pdf mvc : Convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi Library control API .net web page wpf sharepoint EXPORTS_Science_Plan_May18_2015_final10-part1189

99 
Saw, K.A., Boorman, B., Lampitt, R.S. and R. Sanders (2004), PELAGRA early development of 
an autonomous, neutrally buoyant sediment trap. In, Advances in Technology for Underwater 
Vehicles, Conference Proceedings, 16-17 March 2004. Advances in Technology for 
Underwater Vehicles London, UK, Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology, 
165-175. 
Siegel, D.A. (1998), Resource competition in a discrete environment Why are plankton  
distributions paradoxical? Limnology and Oceanography43, 1133-1146. 
Siegel, D.A., S.C. Doney and J.A. Yoder (2002) The spring bloom of phytoplankton in the North 
Atlantic Ocean and Sverdrup's critical depth hypothesis. Science296, 730-733.  
Siegel, D.A., S. Maritorena, N.B. Nelson, and M.J. Behrenfeld (2005), Independence and 
interdependences among global ocean color properties Reassessing the bio-optical 
assumption. Journal of Geophysical Research110, C07011. 
Siegel, D.A., Behrenfeld, M.J., Maritorena, S., McClain, C.R., Antoine, D., Bailey, S.W., 
Bontempi, P.S., Boss, E.S., Dierssen, H.M., Doney, S.C., Eplee, R.E. Jr., Evans, R.H., 
Feldman, G.C., Fields. E., Franz, B.A., Kuring, N.A.,Mengelt, C., Nelson, N.B., Patt, F.S., 
Robinson, W.D., Sarmiento, J.L., Swan, C.M., Werdell, P.J., Westberry, T.K., Wilding, J.G., 
Yoder, J.A. (2013), Regional to global assessments of phytoplankton dynamics from the 
SeaWiFS mission. Remote Sensing of the Environment135, 77-91. 
Siegel, D. A., K. O. Buesseler, S. C. Doney, S. F. Sailley, M. J. Behrenfeld, and P. W. Boyd 
(2014), Global assessment of ocean carbon export by combining satellite observations and 
food-web models, Global Biogeochemical Cycles28, 181–196, doi:10.1002/2013GB004743. 
Sieracki, M.E.,M. Benfield, A. Hanson, C. Davis, C.H. Pilskaln, D. Checkley, H.M. Sosik, C. 
Ashjian, P. Culverhouse, R. Cowen, R. Lopes, W. Balch, and X. Irigoien (2009), Optical 
plankton imaging and analysis systems for ocean observation. Proceedings of OceanObs’09 
Sustained Ocean Observations and Information for Society (Vol. 2), Venice, Italy, 21-25 
September 2009, ESA Publication WPP-306. 
Sigman, D.M., and E.A. Boyle (2000), Glacial/interglacial variations in atmospheric carbon 
dioxide. Nature, 407(6806), 859-869. 
Stanley, R. H., S. C. Doney, W. J. Jenkins, and D. E. Lott III (2012), Apparent oxygen utilization 
rates calculated from tritium and helium-3 profiles at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study 
site. Biogeosciences, 9, 1969-1983. 
Steinberg, D.K., C.A. Carlson, N.R. Bates, S.A. Goldthwait, L.P. Madin, and A.F. Michaels 
(2000), Zooplankton vertical migration and the active transport of dissolved organic and 
inorganic carbon in the Sargasso Sea. Deep-Sea Research I47, 137-158.  
Steinberg, D. K., B. A. S. Van Mooy, K. O. Buesseler, P. P. Boyd, T. Kobari, and D. M. Karl 
(2008) Bacterial vs. zooplankton control of sinking particle flux in the ocean’s twilight zone.  
Limnology and Oceanography. 53(4) 1327-1338. 
Steinberg, D.K. (2014). Chapter 5. Marine biogeochemical cycles b. Zooplankton.  M. Edwards, 
A. Lindley, C. Castellani,  (eds.) North Atlantic Plankton. Oxford University Press. in press 
Stemmann, L., and E. Boss (2012), Plankton and particle size and packaging from determining 
optical properties to driving the biological pump. Annual Review of Marine Science4, 263–
290. 
Convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
change pdf into jpg; convert pdf to jpg file
Convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
.pdf to .jpg online; best convert pdf to jpg
100 
Stemmann, L., G.A. Jackson, D. Ianson (2004a), A vertical model of particle size distributions 
and fluxes in the midwater column that includes biological and physical processes — Part I 
model formulation. Deep-Sea Research Part I, 51,865–884. 
Stemmann, L., G.A. Jackson and G.Gorsky (2004b), A vertical model of particle size 
distributions and fluxes in the midwater column that includes biological and physical 
processes — Part II application to a three year survey in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Deep-
Sea Research Part I51,885908.  
Stramski, D., R. A. Reynolds, M. Kahru, and B. G. Mitchell (1999), Estimation of particulate 
organic carbon in the ocean from satellite remote sensing. Science285, 239–242. 
Stramski. D., R.A. Reynolds, M. Babin, S. Kaczmarek, M.R. Lewis, R. Rottgers, A. Sciandra, M. 
Stramska, M.S. Twardowski, B.A. Franz, and H. Claustre (2008), Relationships between the 
surface concentration of particulate organic carbon and optical properties in the eastern 
South Pacific and eastern Atlantic Oceans, Biogeoscience5, 171-201. 
Westberry, T.K., M.J. Behrenfeld, D.A. Siegel, E. Boss (2008), Carbon-based primary 
productivity modeling with vertically resolved photoacclimation. Global Biogeochemical  
Cycles, 22, GB2024. 
Xing, X., Morel, A., Claustre, H., D'Ortenzio, F., and A. Poteau (2012), Combined processing 
and mutual interpretation of radiometry and fluorometry from autonomous profiling Bio-Argo 
floats 2. Colored dissolved organic matter absorption retrieval. Journal of Geophysical 
Research117(C4), C04022. 
!
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(0) ' Convert the first New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get the first page of PDF.
convert pdf to high quality jpg; convert pdf image to jpg image
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and Description: Convert all the PDF pages to
convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi; convert pdf to jpg batch
101 
11.!Additional!Materials!
11.1!Acronyms!
ADCP 
Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler 
ALOHA 
A Long term Oligotrophic Habitat Assessment time-series station 
north of Hawaii 
AUV 
Autonomous Underwater Vehicle 
BATS 
Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Station southeast of Bermuda 
BCO-DMO 
Biological & Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office 
BGC 
Biogeochemical 
BSi 
Biogenic silica 
Carbon 
CDOM 
Colored Dissolved Organic Matter 
Chl 
Chlorophyll 
C
phyto
Phytoplankton biomass retrieved from satellites 
CTD 
Conductivity, temperature and depth sensors 
DIC 
Dissolved Inorganic Carbon 
DOC 
Dissolved Organic Carbon 
DSR  
Deep-Sea Research 
EP  
Export Production 
EQPAC  
EQuatorial PACific -JGOFS project to study the upwelling zone of the 
equatorial Pacific.  
EZ  
Euphotic Zone. 
Ez-ratio  
POC flux at the base of the Euphotic Zone normalized by the NPP 
rate 
FCM  
Fluorescence Correlation Microscopy 
GPP  
Gross Primary Production 
HNLC  
High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll  
HPLC  
High Performance Liquid Chromatography 
HOT  
Hawaiian Ocean Time-series 
IOP 
Inherent Optical Property (absorption & scattering coefficients, etc.) 
JGOFS  
Joint Global Ocean Flux Study 
Kd  
Diffuse attenuation coefficient 
LISST  
Laser In Situ Scattering and Transmissometry (device to estimate the 
particle size distribution from forward light scatter) 
LOPC  
Laser Optical Plankton Counter 
LwN  
Normalized water leaving radiance 
ML 
Mixed Layer 
MLD 
Mixed Layer Depth 
Nitrogen 
NAB08  
North Atlantic Bloom experiment 2008  
NABE  
JGOFS North Atlantic Bloom Experiment 
NCP  
Net Community Production 
NMR  
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 
NOMAD  
NASA bio-Optical Marine Algorithm Dataset 
102 
NPP 
Net Primary Production 
OBB 
NASA Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry program 
OOI 
Ocean Observatories Initiative 
OCLI 
Ocean Color and Land Imager 
OSNAP 
Overturning in the Sub-Polar North Atlantic Program 
OSP 
Ocean Station Papa 
OSSE 
Observation System Simulation Experiment 
P  
Phosphorus 
PACE  
Pre-aerosol, Clouds and Ecosystems satellite mission  
PAP  
Porcupine Abyssal Plain  
PAR  
Photosynthetically Active Radiation 
PDMPO  
2-(4-pyridyl)-5-((4-(2  
dimethylaminoethylaminocarbamoyl)methoxy)phenyl)oxazole 
PFT  
Plankton Functional Type 
PIC  
Particulate Inorganic Carbon 
PN  
Particulate Nitrogen 
PSD  
Particle Size Distribution 
POC  
Particulate Organic Carbon 
SeaBASS  
SeaWiFS Bio-Optical Archive and Storage System  
SIMS  
Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry 
SMS  
SubMesoScale 
SSS  
Sea Surface Salinity 
SST  
Sea Surface Temperture 
SVT  
Settling Velocity Trap 
T/S  
Temperature & Salinity 
TEP 
Transparent Exopolymer Particles  
TS 
Time-series 
TZ 
Twilight Zone (or mesopelagic zone) 
UVP 
Underwater Vision Profiler 
VPR 
Video Plankton Recorder 
WG 
NASA Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry Field Campaigns 
Working Group 
XANES 
X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure 
11.2!Complete!Measurement!Table!and!References!for!Methods!
Table 1 in the text lists the required measurements and approaches for the EXPORTS 
field campaign. Given the context of its presentation in the main text, Table 1 does not 
include typical methods for the required measurements. A complete list of 
measurements and method references developed as a result of the June 2013 Experts 
Meeting (Section 11.4 below) are available online at the following URL’s.  
Table of measurements: 
http://exports.oceancolor.ucsb.edu/system/files/documents/CompleteMeasurementTabl
e_June03_2014.xlsx 
103 
Measurement references: http://exports.oceancolor.ucsb.edu/system/files/documents/ 
MeasurementTableRefs_June03_2014.pdf 
Please understand that the choices of references included in these tables are not meant 
to be restrictive and prescriptive.  They are only provided to give examples and ideas of 
what is possible for the EXPORTS Science Definition Team to work from as they work 
on the implementation plan for EXPORTS.   
11.3!Project!Cost!Estimation!Spreadsheet!
The project cost estimation details are presented in Section 8.7 of the EXPORTS 
science plan. Table 4 presents the spreadsheet used for these calculations, which 
includes additional details for how the ship time request was estimated as well as the 
annual resources required.    
Table 4 EXPORTS project estimate spreadsheet 
!"#$%&'#()*+&$,#-)%./0$,#&0+1$
2)%./0
2)%./0
34%1#5+6$ 34%1#5+6$34%1#5+6$
70'%$/
8%*9:0-* ;#3%<
=)'>
?@#()*+&
A3#&0+1
B83A
CDDEF
CDEF
@+-0+"-%+"31+&%+) 5/1)*6G0/&0%/H/
BI#;+J%(%J
5/1)*6
4
4
4
2
4
5
3
3
60
70
24
K/J*H/0
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
BI#:&)+"%J
5/1)*6
4
4
4
2
4
5
3
3
75
85
20
K/J*H/0
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
?%"
8
8
8
2
4
5
3
3
31+0/$
0
0
0
1
1
2
2
2
&*&+)#L#0/M
8
8
8
3
5
7
5
5
135
155
44
'"%&#J*$&
$100
$100
$75
$200
$100
$75
$150
$150
$50
$40
$20
&*&+)#J*$&
$800
$800
$600
$600
$500
$525
$750
$750
$6,750
$6,200
$880
A*&+)#-/+0
$5,325
A*&+)#34%1 $13,830
;*0&$#'$/.#(*0#J+)JN
7*$&#*(#3J%/"J/#A/+F$
BI#;+J%(%J 47.6N!122.3W!Seattle
L#20*'1$
OG6
6/+0
P#&%F/#/M'%1N OG10*Q/J&
50.7N!144.5W!Papa
20
250
5
100
1250
BI#:&)+"&%J 41.5N!70.7W!Woods!Hole
3R??:KS
49!N!16.5W!PaP
2/+0#
34%1#5+6$;!T$#UVDW
;!#IM'%1
@*-$&%J$ 5+&+#?+" " ;0*Q/J&#X((
AXA:@
back!to!
$5,325
$13,830
$25,000
$2,000
$1,250
$2,500
$2,000
$51,905
50.8N!1.4W!Southhampton!UK
10%
27%
48%
4%
2%
5%
4%
*!PI!permanent!equipment!avg.!$100/group;!Logistics!$250/yr;!Data!$500/yr;!Project!office/mtg!$400/yr
SI:K@S#8KI:Y5XZB#U0*'-4#/$&%F+&/W
6/+0$#
1
2
3
4
5
sum
&*&+)$G60
$10,000
$15,000
$8,000
$15,000
$4,000
$52,000
[G60
19%
28%
16%
29%
8%
*!assumes!most!of!ship!time!in!Yr!1!&!3;!equip!highest!in!yr!1;!PI!costs!higher!in!field!years,!lowest!in!year!5
:))#J*$&$#%"#OPY#'"%&$
104 
11.4!EXPORTS!Planning!Process!!
The EXPORTS science plan was created to be a community consensus plan for 
understanding the biological pump from satellite observables.  The process from 
submission of the initial proposal for NASA support of the planning process to the 
completion of the science plan took just more than two years. The initial proposal was 
submitted in response to the ROSES-2012 program element A.3, Ocean Biology and 
Biogeochemistry.  The scoping plan proposal was for the planning of a NASA field 
campaign entitled “Controls on Open Ocean Productivity and Export Experiment – 
COOPEX”. The support for COOPEX was for a one-time experts meeting at the 
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), communications and the final 
production of the science plan.  David Siegel and Ken Buesseler are the co-PI’s of the 
COOPEX scoping plan proposal.   
Table 5: Membership and Expertise of the EXPORTS Writing Team 
Name 
Organization 
Expertise 
David Siegel 
UCSB 
Co-PI; Remote sensing, ocean optics & 
modeling 
Ken Buesseler 
WHOI 
Co-Pi; Biogeochemistry & export 
Mike Behrenfeld 
Oregon State  
Phytoplankton & remote sensing 
Claudia Benitez-
Nelson 
Univ. South 
Carolina 
Biogeochemistry & export 
Emmanuel Boss 
Univ. Maine 
Autonomous sampling, ocean optics & 
remote sensing 
Mark Brzezinski 
UCSB 
Phytoplankton & biogeochemistry 
Adrian Burd 
Univ. Georgia 
Modeling of export processes 
Craig Carlson 
UCSB 
Microbial oceanography 
Eric D’Asaro 
UW 
Physical oceanography & autonomous 
sampling 
Scott Doney 
WHOI 
Earth system modeling, biogeochemistry & 
remote sensing 
Mary Jane Perry 
Univ. Maine 
Phytoplankton, autonomous sampling 
Rachel Stanley 
WHOI 
Biogeochemistry & geochemical techniques 
Deborah Steinberg VIMS 
Zooplankton & biogeochemistry 
The approach to creating the EXPORTS science plan was to develop community 
consensus through regular telecoms with a dedicated writing team, a one-time intense 
experts meeting at UCSB to set the science plans goals and questions and by informing 
the community and responding their feedback. Feedback came in the form of responses 
to presentations at national and specialist meetings as well as written comments 
submitted on the draft plan (dated Feb. 19, 2014). Agency feedback from NASA as well 
as NSF program managers was also considered in the planning process. In particular, 
105 
this public vetting / feedback process for creating a science plan was new to the NASA 
Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry program.   
The composition of the writing team was set at the time of the writing of the initial 
scoping plan proposal. Members were chosen based upon their expertise and academic 
leadership in a particular area of the science and/or sampling of the ocean’s carbon 
cycle as well as their enthusiasm for the task at hand and track record for working well 
as a team (Table 5).  The writing team created the initial goals and questions for the 
experts meeting at UCSB, wrote the EXPORTS science plan and responded to 
community and agency feedback. The writing team started working together starting in 
the fall of 2013.  Interactions among the team members have mostly been via telecons 
that occurred generally every other week with work by team members in between 
telecons.  
Table 6: Attendees of the EXPORTS Experts Meeting at UCSB 
Name 
Organization 
Expertise 
Barney Balch 
Bigelow  
Phytoplankton & calcification 
Mike Behrenfeld 
Oregon State 
Phytoplankton & remote sensing 
Claudia Benitez-
Nelson 
Univ. South 
Carolina 
Biogeochemistry & export 
Paula Bontempi 
NASA HQ 
NASA planning  
Mark Brzezinski 
UCSB 
Phytoplankton & biogeochemistry 
Ken Buesseler 
WHOI 
Biogeochemistry & export 
Craig Carlson 
UCSB 
Microbial oceanography 
Dave Checkley 
UCSD/SIO 
Autonomous sampling & zooplankton 
Curtis Deutsch 
UCLA 
Earth system modeling & biogeochemistry 
Scott Doney 
WHOI 
Earth system modeling, biogeochemistry & 
remote sensing 
Kim Halsey 
Oregon State 
Phytoplankton physiology 
Debora Iglesias-
Rodriguez 
UCSB 
Phytoplankton & calcification 
George Jackson 
Texas A&M 
Particle aggregation & autonomous 
sampling 
Ken Johnson 
MBARI 
Autonomous sampling & biogeochemistry 
Mike Landry 
UCSD/SIO 
Zooplankton & biogeochemistry 
Craig Lee 
Univ. Washington Physical ocean & autonomous sampling 
Stephane Maritorena UCSB 
Remote sensing & ocean optics 
Norm Nelson 
UCSB 
Ocean optics, remote sensing & 
biogeochemistry 
Uta Passow 
UCSB 
Plankton processes & export 
Mary Jane Perry 
Univ. Maine 
Phytoplankton & autonomous sampling 
Paul Quay 
Univ. Washington Biogeochemistry & geochemical techniques 
David Siegel 
UCSB 
Remote sensing, ocean optics, 
106 
biogeochemistry & modeling 
Heidi Sosik 
WHOI 
Phytoplankton & autonomous sampling 
Rachel Stanley 
WHOI 
Biogeochemistry & geochemical techniques 
Deborah Steinberg 
VIMS 
Zooplankton & biogeochemistry 
Dariusz Stramski 
UCSD/SIO 
Ocean optics & remote sensing 
The experts meeting at UCSB was held June 3-6, 2013 focused on finalizing the overall 
goals and the science questions for the planned field campaign. The experts were 
invited from the community with focus on their expertise and representation of the many 
issues and institutions that potentially can contribute to EXPORTS (Table 6).  Project 
goals and science questions were discussed at the experts meeting. Also a preliminary 
sampling plan was created.  
Of particular significance, it was realized at the experts meeting that the original 
COOPEX plan, which required constraining both the production and the fate of fixed 
organic carbon, was too ambitious and the COOPEX plan was going to be very difficult 
to achieve because of budgetary (and berthing) limitations. At the meeting, it was 
decided that the field campaign should focus on the fates of fixed carbon and not its 
production (besides measurements required to improve remote sensing algorithms). It 
was there and then that the EXport Processes in the Ocean from RemoTe Sensing 
(EXPORTS) field campaign was born.   
There have been many opportunities for community inputs to the EXPORTS science 
plan since the experts meeting. This includes the 2013 and 2014 Ocean Color 
Research Team (OCRT) meetings where the EXPORTS plan was presented orally and 
with a poster.  The EXPORTS plan was also presented at the 2013 U.S. Ocean Carbon 
and Biogeochemisty (OCB) meeting with both oral and poster presentations. Also, there 
were many sidebar discussions at these meetings with the writing team members and 
these comments were synthesized and discussed as the writing team proceeded with 
the science plan. It is stressed that at each presentation, community inputs improved 
the EXPORTS science plan.   
The major roll out of the EXPORTS science plan occurred at the 2014 Ocean Sciences 
Meeting (OSM) in Honolulu.  The draft report was presented in a scheduled talk by 
Siegel, a poster by Buesseler, and an evening Town Hall discussion. Nearly every 
member of the writing team was at the OSM. All events were very well attended. Again 
community feedback was synthesized by the writing team and used in improving the 
science plan.  
At the 2014 OSM, the draft report was made available via the EXPORTS website at 
UCSB (http://exports.oceancolor.ucsb.edu) for public comment. The EXPORTS writing 
107 
team solicited written comments on the draft plan from February 25, 2014 to April 15, 
2014. Nearly 100 downloads of the draft report were made and 25 written comments 
were either posted to the UCSB EXPORTS website or emailed to the exports email at 
UCSB (exports@eri.ucsb.edu).  All comments were carefully considered and 
synthesized in the draft submission submitted to NASA.  NASA’s review of the draft 
EXPORTS Science Plan is discussed in the next section.   
11.5!NASA!Review!of!EXPORTS!Scoping!Study!Report!!
Attachment (EXPORTS Panel Summary FINAL 2.6.15.docx) included in email from 
Paula Bontempi (dated February 6, 2015)  
Summary of NASA Review of EXPORTS Scoping Study Report and Recommended Next Steps 
History 
Under the NASA ROSES 2012 A.3 Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry (OBB) program element, 
NASA advertised for scoping studies to identify scientific questions and to develop the initial study 
design and implementation concept for a new NASA OBB field campaign. The Export Processes in the 
Ocean from RemoTe Sensing (EXPORTS) scoping study was submitted by authors David Siegel, Ken 
Buesseler et al. for consideration by NASA on June 3, 2014. Following submission, the NASA OBB 
program in conjunction with the Carbon Cycle and Ecosystem Focus Area website, posted the document 
on line for public comment (60d) and broadcast this opportunity to the oceanographic and Earth Science 
communities using a wide range of E-mail lists. NASA solicited community input and feedback on the 
draft EXPORTS science plan (via direct email to the Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems Focus Area office) on 
the science questions, approaches, measurements, missing components, international and domestic 
partners, etc. 
The public comment period ended on August 26, 2014. 
On January 8-9, 2015, the OBB Program’s Field Campaign Working Group met as a panel with Dr. 
Bontempi to consider the comments from the community, offer their own comments and review, and to 
prepare this statement summarizing the findings of the review and any recommended next steps. The 
panel was charged with evaluating/commenting on the following: 
1) the scientific value, importance and priority of the research questions,   
2) the appropriateness of the scientific implementation approach and methods,   
3) feasibility of the proposed plan including: 
a) the probability of success in achieving its scientific goals and objectives and  
b) the implementation plan (e.g., logistics, cost, management), and 
4) what steps should be taken next, if NASA decides to continue developing plans for this field 
campaign.  
The panel was also asked to rate the proposed field campaign as to its readiness to proceed by 
selecting one of the following categories: 
1) This field campaign is of high merit and ready to move into implementation (ready for a 
solicitation, securing partners, planning field infrastructure). 
2) This field campaign is of potential high merit, but needs further study/planning to resolve 
science or other issues. 
108 
3) This field campaign should not be pursued further. 
This document summarizes the discussions of, and contains recommendations from, the Field 
Campaign Working Group meeting held on January 8-9, 2015.  
I. SUMMARY OF PROPOSED FIELD CAMPAIGN 
The goal of the EXPORTS field program is to identify and quantify the mechanisms that determine 
the export of biogenic carbon from the euphotic zone and its transformation in the mesopelagic zone at 
regional and global scales using satellite observations, in situ instruments and sensors, autonomous 
underwater platforms (gliders and floats), data mining and models. The plan focuses on the “biological 
pump” and ways to characterize its magnitude, efficiency, and vertical variability as linked to biological 
processes in the surface and intermediate layers of the ocean. The proposed field campaign comprises 
four experiments, each involving two ships (one operating in a Lagrangian mode, the other doing spatial 
surveys) at two distinct oceanographic sites with strong seasonal physical forcing (North Atlantic and 
Eastern sub-Arctic Pacific). Each site would be occupied twice (once in two different seasons). Taken 
together, these experiments are intended to provide information on different ‘states’ of the biological 
pump.  
The proposed plan includes the development of numerical models and algorithms that will permit 
quantification of carbon export from remotely sensed estimates of (i) phytoplankton biomass and 
community structure, (ii) particle size distributions, and (iii) dissolved organic matter (DOM), all of 
which will be derived from spectral reflectance and intermediate, modeled products such as optical 
backscattering and attenuation spectra. Validation of the models generated by this campaign would 
provide algorithms (with defined confidence limits) to monitor ocean productivity and carbon export from 
the surface ocean, as well as changes in these processes, from orbiting remote sensing platforms such as 
the Pre-Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission. 
II. SCIENTIFIC VALUE, IMPORTANCE AND PRIORITY OF THE RESEARCH QUESTIONS 
The proposed plan is interdisciplinary and would combine individuals with expertise in a broad range 
of topics, including ocean optics, marine ecology, biogeochemistry and physical oceanography. The plan 
includes use of new technologies, such as autonomous platforms, which can make measurements over 
longer duration and sometimes more cheaply than ships, and that can sample at relatively high resolution 
along a track. Integrating these different areas of expertise and technologies in support of a 
comprehensive field campaign is a clear strength of the plan.  
The plan’s main science questions (detailed on pages 26-28 of the EXPORTS document) are important, 
both from a biogeochemical and a societal perspective. They focus on an area of research that NASA 
should support, because results would both increase our basic understanding of processes that influence 
carbon export from the surface ocean and our ability to predict how the ocean will respond to future 
changes in climate. The EXPORTS science plan is relevant to the goals of NASA’s Earth Science 
Division to “coordinate a series of satellite and airborne missions for long-term global observations of the 
land surface, biosphere, solid Earth, atmosphere, and oceans to enable an improved understanding of the 
Earth as an integrated system”. The plan also addresses the following Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems 
Focus Area science questions: “How are global ecosystems changing? How do ecosystems, land cover 
and biogeochemical cycles respond to and affect global environmental change? How will carbon cycle 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested