might also want your product, what you are missing. In effect, you are forfeiting a 
huge potential to increase your sales and profits. One might well ask, “What are you thinking?” 
There is no doubt that many more of the non-exporters have the potential to export, especially 
those with already strong domestic track records and nationwide distribution. If they have 
survived and succeeded in the U.S., the world’s most competitive market – against the same 
competition they would face as exporters -- they could likely compete anywhere. They just 
haven’t tried, or perhaps they tried but gave up too soon. 
2 | Page 
C. Myths about Exporting - Why More Companies Don't Export 
Many prior studies have examined the under-exporting phenomenon in the U.S., the factors 
responsible, and the needs that must be met to increase exporter involvement. These studies have 
generally found that non-exporters lack motivation, interest or confidence, stemming from:  
 Misconceptions -- I’m too small, can’t afford it, can’t compete, too complicated, too risky.  
 Fear -- of the unknown, of regulations, of not getting paid, of IPR risks, of legal liability.  
 Ignorance -- of their export potential, of the benefits, of the steps and procedures.  
Let’s take a look at the reasons given for not exporting – or more accurately the excuses and 
myths – causing so many to miss out on huge opportunities to increase their sales and profits.  
 I'm too small to export; only large firms with name recognition, ample resources, and 
export departments can export successfully. False! In the U.S., for example, over 95% of the 
exporting firms are small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Many have fewer than 50 
employees and annual sales in the $1-10 million range. It's true that large firms typically 
account for far more total exports by value (over 85% in the U.S.), but SMEs dominate the 
exporting population in the U.S. and most other countries.  
 I can't afford to export; I don't have the money to hire people, market myself abroad, or 
expand production if I get new export business. Not true! There are low-cost ways to market 
and promote abroad and finance new export orders. These don't require hiring new staff or 
setting up an export department. The Internet is a low-cost medium to reach potential 
customers worldwide, as well as to conduct international market research. At little or no cost, 
for example, you can get product and country market surveys, worldwide market exposure, 
specific trade leads, and find qualified overseas distributors to represent you. Free-or low-
cost help is available from federal, state and local trade assistance organizations. They 
typically offer one-on-one export counseling, export seminars and matchmaking services. If 
you need financing for export purposes, consider the export loan programs offered by the 
U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) or the U.S. Export-Import Bank
.
 I can't compete overseas; my products are unknown and my prices too high for foreign 
markets. Not likely. The world is large, with varied needs and interests. If your product is 
3 | Page 
bought domestically, it might well be wanted and affordable somewhere else in the world. 
What makes your product sell in the home market can help it sell abroad. Price is important, 
but it is not the only selling point. Other competitive factors are need, utility, quality, service, 
credit, consumer taste - these may override price. Don't assume your price is uncompetitive. 
Your products could still be a bargain in strong-currency countries, even after adding 
overseas delivery costs and import duties.  
 Exporting is too risky; I might not get paid. My intellectual property might be copied. I 
might break a law I didn't know about. Not necessarily! Selling anywhere has risks, but they 
can be reduced with common-sense due diligence. To assure you get paid, use bank-backed 
Letters of Credit (L/Cs) or low-cost export credit insurance if buyers want delayed-payment 
terms (see Chapter IVD on payment methods). To avoid possible scams, check references 
through the Internet, your bank, or an international credit reporting agency. If you have a 
patent, trademark or copyright, there are ways to protect it overseas as you do here. While 
trade laws vary by country, most are straightforward and non-threatening (see Chapter VA 
on regulatory compliance). For advice and help with contracts, protecting intellectual 
property, etc., consult a lawyer specializing in international trade.  
 Exporting is too complicated; I don't know how. Complexities, yes, but you don't need to be 
the one to demystify them. You can use outside experts to deal with the complications, 
including Export Management Companies (EMCs), freight forwarders, commercial banks, 
and overseas agents and distributors. Between them, they can represent you, find overseas 
customers, present you with sales orders, handle all the export paperwork, assure you get 
paid, and deliver the goods. You fill the orders and get paid for the sale. You pay them a fee 
or commission. If export business warrants, hire your own expert. Or, become more 
knowledgeable yourself. Personalized "how-to" counseling is available at no cost from many 
local trade assistance organizations. Export workshops and online export tutorials are other 
ways to learn at modest cost. Once you learn more and gain confidence, you can better 
decide how much to do yourself and how much to rely on export support services. 
 I’m too busy with the domestic market to think about exporting. That may appear 
understandable, given the seemingly large U.S. market, but it’s a very shortsighted view in 
general and a nonsensical view in a recessed U.S. economy. If you’re basically in business to 
make money, the U.S. market, large as it is, accounts for just a small fraction of the world 
market. In effect, non-exporters with exportable products are saying "I'm not interested in the 
additional sales that exports could bring." Yet, if a new sales order came to them, say from 
Pennsylvania instead of Mexico, would they also say “No, I’m too busy?” Not likely. The 
“too busy” retort masks the same fears about exporting reflected in the other excuses. 
D. Exporting Compared with Domestic Marketing 
Many non-exporters falsely assume that exporting is so much different from domestic selling 
that they couldn’t possibly adjust. Actually, domestic selling and exporting are alike in many 
ways. If you simply apply to exporting what you’re already familiar with domestically, you can 
then learn to deal with the differences and do well as an exporter. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested