mvc display pdf from byte array : Change pdf file to jpg control software system web page windows html console ffa-2002-12-137-part1301

exists.Most Macintosh computers,for instance,can be sluggish at times
because the OS does not do a good job juggling the workload between
processes.The kernel of the OS has not been completely overhauled since
the early days when the machines ran one program at a time.This slug-
gishness will persist for a bit longer until Macintosh releases a new version
known as MacOS X.This will be based on the Mach kernel,a version
developed at Carnegie-Mellon University and released as open source
software.Steve Jobs adopted it when he went to NeXT,a company that
was eventually folded back into Apple.This kernel does a much better job
of juggling different tasks because it uses preemptive multitasking instead
of cooperative multitasking.The original version of the MacOS let each
program decide when and if it was going to give up control of the com-
puter to let other programs run.This low-rent version of juggling was
called cooperative multitasking,but it failed when some program in the
hotel failed to cooperate.Most software developers obeyed the rules,but
mistakes would still occur.Bad programs would lock up the machine.
Preemptive multitasking takes this power away from the individual pro-
grams.It swaps control from program to program without asking permis-
sion.One pig of a program can’t slow down the entire machine.When the
new MacOS X kernel starts offering preemptive multitasking,the users
should notice less sluggish behavior and more consistent performance.
Torvalds plunged in and created a monolithic kernel.This made it eas-
ier to tweak all the strange interactions between the programs.Sure,a
microkernel built around a clean,message-passing architecture was an
elegant way to construct the guts of an OS,but it had its problems.There
was no easy way to deal with special exceptions.Let’s say you want a web
server to run very quickly on your machine.That means you need to treat
messages coming into the computer from the Internet with exceptional
speed.You need to ship them with the equivalent of special delivery or
FedEx.You need to create a special exception for them.Tacking these
exceptions onto a clean microkernel starts to make it look bad.The design
starts to get cluttered and less elegant.After a few special exceptions are
added,the microkernel can start to get confused.
Torvalds’s monolithic kernel did not have the elegance or the sim-
plicity of a microkernel OS like Minix or Mach,but it was easier to
hack.New tweaks to speed up certain features were relatively easy to
60 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 60
Change pdf file to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi; change pdf to jpg file
Change pdf file to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert multipage pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg online
add.There was no need to come up with an entirely new architecture
for the message-passing system.The downside was that the guts could
grow remarkably byzantine,like the bureaucracy of a big company.
In the past,this complexity hurt the success of proprietary operating
systems.The complexity produced bugs because no one could under-
stand it. . Torvalds’s system, however, came with all the source code,
making it much easier for application programmers to find out what
was causing their glitch.To carry the corporate bureaucracy metaphor a
bit further,the source code acted like the omniscient secretary who is
able to explain everything to a harried executive.This perfect knowl-
edge reduced the cost of complexity.
By the beginning of 1992,Linux was no longer a Finnish student’s
part-time hobby.Several influential programmers became interested in
the code.It was free and relatively usable.It ran much of the GNU
code,and that made it a neat,inexpensive way to experiment with some
excellent tools.More and more people downloaded the system,and a
significant fraction started reporting bugs and suggestions to Torvalds.
He rolled them back in and the project snowballed.
A
H
obby
B
e
g
ets
a
P
r
o
ject 
t
ha
B
e
g
ets
a
M
ov
eme
n
t
On the face of it,Torvalds’s decision to create an OS wasn’t extraordinary.
Millions of college-age students decide that they can do anything if they
just put in a bit more elbow grease.The college theater departments,
newspapers,and humor magazines all started with this impulse,and the
notion isn’t limited to college students. . Millions of adults run Little
League teams,build model railroads,lobby the local government to create
parks,and take on thousands of projects big and small in their spare time.
Every great idea has a leader who can produce a system to sustain it.
Every small-town lot had kids playing baseball,but a few guys organized
a Little League program that standardized the rules and the competition.
Every small town had people campaigning for parks,but one small group
created the Sierra Club,which fights for parks throughout the world.
This talent for organizing the work of others is a rare commodity,
O
U
T
S
IDER
… 61
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 61
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the PDF files with the
changing pdf to jpg; pdf to jpg converter
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf to jpg batch; convert pdf pages to jpg
and Torvalds had a knack for it.He was gracious about sharing his sys-
tem with the world and he never lorded it over anyone.His messages
were filled with jokes and self-deprecating humor,most of which were
carefully marked with smiley faces (:-)) to make sure that the message
was clear.If he wrote something pointed,he would apologize for being
a “hothead.” ” He was always gracious in giving credit to others and
noted that much of Linux was just a clone of UNIX.All of this made
him easy to read and thus influential.
His greatest trick,though,was his decision to avoid the mantle of
power.He wrote in 1992,“Here’s my standing on ‘keeping control,’in 2
words (three?):I won’t.The only control I’ve effectively been keeping
on Linux is that I know it better than anybody else.”
He pointed out that his control was only an illusion that was caused
by the fact that he did a good job maintaining the system.“I’ve made
my changes available to ftp-sites etc.Those have become effectively
official releases,and I don’t expect this to change for some time:not
because I feel I have some moral right to it,but because I haven’t heard
too many complaints.”
As he added new features to his OS, he shipped new copies fre-
quently.The Internet made this easy to do.He would just pop a new
version up on a server and post a notice for all to read:come download
the latest version.
He made it clear that people could vote to depose him at any time.
“If people feel I do a bad job,they can do it themselves.”They could
just take all of his Linux code and start their own version using
Torvalds’s work as a foundation.
Anyone could break off from Torvalds’s project because Torvalds
decided to ship the source code to his project under Richard Stallman’s
GNU General Public License,or GPL.In the beginning,he issued it
with a more restrictive license that prohibited any “commercial”use,but
eventually moved to the GNU license. . This was a crucial decision
because it cemented a promise with anyone who spent a few minutes
playing with his toy operating system for the 386.It stated that all of
the source code that Torvalds or anyone else wrote would be freely
accessible and shared with everyone.This decision was a double-edged
sword for the community.Everyone could take the software for free,
62 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 62
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
change pdf to jpg on; convert pdf file to jpg online
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc. PowerPoint.dll. This demo code convert dicom file all pages to jpg images.
change from pdf to jpg on; convert pdf to jpg for
but if they started circulating some new software built with the code,
they would have to donate their changes back to the project.It was like
flypaper.Anyone who started working with the project grew attached to
it.They couldn’t run off into their own corner.Some programmers joke
that this flypaper license is like sex.If you make one mistake by hooking
up with a project protected by GPL,you pay for it forever.If you ever
ship a version of the project,you must include all of the source code.It
can be distributed freely forever.
While some people complained about the sticky nature of the GPL,
enough saw it as a virtue.They liked Torvalds’s source code,and they
liked the fact that the GPL made them full partners in the project.
Anyone could donate their time and be sure it wasn’t going to disappear.
The source code became a body of work held in common trust for
everyone.No one could rope it off,fence it in,or take control.
In time,Torvalds’s pet science project and hacking hobby grew as
more people got interested in playing with the guts of machines.The
price was right,and idle curiosity could be powerful.Some wondered
what a guy in Finland could do with a 386 machine.Others wondered
if it was really as usable as the big machines from commercial compa-
nies.Others wondered if it was powerful enough to solve some prob-
lems in the lab.Still others just wanted to tinker.All of these folks gave
it a try,and some even began to contribute to the project.
Torvalds’s burgeoning kernel dovetailed nicely with the tools that the
GNU project created. All of the work by Stallman and his disciples
could be easily ported to work with the operating system core that
Torvalds was now calling Linux.This was the power of freely distrib-
utable source code. Anyone could make a connection, , and someone
invariably did.Soon,much of the GNU code began running on Linux.
These tools made it easier to create more new programs,and the snow-
ball began to roll.
Many people feel that Linus Torvalds’s true act of genius was in
coming up with a flexible and responsive system for letting his toy
OS grow and change.He released new versions often,and he encour-
aged everyone to test them with him.In the past,many open source
developers using the GNU GPL had only shipped new versions at
major landmarks in development,acting a bit like the commercial
O
U
T
S
IDER
… 63
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 63
C# TIFF: How to Use C#.NET Code to Compress TIFF Image File
C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object. List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); / Step1: Load image to REImage object. foreach (string file in
conversion of pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg on
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add PDFDocument(images.ToArray()); / Save document to a file. Program.RootPath + "\\output.pdf"; doc.Save
convert pdf picture to jpg; convert multi page pdf to jpg
developers.After they released version 1.0, they would hole up in
their basements until they had added enough new features to justify
version 2.0.
Torvalds avoided this perfectionism and shared frequently. If he
fixed a bug on Monday,then he would roll out a new version that after-
noon.It’s not strange to have two or three new versions hit the Internet
each week.This was a bit more work for Torvalds,but it also made it
much easier for others to become involved.They could watch what he
was doing and make their own suggestions.
This freedom also attracted others to the party.They knew that
Linux would always be theirs,too.They could write neat features and
plug them into the Linux kernel without worrying that Torvalds would
yank the rug out from under them.The GPL was a contract that lasted
long into the future.It was a promise that bound them together.
The Linux kernel also succeeded because it was written from the
ground up for the PC platform. . When the Berkeley UNIX hackers
were porting BSD to the PC platform,they weren’t able to make it fit
perfectly.They were taking a piece of software crafted for older com-
puters like the VAX,and shaving off corners and rewriting sections
until it ran on the PC.
Alan Cox pointed out to me,“The early BSD stuff was by UNIX
people for UNIXpeople.You needed a calculator and familiarity with
BSD UNIXon big machines (or a lot of reading) to install it.You also
couldn’t share a disk between DOS
/
Windows and 386BSD or the early
branches off it.
“Nowadays FreeBSD understands DOS partitions and can share a
disk,but at the time BSD was scary to install,”he continued.
The BSD also took certain pieces of hardware for granted.Early ver-
sions of BSD required a 387,a numerical coprocessor that would speed
up the execution of floating point numbers.Cox remembers that the
price (about $100) was just too much for his budget.At that time,the
free software world was a very lean organization.
Torvalds’s operating system plugged a crucial hole in the world of free
source software and made it possible for someone to run a computer
without paying anyone for a license.Richard Stallman had dreamed of
this day,and Torvalds came up with the last major piece of the puzzle.
64 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 64
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
convert pdf into jpg online; conversion pdf to jpg
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG
bulk pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf image to jpg image
A
D
iffere
n
K
i
nd
o
T
r
i
a
l
During the early months of Torvalds’s work,the BSD group was stuck
in a legal swamp.While the BSD team was involved with secret settle-
ment talks and secret depositions,Linus Torvalds was happily writing
code and sharing it with the world on the Net. . His life wasn’t all
peaches and cream,but all of his hassles were open.Professor Andy
Tanenbaum,a fairly well-respected and famous computer scientist,got
in a long,extended debate with Torvalds over the structure of Linux.He
looked down at Linux and claimed that Linux would have been worth
two F’s in his class because of its design.This led to a big flame war that
was every bit as nasty as the fight between Berkeley and AT&T’s USL.
In fact,to the average observer it was even nastier.Torvalds returned
Tanenbaum’s fire with strong words like “fiasco,”“brain-damages,”and
“suck.” He brushed off the bad grades by pointing out that Albert
Einstein supposedly got bad grades in math and physics.The high-
priced lawyers working for AT&T and Berkeley probably used very
expensive and polite words to try and hide the shivs they were trying to
stick in each other’s back.Torvalds and Tanenbaum pulled out each
other’s virtual hair like a squawkfest on the Jerry Springer show.
But Torvalds’s flame war with Tanenbaum occurred in the open in an
Internet newsgroup.Other folks could read it,think about it,add their
two cents’worth,and even take sides.It was a wide-open debate that
uncovered many flaws in the original versions of Linux and Tanenbaum’s
Minix.They forced Torvalds to think deeply about what he wanted to do
with Linux and consider its flaws.He had to listen to the arguments of a
critic and a number of his peers on the Net and then come up with argu-
ments as to why his Linux kernel didn’t suck too badly.
This open fight had a very different effect from the one going on in
the legal system. . Developers and UNIX hackers avoided the various
free versions of BSD because of the legal cloud.If a judge decided that
AT&T and USL were right, , everyone would have to abandon their
work on the platform.While the CSRG worked hard to get free,judges
don’t always make the choices we want.
The fight between Torvalds and Tanenbaum,however,drew people
into the project.Other programmers like David Miller,Ted T’so,and
O
U
T
S
IDER
… 65
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 65
Peter da Silva chimed in with their opinions.At the time,they were just
interested bystanders.In time, , they became part of the Linux brain
trust.Soon they were contributing source code that ran on Linux.The
argument’s excitement forced them to look at Torvalds’s toy OS and try
to decide whether his defense made any sense.Today,David Miller is
one of the biggest contributors to the Linux kernel.Many of the origi-
nal debaters became major contributors to the foundations of Linux.
This fight drew folks in and kept them involved. . It showed that
Torvalds was serious about the project and willing to think about its
limitations.More important,it exposed these limitations and inspired
other folks on the Net to step forward and try to fix them.Everyone
could read the arguments and jump in.Even now,you can dig up the
archives of this battle and read in excruciating detail what people were
thinking and doing. . The AT&T
/
USL-versus-Berkeley fight is still
sealed.
To this day,all of the devotees of the various BSDs grit their teeth
when they hear about Linux.They think that FreeBSD,NetBSD,and
OpenBSD are better,and they have good reasons for these beliefs.They
know they were out the door first with a complete running system.But
Linux is on the cover of the magazines.All of the great technically
unwashed are now starting to use “Linux”as a synonym for free soft-
ware.If AT&T never sued,the BSD teams would be the ones reaping
the glory.They would be the ones to whom Microsoft turned when it
needed a plausible competitor.They would be more famous.
But that’s crying over spilled milk.The Berkeley CSRG lived a life
of relative luxury in their world made fat with big corporate and gov-
ernment donations.They took the cash,and it was only a matter of
time before someone called them on it.Yes,they won in the end,but it
came too late.Torvalds was already out of the gate and attracting more
disciples.
McKusick says,“If you plot the installation base of Linux and BSD
over the last five years, you’ll see that they’re both in exponential
growth.But BSD’s about eighteen to twenty months behind.That’s
about how long it took between Net Release 2 and the unencumbered
4.4BSD-Lite.That’s about how long it took for the court system to do
its job.”
66 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 66
7.
GRO
W
TH
Through the 1990s,the little toy operating system grew slowly and quietly
as more and more programmers were drawn into the vortex.At the begin-
ning,the OS wasn’t rich with features.You could run several different pro-
grams at once,but you couldn’t do much with the programs.The system’s
interface was just text.Still,this was often good enough for a few folks in
labs around the world.Some just enjoyed playing with computers.Getting
Linux running on their PC was a challenge,not unlike bolting an after-
market supercharger onto a Honda Civic.But others took the project more
seriously because they had serious jobs that couldn’t be solved with a pro-
prietary operating system that came from Microsoft or others.
In time,more people started using the system and started contribut-
ing their additions to the pot.Someone figured out how to make MIT’s
free X Window System run on Linux so everyone could have a graphi-
cal interface.Someone else discovered how to roll in technology for
interfacing with the Internet.That made a big difference because every-
one could hack,tweak,and fiddle with the code and then just upload
the new versions to the Net.
It goes without saying that all the cool software coming out of
Stallman’s Free Software Foundation found its way to Linux. Some
were simple toys like GNU Chess,but others were serious tools that
were essential to the growth of the project.By 1991,the FSF was offer-
ing what might be argued were the best text editor and compiler in the
world.Others might have been close,but Stallman’s were free.These
were crucial tools that made it possible for Linux to grow quickly from
a tiny experimental kernel into a full-featured OS for doing everything
a programmer might want to do.
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 67
James LewisMoss,one of the many programmers who devote some
time to Linux,says that GCC made it possible for programmers to cre-
ate,revise,and extend the kernel.“GCC is integral to the success of
Linux,”he says,and points out that this may be one of the most impor-
tant reasons why “it’s polite to refer to it as GNU
/
Linux.”
LewisMoss points out one of the smoldering controversies in the world
of free software:all of the tools and games that came from the GNU project
started becoming part of what people simply thought of as plain “Linux.”
The name for the small kernel of the operating system soon grew to apply to
almost all the free software that ran with it.This angered Stallman,who first
argued that a better name would be “Lignux.”When that failed to take hold,
he moved to “GNU
/
Linux.” Some ignored his pleas and simply used
“Linux,”which is still a bit unfair.Some feel that “GNU
/
Linux”is too much
of a mouthful and,for better or worse,just plain Linux is an appropriate
shortcut.Some,like LewisMoss,hold firm to GNU
/
Linux.
Soon some people were bundling together CD-ROMs with all this
software in one batch.The group would try to work out as many
glitches as possible so that the purchaser’s life would be easier. . All
boasted strange names like Yggdrasil,Slackware,SuSE,Debian,or Red
Hat.Many were just garage projects that never made much money,but
that was okay. Making money wasn’t really the point. People just
wanted to play with the source.Plus,few thought that much money
could be made.The GPL,for instance,made it difficult to differentiate
the product because it required everyone to share their source code with
the world.If Slackware came up with a neat fix that made their version
of Linux better,then Debian and SuSE could grab it.The GPL pre-
vented anyone from constraining the growth of Linux.
But only greedy businessmen see sharing and competition as nega-
tives.In practice,the free flow of information enhanced the market for
Linux by ensuring that it was stable and freely available.If one key CD-
ROM developer gets a new girlfriend and stops spending enough time
programming,another distribution will pick up the slack.If a hurricane
flattened Raleigh,North Carolina,the home of Red Hat,then another
supplier would still be around.A proprietary OS like Windows is like a
set of manacles.An earthquake in Redmond,Washington,could cause
a serious disruption for everyone.
68 …
FREE
FOR
ALL
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 68
The competition and the GPL meant that the users would never
feel bound to one OS.If problems arose,anyone could always just start
a splinter group and take Linux in that direction.And they did.All 
the major systems began as splinter groups, , and some picked up
enough steam and energy to dominate. In time, , the best splinter
groups spun off their own splinter groups and the process grew terribly
complicated.
Th
e
E
st
ab
lis
h
me
n
B
e
g
i
n
s
 t
o
No
ti
ce
By the mid-1990s,the operating system had already developed quite a
following.In 1994,Jon Hall was a programmer for Digital,a company
that was later bought by Compaq.Hall also wears a full beard and uses
the name “maddog”as a nickname.At that time,Digital made worksta-
tions that ran a version of UNIX.In the early 1990s,Digital made a big
leap forward by creating a 64-bit processor version of its workstation
CPU chip,the Alpha,and the company wanted to make sure that the
chip found widespread acceptance.
Hall remembers well the moment he discovered Linux. . He told
Linux T
o
day,
I didn’t 
e
v
e
n kn
o
w I wa
s
inv
o
lv
e
d with Linux at fir
s
t.I g
o
t a 
co
py
o
fDr.Dobb’s Journal,and in th
e
r
e
wa
s
an adv
e
rti
se
m
e
nt f
o
r “g
e
t
a UNIX 
o
p
e
rating 
s
y
s
t
e
m,all th
e
so
ur
ce
co
d
e
,and run it 
o
n y
o
ur
PC.”And I think it wa
s
$99.And I g
o
,“Oh,w
o
w,that’
s
pr
e
tty
coo
l.F
o
r $99,I 
c
an d
o
that.”S
o
se
nt away f
o
r it,g
o
t th
e
CD.Th
e
o
nly tr
o
ubl
e
wa
s
that I didn’t hav
e
a PC t
o
run it 
o
n.S
o
I put it 
o
n
my Ultrix 
s
y
s
t
e
m,t
oo
k a l
oo
k at th
e
main pag
es
,dir
ec
t
o
ry 
s
tru
c
tur
e
and 
s
tuff,and 
s
aid,“H
e
y,that l
oo
k
s
pr
e
tty 
coo
l.”Th
e
n I put it
away in th
e
filing 
c
abin
e
t.That wa
s
pr
o
bably ar
o
und 
J
anuary 
o
f
1994.
In May 1994,Hall met Torvalds at a DECUS (Digital Equipment
Corporation User Society) meeting and became a big fan.Hall is a pro-
grammer’s programmer who has written code for many different
GRO
W
TH
… 69
FreeForAll/1-138/repro  4/21/00  11:44 AM  Page 69
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested