pdf mvc : Change from pdf to jpg SDK control service wpf azure html dnn fas1313-part1230

Copyright © 1997, Financial Accounting Standards Board
Not for redistribution
include an explicit req
uirement, it believes that many items of revenue or expense clearly relate
to a particular segment and that it would be unlikely that the information used by management
would omit those items.
90.
To assist users of financial statements in understanding segment disclosures, this Statement
requires that enterprises provide sufficient explanation of the basis on which the information was
prepared.  That disclosure must include any
differences in the basis of measurement between the
consolidated amounts and the segment amounts.  It also must indicate whether allocations of
items were made symmetrically.  An enterprise may allocate an expense to a segment without
allocating the relat
ed asset; however, disclosure of that fact is required.  Enterprises also are
required to reconcile to the consolidated totals in the enterprise's financial statements the totals
of reportable segment assets, segment revenues, segment profit or loss, and a
ny other significant
segment information that is disclosed.
91.
In addition, the advantages of reporting unadjusted management information are
significant.  That practice is consistent with defining segments based on the structure of the
enterprise's internal organization.  It imposes little increm
ental cost on the enterprise and
requires little incremental time to prepare.  Thus, the enterprise can more easily report segment
information in condensed financial statements for interim periods and can report more
information about each segment in annua
l financial statements.  Information used by
management also highlights for a user of financial statements the risks and opportunities that
management considers important.
Information to Be Disclosed about Segments
92.
The items of information about each reportable operating segment that must be disclosed as
described in paragraphs 25-31 represent a balance between the needs of users of financial
statements who may want a complete set of financial sta
tements for each segment and the costs
to preparers who may prefer not to disclose any segment information.  Statement 14 required
disclosure of internal and external revenues; profit or loss; depreciation, depletion, and
amortization expense; and unusual 
items as defined in APB Opinion No. 30, 
Reporting the
Results of Operations—Reporting the Effects of Disposal of a Segment of a Business, and
Extraordinary, Unusual and Infrequently Occurring Events and Transactions
, for each segment.
Statement 14 also re
quired disclosure of total assets, equity in the net income of investees
accounted for by the equity method, the amount of investment in equity method investees, and
total expenditures for additions to long-lived assets.  Some respondents to the Exposure D
raft
objected to disclosing any information that was not required by Statement 14, while others
recommended disclosure of additional items that are not required by this Statement.  This
Statement calls for the following additional disclosures only if the i
tems are included in the
measure of segment profit or loss that is reviewed by the chief operating decision maker:
significant noncash items, interest revenue, interest expense, and income tax expense.
93.
Some respondents to the Exposure Draft expressed concern that the proposals would
Page 31
Change from pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
to jpeg; convert pdf file into jpg format
Change from pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
pdf to jpeg; .pdf to jpg converter online
Copyright © 1997, Financial Accounting Standards Board
Not for redistribution
increase the sheer volume of information compared to what was required to be reported under
Statement 14.  The Board considers that concern to be oversta
ted for several reasons.  Although
this Statement requires disclosure of more information about an individual operating segment
than Statement 14 required for an industry segment, this Statement requires disclosure of
information about only one type of seg
ment—reportable operating segments—while Statement
14 required information about two types of segments—industry segments and geographic
segments.  Moreover, Statement 14 required that many enterprises create information solely for
external reporting, while
almost all of the segment information that this Statement requires is
already available in management reports.  The Board recognizes, however, that some enterprises
may find it necessary to create the enterprise-wide information about products and service
s,
geographic areas, and major customers required by paragraphs 36-39.
94.
The Board decided to require disclosure of significant noncash items included in the
measure of segment profit or loss and information about total expenditures for additions to
long-lived segment assets (other than financial instrument
s, long-term customer relationships of
a financial institution, mortgage and other servicing rights, deferred policy acquisition costs, and
deferred tax assets) if that information is reported internally because it improves financial
statement users' abili
ties to estimate cash-generating potential and cash requirements of
operating segments.  As an alternative, the Board considered requiring disclosure of operating
cash flow for each operating segment.  However, many respondents said that disclosing
operati
ng cash flow in accordance with FASB Statement No. 95, 
Statement of Cash Flows,
would require that they gather and process information solely for external reporting purposes.
They said that management often evaluates cash generated or required by segments
in ways
other than by calculating operating cash flow in accordance with Statement 95.  For that reason,
the Board decided not to require disclosure of cash flow by segment.
95.
Disclosure of interest revenue and interest expense included in reported segment profit or
loss is intended to provide information about the financing activities of a segment.  The
Exposure Draft proposed that an enterprise disclose gr
oss interest revenue and gross interest
expense for all segments in which reported profit or loss includes those items.  Some respondents
said that financial services segments generally are managed based on net interest revenue, or the
“spread,” and that m
anagement looks only to that data in its decision-making process.  Therefore
those segments should be required to disclose only the net amount and not both gross interest
revenue and expense.  Those respondents noted that requiring disclosure of both gross
amounts
would be analogous to requiring nonfinancial services segments to disclose both sales and cost
of sales.  The Board decided that segments that derive a majority of revenue from interest should
be permitted to disclose net interest revenue instead 
of gross interest revenue and gross interest
expense if management finds that amount to be more relevant in managing the segment.
Information about interest is most important if a single segment comprises a mix of financial and
nonfinancial operations.  I
f a segment is primarily a financial operation, interest revenue
probably constitutes most of segment revenues and interest expense will constitute most of the
difference between reported segment revenues and reported segment profit or loss.  If the
segmen
t has no financial operations or only immaterial financial operations, no information
Page 32
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour.
change pdf file to jpg file; convert multiple pdf to jpg online
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Allow to change converting image with adjusted width & height; Change image resolution Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in
convert pdf into jpg; change pdf file to jpg
Copyright © 1997, Financial Accounting Standards Board
Not for redistribution
about interest is required.
96.
The Board decided not to require the disclosure of segment liabilities.  The Exposure Draft
proposed that an enterprise disclose segment liabilities because the Board believed that liabilities
are an important disclosure for understand
ing the financing activities of a segment.  The Board
also noted that the requirement in FASB Statement No. 94, 
Consolidation of All Majority-Owned
Subsidiaries,
to disclose assets, liabilities, and profit or loss about previously unconsolidated
subsidiari
es was continued from APB Opinion No. 18, 
The Equity Method of Accounting for
Investments in Common Stock,
pending completion of the project on disaggregated disclosures.
However, in commenting on the disclosures that should be required by this Statement,
many
respondents said that liabilities are incurred centrally and that enterprises often do not allocate
those amounts to segments.  The Board concluded that the value of information about segment
liabilities in assessing the performance of the segments o
f an enterprise was limited.
97.
The Board decided not to require disclosure of research and development expense included
in the measure of segment profit or loss.  The Exposure Draft would have required that
disclosure to provide financial statement users with inform
ation about the operating segments in
which an enterprise is focusing its product development efforts.  Disclosure of research and
development expense was requested by a number of financial statement users and was
specifically requested in both the report 
of the AICPA's Special Committee and the AIMR's 1993
position paper.  However, respondents said that disclosing research and development expense by
segment may result in competitive harm by providing competitors with early insight into the
strategic plans 
of an enterprise.  Other respondents observed that research and development is
only one of a number of items that indicate where an enterprise is focusing its efforts and that it
is much more significant in some enterprises than in others.  For example, co
sts of employee
training and advertising were cited as items that often are more important to some enterprises
than research and development, calling into question the relevance of disclosing only research
and development expense.  Additionally, many respo
ndents said that research and development
expense often is incurred centrally and not allocated to segments.  The Board therefore decided
not to require the disclosure of research and development expense by segment.
Interim Period Information
98.
This Statement requires disclosure of limited segment information in condensed financial
statements that are included in quarterly reports to shareholders, as was proposed in the
Exposure Draft.  Statement 14 did not apply to those cond
ensed financial statements because of
the expense and the time required for producing segment information under Statement 14.  A
few respondents to the Exposure Draft said that reporting segment information in interim
financial statements would be unnecess
arily burdensome.  However, users contended that, to be
timely, segment information is needed more often than annually and that the difficulties of
preparing it on an interim basis could be overcome by an approach like the one in this Statement.
Managers 
of many enterprises agree and have voluntarily provided segment information for
interim periods.
Page 33
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Web Security. Your PDF and JPG files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
convert online pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpeg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C:\input.tif"; String outputDirectory = @"C:\output\"; // Convert tiff to jpg and show How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C#
batch pdf to jpg online; convert pdf file to jpg format
Copyright © 1997, Financial Accounting Standards Board
Not for redistribution
99.
The Board decided that the condensed financial statements in interim reports issued to
shareholders should include disclosure of segment revenues from external customers,
intersegment revenues, a measure of segment profit or loss, mate
rial changes in segment assets,
differences in the basis of segmentation or the way segment profit or loss was measured in the
previous annual period, and a reconciliation to the enterprise’s total profit or loss.  That decision
is a compromise between the
needs of users who want the same segment information for interim
periods as that required in annual financial statements and the costs to preparers who must report
the information.  Users will have some key information on a timely basis.  Enterprises shou
ld not
incur significant incremental costs to provide the information because it is based on information
that is used internally and therefore already available.
Restatement of Previously Reported Information
100.
The Board decided to require restatement of previously reported segment information
following a change in the composition of an enterprise’s segments unless it is impracticable to
do so.  Changes in the composition of segments interru
pt trends, and trend analysis is important
to users of financial statements.  Some financial statement issuers have said that their policy is to
restate one or more prior years for internal trend analysis.  Many reorganizations result in
discrete profit ce
nters’ being reassigned from one segment to another and lead to relatively
simple restatements.  However, if an enterprise undergoes a fundamental reorganization,
restatement may be very difficult and expensive. The Board concluded that in those situations
restatement may be impracticable and, therefore, should not be required.  However, if an
enterprise does not restate its segment information, the enterprise is required to provide
current-period segment information on both the old and new bases of segment
ation in the year in
which the change occurs unless it is impracticable to do so.
Enterprise-Wide Disclosures
101.
Paragraphs 36-39 require disclosure of information about an enterprise’s products and
services, geographic areas, and major customers, regardless of the enterprise’s organization.  The
required disclosures need be provided only if the
y are not included as part of the disclosures
about segments.  The Exposure Draft proposed requiring additional disclosures about products
and services and geographic areas 
by segment
.  Many respondents said that that proposal would
have resulted in disclo
sure of excessive amounts of information.  Some enterprises providing a
variety of products and services throughout many countries, for example, would have been
required to present a large quantity of information that would have been time-consuming to
prep
are and of questionable benefit to most financial statement users.  The Board decided that
additional disclosures provided on an enterprise-wide basis rather than on a segment basis would
be appropriate and not unduly burdensome.  The Board also agreed tha
t those enterprise-wide
disclosures are appropriate for all enterprises including those that have a single operating
segment if the enterprise offers a range of products and services, derives revenues from
customers in more than one country, or both.
Page 34
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
convert pdf to jpg c#; convert pdf to jpg converter
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Users may easily change image size, rotate image angle, set image rotation in dpi Covert JPG & JBIG2 image with high-quality; Provide user-friendly interface
change file from pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter online
Copyright © 1997, Financial Accounting Standards Board
Not for redistribution
102.
Based on reviews of published information about public enterprises, discussions with
constituents, and a field test of the Exposure Draft, the Board believes that most enterprises are
organized by products and services or by geograph
y and will report one or both of those types of
information in their reportable operating segment disclosures.  However, some enterprises will
be required by paragraphs 36-39 to report additional information because the enterprise-wide
disclosures are requ
ired for all enterprises, even those that have a single reportable segment.
Information about Products and Services
103.
This Statement requires that enterprises report revenues from external customers for each
product and service or each group of similar products and services for the enterprise as a whole.
Analysts said that an analysis of trends in r
evenues from products and services is important in
assessing both past performance and prospects for future growth.  Those trends can be compared
to benchmarks such as industry statistics or information reported by competitors.  Information
about the asset
s that are used to produce specific products and deliver specific services also
might be useful.  However, in many enterprises, assets are not dedicated to specific products and
services and reporting assets by products and services would require arbitrary
allocations.
Information about Geographic Areas
104.
This Statement requires disclosure of information about both revenues and assets by
geographic area.  Analysts said that information about revenues from customers in different
geographic areas assists them in understanding concentrati
ons of risks due to negative changes in
economic conditions and prospects for growth due to positive economic changes.  They said that
information about assets located in different areas assists them in understanding concentrations
of risks (for example, p
olitical risks such as expropriation).
105.
Statement 14 requires disclosure of geographic information by geographic region, whereas
this Statement requires disclosure of individually material countries as well as information for
the enterprise’s country of domicile and all fo
reign countries in the aggregate.  This Statement’s
approach has two significant benefits.  First, it will reduce the burden on preparers of financial
statements because most enterprises are likely to have material operations in only a few countries
or per
haps only in their country of domicile. Second, and more important, it will provide
information that is more useful in assessing the impact of concentrations of risk.  Information
disclosed by country is more useful because it is easier to interpret.  Coun
tries in contiguous
areas often experience different rates of growth and other differences in economic conditions.
Under the requirements of Statement 14, enterprises often reported information about broad
geographic areas that included groupings such as 
Europe, Africa, and the Middle East.  Analysts
and others have questioned the usefulness of that type of broad disclosure.
106.
Respondents to the Exposure Draft questioned how revenues should be allocated to
individual countries.  For example, guidance was requested for situations in which products are
shipped to one location but the customer resides in anot
her location.  The Board decided to
Page 35
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
convert pdf to jpeg on; convert pdf images to jpg
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
similar software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
batch convert pdf to jpg; best program to convert pdf to jpg
Copyright © 1997, Financial Accounting Standards Board
Not for redistribution
provide flexibility concerning the basis on which enterprises attribute revenues to individual
countries rather than requiring that revenues be attributed to countries according to the location
of customers.  The Board a
lso decided to require that enterprises disclose the basis they have
adopted for attributing revenues to countries to permit financial statement users to understand the
geographic information provided.
107.
As a result of its decision to require geographic information on an enterprise-wide basis,
the Board decided not to require disclosure of capital expenditures on certain long-lived assets
by geographic area.  Such information on an e
nterprise-wide basis is not necessarily helpful in
forecasting future cash flows of operating segments.
Information about Major Customers
108.
The Board decided to retain the requirement in Statement 14, as amended by FASB
Statement No. 30, 
Disclosure of Information about Major Customers,
to report information
about major customers because major customers of an enterprise re
present a significant
concentration of risk.  The 10 percent threshold is arbitrary; however, it has been accepted
practice since Statement 14 was issued, and few have suggested changing it.
Competitive Harm
109.
A number of respondents to the Exposure Draft noted the potential for competitive harm as
a result of disclosing segment information in accordance with this Statement.  The Board
considered adopting special provisions to reduce the po
tential for competitive harm from certain
segment information but decided against it.  In the Invitation to Comment, the Tentative
Conclusions, and the Exposure Draft, the Board asked constituents for specific illustrations of
competitive harm that has res
ulted from disclosing segment information.  Some respondents said
that public enterprises may be at a disadvantage to nonpublic enterprises or foreign competitors
that do not have to disclose segment information.  Other respondents suggested that informati
on
about narrowly defined segments may put an enterprise at a disadvantage in price negotiations
with customers or in competitive bid situations. 
110.
Some respondents said that if a competitive disadvantage exists, it is a consequence of an
obligation that enterprises have accepted to gain greater access to capital markets, which gives
them certain advantages over nonpublic enterp
rises and many foreign enterprises.  Other
respondents said that enterprises are not likely to suffer competitive harm because most
competitors have other sources of more detailed information about an enterprise than that
disclosed in the financial stateme
nts.  In addition, the information that is required to be disclosed
about an operating segment is no more detailed or specific than the information typically
provided by a smaller enterprise with a single operation.
111.
The Board was sympathetic to specific concerns raised by certain constituents; however, it
decided that a competitive-harm exemption was inappropriate because it would provide a means
Page 36
Copyright © 1997, Financial Accounting Standards Board
Not for redistribution
for broad noncompliance with this Statement.  Som
e form of relief for single-product or
single-service segments was explored; however, there are many enterprises that produce a single
product or a single service that are required to issue general-purpose financial statements.  Those
statements would incl
ude the same information that would be reported by single-product or
single-service segments of an enterprise.  The Board concluded that it was not necessary to
provide an exemption for single-product or single-service segments because enterprises that
pro
duce a single product or service that are required to issue general-purpose financial
statements have that same exposure to competitive harm.  The Board noted that concerns about
competitive harm were addressed to the extent feasible by four changes made d
uring
redeliberations: (a) modifying the aggregation criteria, (b) adding quantitative materiality
thresholds for identifying reportable segments, (c) eliminating the requirements to disclose
research and development expense and liabilities by segment, and
(d) changing the second-level
disclosure requirements about products and services and geography from a segment basis to an
enterprise-wide basis.
Cost-Benefit Considerations
112.
One of the precepts of the Board’s mission is to promulgate standards only if the expected
benefits of the resulting information exceed the perceived costs.  The Board strives to determine
that a proposed standard will fill a signific
ant need and that the costs incurred to satisfy that
need, as compared with other alternatives, are justified in relation to the overall benefits of the
resulting information.  The Board concluded that the benefits that will result from this Statement
will
exceed the related costs.
113.
The Board believes that the primary benefits of this Statement are that enterprises will
report segment information in interim financial reports, some enterprises will report a greater
number of segments, most enterprises will report
more items of information about each segment,
enterprises will report segments that correspond to internal management reports, and enterprises
will report segment information that will be more consistent with other parts of their annual
reports.
114.
This Statement will reduce the cost of providing disaggregated information for many
enterprises.  Statement 14 required that enterprises define segments by both industry and by
geographical area, ways that often did not match the way
that information was used internally.
Even if the reported segments aligned with the internal organization, the information required
was often created solely for external reporting because Statement 14 required certain allocations
of costs, prohibited ot
her cost allocations, and required allocations of assets to segments.  This
Statement requires that information about operating segments be provided on the same basis that
it is used internally.  The Board believes that most of the enterprise-wide disclosu
res in this
Statement about products and services, geography, and major customers typically are provided in
current financial statements or can be prepared with minimal incremental cost.
Page 37
Copyright © 1997, Financial Accounting Standards Board
Not for redistribution
Applicability to Nonpublic Enterprises and Not-for-Profit Organizations
115.
The Board decided to continue to exempt nonpublic enterprises from the requirement to
report segment information.  Few users of nonpublic enterprises’ financial statements have
requested that the Board require that those enterprises p
rovide segment information.
116.
At the time the Board began considering improvements to disclosures about segment
information, FASB Statement No. 117, 
Financial Statements of Not-for-Profit Organizations,
had not been issued and there were no effective standards fo
r consolidated financial statements
of not-for-profit organizations.  Most not-for-profit organizations provided financial information
for each of their funds, which is a form of disaggregated information.  The situation in Canada
was similar.  Thus, when 
the two boards agreed to pursue a joint project, they decided to limit
the scope to public business enterprises.
117.
The Board provided for a limited form of disaggregated information in 
paragraph 26 of
Statement 117, which requires disclosure of expense by functional classification. However, the
Board acknowledges that the application of that Stat
ement may increase the need for
disaggregated information about not-for-profit organizations.  A final Statement expected to
result from the FASB Exposure Draft, 
Consolidated Financial Statements:  Policy and
Procedures,
also may increase that need by requ
iring aggregation of information about more
entities in the financial statements of not-for-profit organizations.
118.
The general approach of providing information based on the structure of an enterprise’s
internal organization may be appropriate for not-for-profit organizations.  However, the Board
decided not to add not-for-profit organizations to
the scope of this Statement.  Users of financial
statements of not-for-profit organizations have not urged the Board to include those
organizations, perhaps because they have not yet seen the effects of Statement 117 and the
Exposure Draft on consolidatio
ns.  Furthermore, the term 
not-for-profit organizations
applies to
a wide variety of entities, some of which are similar to business enterprises and some of which
are very different.  There are likely to be unique characteristics of some of those entities 
or
special user needs that require special provisions, which the Board has not studied.  In addition,
the AcSB has recently adopted standards for reporting by not-for-profit organizations that are
different from Statement 117.  In the interest of completin
g this joint project in a timely manner,
the Board decided not to undertake the research and deliberations that would be necessary to
adapt the requirements of this Statement to not-for-profit organizations at this time.  Few
respondents to the Exposure Dr
aft disagreed with the Board’s position.
Effective Date and Transition
119.
The Board concluded that this Statement should be effective for financial statements issued
for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 1997.  In developing the Exposure Draft, the Board
had decided on an effective date of December 
15, 1996.  The Board believed that that time frame
Page 38
Copyright © 1997, Financial Accounting Standards Board
Not for redistribution
was reasonable because almost all of the information that this Statement requires is generated by
systems already in place within an enterprise and a final Statement was expected to be issued
before the en
d of 1996.  However, respondents said that some enterprises may need more time to
comply with the requirements of this Statement than would have been provided under the
Exposure Draft.
120.
The Board also decided not to require that segment information be reported in financial
statements for interim periods in the initial year of application.  Some of the information that is
required to be reported for interim periods i
s based on information that would have been reported
in the most recent annual financial statements.  Without a full set of segment information to use
as a comparison and to provide an understanding of the basis on which it is provided, interim
information
would not be as meaningful.
Appendix B:  ILLUSTRATIVE GUIDANCE
121.
This appendix provides specific examples that illustrate the disclosures that are required by
this Statement and provides a diagram for identifying reportable operating segments.  The
formats in the illustrations are not requirements.
The Board encourages a format that provides
the information in the most understandable manner in the specific circumstances.  The following
illustrations are for a single hypothetical enterprise referred to as Diversified Company.
122.
The following is an illustration of the disclosure of descriptive information about an
enterprise’s reportable segments.  (References to paragraphs in which the relevant requirements
appear are given in parentheses.)
Description of 
the types of products and services from which each reportable
segment derives its revenues (paragraph 26(b))
Diversified Company has five reportable segments:  auto parts, motor vessels, software,
electronics, and finance.  The auto parts segment produces
replacement parts for sale to
auto parts retailers.  The motor vessels segment produces small  motor vessels to serve
the offshore oil industry and similar businesses.  The software segment produces
application software for sale to computer manufacturers 
and retailers.  The electronics
segment produces integrated circuits and related products for sale to computer
manufacturers.  The finance segment is responsible for portions of the company's
financial operations including financing customer purchases of p
roducts from other
segments and real estate lending operations in several states.
Measurement of segment profit or loss and segment assets (paragraph 31)
The accounting policies of the segments are the same as those described in the summary
Page 39
Copyright © 1997, Financial Accounting Standards Board
Not for redistribution
of significan
t accounting policies except that pension expense for each segment is
recognized and measured on the basis of cash payments to the pension plan.  Diversified
Company evaluates performance based on profit or loss from operations before income
taxes not incl
uding nonrecurring gains and losses and foreign exchange gains and losses.
Diversified Company accounts for intersegment sales and transfers as if the sales or
transfers were to third parties, that is, at current market prices.
Factors management used to
identify the enterprise's reportable segments
(paragraph 26(a))
Diversified Company's reportable segments are strategic business units that offer
different products and services.  They are managed separately because each business
requires different techn
ology and marketing strategies.  Most of the businesses were
acquired as a unit, and the management at the time of the acquisition was retained.
123.
The following table illustrates a suggested format for presenting information about reported
segment profit or loss and segment assets (paragraphs 27 and 28).  The same type of information
is required for each year for which a comple
te set of financial statements is presented.
Diversified Company does not allocate income taxes or unusual items to segments.  In addition,
not all segments have significant noncash items other than depreciation and amortization in
reported profit or loss
.  The amounts in this illustration are assumed to be the amounts in reports
used by the chief operating decision maker.
Auto
Parts
Motor
Vessels
Software
Electronics
Finance
All
Other
Totals
Revenues from
external customers
$3,000
$5,000
$9,500
$12,000
$5,000
$1,000 
a
$35,500
Intersegment
revenues
3,000
1,500
4,500
Interest revenue
450
800
1,000
1,500
3,750
Interest expense  
350
600
700
1,100
2,750
Net interest
revenue 
b
1,000
1,000
Depreciation an
d
amortization  
200
100
50
1,500
1,100
2,950
Segment profit  
200 
70
900
2,300
500
100
4,070
Other significant
noncash items:
Cost in excess of
billings on long-
term contracts
—  
200
200
Page 40
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested