pdf mvc : Convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi application SDK utility html winforms .net visual studio ffa-2002-12-1321-part1283

time studying françai
s
and drinking d
e
c
aféand not enough time study-
ing Java,the programming language.You’re trè
s
so
by your word
processor’s inability to grok just how BCBGyou can be and spell-check
ind
e
uxlanguages.
The bounty system could be your savior.You would post a message say-
ing,“Attention
!
I will reward with a check for $100 anyone who creates a
two-language spell-checker.”If you’re lucky,someone who knows some-
thing about the spell-checker’s source code will add the feature in a few
minutes.One hundred dollars for a few minutes’work isn’t too shabby.
It is entirely possible that another person out there is having the
same problem getting their word processor to v
e
r
s
t
e
h
e
their needs.
They might chip in $50 to the pool.If the problem is truly grand
e
,then
the pot could grow quite large.
This solution is blessed with the wide-open,free-market sensibility
that many people in the open software community like.The bounties
are posted in the open and anyone is free to try to claim the bounties by
going to work.Ideally,the most knowledgeable will be the first to com-
plete the job and nab the payoff.
Several developers are trying to create a firm infrastructure for the
plan.Brian Behlendorf,one of the founding members of the Apache
web server development team,is working with Tim O’Reilly’s company
to build a website known as SourceXchange.Another group known as
CoSource is led by Bernie Thompson and his wife,Laurie.Both will
work to create more software that is released with free source.
Of course,these projects are more than websites.They’re really a
process,and how the process will work is still unclear right now.While
it is easy to circulate a notice that some guy will pay some money for
some software,it is another thing to actually make it work.Writing
software is a frustrating process and there are many chances for dis-
agreement.The biggest question on every developer’s mind is “How can
I be sure I’ll be paid?”and the biggest question on every sugar daddy’s
mind is “How can I be sure that the software works?”
These questions are part of any software development experience.
There is often a large gap between the expectations of the person com-
missioning the software and the person writing the code. In this
shadow are confusion,betrayal,and turmoil.
200 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 200
Convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
.net pdf to jpg; .net convert pdf to jpg
Convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
pdf to jpeg converter; convert pdf into jpg
The normal solution is to break the project up into milestones and
require payment after each milestone passes.If the coder is doing some-
thing unsatisfactory,the message is transmitted when payment doesn’t
arrive.Both SourceXchange and CoSource plan on carrying over the
same structure to the world of bounty-hunting programmers.Each pro-
ject might be broken into a number of different steps and a price for
each step might be posted in advance.
Both systems try to alleviate the danger of nonpayment by requiring
that someone step in and referee the end of the project.A peer reviewer
must be able to look over the specs of the project and the final code and
then determine whether money should be paid. . Ideally, this person
should be someone both sides respect.
A neutral party with the ability to make respectable decisions is
something many programmers and consultants would welcome. . In
many normal situations,the contractors can only turn to the courts to
solve disagreements,and the legal system is not really schooled in mak-
ing these kinds of decisions.The company with the money is often able
to dangle payment in front of the programmers and use this as a lever to
extract more work.Many programmers have at least one horror story to
tell about overly ambitious expectations.
Of course,the existence of a wise neutral party who can see deeply
into the problems and provide a fair solution is close to a myth.Judging
takes time.SourceXchange promises that these peer reviewers will be
paid,and this money will probably have to come from the people offer-
ing the bounty.They’re the only ones putting money into the system in
the long run.Plus,the system must make the people offering bounties
happy in the long run or it will fail.
The CoSource project suggests that the developers must come up
with their own authority who will judge the end of the job and present
this person with their bid.The sponsors then decide whether to trust
the peer reviewer when they okay the job.The authorities will be judged
like the developers,and summaries of their reputation will be posted on
the site.While it isn’t clear how the reviewers will be paid,it is not too
much to expect that there will be some people out there who will do it
just for the pleasure of having their finger in the stew.They might,for
instance,want to offer the bounty themselves but be unable to put up
M
O
N
EY
… 201
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 201
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(0) ' Convert the first New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get the first page of PDF.
best pdf to jpg converter for; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and Description: Convert all the PDF pages to
convert pdf to jpg file; changing pdf file to jpg
much money.Acting as a reviewer would give them the chance to make
sure the software did what they wanted without putting up much cash.
One of the most difficult questions is how to run the marketplace.A
wide-open solution would let the sponsors pay when the job was done
satisfactorily.The first person to the door with running code that met
the specs would be the one to be paid.Any other team that showed up
later would get nothing.
This approach would offer the greatest guarantees of creating well-
running code as quickly as possible.The programmers would have a
strong incentive to meet the specs quickly in order to win the cash.The
downside is that the price would be driven up because the programmers
would be taking on more risk.They would need to capitalize their own
development and take the chance that someone might beat them to the
door.Anxious sponsors who need some code quickly should be willing
to pay the price.
Another solution is to award contracts before any work is done.
Developers would essentially bid on the project and the sponsor would
choose one to start work.The process would be fairly formal and favor the
seasoned,connected programmers.A couple of kids working in their spare
time might be able to win an open bounty,but they would be at a great
disadvantage in this system.Both CoSource and SourceXchange say that
they’ll favor this sort of preliminary negotiation.
If the contracts are awarded before work begins,the bounty system
looks less like a wild free-for-all and more like just a neutral market-
place for contract programmers to make their deals.Companies like
Cygnus already bid to be paid for jobs that produce open source.These
marketplaces for bounties will need to provide some structure and effi-
ciencies to make it worth people’s time to use them.
One possible benefit of the bounty system is to aggregate the desires
of many small groups.While some bounties will only serve the person
who asks for them,many have the potential to help people who are
willing to pay.An efficient system should be able to join these people
together into one group and put their money into one pot.
CoSource says that it will try to put together the bounties of many
small groups and allow people to pay them with credit cards.It uses the
example of a group of Linux developers who would gather together to
202 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 202
fund the creation of an open source version of their favorite game.They
would each chip in $10,$20,or $50 and when the pot got big enough,
someone would step forward.Creating a cohesive political group that
could effectively offer a large bounty is a great job for these sites.
Of course,there are deeper questions about the flow of capital and
the nature of risks in these bounty-based approaches. . In traditional
software development,one group pays for the creation of the software
in the hope that they’ll be able to sell it for more than it cost to create.
Here, the programmer would be guaranteed a fixed payment if he
accomplished the job.The developer’s risk is not completely eliminated
because the job might take longer than they expected,but there is little
of the traditional risk of a start-up firm.It may not be a good idea to
separate the risk-taking from the people doing the work.That is often
the best way to keep people focused and devoted.
Each of these three systems shows how hard the free software indus-
try is working at finding a way for people to pay their bills and share
information successfully.Companies like Cygnus or BitKeeper are real
efforts built by serious people who can’t live off the largesse of a univer-
sity or a steady stream of government grants.Their success shows that it
is quite possible to make money and give the source code away for free,
but it isn’t easy.
Still,there is no way to know how well these companies will survive
the brutal competition that comes from the free flow of the source code.
There are no barriers to entry,so each corporation must be constantly
on its toes.The business becomes one of service,not manufacturing,
and that changes everything.There are no grand slam home runs in that
world.There are no billion-dollar explosions.Service businesses grow
by careful attention to detail and plenty of focused effort.
M
O
N
EY
… 203
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 203
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 204
16.
FORK
A T-shirt once offered this wisdom to the world:“If you love someone,
set them free.If they come back to you,it was meant to be.If they don’t
come back,hunt them down and kill them.”The world of free software
revolves around letting your source code go off into the world.If things
go well,others will love the source code,shower it with bug fixes,and
send all of this hard work flowing back to you.It will be a shining
example of harmony and another reason why the free software world is
great.But if things don’t work out,someone might fork you and there’s
nothing you can do about it.
“Fork”is a UNIX command that allows you to split a job in half.
UNIX is an operating system that allows several people to use the same
computer to do different tasks,and the operating system pretends to
run them simultaneously by quickly jumping from task to task.A typi-
cal UNIX computer has at least 100 different tasks running. . Some
watch the network for incoming data,some run programs for the user,
some watch over the file system,and others do many menial tasks.
If you “fork a job,”you arrange to split it into two parts that the com-
puter treats as two separate jobs.This can be quite useful if both jobs
are often interrupted,because one can continue while the other one
stalls.This solution is great if two tasks,A and B,need to be accom-
plished independently of each other.If you use one task and try to
accomplish A first,then B won’t start until A finishes.This can be quite
inefficient if A stalls.A better solution is to fork the job and treat A and
B as two separate tasks.
Most programmers don’t spend much time talking about these kinds
of forks.They’re mainly concerned about forks in the political process.
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 205
Programmers use “fork”to describe a similar process in the organization
of a project,but the meaning is quite different.Forks of a team mean
that the group splits and goes in different directions.One part might
concentrate on adding support for buzzword Alpha while the other
might aim for full buzzword Beta compatibility.
In some cases,there are deep divisions behind the decision to fork.
One group thinks buzzword Alpha is a sloppy,brain-dead kludge job
that’s going to blow up in a few years.The other group hates buzzword
Beta with a passion.Disputes like this happen all the time.They often
get resolved peacefully when someone comes up with buzzword
Gamma,which eclipses them both. . When no Gamma arrives,people
start talking about going their separate ways and forking the source.If
the dust settles,two different versions start appearing on the Net com-
peting with each other for the hearts and CPUs of the folks out there.
Sometimes the differences between the versions are great and some-
times they’re small.But there’s now a fork in the evolution of the source
code,and people have to start making choices.
The free software community has a strange attitude toward forks.
On one hand,forking is the whole reason Stallman wrote the free soft-
ware manifesto.He wanted the right and the ability to mess around
with the software on his computer.He wanted to be free to change it,
modify it,and tear it to shreds if he felt like doing it one afternoon.No
one should be able to stop him from doing that.He wanted to be totally
free.
On the other hand,forking can hurt the community by duplicating
efforts,splitting alliances,and sowing confusion in the minds of users.
If Bob starts writing and publishing his own version of Linux out of his
house, then he’s taking some energy away from the main version.
People start wondering if the version they’re running is the Missouri
Synod version of Emacs or the Christian Baptist version.Where do
they send bug fixes? Who’s in charge? Distribution groups like Debian
or Red Hat have to spend a few moments trying to decide whether they
want to include one version or the other.If they include both,they have
to choose one as the default.Sometimes they just throw up their hands
and forget about both.It’s a civil war,and those are always worse than a
plain old war.
206 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 206
Some forks evolve out of personalities that just rub each other the
wrong way.I’ve heard time and time again,“Oh,we had to kick him out
of the group because he was offending people.”Many members of the
community consider this kind of forking bad.They use the same tone of
voice to describe a fork of the source code as they use to describe the
breakup of two lovers.It is sad,unfortunate,unpleasant,and something
we’ll never really understand because we weren’t there.Sometimes people
take sides because they have a strong opinion about who is right.They’ll
usually go off and start contributing to that code fork.In other cases,peo-
ple don’t know which to pick and they just close their eyes and join the one
with the cutest logo.
Fo
r
k
s
and
 t
h
e
Th
re
a
o
D
is
un
it
y
Eric Raymond once got in a big fight with Richard Stallman about the
structure of Emacs Lisp.Raymond said,“The Lisp libraries were in bad
shape in a number of ways.They were poorly documented.There was a
lot of work that had gone on outside the FSF that should be integrated
and I wanted to merge in the best work from outside.”
The problem is that Stallman didn’t want any part of Raymond’s
work.“He just said,‘I won’t take those changes into the distribution.’
That’s his privilege to do,”Raymond said.
That put Raymond in an awkward position.He could continue to do
the work,create his own distribution of Emacs,and publicly break with
Stallman.If he were right and the Lisp code really needed work,then
he would probably find more than a few folks who would cheer his
work.They might start following him by downloading his distribution
and sending their bug fixes his way.Of course,if he were wrong,he
would set up his own web server,do all the work,put his Lisp fixes out
there, and find that no one would show up. . He would be ignored
because people found it easier to just download Stallman’s version of
Emacs,which everyone thought was sort of the official version,if one
could be said to exist.They didn’t use the Lisp feature too much so it
wasn’t worth thinking about how some guy in Pennsylvania had fixed it.
They were getting the real thing from the big man himself.
FORK
… 207
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 207
Of course,something in between would probably happen.Some folks
who cared about Lisp would make a point of downloading Raymond’s
version.The rest of the world would just go on using the regular version.
In time,Stallman might soften and embrace the changes,but he might
not.Perhaps someone would come along and create a third distribution
that melded Raymond’s changes with Stallman’s into a harmonious ver-
sion.That would be a great thing,except that it would force everyone to
choose from among three different versions.
In the end, , Raymond decided to forget about his improvements.
“Emacs is too large and too complicated and forking is bad.There was
in fact one group that got so fed up with working with him that they
did fork Emacs.That’s why X Emacs exists.But major forks like that
are rare events and I didn’t want to be part of perpetrating another one,”
he said.Someone else was going to have to start the civil war by firing
those shots at Fort Sumter.
BSD’
s
G
a
r
d
e
n
o
Fo
r
k
i
ng
Pa
t
h
s
Some forks aren’t so bad.There often comes a time when people have
legitimate reasons to go down different paths.What’s legitimate and
what’s not is often decided after a big argument,but the standard rea-
sons are the same ones that drive programming projects.A good fork
should make a computer run software a gazillion times faster. Or it
might make the code much easier to port to a new platform.Or it
might make the code more secure.There are a thousand different rea-
sons,and it’s impossible to really measure which is the right one.The
only true measure is the number of people who follow each branch of
the fork.If a project has a number of good disciples and the bug fixes
are coming quickly,then people tend to assume it is legitimate.
The various versions of the BSD software distribution are some of
the more famous splits around. All are descended, , in one way or
another,from the original versions of UNIX that came out of Berkeley.
Most of the current ones evolved from the 4.3BSD version and the
Network Release 2 and some integrated code from the 4.4BSD release
after it became free.All benefited from the work of the hundreds of
208 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 208
folks who spent their free time cloning the features controlled by
AT&T.All of them are controlled by the same loose BSD license that
gives people the right to do pretty much anything they want to the
code.All of them share the same cute daemon as a mascot.
That’s where the similarities end.The FreeBSD project is arguably
the most successful version.It gets a fairly wide distribution because its
developers have a good deal with Walnut Creek CD-ROM Distrib-
utors,a company that packages up large bundles of freeware and share-
ware on the Net and then sells them on CD-ROM.The system is well
known and widely used because the FreeBSD team concentrates on
making the software easy to use and install on Intel computers.Lately,
they’ve created an Alpha version,but most of the users run the software
on x86 chips.Yahoo
!
uses FreeBSD.
FreeBSD,of course,began as a fork of an earlier project known as
386BSD,started by Bill Jolitz.This version of BSD was more of an aca-
demic example or a proof-of-concept than a big open source project
designed to take over the world.
Jordan Hubbard,someone who would come along later to create a
fork of 386BSD,said of Jolitz’s decision to create a 386-based fork of
BSD,“Bill’s real contribution was working with the 386 port.He was
kind of an outsider.No one else saw the 386 as interesting.Berkeley had
a myopic attitude toward PCs.They were just toys.No one would sup-
port Intel.That was the climate at the time.No one really took PCs
seriously.Bill’s contribution was to realize that PCs were going places.”
From the beginning,Hubbard and several others saw the genius in
creating a 386 version of BSD that ran on the cheapest hardware avail-
able.They started adding features and gluing in bug fixes,which they
distributed as a file that modified the main 386BSD distribution from
Jolitz.This was practical at the beginning when the changes were few,
but it continued out of respect for the original creator,even after the
patches grew complicated.
Finally,a tussle flared up in 1993.Jordan Hubbard,one of the fork-
ers,writes in his history of the project,
386BSD wa
s
Bill 
Jo
litz’
s
o
p
e
rating 
s
y
s
t
e
m,whi
c
h had b
ee
n up t
o
that
p
o
int 
s
uff
e
ring rath
e
se
v
e
r
e
ly fr
o
m alm
os
t a y
e
ar’
s
w
o
rth 
o
fn
e
gl
ec
t.A
s
FORK
… 209
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 209
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested