4#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
4-9
Throughout the Design Stage, analysis-design cycles are conducted for each of the bridge subsystems.  
Because most of these subsystems are interconnected, changes in one often affect the design of others.  For 
example, as the structural engineer’s estimate of the weight of the towers changes, the geotechnical engineer 
will need to modify the design of the tower foundations accordingly.  Even though the Design Team members 
are all working on different parts of the project, they must work closely together to ensure that their subsystem 
designs are well integrated.
As the upward arrows on the design process diagram suggest, iterations can occur at any 
phase of the design process, not just between Phases 5 and 6.  During the development of con-
ceptual alternatives, the Design Team may identify shortcomings in the needs analysis that must 
be rectified.  When presented with the completed type study, the Owner may decide that none of 
the conceptual alternatives are acceptable and send the designers back to drawing board to 
develop new ideas.  Sometimes, analysis reveals that a previously selected subsystem won’t work 
or that an alternative subsystem will work more efficiently.  In each of these situations, the engi-
neering design process takes one or more steps backward, then resumes with a new design requirement, a new 
alternative, or a new subsystem.  But these apparent setbacks should not be regarded as failures.  They are 
inevitable and, indeed, they are desirable, because they often result in a better solution to the problem at hand.
As the Design Stage progresses, the Owner often uses formal design reviews to monitor the conduct of the 
design process.  Through this management technique, the Owner ensures that the design is progressing on 
schedule and the project requirements are being addressed. To conduct a design review, the Owner requires 
the Design Professional to submit a complete draft of the design—drawings, reports, and draft specifica-
tions—at certain specified levels of completion.  For example, the Owner might require design submittals when 
the work is 30%, 60% and 90% complete.  The Owner—in this case, the Department of Transportation—reviews 
each submittal and provides written comments back to the Design Professional.  Members of the Design Team 
are expected to address each of these comments in subsequent design submittals, to ensure that the DOT is 
100% satisfied with the completed design.  The Design Stage concludes with the delivery of a complete set of 
plans and specifications to the Owner.  
The Construction and Operation Stage
During this final stage of the engineering design process, the Owner selects a Constructor, the Constructor 
builds the bridge, and the completed structure is placed into service.  The procurement phase (Phase 7) begins 
with the selection of a Constructor.  In the United States, this selection is normally done by competitive bid-
ding—a process called design-bid-build project delivery.  Design-bid-build project delivery generally works like 
this:
The Owner advertises the project through public notices and ads in industry publications.
Construction contractors obtain copies of the plans, specifications, and other bidding documents from the 
Owner.
Construction contractors prepare and submit their bids.  A bid is the contractor’s estimate of how much it 
will cost to construct the bridge.  In submitting a bid, the contractor is saying, “I can build this structure for x 
dollars.”  To ensure the fairness of the process, bids are always submitted in sealed envelopes.
On a designated day, the Owner conducts a bid opening.  In a public meeting, all bids are opened and read 
aloud.  Each bid is checked to ensure that it includes all required information and that the bid amount is not 
unreasonably low.  A bid that meets these conditions is called responsive and responsible.
The Owner awards the construction contract to the lowest responsive, responsible bidder.  This contractor 
becomes the Constructor for the project.
It is important to note that design-bid-build is not the only form of project delivery available to Owners. An 
alternative called design-build project delivery is becoming increasingly popular in the U.S. and is, in fact, the 
norm outside of the U.S.  Design-build project delivery is described in Learning Activity #5.
.Pdf to .jpg converter online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf document to jpg; convert pdf file into jpg
.Pdf to .jpg converter online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf image to jpg image; changing pdf to jpg
4-10
Once the contract is awarded, the Owner issues a notice to proceed—an official authorization to start work 
on the project.  But even after the notice is issued, the Constructor has a lot of things to do before construction 
can actually begin.  These include hiring sub-contractors, preparing a construction plan and a project schedule, 
setting up the construction site, establishing jobsite safety and quality control procedures, ordering materials, 
and preparing shop drawings.
Once construction (Phase 8) actually gets underway, the contractor builds the bridge—much as you did in 
Learning Activity #1—along with all associated highways and facilities.  The overall objective of the construction 
phase is to complete the project on time, within the Owner’s budget, and to the level of quality required by the 
plans and specifications.  The Design Team typically has only minimal involvement in this phase.  The design 
engineers usually review the Constructor’s shop drawings and are often called upon to respond to the Con-
structor’s requests for information, as unforeseen circumstances are encountered on the construction site.
Finally, after many months of design and construction, it is Opening Day for the new bridge.  A brass band 
plays, and the Commissioner of Transportation makes an inspirational speech.  The Governor cuts the ribbon, 
and a wave of traffic surges forward across the span.  The crowd cheers.  The bridge is complete, and every 
member of the Project Team takes a moment to revel in their accomplishment.  But only a moment!  Back at the 
office, a new project—a new challenge and a new opportunity to serve society—is waiting.
Ideally, the nine-phase engineering design process concludes with many years of conscientious operation 
and maintenance (Phase 9) by the Department of Transportation.  Trained technicians carefully inspect the 
entire structure every two or three years, looking for signs of deterioration and identifying needed repairs.  
Maintenance crews regularly clean the storm drains and expansion joints, repaint weathered steel, and repair 
cracked asphalt.  As a result of this modest investment in routine maintenance and repair, the bridge might 
serve its purpose safely and effectively for a century or more.  Ultimately, of course, the structure will become 
obsolete, or the cost of maintaining it will exceed the cost of building a new bridge.  At this point, there is a 
need for a replacement bridge, and the design process begins all over again with Phase 1.
Unfortunately, bridges are often not effectively maintained.  Sometimes bridges are placed into service then 
simply forgotten.  More often, state and local governments have well-designed inspection and maintenance 
programs in place but don’t receive enough funding to perform needed repairs.  But trying to save money by 
cutting back on bridge maintenance is “penny wise and pound foolish.”  Bridges that are not maintained dete-
riorate rapidly, resulting in the need for expensive rehabilitation or replacement projects.  Such projects ulti-
mately cost far more than routine maintenance programs, especially considering the hidden costs associated 
with closing down major highways for months at a time, while bridges are rehabilitated or replaced.
Computer-Aided Design
Few things have revolutionized the engineering design process more that the widespread availability of 
computers and various forms of computer-aided design (CAD) software.  CAD software provides designers with 
incredibly powerful tools for drawing, modeling, analyzing, and evaluating engineered systems.  Specifically, 
modern computer-aided design programs enhance the design of bridges in the following ways:
Using CAD software, an engineer can create accurate two-dimensional and three-dimensional drawings of a 
bridge.  As the design evolves, CAD drawings can be easily updated.  Hand-drawn plans must be redone 
from scratch every time the design changes.  
CAD provides the capability to accurately visualize a completed structure, long before the first shovel of soil 
is turned or the first batch of concrete is poured.  Thus CAD can be used effectively in the development of 
conceptual alternatives (Phase 2) and in the presentation of alternatives to the Owner (Phase 3).
Some CAD software provides the capability to create a highly accurate structural model, then analyze the 
structure to determine its internal forces, then automatically select steel or concrete members strong 
enough to carry these forces.   As such, CAD can substantially increase the efficiency of Phases 5 and 6 in 
the design process.  By expediting the analysis-design cycle, CAD makes it possible for the engineer to 
explore a wider variety of design alternatives and thus achieve greater efficiency and lower cost.
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert multi page pdf to single jpg; convert pdf file to jpg format
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
reader pdf to jpeg; c# pdf to jpg
4#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
4-11
Because computer-generated designs can be saved in electronic form, CAD gives teams of engineers 
unprecedented capability to share design information via computer networks and the Internet.  This capa-
bility allows the members of the Design Team to coordinate their efforts across the office or across the 
globe.
With their ease of use, realistic graphics, and incredible computational capability, CAD programs sometimes 
make us think that human engineers have become obsolete.  But nothing could be farther from the truth!  Like 
the electronic calculator and the slide rule before it, like the T-square and the draftsman’s scale, CAD software is 
only a tool.  Like any tool, it can improve human efficiency, but it can never substitute for human creativity and 
good judgment.  And like any tool, CAD can be misused.  Some aspects of structural modeling and design 
simply cannot be automated.  They require in-depth understanding of engineering principles, an appreciation 
for constructability, and good old-fashioned common sense.  Designers who use CAD software as a “black 
box”—a problem-solving tool whose inner workings they do not fully understand—are toying with disaster, 
because they have no basis for assessing whether or not the computer’s answers make sense.  More than one 
experienced engineer has said, “Never use the computer for a task that you can’t already do by hand.”
The West Point Bridge Designer
The West Point Bridge Designer is a computer-aided design program developed to introduce you to the 
engineering design process and to demonstrate how engineers use the computer as a problem-solving tool.  
The software will enable you to create a structural model of a truss, then run a simulated load test to determine 
if the structure can safely carry its applied loads—its own self-weight and the weight of a standard highway truck 
loading.  In effect, the West Point Bridge Designer does automatically what we did manually in Learning Activity 
#3.  The only difference is that the projects provided in the West Point Bridge Designer are full-sized bridges 
made of steel, while the project provided in Learning Activity #3 is a model bridge made of cardboard.
The West Point Bridge Designer attempts to mimic the “look and feel” of an industry-standard CAD pro-
gram, but with a simpler user interface that allows fewer opportunities for errors.  Ease of use is achieved 
primarily by using seven built-in design projects.  Once you have selected a project, the software automatically 
establishes the scale of the drawing, the bridge supports, and the drawing grid.  You can begin creating your 
structural model immediately, using a few simple drawing and editing tools.  With a standard CAD program, you 
would have to define the scale, supports, and grid by yourself, and you would be confronted by an overwhelm-
ing array of drawing and editing tools.  The very characteristics that make standard CAD software so powerful 
and flexible also make it seem complex and intimidating to new users.  
The Bridge Designer helps prevent errors by allowing you to place joints only at pre-defined grid points, by 
requiring you to draw members from joint to joint, by allowing member properties to be selected from drop-
down lists, and by providing truss templates to guide your creation of a stable structural model.
The most important feature of the West Point Bridge Designer is its simulated load test.  Once you have 
created a complete, stable structural model, you can run the load test with the click of a single button.  When 
you initiate the load test, the software will perform the following actions behind the scenes:
Create supports at the appropriate locations in your structural model.
Calculate the weight of all members, and apply these forces to the structure as loads.
Calculate the weight of the concrete bridge deck, asphalt road surface, and floor beams, then apply the 
corresponding loads to the structure.
Apply a standard AASHTO H20-44 truck loading to the structure at multiple 
positions, representing the movement of the truck across the bridge.  
AASHTO is the American Association of State Highway and Transportation 
Officials, an organization that develops design codes and specifications for 
highway bridges in the United States.  The H20-44 truck is a vehicle with two 
axles spaced 4.0 meters apart.  The front axle weighs 35 kilonewtons (kN), and 
the rear axle weighs 145 kilonewtons (kN).  These axle weights are further 
increased by a dynamic load allowance of 33%, to account for the effects of 
the moving load.  This means that a moving truck causes about 33% higher 
internal forces in the truss members than a stationary truck would cause.
35 kN
145 kN
35 kN
145 kN
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Converter; String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
reader convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg batch
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. using RasterEdge.XDoc.Converter; String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.dcm"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert dicom to
convert multipage pdf to jpg; advanced pdf to jpg converter
4-12
Check the structural model for stability.  If the structural model is unstable, the West Point Bridge Designer 
will stop the load test, inform you of the problem, and provide some suggestions for fixing it.
Perform a structural analysis, considering the combined effects of the bridge self-weight and truck loading.  
For each truck position, the software calculates the displacement of each joint and the member force for 
each member in the structural model.
For each member, compare the calculated member forces for all truck positions, and determine the abso-
lute maximum tension force and the absolute maximum compression force.  These are the critical forces 
that determine whether a given member is safe or unsafe.
Calculate the tensile strength and compressive strength of each member, using standard AASHTO strength 
equations.
For each member, compare the absolute maximum tension force with the tensile strength, and compare the 
absolute maximum compression force with the compressive strength.  If the force exceeds the strength in 
either case, the member is unsafe; if not, the member is safe.
Display the load test animation. 
The results of the load test are provided in a variety of different forms, both numerical and graphical.  As 
you will see in this learning activity, the load test results will help you to strengthen any unsafe members and to 
optimize your design to minimize its cost.
Q
Q
1
What portion of the engineering design process does 
WPBD address?
When you use the West Point Bridge Designer to 
design a truss, what phases of the nine-phase 
engineering design process are you doing?
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
Features and Benefits. Powerful image converter to convert images of JPG Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after
best pdf to jpg converter online; change pdf to jpg image
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
An advanced PDF converter tool, which supports to be integrated in .NET to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
.pdf to jpg converter online; change file from pdf to jpg
4#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
4-13
The Learning Activity
The Problem
The Need
With the success of the Grant Road Bridge project, the Town Engineer of Hauptville has decided to replace 
several other obsolete bridges in the town.  The first of these is an old concrete beam bridge that carries Lee 
Road over Union Creek, a short distance from the Grant Road Bridge.  The old bridge will be demolished and 
replaced with a more modern structure.  The Town Engineer is very satisfied with the work done by Thayer 
Associates on the Grant Road Bridge, so he hires this firm to design the new Lee Road Bridge as well.
Design Requirements
The Hauptville Town Engineer works closely with civil engineers from Thayer Associates to develop the 
following design requirements for the bridge:
The new bridge will be constructed on the abutments from the old structure.  These existing supports are 
24 meters apart.  
The bridge must carry two lanes of traffic.
The bridge must meet the structural safety requirements of the AASHTO bridge design code. 
For consistency with the nearby Grant Road Bridge, the new structure should be a truss.  It is not necessary 
for it to be a Pratt Through Truss, however.
The bridge will be made of steel.
Because of the limited project budget, it is essential that the new bridge cost as little as possible.
Your Job
You are a structural engineer employed by Thayer Associates.  You are assigned to design the main trusses 
for the Lee Road Bridge.  Your responsibility is to design trusses that are safe, that satisfy all of the other design 
requirements, and that cost as little as possible. 
The Solution
The Plan
Our plan to design the Lee Road Bridge is depicted in the flowchart on the following page.  Each rectangle 
in the chart represents one step in the design process.  The arrows indicate the order in which the steps 
should be performed.  The diamonds represent decision points.  When you reach one of these, your next step 
will depend on the answer to the question.
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Features and Benefits. High speed JPEG to GIF Converter, faster than other JPG Converters; Standalone software, so the user who is not online still can use
change pdf to jpg on; reader convert pdf to jpg
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage. .NET converter control for
convert pdf to jpg for online; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
4-14
Record Your Design
yes
yes
no
Select a
Design Project
Decide on a 
Truss Configuration
Draw Joints
Draw Members
Load Test
Your Design
Strengthen
Unsafe Members
Are
Any Members
Unsafe
?
Are the
Member Selections
Optimum
?
Optimize Selection
of Members
yes
no
Optimize the
Shape of the Truss
no
Is the
Shape
Optimum
?
Try  a New Truss
Configuration
Is the
Configuration
Optimum
?
no
Choose the Optimum Design
Start
Record Your Design
yes
yes
no
Select a
Design Project
Decide on a 
Truss Configuration
Draw Joints
Draw Members
Load Test
Your Design
Strengthen
Unsafe Members
Are
Any Members
Unsafe
?
Are the
Member Selections
Optimum
?
Optimize Selection
of Members
yes
no
Optimize the
Shape of the Truss
no
Is the
Shape
Optimum
?
Try  a New Truss
Configuration
Is the
Configuration
Optimum
?
no
Choose the Optimum Design
Start
yes
4#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
4-15
Start the West Point Bridge Designer
To run the West Point Bridge Designer, click the Windows Start button, then select Programs, then West 
Point Bridge Designer, and finally WPBD4.exe.  Read the Tip of the Day, then click the OK button to close it.  At 
this point, you’ll see the Welcome screen.  Ensure that the Create a New Bridge Design option is selected, and 
click OK.
Select a Design Project
The Drawing Board Setup Wizard is now displayed, and you are prompted to select a design project.  The 
Lee Road Bridge has a span of 24 meters, so select the Single Span Truss (24 meters) option, and click the Next 
button.
4-16
Decide on a Truss Configuration
The West Point Bridge Designer will allow you to create virtually any truss configuration (including statically 
indeterminate ones), as long as the resulting structural model is stable.  But determining whether or not a 
configuration is stable can sometimes be tricky.  Until you’ve gained some experience, it’s best to start with a 
simple, standard configuration—like the Pratt, Howe, or Warren truss.  The West Point Bridge Designer provides 
templates for a variety of different standard truss configurations.  If you use a template, the locations of all joints 
and members for the standard truss you selected will be displayed with light gray lines on the Drawing Board.
The Drawing Board Setup Wizard now prompts you to select a template.  Choose the Pratt Through Truss, 
and click Next.  
Now enter your name in the Designed By box and, if you like, add a Project ID.  The Project ID is a name or 
number you assign to your design for future reference.  If you are planning to try a variety of different design 
alternatives, the Project ID is a good way to keep track of them.  Both your name and the Project ID will appear 
in the Title Block on the Drawing Board and are also included on the hard-copy printout of your design.
4#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
4-17
The Drawing Board already shows those portions of the bridge that you will not be designing—the abut-
ments, the floor beams, the concrete deck, and the road surface.  Note also that the first seven joints in the 
structural model have been created automatically.  They are located at the points where the floor beams are 
attached to the main truss.  Since the positions of the floor beams are fixed, these seven joints cannot be moved 
or deleted.  The Drawing Board also displays the configuration of a Pratt Through Truss, marked with light gray 
lines.  This is the template you selected earlier.
Note that the Design Tools palette has four available tools—the 
Joint Tool, the Member Tool, the Select Tool, and the Eraser Tool.  The 
Joint Tool should already be selected.
Click Next, then Finish.  The Drawing Board Setup Wizard disappears, revealing the Bridge Design Win-
dow—the graphical environment in which you will create, test, and optimize your design.  The Bridge Design 
Window includes the following major elements:
Menu bar and Toolbars – Commands for creating, modifying, testing, recording, and reporting a bridge 
design.
Drawing Board – The portion of the screen on which you will draw joints and members to create a structural 
model.
Design Tools palette – Special toolbar containing tools that are used to create and modify a structural model 
on the Drawing Board.
Rulers – Guides that show the vertical and horizontal dimensions of the structural model.
Title Block – Portion of the Drawing Board displaying the designer’s name and Project ID.
Member List – List of all members in the current structural model, normally hidden on the right-hand side of 
the Drawing Board. (The Member List can be displayed by dragging it to the left with your mouse).
4-18
TIP
The red cross-hairs allow you to position joints accurately, using the Rulers 
along the bottom and left side of the Drawing Board.
Draw Joints
With the Drawing Board setup completed, we can begin creating our structural model by drawing joints and 
members.  We’ll begin with the joints.  The Drawing Board Setup Wizard has already created the first seven 
joints automatically.  You must create five more—the five joints that lie along the top chord of the truss.  The 
light gray circles in the template show where to put them.  
To draw a joint, use your mouse to position the red cross-hairs at the desired location, then click the left 
mouse button.  Repeat this process for all five joints.
When you’re done, the structural model should look like this:
TIP
If you make a mistake while creating or modifying your structural model, just 
click the 
Undo button
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested