mvc display pdf from byte array : Best pdf to jpg converter for software Library project winforms .net asp.net UWP filefolderbridge12-part1357

3#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
3-33
10)
Can members with zero force be removed?  Members BI and FM could be removed from our model of the 
Grant Road Bridge with no adverse consequences; however, they could not be safely removed from the actual 
highway bridge.  In the actual bridge, Members BI and FM serve an important structural function—they support 
the floor beams attached to the truss at Joints B and F.  These floor beams help to support the bridge deck and 
transmit vehicular loads from the deck to the main trusses.  Thus, in the actual bridge, Members BI and FM are 
in tension and are essential to the structure’s load-carrying ability.
Member DK could not be safely removed from either the model or the actual bridge.  Without Member DK, 
we would have just one continuous member from Joint J to Joint L—there would be no reason for a joint at K.  
This new member—let’s call it Member JL—would be twice as long as Member JK or Member KL.  As a result, 
Member JL would be much weaker in compression than JK or KL.  (Recall from Learning Activity #2 that com-
pression strength decreases substantially with increasing length.)  To keep Member JL from buckling, a con-
siderably larger tube would be required.  Thus, even though Member DK has no internal force, it effectively 
strengthens the structure by dividing Member JL into two shorter, stronger compression members.
It is also worth noting that, in an actual bridge, the internal force in Member DK would not be zero.  It 
would actually carry part of the self-weight of Members JK and KL, resulting in a small compressive internal 
force.  In our analysis, the internal force in Member DK is zero only because we assumed the self-weight to be 
zero.
11)
Can you analyze a more complex truss?  The Gallery of Structural Analysis Results (Appendix B) provides 
the calculated internal member forces for a wide variety of common truss configurations.  
Best pdf to jpg converter for - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf pages to jpg; change pdf file to jpg
Best pdf to jpg converter for - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
batch pdf to jpg converter online; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf into jpg format; pdf to jpg
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
pdf to jpeg; best pdf to jpg converter
4#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
4-1
#
4
Overview of the Activity
In this learning activity, we will use a specially developed software package called the West Point Bridge 
Designer to design a truss bridge.  We will use the software to create a structural model, then run a simulated 
load test to evaluate the design.  The load test will help us to identify members with inadequate strength.   
We will strengthen these members by increasing their size.  Finally we will optimize the design by minimizing  
its cost. 
Why?
Design is the essence of engineering.  To learn about engineering, you must learn about design.  And the 
only way to fully appreciate the challenges and rewards of design is to do it.  In this learning activity, we will 
design a bridgewith the aid of a computer and some special software.  Then in Learning Activity #5, we will do 
the same sort of design by hand.  
Why use the computer first?  The West Point Bridge Designer software allows you to learn about the design 
process, without having to worry about the mathematical calculations that would normally be required in 
certain phases of the process.  All of the quantities you measured or calculated manually in Learning Activities 
#2 and #3—tensile strength, compressive strength, loads, reactions, and member forces—are computed auto-
matically by the West Point Bridge Designer.  By doing all these computations for you, the software allows you 
to focus on the creative part of the design process—structural modeling—and to explore many more design 
alternatives than you could do otherwise.  Modern computer-aided design software provides essentially the 
same benefits to practicing engineers.  Thus when you use the West Point Bridge Designer you are also learning 
how engineers use the computer as a design tool.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Best PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful .NET WinForms application to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi; convert pdf to high quality jpg
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Best PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET for converting PDF to image in C#.NET Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
convert multiple pdf to jpg; convert pdf pictures to jpg
4-2
Learning Objectives
As a result of this learning activity, you will be able to do the following:
Describe the problem-solving process.
Describe the engineering design process.
Explain how the engineering design process is applied to the design of a highway bridge.
Explain how engineers use computers to enhance the engineering design process.
Design a truss bridge, using the West Point Bridge Designer software.
Key Terms
To successfully complete this learning activity, you must understand the following key terms and concepts 
from previous learning activities:
truss 
deck 
load 
Owner 
member 
floor beam 
internal force 
Design Professional 
top chord 
foundation 
tension 
Constructor 
bottom chord 
abutment 
compression 
plans & specifications 
diagonal 
pier 
strength 
quality control 
vertical 
joint 
failure 
shop drawings 
If you need to refresh your memory on any of these terms, see the Glossary in Appendix D.
Information
Problem-Solving
Engineering design is really just a specialized form of problem-solving.  All engineers are problem-solvers, 
but you certainly don’t need to be an engineer to solve problems effectively.
We are all confronted with problems every day.  Sometimes they are large and complicated, like deciding 
which college to attend or figuring out how to program your VCR.  Other times they are small and simple, like 
deciding which movie to watch tonight.  But no matter what problem you’re facing, you’ll solve it more effec-
tively and more efficiently if you use a methodical process to achieve a solution.  Consider this example: 
A teacher has just received a new set of reference books for his classroom but has no place to put them.   
He asks Rush, one of his students, to put up some bookshelves as a service project.  Rush is in a hurry.  He has 
basketball practice right after class and wants to go to a movie after practice.  He decides to do the bookshelf 
project quickly and with as little effort as possible.  He goes to the local hardware store and buys a four-foot 
length of wooden shelving, two metal shelf brackets, and four small woodscrews.  He returns to the classroom, 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Best and professional C# image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
convert pdf to jpg c#; batch convert pdf to jpg online
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Best WPF PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful PDF converter. PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
change pdf file to jpg file; convert pdf into jpg online
4#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
4-3
drills four holes in the wall, attaches the brackets to the wall with the four screws, and places the shelf on top of 
the bracket.   Then he heads off to basketball practice.  When the teacher returns to the classroom a few min-
utes later, he is pleasantly surprised to find that Rush has already finished the job.  The teacher is immediately 
disappointed, however, when he notices that the shelf is too short.  The reference books require six feet of shelf 
space, not four.  But Rush never bothered to ask how large the shelf needed to be.  Nonetheless, the teacher 
begins placing the books on the shelf.  After only five or six books are in place, the screws suddenly pull out of 
the wall, and the shelf crashes to the floor.
The next day, the teacher asks Anne to do the job.  Anne is also in a hurry, but she realizes that the best way 
to get a job done quickly is to do it right the first time.  Before doing anything, she asks the teacher a series of 
questions. How many books are there?  How much do they weigh?  Where is the best place in the classroom for 
the books to be located?  What color would best match the classroom décor?  With the answers to these ques-
tions, she sits down and sketches three alternative solutions—a single six-foot shelf; two three-foot shelves, one 
above the other; and a simple three-shelf bookcase that would stand on the floor.  She shows the sketches to 
the teacher and explains the advantages and disadvantages of each alternative.  The single six-foot shelf will be 
least expensive but will use a large amount of wall space.  The two-shelf arrangement will use less wall space, 
but the upper shelf will be harder to reach.  The bookcase will be movable, but it will also be most expensive.  
The teacher decides on the two-shelf arrangement.  Anne takes careful measurements and makes a final sketch 
of her design.  She takes the sketch to the hardware store and gets the manager’s recommendation on the 
number and types of brackets and screws required for the job.  Then she brings all of the materials back to the 
classroom, carefully plans how she will assemble the shelves, and starts the job.  She ensures that the mounting 
screws are driven into the wooden wall studs, so they don’t pull out.  Finally, when the job is complete, she 
carefully places all of the reference books on the shelves to ensure that they are strong enough.  She adds a few 
extra books, just to be sure.  Anne gets an A for the project.  More important, she gets the satisfaction of know-
ing that she did the job well and, in the process, made a positive contribution to her class.
Obviously, Anne’s solution to the bookshelf problem is a lot more effective than Rush’s.  Anne succeeds 
because she follows a methodical problem-solving process, consisting of the following seven steps:
1) Identify the problem – The teacher asks Anne to put up a new bookshelf.
2) Define the problem – Anne asks questions until she understands exactly what the teacher wants.
3) Develop alternative solutions – She sketches three different bookshelf configurations.
4) Analyze and compare alternative solutions – She determines the advantages and disadvantages of  
each configuration.
5) Select the best alternative – She presents her three alternatives to the teacher, and the teacher chooses  
the one that best meets his needs.
6) Implement the solution – Anne makes a final sketch, buys the necessary materials, obtains the advice of  
an expert, plans the job, and puts up the shelves.
7) Evaluate the results – Anne loads the bookshelves to ensure that they are strong enough.
Rush’s problem-solving process can be summed up in three words: Just do it!  This approach might work for 
selling sneakers but usually doesn’t work very well for solving problems—especially large, complicated ones.  
Rush fails because he tries to solve a problem he doesn’t really understand; he doesn’t consider a range of 
alternative solutions; he doesn’t acquire the necessary technical expertise to do the job; and he doesn’t develop 
a plan before starting to work.  In Rush’s case, the consequences of the failure aren’t too severe—a few holes in 
the wall and some wasted lumber.  But what if Rush had been a structural engineer and the bookshelf had been 
a bridge?  Then the consequences of his haphazard problem-solving process could have been tragic.
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Best and professional image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
bulk pdf to jpg converter; convert from pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Best adobe PDF to image converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap
batch pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi
4-4
If Rush ever has to put up another set of bookshelves, he probably won’t make the same mistakes as he did 
on his first attempt.  But what if he needs to change the oil in his dad’s car or build a deck or apply to college?  
Will he make the same sorts of careless errors every time he is confronted with a new and unfamiliar problem?  
He won’t, if he learns that the problem-solving process can be applied to any kind of problem and can sub-
stantially improve his chances of achieving a successful solution on the first try.  
The Engineering Design Process
Engineering design is a specialized form of problem-solving—the application of math and science to create 
something that meets a human need.  What are the “human needs” that engineers fulfill?  The products of 
engineering are all around us.  Every building, every bridge, every highway, every car, every airplane, every 
electrical appliance, and every computer you have ever used was designed by a team of engineers.   The many 
forms of technology that form the fabric of modern civilization are all products of engineering.
Yet engineering design is much more than just math, science, and technology.  It is also a creative pro-
cess—one requiring the ability to conceive of problem solutions that no one has previously imagined.  Theo-
dore von Kármán, an eminent scientist and engineer, expressed this sentiment perfectly when he said, “The 
scientist describes what is; the engineer creates what never was.”
1
Some of the finest examples of creative engineering design are the world’s great suspension bridges.  With 
their graceful cables, monumental towers, and grand scale, these structures are both beautiful and awe-inspir-
ing.  Many have become symbols of the cities in 
which they reside.  Can you even imagine San 
Francisco’s Golden Gate without the Golden Gate 
Bridge; or New York City’s East River without the 
Brooklyn Bridge?  Yet there was, in fact, a time when 
each of these great bridges existed only in the mind 
of an engineer.  Indeed, the real creativity in the 
design of the Brooklyn Bridge lies not in its physical 
appearance, but in the ability of its designer, John 
Roebling, to envision this spectacular structure, 
even though nothing like it had ever been 
attempted before.
How does a great bridge come to be?  How is 
the engineer’s dream translated into a steel and 
concrete structure carrying tens of thousands of 
vehicles per day?  The answer lies in the engineering 
design process—a systematic approach that engi-
neers use to create technological solutions to 
problems.
As it is depicted here, the engineering design process consists of nine distinct phases, grouped into three 
major stages—project planning, design, and construction and operation.  This diagram is intended to illustrate 
the process in a general way.  It applies equally well to the design of a skyscraper, a car, or a stereo system.  But 
to see what actually happens in each phase, let’s apply this process to a specific example—the planning, design, 
and construction of a major highway bridge.
THE NEED
Needs Analysis
Development of Conceptual Alternatives
Selection of the Preferred Alternative
Preliminary Subsystem Selection
Detailed Subsystem Analysis
Detailed Subsystem Design
Procurement
Construction
Operation and Maintenance
Project
Planning
Stage
Design
Stage
Construction
and
Operation
Stage
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
THE NEED
Needs Analysis
Development of Conceptual Alternatives
Selection of the Preferred Alternative
Preliminary Subsystem Selection
Detailed Subsystem Analysis
Detailed Subsystem Design
Procurement
Construction
Operation and Maintenance
Project
Planning
Stage
Design
Stage
Construction
and
Operation
Stage
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
1
Quoted in A. L. Mackay, Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (London: Adam Hilger), 1991.
4#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
4-5
Bridge Design
The Project Planning Stage
Let’s imagine that a state Department of Transportation (DOT) decides to route a new highway across a 
major river.  The DOT has initiated the engineering design process by identifying a need for a new highway 
bridge.  To meet this need, the department hires an engineering firm to design the structure.  The DOT is acting 
as the Owner for the project.  The Design Professional is a senior structural engineer from the engineering 
firm—a woman named Anne, who first became interested in engineering when her high-school teacher asked 
her to put up a set of bookshelves in the classroom many years ago.  Anne assembles the Design Team, whose 
members include structural, transportation, geotechnical, hydraulic, and environmental engineers from the 
firm, as well as other technical specialists hired as consultants for this particular project.
The project planning stage begins with a needs analysis (Phase 1 on the diagram on the previous page), in 
which the Design Team and the Owner work together to define the project requirements and constraints as 
fully as possible.  The needs analysis includes a determination of:
the proposed location of the bridge, 
the amount of vehicle traffic it can be expected to carry, 
the number of traffic lanes required, 
aesthetic requirements for the completed structure, 
the laws and regulations that will affect the design, and 
the project budget.  
As part of the needs analysis, the Design Team also conducts a thorough site investigation, aimed at deter-
mining such factors as:
the width and depth of the river,
the potential for ice buildup in winter,
the height and slopes of the river banks,
the type of soil and the  depth to good foundation material—like strong rock,
the conditions at the proposed location of the approaches—the roadways leading up to the ends of the 
bridge,
the amount of boat traffic in the river, 
the required width and height of the navigation channel in the river, and 
the potential environmental impact of the structure.
Once the needs analysis is complete, the development of conceptual alternatives (Phase 2) begins.  During 
this phase, the Design Team develops a range of distinctly different alternative bridge types and configurations.  
These alternatives are analyzed and compared, with the ultimate objective of selecting the bridge type that is 
best suited to the needs of the Owner and the characteristics of the site.  
4-6
The development of conceptual alternatives is heavily influenced by the needs analysis.  For example:
If the river is very deep at the crossing point, it will be difficult and expensive to build piers in the water.  In 
this case, a long-span structure with fewer piers is called for.  
Even if it is feasible to put piers in the river, their locations may be dictated by government regulations 
governing the width of the navigation channel for boats.  
Such constraints on the locations of the piers 
will often determine the required span length 
of the bridge.  And the required span length 
often has a major influence on which bridge 
configuration is most economical.  (See the 
sidebar at right.)
The height and steepness of the riverbanks can 
also influence the selection of the bridge type.  
High, steep banks might favor the use of an arch 
bridge.  Low-lying banks might require the 
construction of ramps on either end of the 
bridge, in order to raise the structure to an 
adequate height over the water.  But the fea-
sibility of building long ramps will depend on 
how much development—buildings, streets, 
factories, and so forth—exists along the shore-
line at the proposed bridge location.
Often the Owner will want the bridge to cost as 
little as possible.  Even if minimizing cost is not 
an objective, however, keeping the construction 
cost within the project budget is essential.  Thus 
the financial constraints identified during the 
needs analysis are critical to the development of 
conceptual alternatives.
Sometimes the Owner places a high value on 
aesthetics and is willing to pay extra for a 
visually appealing structure.  This might be the 
case, for example, if the bridge is to be located 
in a downtown waterfront area, where improv-
ing residents’ quality of life and promoting 
tourism would be important design require-
ments.
Sometimes aesthetic considerations will require 
the use of a certain bridge type, even if it is not 
as efficient or economical as other alternatives.  
For example, sometimes an older bridge 
becomes functionally inadequate (even if it is 
still structurally safe) because its roadway does 
not have enough lanes to handle modern traffic 
demands.   In such cases, a new bridge is often 
built immediately adjacent to the older one, so 
that each bridge carries several lanes of traffic.  
When a new bridge is built adjacent to an older 
one, the new one is often designed to look identical to the older one—even if a different configuration 
might be more efficient.
On an Actual Bridge Project 
Which bridge type is most economical?
Different types of structures tend to be most 
economical for different span lengths.  For very 
long spans of 3,000 feet or more, suspension 
bridges are generally used.  For spans of 1,500 to 
3,000 feet, cable-stayed bridges are becoming 
increasingly popular.  Various types of arch 
bridges and cantilever trusses are often most 
economical for spans in the range of 1,000 to 
2,000 feet, while beam bridges and truss bridges 
are most common for spans under 1,000 feet.  
For excellent descriptions of these bridge types 
and how they work, see David Macaulay’s 
beautifully illustrated book Building Big 
(Houghton Mifflin, 2000).
Suspension Bridge
Cable-Stayed Bridge
Cantilever Truss Bridge
Arch Bridge
Tied Arch Bridge
Truss Bridge
Beam Bridge
Suspension Bridge
Suspension Bridge
Cable-Stayed Bridge
Cable-Stayed Bridge
Cantilever Truss Bridge
Cantilever Truss Bridge
Arch Bridge
Tied Arch Bridge
Arch Bridge
Tied Arch Bridge
Truss Bridge
Beam Bridge
Truss Bridge
Beam Bridge
4#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
4-7
These examples demonstrate that developing conceptual alternatives to meet a particular set of project 
requirements is not an easy task.  During this phase, the Design Team doesn’t have the time or resources to do 
detailed design work.  Conceptual alternatives are only developed in enough detail (1) to ensure that the 
completed structure will meet the Owner’s needs and (2) to perform a reasonably accurate cost estimate.  In this 
phase, the designer’s experience may be more important than any other factor in determining which project 
alternatives are feasible and which are not.
At the conclusion of this phase, the Design Team often produces a report called a type study.  The type 
study describes the alternative bridge configurations that were considered by the designers.  It explains the 
advantages and disadvantages of each and provides the Design Professional’s recommended alternative.  This 
recommendation is based on thorough consideration of many criteria, including:
How well the design satisfies the Owner’s requirements,
construction cost,
constructability,
expected duration of the construction project,
environmental impact,
community impact,
requirements for obtaining land and legal rights-of-way,
traffic safety, and
aesthetics.
The type study is presented to the Owner, who may accept the designer’s recommendation or opt for one of 
the other alternative configurations.  The Owner’s selection of a preferred alternative (Phase 3) is the final phase 
of the Project Planning Stage.  The product of this phase—the selected alternative—is called the conceptual 
design.
In our example project, the width of the river at the proposed bridge site is 2000 feet.  The river is quite 
deep, so all piers and abutments must be placed on the shore.  The riverbanks are low and flat.  Based on these 
considerations and the Owner’s requirements, the Design Team develops three alternative bridge configu-
rations—a truss, a tied arch, and a cable-stayed bridge.  Each will have a main span of 2000 feet, and each will 
carry six lanes of traffic.  The Design Team’s preliminary cost analysis indicates that the cable-stayed bridge will 
be least expensive.  The Owner has also expressed a preference for the appearance of the cable-stayed struc-
ture.  In considering the other selection criteria, the designers find that none of the three conceptual alterna-
tives has a clear advantage.  Thus the Design Professional’s type study recommends the cable-stayed bridge, and 
the Owner accepts her recommendation.
The Design Stage
With the conceptual design complete, the Design Stage begins.  A major highway bridge is an enormously 
complex system.  The Design Team deals with this complexity by breaking the large system into a series of 
smaller, simpler components or subsystems.  For our cable-stayed bridge, these subsystems might include the 
towers, the foundations, the deck, the main beams supporting the deck, the cables, the highway approaches, 
the electrical lighting system, the toll plaza, and the landscaping of the site—to name only a few.  Responsibility 
for each subsystem is assigned to technical specialists with expertise in that area.  For example, structural 
engineers will work on the towers, deck, beams, and other structural elements; geotechnical engineers will 
have responsibility for the foundations; transportation engineers will be assigned to handle the highway 
approaches and the geometric layout of the toll plaza.  
4-8
On an Actual Bridge Project 
Spread footings or piles?
The purpose of a foundation is to distribute the 
weight of a structure (and all the loads acting on 
it) to the soil on which the structure rests.  
Without a well-designed foundation, the 
structure will settle excessively and might even 
collapse.  
The type of foundation used for a particular 
structure depends primarily on the quality of 
the soil below the surface of the ground.  If 
there is good firm soil or solid rock relatively 
close to the surface, the geotechnical engineer 
will typically choose a spread footing—a flat 
slab of concrete placed directly on the firm soil 
or rock.  However, if the soil near the surface is 
soft, the bridge will probably need to be sup-
ported on piles—long steel or concrete shafts 
that are driven down through the soft soil layers 
and into firm soil or rock below
Spread 
Footing
Firm Soil
Soft Soil
Pier or 
Abutment
Spread 
Footing
Firm Soil
Soft Soil
Pier or 
Abutment
Pier or 
Abutment
Pier or 
Abutment
Pile
Firm Soil
Soft Soil
Pile Cap
Pier or 
Abutment
Pile
Firm Soil
Soft Soil
Pile Cap
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested