mvc display pdf from byte array : Convert .pdf to .jpg online software application dll windows azure asp.net web forms filefolderbridge0-part1353

Designing and Building 
File-Folder Bridges
A Problem-Based Introduction to Engineering
Stephen J. Ressler, P.E., Ph.D.
United States Military Academy
Convert .pdf to .jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
conversion of pdf to jpg; convert pdf document to jpg
Convert .pdf to .jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
batch convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg format
Product of the U.S. Government
Graphic Design and Layout by Creative Graphics, Goshen, NY 10924
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert pdf image to jpg online; pdf to jpg converter
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert multi page pdf to single jpg; convert pdf file to jpg
Sponsored by the
www.asce.org
Sponsorship does not imply endorsement by the United States Military Academy or the Department of Defense.
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
convert pdf to high quality jpg; changing pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
convert pdf file into jpg format; changing pdf to jpg file
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
bulk pdf to jpg converter online; convert multiple pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
best convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg on
Every bridge begins in the mind of an engineer.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Jpeg, VB.NET compress PDF, VB.NET print PDF, VB.NET merge PDF files, VB.NET view PDF online, VB.NET Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf file into jpg format
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
best way to convert pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg
Contents
Preface: 
For the Teacher.....................................................................................v 
Learning Activity #1: 
Build a Model of a Truss Bridge.......................................................1-1 
Learning Activity #2:
Test the Strength of Structural Members.......................................2-1 
Learning Activity #3:
Analyze and Evaluate a Truss............................................................3-1 
Learning Activity #4:
Design a Truss Bridge with a Computer.........................................4-1 
Learning Activity #5:
Design and Build a Model Truss Bridge.........................................5-1 
Appendix A:
A Gallery of Truss Bridges................................................................A-1 
Appendix B:
A Gallery of Structural Analysis Results........................................B-1 
Appendix C:
Building the Testing Machine..........................................................C-1 
Appendix D:
Glossary..............................................................................................D-1 
About Bridge-Building Projects
A few years ago, I worked with a group of our undergraduate engineering students to run a popsicle stick 
bridge-building contest for 11
th
and 12
th
graders from several local schools.  Our purpose was to introduce the 
high school students to engineering and to stimulate their interest in engineering careers.  We also hoped to 
motivate them to work hard in their math and science courses—to acquire the background necessary to study 
engineering at the college level.  
The format of our contest was typical of the bridge-building projects that have become so popular in 
secondary school science and technology programs in recent years.  We organized the students into teams, and 
each team received a pile of popsicle sticks and a hot glue gun.  Within a specified period of time, each team 
built a model bridge to span a specified distance.  At the end of the construction period, we placed each bridge 
into a hydraulic testing machine and loaded it to failure, to determine its strength.  The bridge with the highest 
strength-to-weight ratio was declared the winner, and the students who created the winning structure received 
a nice trophy.   
By all accounts, the event was a great success.  A large number of students from several different high 
schools participated, and the inter-school rivalry helped to generate the sort of excitement I normally associate 
with a championship basketball game.  The students certainly enjoyed themselves, and their teachers praised 
both the content and organization of the contest.  Based on the unanimously positive feedback, we concluded 
that we had accomplished our goal.  We had indeed introduced participants to the exciting, creative world of 
engineering.
Only after the event was over did I begin to question the value of our bridge-building contest.  What had 
the students actually learned about engineering from the contest?  After much soul-searching, I had to admit 
that the answer was “not much.”  Based on what our student participants actually did in the contest, they could 
only have learned three things:
Engineers build bridges.
Engineers test structures by loading them to failure.
Engineers design bridges for maximum strength-to weight ratio.
v
Unfortunately, all three of these notions are quite wrong; yet they are perpetuated by virtually every model 
bridge-building project I have ever seen.
The essence of engineering is design.  Engineering design entails the application of math, science, and 
technology to create something that meets a human need.  The engineering design process is, at the same time, 
both systematic and creative.  And the engineering design process is always iterative:  engineers must explore 
many different alternatives before they can hope to achieve an optimum solution.  These are the essential 
characteristics of engineering; yet our bridge-building contest communicated none of these characteristics to 
the student participants.  
Our students never actually designed their bridges.  Some simply glued popsicle sticks together without 
forethought.  Others drew sketches before they started building, but their sketches were based on nothing 
more than vague ideas of what a bridge should look like.   We gave participants no basis to decide what 
might make a bridge design effective or efficient.
Our students did not apply math or science, nor did we show them any evidence that math and science 
could have been used to design their bridges more effectively.   
Our students never experienced the iterative nature of design.  They built a bridge and broke it—precisely 
one iteration.  They had no opportunity to assess how well the design worked, make appropriate modifica-
tions, and test the validity of those modifications in subsequent design iterations.
We gave our students a totally unrealistic standard for success—maximum strength-to-weight ratio, deter-
mined by testing the structure to failure.  Engineers design actual structures to stand up, not to fail.  Actual 
structures are generally designed to carry a specified loading safely, at minimum cost.  Actual structures are 
never designed for maximum strength-to-weight ratio.  If they were, then a 10-ton bridge that can safely 
carry a 10-ton load would be just as good as a 50-ton bridge that can carry a 50-ton load.  But these two 
bridges are not equally safe.  If you don’t believe me, try driving a 20-ton truck across each one.
At the end of the day, our bridge-building contest provided little or no opportunity for students to learn 
what engineering is or what engineers do.  However, it did have one positive impact: it convinced me that there 
must be a better way.
About the West Point Bridge Designer
I developed the West Point Bridge Designer software in direct response to the inherent limitations of the 
traditional model bridge-building project.   When a student uses the Bridge Designer, he or she designs a real 
bridge, not a model.  The design uses real structural materials, not Popsicle sticks, balsa wood, or pasta.  The 
“simulated load test” is based on a realistic truck loading and actual principles of structural mechanics.  More 
important, the basic design paradigm is realistic.  With the West Point Bridge Designer, a bridge must be 
designed to carry a fixed, code-specified loading safely and at minimum cost.  No more maximum strength-
to-weight ratio!  And the computer simulation provides a reasonably accurate representation of the iterative 
nature of design.  The student is free to explore a nearly limitless range of alternative designs and to observe the 
cause-effect relationships between design changes and subsequent structural performance. A student who 
designs a bridge with this software experiences a reasonably authentic simulation of the engineering design 
process.
Since I first made the West Point Bridge Designer available on the worldwide web three years ago, the 
response from teachers, students, and engineering practitioners has been overwhelmingly positive and enor-
mously valuable.  Many teachers, in particular, have provided insightful suggestion for making the Bridge 
Designer a more valuable educational tool.  I have incorporated these recommendations into subsequent 
software releases whenever it was feasible to do so.  
It is important for me to acknowledge up front that the West Point Bridge Designer also has some serious 
limitations as an educational tool.  It can easily contribute to an unhealthy reliance on the computer as the 
unquestioned source of the Right Answer.  In a sense, it is a “black box”—a computer tool that students can use 
vi
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested