pdf mvc : Changing pdf file to jpg SDK software service wpf .net asp.net dnn ffa-2002-12-1323-part1285

“In BSD,you can do a unified make.They’re fairly proud of that,”says
Raymond.“But this creates rigidities that give people incentives to fork.
The BSD things that are built that way develop new spin-off groups each
week,while Linux,which is more loosely coupled,doesn’t fork.”
He elaborates,“Somebody pointed out that there’s a parallel of politics.
Rigid political and social institutions tend to change violently if they
change at all,while ones with more play in them tend to change peacefully.”
But this distinction may be semantic. . Forking does occur in the
Linux realm,but it happens as small diversions that get explained away
with other words.Red Hat may choose to use GNOME,while another
distribution like SuSE might choose KDE.The users will see a big dif-
ference because both tools create virtual desktop environments. . You
can’t miss them.But people won’t label this a fork.Both distributions
are using the same Linux kernel and no one has gone off and said,“To
hell with Linus, , I’m going to build my own version of Linux.”
Everyone’s technically still calling themselves Linux, , even if they’re
building something that looks fairly different on the surface.
Jason Wright,one of the developers on the OpenBSD team,sees the
organization as a good thing.“The one thing that all of the BSDs have
over Linux is a unified source tree.We don’t have Joe Blow’s tree or Bob’s
tree,”he says.In other words,when they fork,they do it officially,with
great ceremony,and make sure the world knows of their separate cre-
ations.They make a clear break,and this makes it easier for developers.
Wright says that this single source tree made it much easier for them to
turn OpenBSD into a very secure OS.“We’ve got the security over Linux.
They’ve recently been doing a security audit for Linux,but they’re going
to have a lot more trouble.There’s not one place to go for the source code.”
To extend this to political terms,the Linux world is like the 1980s
when Ronald Reagan ran the Republican party with the maxim that no
one should ever criticize another Republican.Sure,people argued inter-
nally about taxes,abortion,crime,and the usual controversies,but they
displayed a rare public cohesion.No one criticizes Torvalds,and every-
one is careful to pay lip service to the importance of Linux cohesion even
as they’re essentially forking by choosing different packages.
The BSD world,on the other hand, , is like the biblical realm in
Monty Python’s film Th
e
Lif
e
o
fBrian.In it,one character enumerates
220 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 220
Changing pdf file to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
to jpeg; convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg
Changing pdf file to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change pdf into jpg; change pdf to jpg online
the various splinter groups opposing the occupation by the Romans.
There is the People’s Front of Judea, the Judean People’s Front, the
Front of Judean People,and several others.All are after the same thing
and all are manifestly separate.The BSD world may share a fair amount
of code;it may share the same goals,but it just presents it as coming
from three different camps.
John Gilmore,one of the founders of the free software company
Cygnus and a firm believer in the advantages of the GNU General
Public License, says,“In Linux,each package has a maintainer, and
patches from all distributions go back through that maintainer.There is
a sense of cohesion.People at each distribution work to reduce their dif-
ferences from the version released by the maintainer.In the BSD world,
each tree thinks they own each program—they don’t send changes back
to a central place because that violates the ego model.”
Jordan Hubbard, , the leader of FreeBSD, is critical of Raymond’s
characterization of the BSD world.“I’ve always had a special place in
my heart for that paper because he painted positions that didn’t exist,”
Hubbard said of Raymond’s piece “The Cathedral and the Bazaar.”
“You could point to just the Linux community and decide which part
was cathedral-oriented and which part was bazaar-oriented.
“Every single OS has cathedral parts and bazaar parts.There are
some aspects of development that you leave deliberately unfocused and
you let people contribute at their own pace.It’s sort of a bubble-up
model and that’s the bazaar part.Then you have the organizational part
of every project.That’s the cathedral part.They’re the gatekeepers and
the standards setters.They’re necessary,too,”he said.
When it comes right down to it,there’s even plenty of forking going
on about the definition of a fork.When some of the Linux team point
at the BSD world and start making fun about the forks,the BSD team
gets defensive. . The BSD guys always get defensive because their
founder isn’t on the cover of all the magazines.The Linux team hints
that maybe,if they weren’t forking,they would have someone with a
name in lights,too.
Hubbard is right.Linux forks just as much,they just call it a distribution
or an experimental kernel or a patch kit.No one has the chutzpah to spin
off their own rival political organization.No one has the political clout.
FORK
… 221
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 221
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
the second PDF file to the target one, this PDF file merge function put the two target PDF together and save as new PDF, without changing the previous
batch pdf to jpg; .pdf to .jpg converter online
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Supports for changing image size. this .NET PDF to TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss
convert pdf to jpg file; convert from pdf to jpg
A
Fo
r
k
a
Sp
lit, 
and
a
R
e
un
i
on
Now,after all of the nasty stories of backstabbing and bickering,it is
important to realize that there are actually some happy stories of forks
that merge back together.One of the best stories comes from the halls
of an Internet security company,C2Net,that dealt with a fork in a very
peaceful way.
C2Net is a Berkeley-based company run by some hard-core advo-
cates of online privacy and anonymity.The company began by offering
a remailing service that allowed people to send anonymous e-mails to
one another.Their site would strip off the return address and pass it
along to the recipient with no trace of who sent it.They aimed to fulfill
the need of people like whistleblowers,leakers, and other people in
positions of weakness who wanted to use anonymity to avoid reprisals.
The company soon took on a bigger goal when it decided to modify
the popular Apache web server by adding strong encryption to make it
possible for people to process credit cards over the web.The technology,
known as SSL for “secure sockets layer,”automatically arranged for all
of the traffic between a remote web server and the user to be scrambled
so that no one could eavesdrop.SSL is a very popular technology on the
web today because many companies use it to scramble credit card num-
bers to defeat eavesdroppers.
C2Net drew a fair deal of attention when one of its founders,Sameer
Parekh,appeared on the cover of F
o
rb
es
magazine with a headline teas-
ing that he wanted to “overthrow the government.”In reality,C2Net
wanted to move development operations overseas,where there were no
regulations on the creation of cryptographically secure software.C2Net
went where the talent was available and priced right.
In this case, , C2Net chose a free version of SSL written by Eric
Young known as SSLeay.Young’s work is another of the open source
success stories.He wrote the original version as a hobby and released it
with a BSD-like license.Everyone liked his code,downloaded it,exper-
imented with it,and used it to explore the boundaries of the protocol.
Young was just swapping code with the Net and having a good time.
Parekh and C2Net saw an opportunity.They would merge two free
products, the Apache web server and Young’s SSLeay, , and make a
222 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 222
C# Tiff Convert: How to Convert Raster Images (Jpeg/Png/Bmp/Gif)
Give You Sample Codes for Changing and Converting Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF.dll. an example of converting raster image Jpeg to Tiff image file.
convert pdf image to jpg; change from pdf to jpg
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
image format in VB programming code, like changing "tif" to and then you can get any wanted target image file. users are also allowed to convert PDF to other
pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf file into jpg format
secure version so people could easily set up secure commerce sites for
the Internet.They called this product Stronghold and put it on the
market commercially.
C2Net’s decision to charge for the software rubbed some folks the
wrong way.They were taking two free software packages and making
something commercial out of them.This wasn’t just a fork,it seemed
like robbery to some.Of course,these complaints weren’t really fair.
Both collections of code emerged with a BSD-style license that gave
everyone the right to create and sell commercial additions to the prod-
uct.There wasn’t any GPL-like requirement that they give back to the
community.If no one wanted a commercial version,they shouldn’t have
released the code with a very open license in the first place.
Parekh understands these objections and says that he has weathered
plenty of criticism on the internal mailing lists.Still,he feels that the
Stronghold product contributed a great deal to the strength of Apache
by legitimizing it.
“I don’t feel guilty about it.I don’t think we’ve contributed a whole
lot of source code,which is one of the key metrics that the people in the
Apache group are using.In my perspective,the greatest contribution
we’ve made is market acceptance,”he said.
Parekh doesn’t mean that he had to build market acceptance among
web developers.The Apache group was doing a good job of accomplish-
ing that through their guerrilla tactics,excellent product,and free price
tag.But no one was sending a message to the higher levels of the com-
puter industry,where long-term plans were being made and corporate
deals were being cut.Parekh feels that he built first-class respectability
for the Apache name by creating and supporting a first-class product
that big corporations could use successfully.He made sure that everyone
knew that Apache was at the core of Stronghold,and people took notice.
Parekh’s first job was getting a patent license from RSA Data
Security.Secure software like SSL relies on the RSA algorithm,an idea
that was patented by three MIT professors in the 1970s.This patent is
controlled by RSA Data Security.While the company publicized some
of its licensing terms and went out of its way to market the technology,
negotiating a license was not a trivial detail that could be handled by
some free software team.Who’s going to pay the license? Who’s going
FORK
… 223
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 223
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
PowerPoint: PPT, PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document to open specified file in server file system or or zoom out functions, and changing file rotation angle
batch convert pdf to jpg; convert multiple pdf to jpg
to compute what some percentage of free is? Who’s going to come up
with the money? These questions are much easier to answer if you’re a
corporation charging customers to buy a product. C2Net was doing
that. People who bought Stronghold got a license from RSA that
ensured they could use the method without being sued.
The patent was only the first hurdle.SSL is a technology that tries to
bring some security to web connections by encrypting the connections
between the browser and the server.Netscape added one feature that
allows a connection to be established only if the server has a digital cer-
tificate that identifies it.These certificates are only issued to a company
after it pays a fee to a registered certificate agent like Verisign.
In the beginning,certificate agents like Verisign would issue the cer-
tificates only for servers created by big companies like Netscape or
Microsoft.Apache was just an amorphous group on the Net.Verisign
and the other authorities weren’t paying attention to it.
Parekh went to them and convinced them to start issuing the certifi-
cates so he could start selling Stronghold.
“We became number three, , right behind Microsoft and Netscape.
Then they saw how much money they were making from us,so they
started signing certificates for everyone,”he said.Other Apache projects
that used SSL found life much easier once Parekh showed Verisign that
there was plenty of money to be made from folks using free software.
Parekh does not deny that C2Net has not made many contributions
to the code base of Apache,but he doesn’t feel that this is the best mea-
sure.The political and marketing work of establishing Apache as a
worthwhile tool is something that he feels may have been more crucial
to its long-term health.When he started putting money in the hands of
Verisign,he got those folks to realize that Apache had a real market
share.That cash talked.
The Stronghold fork,however,did not make everyone happy.SSL is
an important tool and someone was going to start creating another free
version.C2Net hired Eric Young and his collaborator Tim Hudson and
paid them to do some work for Stronghold.The core version of Young’s
original SSLeay stayed open,and both continued to add bug fixes and
other enhancements over time.Parekh felt comfortable with this rela-
tionship.Although Stronghold was paying the salaries of Young and
224 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 224
Hudson,they were also spending some of their spare time keeping their
SSLeay toolkit up to date.
Still,the notion of a free version of SSL was a tempting project for
someone to undertake. Many people wanted it. . Secure digital com-
merce demanded it.There were plenty of economic incentives pushing
for it to happen. . Eventually, a German named Ralf S. . Engelschall
stepped up and wrote a new version he called mod_SSL.Engelschall is
a well-regarded contributor to the Apache effort,and he has written or
contributed to a number of different modules that could be added to
Apache.He calls one the “all-dancing-all-singing mod_rewrite module”
for handling URLs easily.
Suddenly,Engelschall’s new version meant that there were dueling
forks.One version came out of Australia,where the creators worked for
a company selling a proprietary version of the code.C2Net distributed
the Australian version and concentrated on making their product easy
to install.The other came out of Europe,distributed for free by some-
one committed to an open source license.The interface may have been a
bit rougher,but it didn’t cost any money and it came with the source
code.The potential for battle between SSLeay and mod_SSL could
have been great.
The two sides reviewed their options.Parekh must have felt a bit frus-
trated and at a disadvantage.He had a company that was making a good
product with repeat buyers.Then an open source solution came along.
C2Net’s Stronghold cost money and didn’t come with source code,while
Engelschall’s mod_SSL cost nothing and came with code.Those were
major negatives that he could combat only by increasing service.When
Engelschall was asked whether his free version was pushing C2Net,he
sent back the e-mail with the typed message,“[grin].”
In essence,C2Net faced the same situation as many major companies
like Microsoft and Apple do today.The customers now had a viable open
source solution to their problems.No one had to pay C2Net for the soft-
ware.The users in the United States needed a patent license,but that
would expire in late 2000.Luckily,Parekh is a true devotee to the open
source world, even though he has been running a proprietary source
company for the last several years.He looked at the problem and decided
that the only way to stay alive was to join forces and mend the fork.
FORK
… 225
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 225
To make matters worse,Hudson and Young left C2Net to work for
RSA Data Security.Parekh lost two important members of his team,
and he faced intense competition.Luckily,his devotion to open source
came to the rescue.Hudson and Young couldn’t take back any of the
work they did on SSLeay.It was open source and available to everyone.
Parekh,Engelschall,several C2Net employees,and several others sat
down (via e-mail) and created a new project they called OpenSSL.This
group would carry the torch of SSLeay and keep it up-to-date.Young
and Hudson stopped contributing and devoted their time to creating a
commercial version for RSA Data Security.
Parekh says of the time,“Even though it was a serious setback for
C2Net to have RSA pirate our people, , it was good for the public.
Development really accelerated when we started OpenSSL.More peo-
ple became involved and control became less centralized. It became
more like the Apache group.It’s a lot bigger than it was before and it’s
much easier for anyone to contribute.”
Parekh also worked on mending fences with Engelschall.C2Net began
to adopt some of the mod_SSL code and blend it into their latest version
of Stronghold.To make this blending easier,C2Net began sending some of
their formerly proprietary code back to Engelschall so he could mix it with
mod_SSL by releasing it as open source.In essence,C2Net was averting a
disastrous competition by making nice and sharing with this competitor.It
is a surprising move that might not happen in regular business.
Parekh’s decision seems open and beneficent,but it has a certain
amount of self-interest behind it.He explains,“We just decided to con-
tribute all of the features we had into mod_SSL so we could start using
mod_SSL internally,because it makes our maintenance of that easier.
We don’t have to maintain our own proprietary version of mod_SSL.
Granted,we’ve made the public version better,but those features weren’t
significant.”
This mixing wasn’t particularly complicated—most of it focused on
the structure of the parts of the source code that handle the interface.
Programmers call these the “hooks”or the “API.”If Stronghold and
mod_SSL use the same hook structure,then connecting them is a piece
of cake.If Engelschall had changed the hook structure of mod_SSL,
then the C2Net would have had to do more work.
226 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 226
The decision to contribute the code stopped Engelschall from doing
the work himself in a way that might have caused more grief for C2Net.
“He was actually planning on implementing them himself,so we were
better off contributing ours to avoid compatibility issues,”says Parekh.
That is to say,Parekh was worried that Engelschall was going to go off
and implement all the features C2Net used,and there was a very real
danger that Engelschall would implement them in a way that was unus-
able to Parekh.Then there would be a more serious fork that would
further split the two groups.C2Net wouldn’t be able to borrow code
from the free version of OpenSSL very easily.So it decided to con-
tribute its own code.It was easier to give their code and guarantee that
OpenSSL fit neatly into Stronghold.In essence,C2Net chose to give a
little so it could continue to get all of the future improvements.
It’s not much different from the car industry.There’s nothing inherently
better or worse about cars that have their steering wheel on the right-hand
side.They’re much easier to use in England.But if some free car engineer-
ing development team emerged in England,it might make sense for a U.S.
company to donate work early to ensure that the final product could have
the steering wheel on either side of the car without extensive redesign.If
Ford just sat by and hoped to grab the final free product,it might find that
the British engineers happily designed for the only roads they knew.
Engelschall is happy about this change.He wrote in an e-mail mes-
sage,“They do the only reasonable approach:They base their server on
mod_SSL because they know they cannot survive against the Open
Source solution with their old proprietary code.And by contributing
stuff to mod_SSL they implicitly make their own product better.This
way both sides benefit.”
Parekh and C2Net now have a challenge.They must continue to
make the Stronghold package better than the free version to justify the
cost people are paying.
Not all forks end with such a happy-faced story of mutual coopera-
tion.Nor do all stories in the free software world end with the money-
making corporation turning around and giving back their proprietary
code to the general effort. But the C2Net
/
OpenSSL case illustrates
how the nature of software development encourages companies and
people to give and cooperate to satisfy their own selfish needs.Software
FORK
… 227
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 227
can do a variety of wonderful things,but the structure often governs
how easy it is for some of us to use.It makes sense to spend some extra
time and make donations to a free software project if you want to make
sure that the final product fits your specs.
The good news is that most people don’t have much incentive to break
off and fork their own project.If you stay on the same team,then you can
easily use all the results produced by the other members.Cooperating is so
much easier than fighting that people have a big incentive to stay together.
If it weren’t so selfish,it would be heartwarming.
228 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 228
17.
CORE
Projects in corporations have managers who report to other managers
who report to the CEO who reports to the board.It’s all very simple in
theory,although it never really works that way in practice.The lines of
control get crossed as people form alliances and struggle to keep their
bosses happy.
Projects in the world of open source software,on the other hand,
give everyone a copy of the source code and let them be the master of
the code running on their machine.Everyone gets to be the Board of
Directors,the CEO,and the cubicle serfs rolled into one.If a free soft-
ware user doesn’t like something,then he has the power to change it.
You don’t like that icon? Boom,it’s gone.You don’t want KDE on your
desktop? Whoosh,it’s out of there.No vice president in charge of MSN
marketing in Redmond is going to force you to have an icon for easy
connection to the Microsoft Network on your desktop. . No graphic
designer at Apple is going to force you to look at that two-faced
Picasso-esque MacOS logo every morning of your life just because
their marketing studies show that they need to build a strong brand
identity.You’re the captain of your free software ship and you decide the
menu,the course,the arrangement of the deck chairs,the placement of
lookouts from which to watch for icebergs,the type of soap,and the
number of toothpicks per passenger to order.In theory,you’re the Lord
High Master and Most Exalted Ruler of all Software Big and Small,
Wild and Wonderful,and Interpreted and Compiled on your machine.
In practice,no one has the time to use all of that power.It’s downright
boring to worry about soap and toothpicks.It’s exhausting to rebuild win-
dow systems when they fail to meet your caviar-grade tastes in software.
FreeForAll/139-276/repro  4/24/00  9:31 AM  Page 229
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested