4#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
4-29
TIP
To move a joint in your structural model, first choose the Select Tool from 
the Design Tools palette.  Then move the mouse pointer over the joint you 
want to move. Press the left mouse button and, while holding it down, drag 
the joint to its new location.  When you release the mouse button, the joint and all 
attached members will be re-drawn in the new location. 
One way to optimize the shape of the structural model is to vary its height.   
The existing truss (A) has a height of 5 meters.  We might try increasing the 
height, say to 6 or 7 meters (B), or we might reduce the height to 3 or 4 meters 
(C).  In either case, you can make the change simply by dragging the five top-
chord joints up or down.  The basic Pratt truss configuration is not changed.  
Once you have adjusted the height of the truss, you’ll need to evaluate and 
optimize the new configuration—run the load test; identify and strengthen all 
unsafe members; and optimize the member properties.  Only then can you 
determine whether or not the change was effective in reducing the cost of your 
design.
Q
Q
5
How would the cost of the design change if we change the height of the truss?
If we increase the height of the truss, do you think the cost of the 
design will increase or decrease?  What if we decrease the height?  
Explain your answer.  
Another way to optimize the structural model is to change its overall shape.   
For example, we might change the basic Pratt Through Truss (A) to a Parker Truss 
(B), by giving the top chord a more rounded shape.  Once again, you can make 
this change simply by dragging the top-chord joints up or down.  Often this 
minor adjustment can reduce the cost of a design significantly.  The Gallery of 
Truss Bridges (Appendix A) shows a number of actual truss bridges that use this 
rounded configuration—an indication that it might provide some added struc-
tural efficiency.  
Pdf to jpg converter - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
change pdf to jpg online; change pdf to jpg format
Pdf to jpg converter - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change pdf file to jpg file; pdf to jpg
4-30
Let’s give it a try.  Starting with the current $2297.62 Pratt Through Truss design, change it to a Parker 
Through Truss by (1) moving the center top-chord joint up 1.5 meters and (2) moving the two adjacent joints up 
1.0 meter.   The resulting truss is 6.5 meters high, as shown below:
This structure still passes the load test, but the increased member lengths cause the cost to increase to 
$2366.04.  Increasing the height of a truss generally causes the member forces in the top and bottom chords to 
decrease.  Thus we would expect to be able to reduce the sizes of these members.  And indeed we can.  The top 
chord—Members 7 through 10—can be reduced from 180mm to 160mm.  The bottom chord members 3 and 4 
can be reduced from 45mm solid bars to 40mm, and the diagonals 18 and 21 can be reduced to 35mm.  Unfor-
tunately, these changes only bring the total cost down to $2315.00—higher than the basic Pratt Through Truss we 
started with.  
One problem with our Parker Truss is that the two end posts—Members 11 and 12—still require the use of 
180mm tubes.  When we reduced the size of the top chord members from 180mm to 160mm tubes, we added an 
additional product to the design.  The added $100 product cost was greater than the material cost reduction we 
gained from using smaller members.  We could make a substantial reduction in the total cost, if we could figure 
out a way to use 160mm tubes for the end posts.  And we can!  Recall that the strength of a member in compres-
sion is strongly influenced by its length.  Compressive strength decreases sharply with increasing length.  Thus 
if we can make the end posts shorter, we can use a smaller tube size to carry the same internal force.  We can 
make the end posts shorter by breaking them in half—by adding a new joint in the middle of each one—then 
adding a new member to preserve the stability of the structural model.  The result is shown below.
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
change pdf into jpg; change from pdf to jpg
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
changing pdf to jpg; .net pdf to jpg
4#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
4-31
To achieve this new configuration, you’ll need to:
Delete Members 11 and 12.  To do this, select the two members, then click the Delete button on the 
toolbar.
Select the Joint Tool from the Design Tools palette, and draw the two new joints—at a vertical position of 
2.5 meters and horizontal positions of 2.0 meters and 22.0 meters.
Select the Member Tool from the Design Tools palette.  Change the default values in the Member Proper-
ties Lists to Carbon Steel, Hollow Tube, and 160mm.  Then draw the four new end post members. Finally, 
change the default values in the Member Properties Lists to Quenched & Tempered Steel, Solid Bar, and 35mm, 
and draw the two new diagonals.
This optimized Parker Through Truss has a total cost of $2226.28.
Try a New Configuration
Recognizing that we were able to make a modest improvement in the cost of our structural model just by 
changing its shape, it is clear that we might do even better by starting with an entirely different truss configura-
tion.  The more configurations we explore, the more likely we will find one that is even more efficient than our 
current design.
Let’s try the standard Warren Deck Truss configuration.  If you follow the template provided by the West 
Point Bridge Designer, your initial structural model will look like this:
If you optimize the member properties for this truss (following the same procedure we used for the Pratt 
Through Truss above), the lowest total cost you will be able to achieve is about $2460.
Q
Q
6
Can you optimize member properties for a truss?
Starting with the standard Warren Deck Truss configuration shown 
above, optimize the member properties—material, cross-section, 
and size—such that the total cost of the design is less than $2500.   
Do not change the shape of the truss.     
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Converter; String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
convert pdf to jpeg on; convert pdf to jpg file
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. using RasterEdge.XDoc.Converter; String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.dcm"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert dicom to
change pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg
4-32
Q
Q
7
Can you optimize the shape of a truss?
Starting with the standard Warren Deck Truss configuration, can you 
modify the shape, such that the total cost of the optimized design is 
less than $2200?      
At $2460, the standard Warren Deck Truss is significantly more expensive than the Parker Through Truss we 
designed earlier.  However, if we change its shape, it is possible to get the cost of the truss under $2180. 
Choose the Optimum Design
In this learning activity, we have developed the following four major design alternatives:
Of these four alternatives, the modified Warren Deck Truss is clearly the optimum.  Nonetheless, we could 
certainly reduce the cost further, by considering a larger number of alternative configurations.  (Indeed, a 
number of users of the West Point Bridge Designer have created successful designs costing under $1600 for this 
project.)  
On an actual bridge project, however, this degree of optimization would probably be adequate.  It wouldn’t 
make much sense for the structural engineer to spend many additional hours refining the design, just to trim a 
few more dollars off the project cost.  (Don’t forget that the engineer’s time costs money too!)  The engineer’s 
professional responsibility is to consider a sufficient number of alternatives to ensure that the final project cost 
is reasonable.  Pursuit of the absolute lowest possible cost is seldom justified.
It is also important to note that selecting a “best” alternative is usually far more complicated than simply 
picking the design that costs the least.  Cost is certainly important, but other factors like aesthetics, ease of 
construction, availability of materials and labor, type of traffic, soil conditions, environmental impact, and safety 
might be equally important in determining which design alternative actually gets built.  For example, if Union 
Creek were a navigable waterway, a deck truss might not provide enough overhead clearance for vessels travel-
ing under the bridge; thus a through truss might be required even if it is not the most economical configuration.
Type 
Cost 
Standard Pratt Through Truss 
$2297.62 
Parker Through Truss 
$2226.28 
Standard Warren Deck Trus s s 
$2457.67 
Modified
W arren Deck Trus s
$2179.78 
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
Windows 2003 and Windows Vista etc. Features and Benefits. Powerful image converter to convert images of JPG, JPEG formats to PDF files;
changing pdf to jpg file; change file from pdf to jpg on
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
What you need to do is just click the convert button, sort the imported file, and then JPEG to GIF Converter will give you JPG files with high good quality.
batch convert pdf to jpg; pdf to jpeg
4#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
4-33
Record Your Design
At the conclusion of the design process, the Design Team prepares a detailed set of plans and specifi-
cations—drawings and documents that describe every aspect of the project.   These documents are the prin-
cipal means of communicating the design to the Constructor who will actually build the facility.  Designers also 
maintain copies of all the engineering calculations on which the design is based.   All of these documents serve 
as a permanent record of the design, as well as a valuable reference for future projects of a similar nature.
You should document the products of your design work in a similar manner.  The West Point Bridge 
Designer provides three different ways to record your design:
To save your design in a specially formatted file, click the Save button on the main tool bar, enter a file 
name, and click OK.  This bridge design file can be opened and modified later. 
To print a drawing of your design, click the Print button on the main toolbar.  A drawing showing the 
configuration and dimensions of the truss and a table listing the assigned member properties will be 
printed to your default printer.
To print a detailed report of your most recent load test results, click the Report Load Test Results button 
on the main toolbar, then click the Print button at the top of the report window.
Conclusion
In this activity, we learned about engineering design by doing it—by designing an actual truss bridge.  Using 
a specially developed software package, we created a structural model, tested it to ensure that it was strong 
enough to carry its prescribed loading, then optimized it to minimize its cost.  As we used the software, we 
observed that design is always iterative and that design always involves tradeoffs.  We also saw how the com-
puter can be used to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of the design process.  What we didn’t do was to 
actually build and test the bridge we designed.  We’re getting pretty good at engineering and construction, but 
building a 24-meter steel truss bridge is probably still a bit beyond our capability.  In Learning Activity #5, how-
ever, we’ll work through a complete design of a model truss bridge, and we will build and test it.
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Image Converter Pro - JPEG to JBIG2 Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from JBIG2 Images on Windows.
change from pdf to jpg on; batch pdf to jpg converter
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Image Converter Pro - JPEG to DICOM Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from DICOM Images on Windows.
convert pdf to jpg; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
4-34
Answers to the Questions 
1) 
What portion of the engineering design process does WPBD address?  When you use the West Point Bridge 
Designer, you begin with Phase 4 of the engineering design process.  You select one particular subsystem—a 
main truss—for a highway bridge.  Then you proceed with multiple cycles of analysis and design—Phases 5 and 
6—until an optimal design for that particular subsystem is achieved.  It is important to recognize that, on an 
actual bridge project, many other subsystems would have to be designed before the final plans and specifica-
tions could be produced.
2) 
Why are these member selections not symmetrical?  Even though the shape of this truss is perfectly sym-
metrical, the loading is not.  The highway load used in the West Point Bridge Designer load test is a standard 
AASHTO H20-44 truck loading.  The H20-44 has a heavy rear axle and a lighter front axle.  Because the loading is 
not symmetrical, the maximum internal member forces are unequal in symmetrical members, like the two end 
posts.  Since the internal member forces are not symmetrical, the member sizes are not either.  Is this realistic?  
Well, no.  The bridge will only carry load safely when the truck crosses from left to right.  If the truck reversed 
direction (with the light axle on the left and the heavy axle on the right), the structure would fail the load test.  
This is an inaccuracy in the West Point Bridge Designer and one of many reasons why the software should be 
used for educational purposes only!
3) 
Why does Member 11 pass the load test as a 180mm tube?  Early in the optimization process, a 190mm tube 
was required for Member 11.  But at that time, all of the compression members had not yet been changed to 
tubes, and none of the tension members had been optimized.  The optimization of these members caused a 
significant reduction in the weight of the truss itself.  And even though the weight of the truss is quite small in 
comparison with the other loads applied to this structure, the lighter weight of the optimized truss was just 
enough to reduce the internal force in Member 11 slightly below the compressive strength of a 180mm tube.
4) 
Why did high-strength steel produce no benefit for compression 
members? This graph shows the compressive strength vs. length curves 
for two bars that have identical dimensions but are made of two dif-
ferent types of steel.  Note that using a stronger material only improves 
the compressive strength of relatively short members.  The strength of 
the steel has no effect at all on the compressive strength of longer 
members.  
To verify this observation yourself, start up the West Point 
Bridge Designer, and click the Report Member Properties 
button on the toolbar.  You will see a graph of strength vs. length for 
the member size, cross-section, and material currently displayed in the 
Member Properties lists.  Now select a new material from the drop-
down list, and watch how the graph changes.
In our design project, changing the compression members to higher strength steels produced no cost reduc-
tion because these members are all relatively long.  If the change to stronger steel produced any increase in 
member strength, that increase was not enough to offset the increased cost of the stronger steel.
5) 
How would the cost of the design change if we change the height of the truss? This is a trick question.  
There’s no way to answer it without actually changing the height of the truss, optimizing member selections for 
the new configuration, and comparing the new cost with the old one.  At first glance, you might guess that 
reducing the height will cause the cost to decrease.  Reducing the height causes the verticals and diagonals to 
get shorter, and shorter members cost less.  But reducing the height also causes the internal member forces in 
the top and bottom chords to increase.  (See Trusses 1 through 4 in the Gallery of Structural Analysis Results, 
Appendix B.)  To pass the load test, you’ll need to increase the size of these members, which will add to the total 
cost.  So decreasing the height of the truss causes two competing effects—one that tends to decrease the cost 
and one that tends to increase it.  You’ll see these same competing effects in reverse, if you increase the height 
of the truss.  As the truss gets higher, the internal member forces in the top and bottom chords get smaller, and 
you can reduce their cost by using smaller members.  But increasing the height also makes the verticals and 
diagonals longer, which makes them more expensive. Clearly there is a trade-off between (1) the member force 
in the top and bottom chords and (2) the length of the verticals and diagonals.  Every truss has an optimum 
height, which represents the best compromise between these two competing effects.  The best way to find the 
optimum height for your design is through trial and error.  
Length
Compressive Strength
High-Strength Steel
Carbon Steel
4#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
4-35
Design almost always involves these sorts of tradeoffs.  It is a rare case indeed when a design change has only 
positive consequences.  More often than not, design changes result in some positive and some negative con-
sequences.  The engineer’s challenge is to figure our when the positives outweigh the negatives.  
6) 
Can you optimize member properties for a truss?  By following a methodical procedure to optimize the 
selection of members for the standard Warren deck truss, you should be able to achieve the following result.  
Material 
Sec. 
Size
Material 
Sec. 
Size
Material 
Sec. 
Size
Carbon Steel 
Tube 
120
Q&T Steel Bar 
55
17 
Carbon Steel Tube 120
HS Steel 
Tube 
150
10 
Q&T Steel Bar 
55
18 
Carbon Steel Tube 120
HS Steel 
Tube 
170
11 
Q&T Steel Bar 
40
19 
Carbon Steel Tube 120
HS Steel 
Tube 
170
12 
Q&T Steel Bar 
55
20 
Carbon Steel Tube 120
HS Steel 
Tube 
150
13 
Q&T Steel Bar 
40
21 
HS Steel 
Tube 150
Carbon Steel 
Tube 
120
14 
HS Steel Tube 150
22 
Q&T Steel 
Bar 
40
Q&T Steel 
Bar 
40
15 
Q&T Steel Bar 
40
23 
HS Steel 
Tube 150
Q&T Steel 
Bar 
55
16 
HS Steel Tube 150
The total cost of this truss is $2,457.67. 
(mm)
(mm)
(mm)
The total cost of this truss is $2,457.67.
7)
Can you optimize the shape of a truss?  The picture below shows one of many possible ways to reduce the 
cost of the design by changing its shape.  The six bottom-chord joints have been moved vertically to increase 
the height of the truss and to give the bottom chord a more rounded shape.  By methodically optimizing the 
member properties for this new configuration, the total cost can be reduced to $2179.78. 
Material 
Sec. 
Size
(mm)
Material 
Sec. 
Size 
Material 
Sec. 
Size 
(mm)
Carbon Steel 
Tube 
130
Q&T Steel Bar 
45
17 
Carbon Steel Tube 130
Carbon Steel 
Tube 
160
10 
Q&T Steel Bar 
45
18 
Carbon Steel Tube 130
Carbon Steel 
Tube 
160
11 
Q&T Steel Bar 
45
19 
Carbon Steel Tube 130
Carbon Steel 
Tube 
160
12 
Q&T Steel Bar 
45
20 
Carbon Steel Tube 130
Carbon Steel 
Tube 
160
13 
Q&T Steel Bar 
45
21 
Carbon Steel Tube 130
Carbon Steel 
Tube 
130
14 
Carbon Steel l Tube 130
22 
Carbon Steel Tube 130
Q&T Steel 
Bar 
45
15 
Carbon Steel l Tube 130
23 
Carbon Steel Tube 130
Q&T Steel 
Bar 
45
16 
Carbon Steel l Tube 130
(mm)
4-36
Some Ideas for Enhancing This Learning Activity
The West Point Bridge Designer has proved to be very popular with students, no doubt because it resem-
bles a video game in some ways.  Graphical creation of the structural model, the load test animation, and the 
use of a single easily understood measure of performance all contribute to this resemblance.  Like a video 
game, the Bridge Designer lends itself well to competition.  Students generally enjoy competing against  
each other and against the “best scores” posted the West Point Bridge Designer web page  
(http://bridgecontest.usma.edu).  
This resemblance to a video game has both positive and negative implications.  Students who get engaged 
in “playing the game” often discover important principles of structural engineering in the process.  It is virtually 
impossible to develop a highly optimal design purely by chance.  The student must work through many design 
iterations, and each new iteration must be informed by careful observations of cause and effect. When I made 
the member shorter, how did its compressive strength change?  When I changed the height of the truss, how did 
the internal member forces change?  The answers to these sorts of questions will inevitably lead to important 
insights about structural engineering.  Shorter members are stronger in compression.  Increasing the height of 
the truss causes the internal forces to decrease in the top and bottom chords
Nonetheless, using the West Point Bridge Designer as a video game has some obvious dangers.  Students 
who get totally absorbed in “the game” may lose sight of the all-important connection between the simulation 
and the real-world structure it represents.  Students might also develop mistaken impressions of how the 
engineering design process works on a real project.  Design is usually not performed in a competitive mode, 
and a practicing structural engineer would almost certainly not do hundreds of design iterations just for the 
sake of shaving a few dollars off of the construction cost.
With these positives and negatives in mind, the teacher might enhance the use of the West Point Bridge 
Designer as a classroom activity in the following ways:
Select one of the seven projects in the West Point Bridge Designer, and use it as the basis for a design 
competition.  Offer a prize or bonus points for the design with the lowest cost.  Organize the class into 
teams of two or three students, with only one computer per team This organization will encourage stu-
dents to interact with each other and to decide among themselves how each new design iteration should 
proceed.  This interaction will make them more aware of their own decision-making process and will 
enhance their opportunities to discover important insights about structural engineering from each other.
You can eliminate some of the unhealthy aspects of competition by setting absolute standards of per-
formance, instead of a relative one.  For example, instead of giving a reward to the best design in the class (a 
relative standard), you might offer a 5% bonus to all designs under $2500, a 10% bonus to all designs under 
$2250, and a 20% bonus to all designs under $2000.  This format is still competitive, but students compete 
against a fixed set of standards, rather than against each other.  This format tends to be particularly effective 
for less gifted students, who might give up more readily when in direct competition with their peers.  In a 
sense, this format is also more realistic, because most actual projects have a fixed project budget—an 
absolute standard—that the designer must satisfy.
Rather than holding a competition, have students explore the relative efficiency of various different truss 
configurations.  Divide the class into teams, and assign a different truss configuration to each team.  The 
easiest way to do this is to have each team use one of the standard truss templates provided by the West 
Point Bridge Designer (see page 4-16).  Each team then optimizes the member selections for its assigned 
truss configuration, without changing the shape of the truss At the end of the project, each team reports its 
optimum cost, and these costs are compared to determine which configuration is most economical.  
4#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
4-37
Students can be asked to model and design an actual bridge—preferably one familiar to them.  If there is an 
appropriate truss bridge near the school, the teacher can take photographs of it and provide copies to the 
students.  The students can use the Bridge Designer to model this structure as accurately as possible, then 
test and optimize it.  (Since the West Point Bridge Designer does not allow the user to change the span 
length of a design, students will only be able to model the shape and configuration of the actual bridge, not 
its specific dimensions.)   This sort of project helps to reinforce the connection between the computer 
simulation and the actual structure it represents.  If no appropriate truss bridges are located near the 
school, the teacher can use the ones provided in the Gallery of Truss Bridges (Appendix A). 
No matter how the West Point Bridge Designer is used, students are more likely to learn from the experi-
ence if they are asked to write a reflective essay at the end of the project.  In their essays, they can be asked 
to comment on what they learned about bridges, about how structures carry load, and about the engineer-
ing design process.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested