pdf mvc : Change pdf into jpg SDK application service wpf azure web page dnn ffa-2002-12-1310-part1271

thick that it is difficult to draw a line and label one collection of boxes
“ProprietarySoft’s SUX–2000” and another collection “GNUSoft’s
Wombat 3.14.15.”The connections are so numerous in well-written,
effective software that line-drawing is difficult.
The problem is similar to the one encountered by biologists as they
try to define ecosystems and species.Some say there are two different
groups of tuna that swim in the Atlantic.Others say there is only one.
The distinction would be left to academics if it didn’t affect the interna-
tional laws on fishing.Some groups pushing the vision of one school
are worried that others on the other side of the ocean are catching their
fish.Others push the two-school theory to minimize the meddling of
the other side’s bureaucracy.No one knows, though,how to draw a
good line.
Stallman’s LGPL was a concession to the fact that sometimes pro-
grams can be used like libraries and sometimes libraries can be used like
programs.In the end,the programmer can draw a strong line around
one set of boxes and say that the GPL covers these functions without
leaking out to infect the software that links up with the black boxes.
Is
 t
h
e
F
ree
So
ft
wa
re
Founda
ti
on
An
ti-
F
ree
do
m
?
Still,these concessions aren’t enough for some people.Many continue
to rail against Stallman’s definition of freedom and characterize the
GPL as a fascist document that steals the rights of any programmer
who comes along afterward.Being free means having the right to do
anything you want with the code,including keeping all your modifica-
tions private.
To be fair,the GPL never forces you to give away your changes to
the source code.It just forces you to release your modifications ifyou
redistribute it.If you just run your own version in your home,then you
don’t need to share anything.When you start sharing binary versions of
the software,however,you need to ship the source code,too.
Some argue that corporations have the potential to work around this
loophole because they act like one person.A company could revise soft-
90 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 90
Change pdf into jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg
Change pdf into jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert .pdf to .jpg; convert pdf to jpg batch
ware and “ship it”by simply hiring anyone who wanted to buy it.The
new employees or members of the corporation would get access to the
software without shipping the source.The source code would never be
distributed because it was not publicly shipped. . No one seriously
believes that anyone would try to exploit this provision with such an
extreme interpretation,but it does open the question of whether an air-
tight license can ever be created.
These fine distinctions didn’t satisfy many programmers who weren’t
so taken with Stallman’s doctrinaire version of freedom.They wanted to
create free software andhave the freedom to make some money off of it.
This tradition dates back many years before Stallman and is a firm part
of academic life.Many professors and students developed software and
published a free version before starting up a company that would com-
mercialize the work. . They used their professor’s salary or student
stipend to support the work,and the free software they contributed to
the world was meant as an exchange.In many cases,the U.S.govern-
ment paid for the creation of the software through a grant,and the free
release was a gift to the taxpayers who ultimately funded it.In other
cases,corporations paid for parts of the research and the free release was
seen as a way to give something back to the sponsoring corporation
without turning the university into a home for the corporation’s low-
paid slave programmers who were students in name only.
In many cases, , the free distribution was an honest gift made by
researchers who wanted to give their work the greatest possible distrib-
ution.They would be repaid in fame and academic prestige,which can
be more lucrative than everything but a good start-up’s IPO.Sharing
knowledge and creating more of it was what universities were all about.
Stallman tapped into that tradition.
But many others were fairly cynical.They would work long enough
to generate a version that worked well enough to convince people of its
value. Then, when the funding showed up, , they would release this
buggy version into the “public domain,”move across the street into their
own new start-up,and resume development.The public domain version
satisfied the university’s rules and placated any granting agencies,but it
was often close to unusable.The bugs were too numerous and too hid-
den in the cruft to make it worth someone’s time.Of course,the origi-
FREEDO
M
… 91
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 91
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour. If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in
convert .pdf to .jpg online; bulk pdf to jpg converter
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
PDF document can be easily loaded into your C# String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF
bulk pdf to jpg; advanced pdf to jpg converter
nal authors knew where the problems lurked,and they would fix them
before releasing the commercial version.
The leader of this academic branch of the free software world
became the Computer Systems Research Group at the University of
California at Berkeley.The published Berkeley Software Distribution
(BSD) versions of UNIX started emerging from Berkeley in the late
1970s.Their work emerged with a free license that gave everyone the
right to do what they wanted with the software,including start up a
company,add some neat features,and start reselling the whole package.
The only catch was that the user must keep the copyright message
intact and give the university some credit in the manual and in adver-
tisements.This requirement was loosened in 1999 when the list of peo-
ple who needed credit on software projects grew too long.Many groups
were taking the BSD license and simply replacing the words
“University of California” with their name. . The list of people who
needed to be publicly acknowledged grew with each new project.As the
distributions grew larger to include all of these new projects,the process
of listing all the names and projects became onerous.The University of
California struck the clause requiring advertising credit in the hopes of
setting an example that others would follow.
Today,many free software projects begin with a debate of “GNU versus
BSD”as the initial founders argue whether it is a good idea to restrict
what users can do with the code.The GNU side always believes that pro-
grammers should be forced to donate the code they develop back to the
world,while the BSD side pushes for practically unlimited freedom.
Rick Rashid is one of the major forces behind the development of
Microsoft’s Windows NT and also a major contributor to our knowl-
edge of how to build a computer operating system.Before he went to
Microsoft,he was a professor at Carnegie-Mellon.While he was there,
he spearheaded the team responsible for developing Mach,an operating
system that offered relatively easy-to-use multitasking built upon a very
tiny kernel.Mach let programmers break their software into multiple
“threads”that could run independently of each other while sharing the
same access to data.
When asked recently about Mach and the Mach license, he
explained that he deliberately wrote the license to be as free as possible.
92 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 92
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in from local file or stream and convert it into BMP, GIF Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET
convert pdf pages to jpg online; .pdf to jpg
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp Component for combining multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file in C#
conversion of pdf to jpg; change pdf into jpg
The GNU GPL,he felt,wasn’t appropriate for technology that was
developed largely with government grants.The work should be as free
as possible and shouldn’t force “other people to do things (e.g., give
away their personal work) in order to get access to what you had done.”
He said,in an e-mail interview,“It was my intent to encourage use of
the system both for academic and commercial use and it was used heav-
ily in both environments.Accent,the predecessor to Mach,had already
been commercialized and used by a variety of companies.Mach contin-
ues to be heavily used today—both as the basis for Apple’s new MacOS
and as the basis for variants of Unix in the marketplace (e.g.,Compaq’s
64-bit Unix for the Alpha).”
Th
e
Evo
l
u
ti
on
o
BSD
The BSD license evolved along a strange legal path that was more like
the meandering of a drunken cow than the laser-like devotion of
Stallman.
Many professors and students cut their teeth experimenting with
UNIX on DEC Vaxes that communicated with old teletypes and dumb
terminals.AT&T gave Berkeley the source code to UNIX, and this
allowed the students and professors to add their instructions and fea-
tures to the software. . Much of their insight into operating system
design and many of their bug fixes made their way back to AT&T,
where they were incorporated in the next versions of UNIX.No one
really thought twice about the source code being available because the
shrink-wrapped software market was still in its infancy.The personal
computer market wasn’t even born until the latter half of the 1970s,and
it took some time for people to believe that source code was something
for a company to withhold and protect.In fact,many of the programs
still weren’t being written in higher-level languages.The programmers
would write instructions directly for the computer, and while these
often would include some instructions for humans,there was little dif-
ference between what the humans wrote and the machine read.
After Bill Joy and others at Berkeley started coming up with several
good pieces of software,other universities started asking for copies.At
FREEDO
M
… 93
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 93
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
changing pdf file to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
convert pdf file to jpg format; convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg
the time,Joy remembers,it was considered a bit shabby for computer
science researchers to actually write software and share it with others.
The academic departments were filled with many professors who
received their formal training in mathematics,and they held the atti-
tude that rigorous formal proofs and analysis were the ideal form of
research.Joy and several other students began rebelling by arguing that
creating working operating systems was essential experimental research.
The physics departments supported experimentalists and theorists.
So Joy began to “publish”his code by sending out copies to other
researchers who wanted it.Although many professors and students at
Berkeley added bits and pieces to the software running on the DEC
Vaxes,Joy was the one who bundled it all together and gave it the
name.Kirk McKusick says in his history of Berkeley UNIX,“...inter-
est in the error recovery work in the Pascal compiler brought in requests
for copies of the system.Early in 1977,Joy put together the ‘Berkeley
Software Distribution.’This first distribution included the Pascal sys-
tem,and,in an obscure subdirectory of the Pascal source,the editor vi.
Over the next year,Joy,acting in the capacity of the distribution secre-
tary,sent out about 30 free copies of the system.”
Today,Joy tells the story with a bit of bemused distraction.He explains
that he just copied over a license from the University ofToronto and “whited
out”“University of Toronto”and replaced it with “University of California.”
He simply wanted to get the source code out the door.In the beginning,the
Berkeley Software Distribution included a few utilities,but by 1979 the
code became tightly integrated with AT&T’s basic UNIX code.Berkeley
gave away the collection of software in BSD,but only AT&T license hold-
ers could use it.Many universities were attracted to the package,in part
because the Pascal system was easy for its students to use.The personal com-
puter world,however,was focusing on a simpler language known as Basic.
Bill Gates would make Microsoft Basic one of his first products.
Joy says that he wrote a letter to AT&T inquiring about the legal
status of the source code from AT&T that was rolled together with the
BSD code.After a year,he says,“They wrote back saying,‘We take no
position’on the matter.”Kirk McKusick,who later ran the BSD project
through the years of the AT&T lawsuit,explained dryly,“Later they
wrote a different letter.”
94 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 94
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff Turn multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file.
convert pdf file into jpg format; change pdf to jpg on
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
XDoc.Tiff for .NET, which can be stably integrated into C#.NET string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List
convert pdf into jpg; change pdf to jpg format
Joy was just one of a large number of people who worked heavily on the
BSD project from 1977 through the early 1980s.The work was low-level
and grungy by today’s standards.The students and professors scrambled
just to move UNIX to the new machines they bought.Often,large parts
of the guts of the operating system needed to be modified or upgraded to
deal with a new type of disk drive or file system.As they did this more and
more often,they began to develop more and more higher-level abstrac-
tions to ease the task.One of the earliest examples was Joy’s screen editor
known as vi,a simple package that could be used to edit text files and
reprogram the system.The “battle”between Joy’s vi and Stallman’s Emacs
is another example of the schism between MIT and Berkeley.This was
just one of the new tools included in version 2 of BSD,a collection that
was shipped to 75 different people and institutions.
By the end of the 1970s,Bell Labs and Berkeley began to split as
AT&T started to commercialize UNIX and Berkeley stuck to its job of
education. Berkeley professor Bob Fabry was able to interest the
Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)
into signing up to support more development at Berkeley.Fabry sold
the agency on a software package that would be usable on many of the
new machines being installed in research labs throughout the country.It
would be more easily portable so that research would not need to stop
every time a new computer arrived.The work on this project became
versions 3 and 4 of BSD.
During this time,the relationship between AT&T and the universi-
ties was cordial.AT&T owned the commercial market for UNIX and
Berkeley supplied many of the versions used in universities.While the
universities got BSD for free,they still needed to negotiate a license
with AT&T,and companies paid a fortune.This wasn’t too much of a
problem because universities are often terribly myopic. If they share
their work with other universities and professors,they usually consider
their sharing done.There may be folks out there without university
appointments,but those folks are usually viewed as cranks who can be
safely ignored. Occasionally, , those cranks write their own OS that
grows up to be Linux.The BSD version of freedom was still a far cry
from Stallman’s,but then Stallman hadn’t articulated it yet.His mani-
festo was still a few years off.
FREEDO
M
… 95
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 95
The intellectual tension between Stallman and Berkeley grew during
the 1980s.While Stallman began what many thought was a quixotic
journey to build a completely free OS,Berkeley students and professors
continued to layer their improvements to UNIX on top of AT&T’s
code.The AT&T code was good,it was available,and many of the folks
at Berkeley had either directly or indirectly helped influence it.They
were generally happy keeping AT&T code at the core despite the fact
that all of the BSD users needed to negotiate with AT&T.This process
grew more and more expensive as AT&T tried to make more and more
money off of UNIX.
Of course,Stallman didn’t like the freedom of the BSD-style license.
To him,it meant that companies could run off with the hard work and
shared source code of another,make a pile of money,and give nothing
back.The companies and individuals who were getting the BSD net-
work release were getting the cumulative hard work of many students
and professors at Berkeley (and other places) who donated their time
and effort to building a decent OS.The least these companies owed the
students were the bug fixes,the extensions,and the enhancements they
created when they were playing with the source code and gluing it into
their products.
Stallman had a point.Many of these companies “shared”by selling
the software back to these students and the taxpayers who had paid for
their work.While it is impossible to go back and audit the motives of
everyone who used the code,there have been many who’ve used BSD-
style code for their personal gain.
Bill Joy,for instance,went to work at Sun Microsystems in 1982 and
brought with him all the knowledge he had gained in developing BSD.
Sun was always a very BSD-centered shop,and many of the people
who bought Sun workstations ran BSD.At that time,AT&T still con-
trolled much of the kernel and many of the small extra programs that
made UNIX a usable system.
But there are counterarguments as well.Joy certainly contributed a
lot to the different versions of BSD.If anyone deserves to go off and get
rich at a company like Sun,it’s he.
Also,the BSD source code was freely available to all comers,and all
companies started with the same advantages.The software business is
96 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 96
often considered to be one of the most free marketplaces around
because of the low barriers to entry.This means that companies should
only be able to charge for the value they add to the BSD code.Sure,all
of the Internet was influenced by the TCP
/
IP code,but now Microsoft,
Apple, IBM, Be,and everyone else compete on the quality of their
interface.
Th
e
P
r
i
ce
o
To
t
a
F
ree
do
m
The debate between BSD-style freedom and GNU-style freedom is
one of the greatest in the free programming world and is bound to con-
tinue for a long time as programmers join sides and experiment.
John Gilmore is one programmer who has worked with software
developed under both types of licenses.He was employee number five
at Sun Microsystems,a cofounder of the software development tool
company Cygnus Solutions, and one of the board members of the
Electronic Frontier Foundation.His early work at Sun gave him the
wealth to pursue many independent projects,and he has spent the last
10 years devoting himself to making it easy for people around the world
to use encryption software.He feels that privacy is a fundamental right
and an important crime deterrent,and he has funded a number of dif-
ferent projects to advance this right.
Gilmore also runs the cypherpunks mailing list on a computer in his
house named Toad Hall near Haight Street in San Francisco.The mail-
ing list is devoted to exploring how to create strong encryption tools
that will protect people’s privacy and is well known for the strong liber-
tarian tone of the deliberations.Practically the whole list believes (and
frequently reiterates) that people need the right to protect their privacy
against both the government and private eavesdropping.Wir
e
dmaga-
zine featured Gilmore on the cover,along with fellow travelers Eric
Hughes and Tim May.
One of his recent tasks was creating a package of free encryption util-
ities that worked at the lowest level of the network operating system.
These tools,known as Free
/
SWAN,would allow two computers that
meet on the Internet to automatically begin encoding the data they
FREEDO
M
… 97
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 97
swap with some of the best and most secure codes available.He imag-
ines that banks,scientific laboratories,and home workers everywhere
will want to use the toolkit.In fact,AT&T is currently examining how
to incorporate the toolkit into products it is building to sell more high-
speed services to workers staying at home to avoid the commute.
Gilmore decided to use the GNU license to protect the Free
/
SWAN
software,in part because he has had bad experiences in the past with
totally free software.He once wrote a little program called PDTar that
was an improvement over the standard version of Tar used on the
Internet to bundle together a group of files into one big, , easy-to-
manage bag of bits often known affectionately as “tarballs.”He decided
he wasn’t going to mess around with Stallman’s GNU license or impose
any restrictions on the source code at all.He was just going to release it
into the public domain and give everyone total freedom.
This good deed did not go unpunished,although the punishment
was relatively minor.He recalls,“I never made PDTar work for DOS,
but six or eight people did.For years after the release,I would get mail
saying,‘I’ve got this binary for the DOS release and it doesn’t work.’
They often didn’t even have the sources that went with the version so I
couldn’t help them if I tried.”Total freedom,it turned out,brought a
certain amount of anarchy that made it difficult for him to manage the
project.While the total freedom may have encouraged others to build
their own versions of PDTar,it didn’t force them to release the source
code that went with their versions so others could learn from or fix their
mistakes
Hugh Daniel,one of the testers for the Free
/
SWAN project,says
that he thinks the GNU General Public License will help keep some
coherency to the project.“There’s also a magic thing with GPL code
that open source doesn’t have,”Daniel said.“For some reason,projects
don’t bifurcate in GPL space.People don’t grab a copy of the code and
call it their own.For some reason there’s a sense of community in GPL
code.There seems to be one version. There’s one GPL kernel and
there’s umpty-ump BSD branches.”
Daniel is basically correct.The BSD code has evolved,or forked,
into many different versions with names like FreeBSD,OpenBSD,and
NetBSD while the Linux UNIX kernel released under Stallman’s GPL
98 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 98
is limited to one fairly coherent package.Still,there is plenty of cross-
pollination between the different versions of BSD UNIX. Both
NetBSD 1.0 and FreeBSD 2.0,for instance,borrowed code from 4.4
BSD-Lite.Also,many versions of Linux come with tools and utilities
that came from the BSD project.
But Daniel’s point is also clouded with semantics.There are dozens if
not hundreds of different Linux distributions available from different
vendors.Many differ in subtle points,but some are markedly different.
While these differences are often as great as the ones between the vari-
ous flavors of BSD,the groups do not consider them psychologically
separate.They haven’t forked politically even though they’ve split off
their code.
While different versions may be good for some projects,it may be a
problem for packages like Free
/
SWAN that depend upon interoperabil-
ity.If competing versions of Free
/
SWAN emerge,then all begin to suf-
fer because the product was designed to let people communicate with
each other.If the software can’t negotiate secure codes because of differ-
ences,then it begins to fail.
But it’s not clear that the extra freedom is responsible for the frag-
mentation.In reality,the different BSD groups emerged because they
had different needs. . The NetBSD group, , for instance, , wanted to
emphasize multiplatform support and interoperability.Their website
brags that the NetBSD release works well on 21 different hardware
platforms and also points out that some of these hardware platforms
themselves are quite diverse.There are 93 different versions of the
Macintosh running on Motorola’s 68k chips,including the very first
Mac.Eighty-nine of them run some part of NetBSD and 37 of them
run all of it.That’s why they say their motto is “Of course it runs
NetBSD.”
The OpenBSD group,on the other hand,is emphasizing security
without compromising portability and interoperability.They want to
fix all security bugs immediately and be the most secure OS on the
marketplace.
There are also deep personal differences in the way Theo de Raadt,
the founder of OpenBSD,started the project after the NetBSD group
kicked him out of their core group.
FREEDO
M
… 99
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 99
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested