Copyright © 1997-2003 BinaryThing Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved | www.planetpdf.com | Planet PDF - a World of Adobe Acrobat and PDF Resources. 
Prev
CHAPTER INDEX
Home
Next
PAGE  41  of  71
•Contents
•Ten years of PDF
•Masters of PDF
•Security & accessibility
•Design & creation
•Acrobat best practice
•Future of PDF
The problem here, as Pfiffner points out, 
seems to be a misunderstanding of the 
product. In that sense, add it to the list. 
What percentage of people, 10 years 
since the product family was launched, still 
don’t grasp the difference between the 
commercial Acrobat product and the freely 
downloadable Acrobat Reader? Or the 
product name from the *company* name, 
for that matter? Far too many, judging 
by the frequent, inaccurate references 
we still see and hear. That aside, Acrobat 
(and most certainly not the free Reader) 
should never be thought of as a design 
tool – at least in terms of being useful in 
the authoring process. But to leap from 
that to a conclusion that Acrobat – and 
PDF, by affiliation – is in any way a threat 
seems a jump worthy of ... dare I say, a 
trained acrobat. While not a design tool, it’s 
definitely a tool.
One discussion we’ve fortunately begun to 
hear less of in the days of Acrobat 5 is the 
debate about ‘HTML or PDF,’ a narrow-
minded argument that once presumed one 
had to choose between the two formats for 
Web publishing. As we’ve opined before, 
there’s not really much debate here – and 
if there is, the answer is ‘both.’ But if you 
really need to make a choice for certain 
situations, then there’s no hard and fast rule 
that says one format is always the right one. 
Each has its merits and its shortcomings. 
Weigh them, make a decision ... if you must.
On the debit side of the ledger for HTML, 
at least as perceived by people skilled 
in print-oriented design, is the ongoing 
challenge of preserving in HTML the 
exact look and feel intentionally created 
by a knowledgeable designer. Simply 
too many uncontrollable variables - still 
true today, but even worse the time this 
debate peaked. And as anyone who has 
worked much with PDF knows by now, 
that’s where PDF shines. It preserves 
the intelligent decisions made by skilled 
designers so that readers will perceive the 
information in the exact manner originally 
intended. It may be an inexact science or 
skill, but there’s a world of evidence and 
experience that supports the notion that 
presentation (design) plays a key role in 
comprehension of information.
If design didn’t matter, we wouldn’t need 
PDF, or at least not for fidelity’s sake. But if 
you buy into the notion that communication 
results in part from the conscious, 
deliberate intentions of a design-oriented 
individual or staff, then viewing PDF as a 
threat seems unjustifiable. It’s an extension 
of and complement to the principles of 
design, seems to me.
Last, with the ever-increasing acceptance 
of PDF, within not the least of professional 
arenas the publishing world, any designer 
today who chooses to ignore the potential 
applications of PDF only limits themselves 
and for some, also their future career 
opportunities.
Pfiffner concludes that the fault here lies 
to a great extent with Adobe marketing, a 
group that over the years has been flogged 
for any number of shortcomings, both 
perceived and real. She says “Adobe needs 
to tweak its marketing strategy so that 
designers better understand the role PDF 
plays.”
At the same time, working in a field as 
competitive as publishing, any designers 
(and companies employing designers) 
looking to have a richer and more valuable 
toolbox than others in the field would be 
well advised not to sit back and wait for the 
maligned Adobe Marketeers to get around 
to dispensing such enlightenment.
Read Pfiffner’s column and, if you have an 
opinion, join us in the PDF-Talkback section 
of the Planet PDF Forum
to have a pow-
wow on this topic.
Batch pdf to jpg converter - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
changing pdf file to jpg; convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg
Batch pdf to jpg converter - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
bulk pdf to jpg converter; convert .pdf to .jpg
Copyright © 1997-2003 BinaryThing Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved | www.planetpdf.com | Planet PDF - a World of Adobe Acrobat and PDF Resources. 
Prev
CHAPTER INDEX
Home
Next
PAGE  42  of  71
•Contents
•Ten years of PDF
•Masters of PDF
•Security & accessibility
•Design & creation
•Acrobat best practice
•Future of PDF
ADOBE PACIFIC’S NICK HODGE 
ON ‘THE MAKING OF GOOD 
PDFS’
Certain principles to keep in mind 
By Craig Kirkwood, Planet PDF Graphic Arts Editor
At the recent Open Publish conference 
in Sydney, Adobe Asia-Pacific’s resident 
PDF Master, Nick Hodge, spoke at length 
of the need to create what he calls “good 
PDFs” in both the enterprise and pre-press 
environments. He identified a number of 
dos and don’ts that can be applied to all 
Acrobat users – with some issues being 
more critical than others, according to the 
context. 
Hodge believes some simple principles 
should be adhered to regardless of the 
working environment. “While enterprise 
users typically demand less of PDFs than 
those working in graphic arts and pre-
press, it’s still important to ensure the 
integrity of the file,” says Hodge. “The 
principles of creating good PDFs remain 
the same regardless of the domain.” 
Enterprise vs. Pre-press
By “enterprise users” we mean those using 
Acrobat for predominantly document 
exchange or archival purposes or those 
creating files intended to be read on-
screen such as the case when making a 
presentation at a conference. Of course, 
this is not necessarily a homogeneous 
group – indeed the needs of those creating 
documents to be laser printed are not the 
same as those intended for the Web – but 
they do share a condition that the files will 
not (necessarily) be sent to a commercial 
raster image processor (RIP) such as 
that used in a pre-press imagesetter or a 
computer-to-plate printer. 
Graphic arts or pre-press users are those 
intending to take the file to be offset or 
digitally printed or those working in a 
pre-press bureau or printing environment 
themselves. Such users have much more 
rigorous requirements of their files. While 
there are a number of 3rd-party products
available to ensure the “preflight” integrity 
of PDFs that doesn’t diminish the necessity 
to ensure files are in good shape before 
preflighting. 
PDFWriter is Evil!
Despite the one-step convenience, 
even enterprise users should avoid 
the PDFWriter application which, until 
recently, shipped with Acrobat (it’s still 
available as a custom install with Acrobat 5 
for Windows, but not for the mac version). 
“It’s evil. Those working in graphic arts 
should avoid it at all costs!” says Hodge, 
not so much because it’s a bad product but 
because it was designed for applications 
that cannot generate PostScript - a species 
which is all but extinct. 
Hodge recommends avoiding PDFWriter 
because it has a number of inherent 
problems. To begin with, key publishing 
applications such as PageMaker and 
QuarkXPress function very poorly with it, 
creating less than optimum results. There 
is also no CMYK support, as required for 
offset printing, and images are compressed 
to a way too low 72 DPI. Finally, vector 
images such as EPS files display and print 
very poorly becoming “green and slimy,” 
says Hodge. 
The Distiller
Hodge believes that mastering the Distiller, 
specifically the Job Options settings, is the 
key to creating good PDFs. “Once you’re 
comfortable inside the Acrobat Distiller 
Job Options dialog box you’re 90 percent 
of the way there,” he says. Planet PDF 
regularly publishes tips and tricks regarding 
Distiller options and other aspects of 
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
Open JPEG to PDF Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "PDF" in "Output
convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi; convert multipage pdf to jpg
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Open JPEG to GIF Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "GIF" in "Output
convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg image
Copyright © 1997-2003 BinaryThing Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved | www.planetpdf.com | Planet PDF - a World of Adobe Acrobat and PDF Resources. 
Prev
CHAPTER INDEX
Home
Next
PAGE  43  of  71
•Contents
•Ten years of PDF
•Masters of PDF
•Security & accessibility
•Design & creation
•Acrobat best practice
•Future of PDF
PDF creation, but here are some of the 
important settings to become familiar with: 
First of all the default Job Options available 
in Acrobat 4 and 5 are a great start and 
satisfy the needs of most according to the 
particular task at hand. That is, selecting the 
“Print” Job Option will compress images 
and embed fonts in order to create an 
optimum file for printing to a laser printer. 
Likewise, the “Press” Job Option setting 
will apply a minimum of image compression 
and maximize the results for offset printing. 
There are, however, a lot of variables that 
can be employed when conditions are not 
quite so typical. Color management, for 
example, when correctly used throughout 
the production process, will generate 
more predictable results than the effective 
guess work that follows the use of an 
uncalibrated monitor and incorrect color 
space translation. 
Actually, Acrobat is intended to permit “soft 
proofing” on screen; that is, the ability to 
confidently assess the results of a printed 
file by viewing the PDF on your monitor. 
But creating a reliable on-screen experience 
requires consistency of profiling across 
devices, including the correct assessment 
of the color gamut of your monitor. There’s 
a lot to say on this subject, but there are 
some good resources online, notably 
Adobe’s Color and Color Management 
technical guides. 
Font embedding is another issue that 
Hodge highlighted during his presentation. 
Those new to the PDF creation process 
may assume that subsetting fonts would 
produce an inferior results. Not so says 
Hodge, subsetting forces the client machine 
to use embedded fonts rather than use 
local systems fonts. Given the wide variance 
among fonts – even between fonts with 
ADVERTISEMENT
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Open JPEG to DICOM Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "DICOM" in
convert pdf to jpg c#; change pdf to jpg
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Open JPEG to JBIG2 Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "JBIG2" in
.pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg format
Copyright © 1997-2003 BinaryThing Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved | www.planetpdf.com | Planet PDF - a World of Adobe Acrobat and PDF Resources. 
Prev
CHAPTER INDEX
Home
Next
PAGE  44  of  71
•Contents
•Ten years of PDF
•Masters of PDF
•Security & accessibility
•Design & creation
•Acrobat best practice
•Future of PDF
the same name, from the same foundry 
– it’s best to avoid local fonts in pre-press 
environments. 
Two Step
Hodge also pointed out that creating 
a PDF is actually a two-stage process 
despite the fact that it typically occurs as 
just one action. That is, when you print 
to the Acrobat Distiller, the first thing 
that happens is a PostScript file is created. 
The Distiller is, in fact, a PostScript RIP; 
and PostScript, just to be clear, is a page-
description language as opposed to PDF, 
which is a file format. 
The creation of the PDF file is actually 
the second phase of the process. Thus, 
while most users create the PostScript 
and PDF at the same time, an alternative 
workflow is to create the PostScript 
file, then create PDFs according to the 
output requirements. Thus a PDF can be 
created for press, print or Web from a 
single PostScript file by merely dragging 
and dropping the PostScript file onto the 
Distiller with the appropriate Job Options 
set for the desired output. 
The integrity of the final PDF is thus a 
product of both the PostScript data and 
the Distillation process according to the 
selected Job Options. Ensuring “good 
PostScript” then is the other factor in 
determining good PDF and, according to 
Hodge, this can be achieved by ensuring 
you have the current version of the Adobe 
PostScript Driver installed. 
At the time of writing, Adobe is 
recommending AdobePS 8.5.1 or later. The 
Acrobat 5.0 CD includes version 8.7.2 and 
the Acrobat 4 CD includes 8.5.1. If you’re 
running a Mac, particularly if you work 
with QuarkXPress, it would pay to take a 
look at Adobe’s support files regarding the 
installation of the PostScript Printer Driver 
as you’ll need the Virtual Printer plug-in to 
obtain best results. 
There’s much more to creating optimum 
PDFs than we can cover here, but take a 
look at our Tips and Tricks section, Shlomo 
Perets’ “PDF Best Practices
” series and 
the Planet PDF Forum
for sound advice. 
Adobe’s support pages and expert center 
are also great resources.
PORTABLE HISTORY 
By Kurt Foss, Planet PDF Editor
Aside from yesterday’s Weblog entry that 
speculated on the likes of Thomas Jefferson 
having access to today’s portable document 
technologies, the reality is, of course, that 
important U.S. government documents 
like the Declaration of Independence 
were created and existed only on paper 
(or another analog storage method for 
preservation purposes) for most of the 
country’s history.
It wasn’t until the presidency of Bill Clinton 
– coincidentally rather than intentionally 
– that the federal government began to get 
serious about the advantages of digitized 
documents and records. Legislation such as 
the Paperwork Elimination Act have helped 
to focus government agencies on the 
importance of harnessing new technologies, 
including Adobe Acrobat and PDF, to 
become more efficient and effective.
While we tend to think most often about 
the conversion of ongoing services such as 
the IRS’ tax forms or the FDA’s streamlined 
drug approval procedures, there are other 
agencies charged with digitally preserving 
the country’s past. 
A new Web site – part of a new initiative 
called “Our Documents: A National 
Initiative on American History, Civics, and 
Service” announced by Pres. George W. 
Bush on September 17 – is a great example 
of these latter efforts.
JPG to JPEG2000 Converter | Convert JPEG to JPEG2000, Convert
Open JPEG to JPEG2000 Converter first; ad JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "JPEG2000" in
convert pdf into jpg online; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
JPG to Word Converter | Convert JPEG to Word, Convert Word to JPG
Open JPEG to Word Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "Word" in
reader convert pdf to jpg; .pdf to .jpg online
Copyright © 1997-2003 BinaryThing Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved | www.planetpdf.com | Planet PDF - a World of Adobe Acrobat and PDF Resources. 
Prev
CHAPTER INDEX
Home
Next
PAGE  45  of  71
•Contents
•Ten years of PDF
•Masters of PDF
•Security & accessibility
•Design & creation
•Acrobat best practice
•Future of PDF
Each week the OurDocuments.gov 
site features three so-called “Milestone 
Documents,” important historical records 
intended to help users “relive defining 
moments in our history.” Featured this 
week, for example, are the following: 
• President Andrew Jackson’s Message to 
Congress ‘On Indian Removal’ (1830) 
• Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848) 
• Compromise of 1850 
A thumbnail preview image and a brief 
description of each document is provided, 
along with a detailed citation that refer-
ences the source of the information. The 
particular document and the historical 
incident and/or issue it represents can be 
further explored by following the provided 
links, offering the following options: 
• Learn More About this Document: 
Background on the particular historical 
topic 
• View Larger Images of this Document: 
Zoom in and view larger images 
• Read the Transcript of this Document: 
Easily read all of the text contained 
within the document 
• Download Printer-friendly PDFs: High-
resolution, image-only PDFs (created 
with Adobe Photoshop) formatted to 
print on standard 8-1/2-inch x 11-inch 
paper 
The site features a list of 100 milestone 
documents, compiled by the National 
Archives and Records Administration 
(NARA), and which cover American history 
from 1776 (Declaration of Independence) 
to 1965 (Voting Rights Act). According to 
the site ... 
“The remaining milestone documents 
are among the thousands of public laws, 
Supreme Court decisions, inaugural 
speeches, treaties, constitutional 
amendments, and other documents that 
have influenced the course of U.S. history. 
They have helped shape the national 
character, and they reflect our diversity, our 
unity, and our commitment as a nation to 
continue our work toward forming ‘a more 
perfect union.’”
The site emphasizes the educational use 
of these historic documents, and features 
appropriate resources designed to help 
teachers integrate them into classroom 
projects and offering relevant educational 
competitions for students. The site links to 
NARA’s “Digital Classroom” project and 
to the National History Day site. Available 
for download is a large, suitable-for-
printing “Our Documents” poster, and an 
information kit, both in PDF.
ADVERTISEMENT
�������������������������������������
������������������������������������
�����������������������������������
����������������������������
�����������������������������
������������������������
������������������������
�����������������������������
����
�������
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "PNG" in "Output
convert pdf to jpg for; convert online pdf to jpg
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
RasterEdge .NET Imaging PDF Converter makes it non-professional end users to convert PDF and PDF/A documents commonly in daily life (like tiff, jpg, png, bitmap
changing pdf to jpg; convert pdf to gif or jpg
Copyright © 1997-2003 BinaryThing Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved | www.planetpdf.com | Planet PDF - a World of Adobe Acrobat and PDF Resources. 
Prev
CHAPTER INDEX
Home
Next
PAGE  46  of  71
•Contents
•Ten years of PDF
•Masters of PDF
•Security & accessibility
•Design & creation
•Acrobat best practice
•Future of PDF
ACROBAT 
BEST PRACTICE
PDF BEST PRACTICES #6: 
HELPING READER ORIENTATION
Location pinpointers can keep users from 
being ‘lost in Hyperspace’ 
By Shlomo Perets of MicroType
When viewing PDF files, readers often 
move between different parts of the same 
PDF document or between different 
documents, following links, bookmarks or 
Find/Search functions. 
Providing information on the current 
document and on the location within the 
document helps to reduce reader disori-
entation and facilitates efficient access to 
information.
This can be accomplished through a com-
bination of items discussed in this article, 
including the following: 
• Document-Level Orientation: 
Document-Level Orientation: including 
a document title, metadata, using an 
appropriate opening state and cross-file 
bookmarks. 
• Topic- and Page-Level Orientation: 
improving pagination to create easier-
to-read page units; identifying the 
current page, topic or location through 
running headers, page labels or topic-
specific bookmarks. 
• Library-Level Orientation: showing 
the relation of the current PDF to 
other PDFs in the sa me document set 
through roadmaps or cross-file book-
marks. 
Advanced interactive items and graphic 
aids can provide additional help where 
applicable. All of these techniques help to 
prevent the “lost in hyperspace” problem, 
improving the reading experience and 
making it less demanding. 
Document-Level Orientation
TITLE
A descriptive document title is very helpful, 
and can be displayed in the title bar at all 
times (enclosed in square brackets). Having 
a unique, meaningful title is also important 
when using the Search function. Title and 
other metadata fields are also used by web 
search engines; guidelines should be set for 
these accordingly. The title may be spoken 
by text-to-speech engines (or screen 
readers). 
When converting a book to a single PDF, 
the title will typically be the book title. 
Converting a book to separate, cross-
linked PDFs (one for each chapter) enables 
more precision, as each chapter can have a 
specific title. 
Following are some guidelines for docu-
ment titles: 
• The title identifies the document, and 
should be consistent with the document 
content/purpose. 
• When converting a book to separate 
PDFs, titles may be identical to the 
chapter titles, or they may also include 
the book/collection name in short form 
(making it easier to identify items when 
the Search Results list includes multiple 
hits). 
• Avoid standard opening phrases; a 
unique beginning will make the titles 
easier to identify when titles are listed 
together in the Search Results list. 
• Titles must be unambiguous and 
meaningful out of context. Note that 
Copyright © 1997-2003 BinaryThing Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved | www.planetpdf.com | Planet PDF - a World of Adobe Acrobat and PDF Resources. 
Prev
CHAPTER INDEX
Home
Next
PAGE  47  of  71
•Contents
•Ten years of PDF
•Masters of PDF
•Security & accessibility
•Design & creation
•Acrobat best practice
•Future of PDF
when a PDF is viewed through a web 
browser plug-in, its title is not displayed 
in the browser’s title bar. A top-level 
bookmark can be used to fill this gap; 
bookmarks for main chapters/sections 
should be nested under this bookmark, 
initially expanded. 
To set the document title: 
In Acrobat 5: File > Document 
Properties, Summary. 
In Acrobat 4: File > Document Info > 
General. 
The shortcut for this in both versions is 
Control+D. 
If supported with your authoring applica-
tion, it is better to specify the title in the 
source file (such as Word or FrameMaker), 
and have it carried over to the PDF auto-
matically. 
To display the title in the title bar: 
Acrobat 4: File > Document Info > Open 
Info, and specify “Resize Window To Initial 
Page”. 
Acrobat 5: File > Document Properties 
> Open Options, Window Options. 
• If the PDF files are to be displayed in 
Acrobat/Reader 5, activate the “Display 
Document Title” setting. 
• IF the PDF files may also be displayed 
in earlier releases of Acrobat/Reader, 
activate the “Resize Window to Initial 
Page” - this will have a resizing effect 
as well as displaying the title in the title 
bar. 
Additional Fields: In addition to Title, 
Acrobat’s standard metadata fields include 
the Subject, Author and Keywords fields 
(blank unless populated). 
ADVERTISEMENT
PDFSearch
SplitPro
PDFTools
FDFImport
PDFStamper
SoftwareforcompletePDFmanagement.
ARTSPDFSearch
ARTSSplitPro
ARTSPDFTools
ARTSFDFImport ARTSPDFStamper
Copyright © 1997-2003 BinaryThing Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved | www.planetpdf.com | Planet PDF - a World of Adobe Acrobat and PDF Resources. 
Prev
CHAPTER INDEX
Home
Next
PAGE  48  of  71
•Contents
•Ten years of PDF
•Masters of PDF
•Security & accessibility
•Design & creation
•Acrobat best practice
•Future of PDF
Even though these were primarily intended 
to be used by Acrobat Search (and are 
also used by some web search engines), 
they may be useful for your readers. The 
Document Summary is easily accessible in 
Acrobat/Reader 4 and 5 through a button 
above the vertical scrolling bar (also avail-
able when PDFs are displayed in a web 
browser). Establish guidelines relevant to 
your types of documents and apply consist-
ently. 
OPENING STATE
• The default opening page and zoom 
of your PDF should display enough 
information to indicate at a glance what 
the document is about. 
• Initial display of the PDF should gener-
ally include bookmarks. In some graph-
ics-intensive PDFs, thumbnails may be 
preferable as the default opening mode. 
• Depending on page design and content, 
a default zoom level may be useful, such 
as Fit Page, Fit Width or 100%. 
• In some cases, especially when the 
same source is used for print and 
viewing, the first page of the document 
is not necessarily the best place for the 
PDF to open at. For instance, opening 
directly at the table of contents may be 
more helpful than front-matter items 
(that are required when the document 
is printed, but typically have to be 
skipped when opening the PDF). 
• If magnification and page layout are 
specified to be “Default,” settings 
specified in local preferences are used. 
These are effective in the specific 
computer only and can be set through 
Edit > Preferences > General, Display 
tab (in Acrobat 4: File > Preferences); 
Default Page Layout and Default Zoom. 
Topic and Page Level Orientation
HEADINGS
Headings, in styles corresponding to the 
hierarchy of topics, significantly help the 
fast scanning of pages when looking for 
information. To be effective, they must be 
distinct from the body of the text in terms 
of font and size, and have additional space 
above and below. 
TOPIC-SPECIFIC BOOKMARKS
Bookmarks are very important in enabling 
the user to visualize document structure, 
and were discussed in depth in a previous 
PDF Best Practices column. Bookmarks 
also indicate the currently viewed section 
in the document (in Acrobat 5 with an 
emphasized page-like icon for and in 
Acrobat 4, a bold bookmark). For this 
feature to be effective, bookmarks for 
main sections should be initially expanded; 
if all major sections are collapsed under 
a top-level bookmark (as is the case with 
Acrobat 5 Help PDF, under “Contents”), 
Copyright © 1997-2003 BinaryThing Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved | www.planetpdf.com | Planet PDF - a World of Adobe Acrobat and PDF Resources. 
Prev
CHAPTER INDEX
Home
Next
PAGE  49  of  71
•Contents
•Ten years of PDF
•Masters of PDF
•Security & accessibility
•Design & creation
•Acrobat best practice
•Future of PDF
only that bookmark is initially emphasized, 
rendering this feature useless. 
PAGE HEADERS
Page headers are very useful as a way to 
keep readers informed as to where they 
are. Even if the document title is set to 
show the specific chapter, readers benefit 
from a running header listing the specific 
topic being discussed in the current page, 
especially in reference-type PDFs, where 
links are frequently activated. This running 
header could list the text of lower-level 
headings, or be a dictionary-style, “from-
to” header. Footers are less efficient for 
on-screen orientation than headers, so 
topic-specific information should be placed 
in headers, while the document name can 
be placed in the footer. 
In documents optimized for on-screen 
reading, unless the anticipated primary use 
is through a web browser, it is possible 
to add printable information that is not 
displayed on-screen using form fields (for 
instance, so that the document title is 
printed in the header). 
SINGLE-SIDED PAGINATION
On-screen, readers typically view one page 
at a time. Critical information must there-
fore appear on every page in a consistent 
location. Single-sided pagination where 
there is no difference between the location 
of header information (including page num-
bers) on left and right pages is preferable. 
Blank left pages at the end of a chapter, 
forcing the next chapter to start on a right 
page, may be required in a print-optimized 
PDF, but cause a disturbance on-screen.
Double-sided pagination is important only 
when the primary anticipated use of the 
PDF is printing on a duplex printer, so that 
the headers and page numbers appear on 
the outer edge of the page, and the first 
page of a new chapter is on the right.
PAGE LABELS
Page labels are useful when trying to access 
a specific page by its printed page number, 
and they are important when there are 
discrepancies between the printed page 
number and the sequential page number 
used in Acrobat to access pages or display 
page number. Page labels are especially 
important in the case of chapter number-
ing (e.g. 3-1,3-2,3-3), as no fixed offset 
between the printed and sequential page 
number could be deduced here, and when 
having to access a specific page in the PDF 
by its print-related number, one has to 
resort to trial and error.
Page labels, when specified, are displayed 
(Acrobat 4 or higher) in the status bar (in 
front of the page number), when dragging 
the vertical scrolling bar, and when thumb-
nails are displayed. Go To Page and Print 
dialog boxes support page labels. 
Page labels can be defined automatically by 
the authoring application, through add-ons, 
or manually in Acrobat (Document > 
Number Pages). 
PAGE BREAKS
When content is displayed in HTML 
browsers, there are no pages and the 
screen is a continuous scroll, from start to 
ADVERTISEMENT
Copyright © 1997-2003 BinaryThing Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved | www.planetpdf.com | Planet PDF - a World of Adobe Acrobat and PDF Resources. 
Prev
CHAPTER INDEX
Home
Next
PAGE  50  of  71
•Contents
•Ten years of PDF
•Masters of PDF
•Security & accessibility
•Design & creation
•Acrobat best practice
•Future of PDF
end. In PDFs, however, there are inevitably 
page breaks (unless content is arranged in 
a set of inter-linked single-page files, not 
exceeding the maximum PDF page height 
of 200 inches). 
Awkward page breaks make reading more 
difficult. The way content is split between 
pages may force readers to take extra 
steps to identify the topic being discussed. 
Meaningful page breaks, on the other 
hand, make the text easier to understand 
and follow, and support fast and efficient 
browsing.
Guidelines for page breaks in PDFs are not 
different in principle from those for printed 
publications. But with PDFs designed with 
the screen as the primary destination you 
may even have more flexibility since trying 
to condense content on fewer pages due 
to printing costs is not an issue. In fact, 
generous white space is beneficial in PDFs, 
especially as on-screen pages are usually 
perceived as being more crowded than 
they actually are. 
Ideally, each page should be a separate, 
easy-to-understand entity; don’t be 
concerned if you have pages that are only 
“half-full.” Having separate pages for dispa-
rate topics also improves the performance 
of Reflow, Find and Search functions (all of 
which do not work across page bounda-
ries). Likewise, when individual pages 
are printed on demand or if structured 
bookmarks are used to print a topic, the 
results are more meaningful if pages do not 
start with “leftovers” from previous topics, 
that run out-of-context.
To minimize the negative impact of page 
breaks, follow these guidelines: 
• Headings that start a new topic and 
fall towards the end of the page (even 
when there are a few lines of text on 
that topic on the same page) should be 
moved to the following page. 
• Headings of all levels should always be 
tied to the following paragraph. 
• If you can fit an entire topic a single 
page, do it, even if this means editing 
text or graphics to squeeze it in. And 
if this means that there is extra white 
space on the previous page, consider 
your user who is gaining both a bonus 
“breathing” of white space and more 
efficient organization of the topics at 
hand. 
• When you have bulleted or numbered 
lists (which are generally very helpful 
on-screen), the introductory paragraph 
should be on view with at least one or 
two of the items, even if the list is long 
and splits between pages. 
• Short code fragments should never be 
split between pages. 
• A series of short items that work as a 
group should not be split. 
• If the document has very long para-
graphs, consider splitting these into 
shorter paragraphs. 
Appropriate line breaks or word breaks 
may also improve reading: 
• Tightly-related words should be kept 
together on the same line - such as 
values and measurement units, or units 
followed by a number (e.g. “Figure 
14”). 
• Hyphenation should be used minimally 
(except in narrow table columns), as it 
disrupts reading. 
• The varying spaces between words 
when text is aligned on both sides of 
the page may also disturb reading; use 
left-aligned paragraphs instead. 
TABLES
Technical reference literature often in-
cludes tables, sometimes complex or multi-
page. Following are a few guidelines which 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested