pdf mvc : Change pdf into jpg Library application component .net windows azure mvc dih0501038-part120

Generation 
Rule 21 Generating Facility Interconnection 
Table 4-2 Generator-Protection Devices 
Generator-Protection Device 
Device
Number 
40 kW 
or 
Less 
41 kW 
to 
400 kW 
401 kW 
and 
Larger 
Phase Overcurrent 
50/51 
X
X
Overvoltage 
59 
Undervoltage 
27 
X
Overfrequency 
81O 
Underfrequency 
81U 
Ground-Fault-Sensing Scheme (Utility Grade) 
51N 
X
Overcurrent with Voltage Restraint (51V) or 
Overcurrent with Voltage Control (51C) 
51V 
51C 
X
Reverse-Power Relay 
32 
X
X
X
Direct-Transfer Trip 
TT 
X
X
X
Notes 
1. Please refer to Table 4-3, “Standard Device Numbers,” on Page 4-29 
for device numbers, definitions, and functions. 
2. When fault-detection is required, per CPUC Rule 21, the phase  
overcurrent protection must be able to detect all line-end phase and  
phase-fault conditions.  
The generator must be equipped with a phase 
instantaneous-overcurrent relay that can detect a line fault under 
subtransient conditions. 
The generator does not have to be equipped with a phase 
instantaneous-overcurrent relay if the generator uses a 51V or 51C 
relay. PG&E determines if a 51V or a 51C relay is better suited for the 
specific project. 
3. For generators rated at 40 kW or less, installing a contactor  
undervoltage release may meet the undervoltage protection  
requirement.  
4. If CPUC Rule 21 requires fault protection, the ground-fault detection 
is required for any noncertified inverter-based, induction, or 
synchronous generating facility. 
Synchronous generators with an aggregate generation over 40 kW and 
induction generators with an aggregate generation over 100 kW 
require ground-fault detection. 
5. When CPUC Rule 21 requires fault protection, a group of generators, 
each less than 400 kW but whose aggregate capacity is 400 kW or 
greater, must have an overcurrent-relay with voltage restraint (or 
voltage control, if determined by PG&E) installed on each generator 
rated greater than 100 kW. 
4-18 
May 1, 2003 
Change pdf into jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
change pdf to jpg image; convert pdf picture to jpg
Change pdf into jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg for online; convert pdf file into jpg format
Generation 
Rule 21 Generating Facility Interconnection 
For nonexport generating facilities operating under the proper system 
conditions, and having a finite “minimum import” (excluding any 
single-phase, very sensitive reverse-power relays, along with the 
dedicated transformer, may be used in lieu of ground-fault protection. 
PG&E prefers that the relay be set as an “under-power” element. As 
specified by CPUC Rule 21, the relay can be set at 5% of the customer’s 
minimum import power (despite the generator’s maximum output) for 
seconds. 
 
transformer rating with a time delay of 2 seconds, as specified by the  
CPUC Rule 21.  
PG&E determines, based on PG&E’s circuit configuration and loading, if 
the distribution-level interconnections require transfer-trip protection. 
A transfer-trip relay is required if PG&E determines that a generation 
facility cannot detect and trip on PG&E’s end-of-line faults within an 
is capable of keeping a PG&E line energized with the PG&E source 
disconnected (please see Attachment 6). 
The sections below describe the required protective and control devices 
for generators. 
4.17.1. Phase Overcurrent 
Please see Table 4-3, “Standard Device Numbers,” on Page 4-29 
(Device 50/51) for the definition and function of the 
phase-overcurrent relays. 
4.17.2. Over/Undervoltage Relay 
The over/undervoltage relay is used to trip the interrupting device 
when the voltage is above or below PG&E’s normal operating 
level. 
In the event that the generator carries load that is isolated from 
PG&E’s electric system, the over/undervoltage relay is used for 
generator and backup protection. 
For all distribution interconnections, the undervoltage relay is set 
for 88% of the nominal voltage (106 V on the 120 V base) unless 
system conditions require otherwise. 
The overvoltage relay is set for 110% of the nominal voltage (132 
V on the 120 V base). 
4.17.3. Over/Underfrequency Relay 
The over/underfrequency relay is used to trip the interrupting 
device when the frequency is above or below PG&E’s normal 
May 1, 2003 
4-19 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour. If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in
convert pdf into jpg format; convert pdf pictures to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
PDF document can be easily loaded into your C# String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF
convert pdf page to jpg; .pdf to .jpg online
Generation 
Rule 21 Generating Facility Interconnection 
operating level. It is used for generator or turbine protection and 
backup protection. 
To maintain generation online during system disturbances, the 
customer must coordinate the generator’s underfrequency relay 
settings with those of other utilities in the Western Electric 
Coordinating Council (WECC). For more information about the 
WECC, please refer to http://www.wecc.biz/main.html. 
For all distribution interconnections, the underfrequency relay is 
set at 58 Hz with a time delay of 30 seconds. The overfrequency 
relay is set at 61 Hz with a time delay of 15 cycles (0.25 second). 
4.17.4. Ground-Fault-Sensing Scheme 
4.17.4.1. General 
The ground-fault-sensing scheme detects PG&E’s 
power-system ground faults and trips the generator’s 
circuit breaker or the main circuit breaker, preventing the 
generator from continuously contributing to a ground fault. 
The ground-fault-sensing scheme is able to detect faults 
between the PG&E system’s side of the dedicated 
transformer and the end of PG&E’s distribution circuit. 
The following types of transformer connections, provided 
with the appropriate relaying equipment, are commonly 
used to detect system ground faults: 
•  System-side – grounded wye; generator-side – delta 
•  System-side – grounded wye; generator-side – wye; 
tertiary – delta 
4.17.4.2. Distribution Interconnections 
For a transformer connected in a delta configuration to the 
distribution system with a delta connection on the system 
side, PG&E recommends a separate grounding 
transformer, in addition to the appropriate relaying 
equipment. 
For a transformer connected in a grounded-wye 
configuration to the 3-wire distribution system with a 
grounded wye on the system side, the generator must have 
a single-phase potential transformer between the neutral 
and ground connection, in addition to the appropriate 
relaying equipment. 
For the typical, distribution-level interconnection schemes, 
please see the following drawings: 
•  Figure 4-1, “Recommended Ground Detection 
Schemes 12 kV Distribution Circuits,” on Page 4-32 
4-20  
May 1, 2003 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in from local file or stream and convert it into BMP, GIF Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET
reader convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpeg on
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp Component for combining multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file in C#
convert multi page pdf to single jpg; convert pdf to jpg for
Generation 
Rule 21 Generating Facility Interconnection 
•  Figure 4-2, “Recommend Ground Detection Schemes 
21 kV Distribution Circuits,” on Page 4-33 
A single generator or a set of generators with an aggregate 
rating of more than 4 kW must not be connected to a 
single-phase line without providing for ground-fault 
tripping. The customer must discuss these situations with 
PG&E in advance. 
For any substation or generation facility built by other 
entities but subsequently owned, maintained, and/or 
operated by PG&E, the customer must ensure that the 
substation or generation facility’s ground grid meets the 
minimum design and safety requirements used in PG&E’s 
substations. The ground-grid design must be analyzed 
according to the “Grounding Design Criteria,” and 
documented according to the “PG&E Analysis 
Specification” (please see Attachment 7). 
The ground grid must meet the minimum design and safety 
requirements used in PG&E substations (please see 
Attachment 7) when the customer connects the generating 
facilities (operated by the customer) to the ground grid of 
an existing or new PG&E substation when one of the 
following situations occur: 
•  The generator is located inside or immediately 
adjacent to PG&E’s substations or switching stations. 
•  The system protection requires a solid ground 
connection for relay operation. 
When the customer’s facilities are not connected to 
PG&E’s ground grid or neutral system, the customer is 
solely responsible for establishing design and safety limits 
for the grounding system. 
4.17.5. Overcurrent Relay with Voltage Restraint or Voltage Control 
An overcurrent relay with voltage restraint or voltage control is 
used to detect multiphase faults and initiate tripping the generator 
circuit breaker. 
The customer must ensure that the required relays are located on 
each individual generator feeder. A group of generators that have 
an aggregate rating over 400 kW must be equipped with an 
overcurrent relay with voltage restraint or voltage control
installed on each generator rated at more than 100 kW. Generators 
rated at, or greater than, 400 kW must be equipped with an 
overcurrent relay with voltage restraint or voltage control. 
To allow for phase-shift correction, the potential circuits to an 
overcurrent relay with voltage restraint or voltage control must 
2  
May 1, 2003  
4-21 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
c# convert pdf to jpg; change from pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
convert multipage pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter for
Generation 
Rule 21 Generating Facility Interconnection 
have a delta-wye or wye-delta auxiliary potential transformer, 
depending on the relay design and operating principle if the 
generator’s step-up transformer is connected wye-delta or 
delta-wye. 
Please contact the applicable PG&E representative to find out the 
proper phase of the auxiliary transformers connection. 
4.17.6. Reverse-Power Relay 
Please see Table 4-2, “Generator-Protection Devices,” on Page 
4-18 (Device #32) for the definition and function of a 
reverse-power relay. 
4.17.7. Fault-Interrupting Devices 
PG&E must review and approve all customer-selected 
fault-interrupting devices. 
There are two basic types of fault-interrupting devices for 
distribution interconnections: 
•  Circuit Breakers 
•  Fuses 
PG&E will determines the type of fault-interrupting device that a 
customer needs based on the following conditions: 
•  The size and type of generator. 
•  The available fault duty. 
•  The local circuit configuration. 
•  The existing PG&E protection equipment. 
4.17.7.1. Circuit Breakers 
A three-phase circuit breaker is the required 
fault-interrupting device at the point of interconnection, 
due to its simultaneous three-phase operation and its ability 
to coordinate with PG&E line-side devices. The 
three-phase circuit breaker is able to automatically separate 
the generator from PG&E’s electric system upon detection 
of a circuit fault. 
The customer may install additional circuit breakers and 
protective relays, which are not required for 
interconnection, in the generation facilities. 
The interconnection circuit breaker must have sufficient 
capacity to interrupt the maximum fault current it may 
experience and must be equipped with accessories to 
perform the following functions: 
•  Trip the circuit breaker with an external trip signal 
supplied through a battery (shunt trip). 
4-22  
May 1, 2003 
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff Turn multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file.
batch convert pdf to jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg online
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
XDoc.Tiff for .NET, which can be stably integrated into C#.NET string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List
convert .pdf to .jpg; change file from pdf to jpg on
Generation 
Rule 21 Generating Facility Interconnection 
•  Telemeter the circuit breaker status, if required by 
PG&E. 
•  Lock out the circuit breaker, if it is operated by 
protective relays. 
4.17.7.2. Fuses 
Fuses are single-phase, direct-acting sacrificial links that 
melt to interrupt fault current and protect the equipment. 
The customer must replace blown fuses manually after 
each fault before the facility may be returned to service. 
Only trained personnel may replace overhead primary 
fuses. 
Fuses cannot be used as the primary protection for 
three-phase generation facilities because fuses: 
•  Are single-phase devices. 
•  May not all melt during a fault. 
•  May not automatically separate the generation 
facility from PG&E’s electric system. 
•  Cannot be operated by the protective relays. 
However, PG&E allows customers to use fuses as 
high-side protection for the dedicated transformer at 
generation facilities rated at less than 1,000 kW if the fuses 
are connected to the distribution-level system, but only if 
the customer’s protection can be coordinated with the 
existing PG&E phase and ground protection. 
If fuses are used, the customer should consider installing a 
negative-sequence relay and/or other devices to protect the 
facility against single-phase conditions. If fuses are used 
for high-side transformer protection, the generator must 
have a separate generator circuit breaker to isolate the 
facility from PG&E electric system during a fault or 
abnormal system conditions. 
PG&E does not allow the customer to use large primary 
fuses that do not coordinate with the circuit breaker ground 
relays in PG&E’s substations, because this may cause all 
the customers on the circuit to lose power if there is a fault 
inside the generating facility. 
4.17.8. Synchronous Generators 
The customer must ensure that the generating unit meets all the 
applicable standards of the: 
•  American National Standards Institute (ANSI) (please refer 
to: www.ansi.org) 
May 1, 2003  
4-23 
Generation 
Rule 21 Generating Facility Interconnection 
•  Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) 
(please refer to: www.standards.ieee.org) 
The prime mover and the generator must be able to operate within 
the full range of voltage and frequency excursions that may exist 
on PG&E’s electric system without damaging the generator. 
4.17.9. Synchronizing Relays 
The purpose of synchronizing devices is to ensure that a 
synchronous generator parallels with PG&E’s electric system 
without causing disturbance to other customers and facilities 
(present and in the future) that are connected to the same system. 
Synchronizing devices also ensure that the generator will not be 
damaged due to an improper parallel action. Please refer to 
Attachment 8, “Generator Automatic Synchronizers for Generation 
Entities,” for additional information and requirements. 
Synchronous generators and other generators with stand-alone 
capability must use one of the methods in the following sections to 
synchronize with PG&E’s electric system. 
4.17.9.1.  PG&E-Approved Automatic Synchronizers 
The PG&E-approved automatic synchronizer (Device 
15/25) must have all of the following characteristics: 
•  A slip-frequency matching window of 0.1 Hz or less. 
•  A voltage-matching window of ± 10% or less. 
•  A phase-angle acceptance window of ± 10° or less. 
•  Breaker-closure time compensation. 
For an automatic synchronizer that does not have the 
“breaker-closure time compensation” feature, the 
generator must use a tighter phase-angle window 
(± 5°) with a 1-second time-acceptance window to 
achieve synchronization within a ± 10° phase angle. 
Note: In addition to the above characteristics, the 
automatic synchronizer must also be able to 
automatically adjust the generator voltage and 
frequency to match the system voltage and 
frequency. 
4.17.9.2.  Automatic Synchronizers Not Approved by PG&E but 
Supervised by a PG&E-Approved Synchronizing Relay 
An automatic synchronizing device that is not 
PG&E-approved but is supervised by a PG&E-approved 
synchronizing relay (Device 25) must have all of the 
following characteristics: 
•  A slip-frequency matching window of 0.1 Hz or less. 
4-24  
May 1, 2003 
Generation 
Rule 21 Generating Facility Interconnection 
• A voltage-matching window of ± 10% or less. 
• A phase-angle acceptance window of ± 10° or less. 
• Breaker-closure time compensation. 
Note: The synchronizing relay closes a supervisory 
contact after the above conditions are met, allowing 
the nonapproved automatic synchronizer to close 
the circuit breaker. 
4.17.9.3.  Manual Synchronization Supervised by a  
Synchronizing Relay  
Manual synchronization with supervision from a 
synchronizing relay (Device 25) functions to synchronize 
the customer’s facility with PG&E’s electric system. 
The automatic synchronizing relay must have all of the 
following characteristics: 
• A slip-frequency matching window of 0.1 Hz or less. 
• A voltage-matching window of ± 10% or less. 
• A phase-angle acceptance window of ± 10° or less. 
• Breaker-closure time compensation. 
Note: The synchronizing relay closes a supervisory 
contact, after the above conditions are met, 
allowing the circuit breaker to close. 
4.17.9.4. Manual Synchronization With a Synch-Check Relay 
Manual synchronization with a synchroscope and a 
synch-check (Device 25) relay with supervisory control is 
allowed only for generators with a less than 1,000 kW 
aggregate nameplate rating. 
The synch-check relay must have the following 
characteristics: 
• A voltage-matching window of ± 10% or less. 
• A phase-angle acceptance window of ± 10° or less. 
A generator that has a greater than 1,000 kW aggregate 
nameplate rating must have a synchronizing relay or an 
automatic synchronizer. 
4.17.10. Frequency/Speed Control 
Unless otherwise specified by PG&E, a governor is required on the 
prime mover to enhance the system stability. 
The generator must set the governor characteristics to provide a 
5% droop (i.e., a 0.15-Hz change in the generator speed must 
cause a 5% change in the generator load). 
May 1, 2003  
4-25 
Generation 
Rule 21 Generating Facility Interconnection 
To help regulate PG&E’s system frequency, the governors on the 
prime mover must be able to operate freely. 
4.17.11. Excitation System Requirements 
The excitation system must be capable of regulating the 
generator-output voltage and power factor for the full range of the 
limits specified by the CPUC Rule 21. 
4.17.12. Voltage Regulation/Power Factor 
According to the California Independent System Operator 
(CAISO) requirements, the voltage regulator must be able to 
maintain the generator voltage under steady-state conditions 
without hunting and within ± 0.5% of any voltage level between 
95% and 105% of the generator’s rated voltage. Voltage-sensing 
must be set at the same point as PG&E’s revenue metering. 
The designated electric control center determines the voltage 
schedules, in coordination with the transmission operations center. 
CPUC Rule 21 requires that the power-factor control maintain a 
power factor between 90% lagging and 90% leading (within a 
PG&E-acceptable tolerance). 
Distribution-level generator interconnections typically require 
power-factor control (i.e., the generator is put on a power-factor 
schedule, rather than on a voltage schedule). 
4.17.13. Event Recorder 
An event recorder is required for all unattended generation 
facilities with a capacity greater than 400 kW and/or with 
automatic or remotely initiated paralleling capability. 
The event recorder must provide PG&E with sufficient 
information to determine the status of the generation facility 
during system disturbances. 
In addition, the event recorder for a generation facility with a 
nameplate rating equal to or greater than 10,000 kW must provide 
a record of deliveries to PG&E of the following items: 
• Real power in kW. 
• Reactive power in kvars. 
• Output voltage in kV. 
4.18. Induction Generators 
power equivalent to that required for a synchronous generator. 
4-26 
May 1, 2003 
Generation 
Rule 21 Generating Facility Interconnection 
Induction machines can be self-excited by nearby distribution capacitors 
or as a result of the capacitive voltage on the distribution grid. 
4.19.  Parallel-only (No Sale) Generator Requirement 
standard synchronous-generator interconnection. The only exception is 
that PG&E may, at its discretion, allow the installation of three very 
along with a dedicated transformer, as an alternative to the normally 
required ground relays. 
The reverse-power relays must be set to pick up on 
transformer-magnetizing current with a time delay not to exceed 2 
seconds. This option may not be feasible on generating systems with a 
off-line frequently for in-plant disturbances. 
agreement with PG&E before operating the parallel-only generators. 
4.20.  PG&E Protection and Control-System Changes That May Be 
Required to Accommodate the Generator’s Interconnection 
At the generation customer’s expense, PG&E performs a detailed 
interconnection study to identify the cost of any required modifications to 
PG&E’s protection and control systems before interconnecting the new 
generator. These modifications are in addition to any distribution-system 
To recover the costs to PG&E for any protection and control-system 
modifications that are directly assigned to the generator, retail generation 
see www.pge.com/customer_services/business/tariffs/pdf/ER21.pdf or 
Attachment 11. 
The following are some of the protection-system modifications that 
PG&E may require: 
•  PG&E’s automatic restoration equipment may need to be modified 
so that the equipment will not restore the generator until it is below 
25% of the nominal voltage, as measured by the restoration 
equipment. (See Engineering Document 053826, “Requirements For 
Distribution Feeder with Synchronous Generating Equipment,” in 
Attachment 3.) 
The restoration of power by automatically re-energizing PG&E’s 
facilities may cause generator damage and system disturbances. 
May 1, 2003  
4-27 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested