mvc display pdf from byte array : Change pdf to jpg on control SDK system azure winforms .net console filefolderbridge20-part1366

BAPPENDIX 
Appendix B-7
13. Pratt Deck Truss (Span=6L, Height=0.75L).
14. Pratt Deck Truss (Span=6L, Height=L).
15. Warren Deck Truss (Span=6L, Height=L).
Change pdf to jpg on - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
batch pdf to jpg converter; change pdf to jpg
Change pdf to jpg on - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf file to jpg format; convert pdf pages to jpg
8-Appendix B
16. Warren Deck Truss (Span=6L, Height=1.375L).
17. Warren Deck Truss with Verticals (Span=6L, Height=L).
18. Warren Deck Truss with Verticals (Span=6L, Height=1.375L).
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour.
pdf to jpg converter; changing file from pdf to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Web Security. Your PDF and JPG files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
change from pdf to jpg on; convert pdf to gif or jpg
CAPPENDIX 
Appendix C-1
C
Description
This simple, lever-based testing machine is designed to apply a controlled tension or compression force to a 
cardboard test specimen and measure that force with reasonable accuracy.  Its use is described in Learning 
Activity #2.  Only a moderate level of woodworking skill is required to build it. 
The configuration and component parts of the testing machine are illustrated in the drawing below.  The 
loading armposts, and base are made of wood.  Pine was used on the original device, but any wood will do.  
The posts and base are all connected together with glue and woodscrews, while the loading arm is fastened to 
the posts with only a single steel bolt, which serves as a pivot.  The arm should be free to rotate about the pivot.  
The T-Line and C-Line are vertical marks on the loading arm, indicating the points where the tension and com-
pression specimens will be fastened for testing.  Felt pads are glued to the underside of the loading arm and the 
top side of the base at the C-Line.  These pads will ensure that compression test specimens are uniformly 
loaded.  The temporary support is a wooden post that is used to support the loading arm while a tension speci-
men is being clamped into position.  
Isometric View of the Testing Machine
Pivot
Loading Arm
Notch
Temporary
Support
Base
Post
C-Line
T
-Line
Felt
Pads
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
conversion pdf to jpg; convert pdf photo to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C:\input.tif"; String outputDirectory = @"C:\output\"; // Convert tiff to jpg and show How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C#
changing pdf file to jpg; reader convert pdf to jpg
2-Appendix C
Test specimens will be fastened into the testing machine with two woodworker’s 
clamps.  6” Quick-Grip® clamps are highly recommended.  These clamps are available 
at most hardware stores.  They work well for this project, because they can be put in 
place with one hand, and their rubber pads are very effective in preventing the test 
specimen from slipping.
Balancing the Loading Arm
To get accurate experimental results from the testing machine, the loading arm must be properly balanced.  
The objective of the balancing process is to ensure that the weight of the arm does not place any load on the 
test specimen.  It is best to accomplish this task during construction, before the hole for the pivot is drilled in 
the loading arm.  Here’s how to do it:
Cut the loading arm to size, and cut out the notch at one end.  
Mark the T-Line about 2 centimeters from the end opposite the notch.
Place one Quick-Grip® clamp on the T-Line.  Ensure that the clamp is centered on the line.
Using the ㅄ” bolt that will eventually be used for the pivot, find the point where the arm (with one clamp 
attached) balances perfectly.  See the photo below.
Mark the balance point, and drill a ㅄ” hole for the pivot through the center of the arm at this location.
Measure L
1
, the distance from the T-Line to the pivot hole.  Then measure the same distance on the opposite 
side of the pivot, and mark the location of the C-Line.
Finally measure L
2
, the distance from the pivot to the center of the notch.  Record both L
1
and L
2
for future 
reference.
On the original testing device, L
1
was 25 cm 
and L
2
was 69.5 cm.  However, these dimensions 
could vary substantially, depending on the 
weight of your clamp, the type of wood you are using, and the actual 
dimensions of your loading arm.  
Once the testing machine is assembled, the loading arm should balance perfectly on 
the pivot, with one clamp attached at the T-line.  If not, add weight to one end until it does 
balance.
The drawing below shows the dimensions the testing machine, in inches.  Of all the dimensions provided, 
only the 6-5/16” distance between the loading arm and the base must be exact.  (This is just slightly larger than 
16 centimeters, the length of our longest compression specimens).  All other dimensions can be adapted to the 
sizes of available lumber, storage space requirements, etc.  The dimension L
1
is the distance from the pivot to 
the T-Line and from the pivot to the C-Line.  The dimension L
2
is the distance from the pivot to the center of the 
notch.  These dimensions will be determined during the process of balancing the loading arm, as describ below.
Elevation View of the Testing Machine
L
2
L
1
L
1
6-5/16”
C-Line
T-Line
12”
12”
1”
3/4”
1-1/4”
40”
1”
3/4”
3/4”
4-1/2”
Side Elevation
Front Elevation
ㅄ” Bolt
L
2
L
1
L
1
6-5/16”
C-Line
T-Line
12”
12”
1”
3/4”
1-1/4”
40”
1”
3/4”
3/4”
4-1/2”
3/4”
3/4”
4-1/2”
Side Elevation
Front Elevation
ㅄ” Bolt
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Allow to change converting image with adjusted width & height; Change image resolution Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in
change pdf into jpg; changing pdf to jpg
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
best convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg image
DAPPENDIX 
Appendix D-1
D
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Users may easily change image size, rotate image angle, set image rotation in dpi Covert JPG & JBIG2 image with high-quality; Provide user-friendly interface
convert pdf to jpeg; reader pdf to jpeg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
pdf to jpeg; c# convert pdf to jpg
2-Appendix D
Constraint—A design requirement that limits some aspect 
of the design.  An example of a constraint is a require-
ment for a bridge to be built above some minimum 
specified height, so that boats on the waterway below 
can pass beneath the structure unhindered.
Constructor—One of the four key players in the Project 
Team.  The Constructor is responsible for planning, 
managing, and performing the construction of a facility.
Cross Section—The two-dimensional shape you see when 
you look at the end of a structural member.
Deck—The flat surface that forms the floor of a bridge 
and supports the roadway.  (See diagram on page 1-3.)
Deck Truss—A truss configuration for which the deck is 
located at the level of the top chord.
Deflection—The distance a structure moves when it is 
loaded.
Deformation—A change in the size or shape of a structural 
member that occurs when the member is loaded.
Design—To devise or create something that meets a 
need.
Design Professional—One of the four key players in the 
Project Team. The Design Professional is responsible for 
conceiving, planning, and providing a high-quality 
design solution to the Owner.
Design-Bid-Build Project Delivery—A method of project 
delivery, in which the Constructor is selected by a 
competitive bidding process.   
Design-Build Project Delivery—A method of project deliv-
ery, in which a single firm is responsible for both design 
and construction.
Design Review—A technique used by the Owner to 
monitor the conduct of the design process.  The Design 
Professional submits a complete draft of the design for 
review, at specified levels of completion.
Diagonal—A type of structural member used in a truss.  
(See diagram on page 1-3.)
Ductility—The capacity of a material to undergo very large 
plastic deformation before rupturing.  A ductile material 
provides ample warning of failure.  The opposite of 
ductile is brittle.
Elastic—Behavior characterized by the capability of a 
structural member to return to its original size and shape 
after its load is removed.
Elevation View—A drawing showing an object viewed 
from the side.
End Post—The diagonal member at each end of a 
through truss.  (See diagram on page 1-3.)
Engineering Design—The application of math, science, 
and technology to create something that meets a 
human need.
Equations of Equilibrium—Equations describing the 
condition that the total force acting on an object in 
equilibrium is equal to zero.  
Equilibrium—The condition that occurs when the 
total force acting on an object is zero.  If an object is 
not moving, then it is in equilibrium.  
Factor of Safety—A number representing the margin 
of safety in a structural design.  The factor of safety 
is used to allow for uncertainty in loads, member 
strengths, and structural analysis results.
Failure—The condition that occurs when the internal 
force in a structural member becomes larger than 
the strength of that member.
Floor Beam—A structural member that supports the 
deck of a bridge.  On a truss bridge, floor beams 
also help to connect the two main trusses together.  
(See diagram on page 1-3.)
Free Body Diagram—A sketch of a “body” (a structure 
or a portion of a structure) showing all of the forces 
acting on it.  
Force—A push or a pull applied to an object.  A force 
always has both magnitude and direction.
Foundation—A component of a structure that dis-
tributes the weight of the structure to the soil or 
rock below it.
Fulcrum—The pivot about which a lever rotates.
Functional Requirement—A design requirement that 
describes how the completed structure will do its 
job.  An example of a functional requirement for a 
bridge is the required number of traffic lanes.
Geotechnical Engineer—A civil engineer with special 
expertise in soils and foundations. 
Gusset Plate—A metal plate used to connect struc-
tural members together in a truss.
Gusset Plate Connection—A type of connection that 
uses gusset plates to join two or more members of a 
truss together.
DAPPENDIX 
Appendix D-3
Hip Vertical—The outermost vertical member at each end 
of a Pratt through truss.  The hip vertical carries tension, 
while all of the remaining verticals in a Pratt through 
truss carry compression.  (See diagram on page 1-3.)
Hypotenuse—The longest of the three sides of a right 
triangle.  The hypotenuse is always the side opposite the 
90
o
angle.  
Internal Force—The tension or compression force devel-
oped in a structural member when loads are applied to 
the structure.
Isometric View—A drawing showing a three-dimensional 
view of an object.
Iteration—A cycle of analysis and design, performed as 
part of the engineering design process.
Joint—The point at which two or more members are 
joined together in a structure.
Lateral Bracing—A series of diagonal structural members 
that help a bridge resist lateral loads, like wind.  The 
lateral bracing members and struts also help to prevent 
the top chords of a truss bridge from buckling sideways.  
(See diagram on page 1-3.)
Load—A force applied to a structure.  
Load-Deformation Curve—A graph that shows how a 
member deforms when a load is applied to it.
Lever—A simple machine consisting of a bar or rod that 
rotates on a pivot.
Mechanics of Materials—The scientific study of structural 
members and materials.  
Member—A load-carrying component of a structure.
Notice to Proceed—An official authorization for the 
Constructor to start work on a project.
Optimize—To maximize the efficiency of a design.  Gener-
ally, a structural design is optimized by minimizing its 
cost without compromising its safety.
Owner—One of the four key players in the Project Team.  
The Owner identifies the need for the project, provides 
funding, puts together the Project Team, and establishes 
the project requirements.
Pier—A foundation element that supports a bridge in the 
middle of the gap.
Pile—A component of a structural foundation, consisting 
of a long steel or concrete shaft that is driven downward 
through weak soil into stronger soil or rock.
Pinned Connection—A type of connection that uses a 
single large metal pin to join two or more structural 
members together.  
Plans and Specifications—The products of the design 
process, created by the Design Professional.  Plans 
are drawings, and specifications are highly detailed 
written descriptions of every aspect of the project.
Plastic Deformation—The permanent elongation of a 
material under load.  Plastic deformation occurs 
after a material has yielded.
Pony Truss— A truss configuration for which the 
deck is located at (or slightly above) the level of the 
bottom chord.  A pony truss looks very similar to a 
through truss, except it is not as high and has no 
struts or lateral bracing between the top chords.
Portal Bracing—An assembly of struts and diagonal 
bracing members that connects the end posts of a 
through truss bridge together.  The portal bracing 
prevents the two main trusses from falling over 
sideways.  (See diagram on page 1-3.)
Procurement—A phase of the design process in 
which a Constructor is selected and construction 
materials are purchased for the project.  
Project Manager—One of the four key players in the 
Project Team.  The Project Manager has overall 
responsibility for managing both the design and 
construction of the facility.  The Project Manager 
represents the Owner and looks after the Owner’s 
interests on all aspects of the project, to include 
scheduling, financial management, and construction 
quality.
Project Team—A team of specialists who are brought 
together to design and build a facility.  The principal 
members of the Project Team are the Owner, the 
Design Professional, the Constructor, and the 
Project Manager.
Pythagorean Theorem—A mathematical relationship 
between the lengths of the sides of a right triangle 
and the length of the hypotenuse.   (See page 3-3.)
Quality Control—The process of routinely inspecting 
and testing materials and workmanship on a project 
and taking corrective action when problems are 
found.
Reaction—A force developed at a support, to keep 
the structure in equilibrium.
4-Appendix D
Required Strength—The actual strength a member must 
be, in order to carry load safely.  In structural design, the 
required strength can be calculated by multiplying the 
factor of safety by the internal member force.
Reinforced Concrete—Concrete that has been strength-
ened for structural applications by embedding steel 
reinforcing bars inside it, before the concrete cures.  The 
steel reinforcement compensates for the low tensile 
strength and low ductility of plain concrete.
Right Triangle—A triangle with one of its three angles 
measuring exactly 90 degrees.
Rupture—A failure mode that occurs when a member 
subjected to a tension force physically breaks into two 
pieces.
Schedule—A tabular listing of members, connections, or 
other components of a structural design, normally 
provided as part of the plans and specifications for a 
project.
Shop Drawings—Detailed drawings of every component 
that will be part of a completed structure.  Shop Draw-
ings are normally prepared by the Constructor and 
approved by the Design Professional.   
Sine—A trigonometric function of an angle.  The sine of 
an angle in a right triangle is calculated by dividing the 
length of the opposite side by the length of the hypot-
enuse The sine is abbreviated “sin.”  (See page 3-3.)
Spread Footing—A type of foundation consisting of a flat 
slab of concrete placed directly on firm soil or rock.  
Stable—A rigid structural configuration in which no 
member or members can move or rotate freely.  A 
structure must be stable to carry load.  A truss is gener-
ally stable when it is composed entirely of intercon-
nected triangles.
Statically Determinate—A structural configuration that can 
be analyzed using the equations of equilibrium alone.  
Only statically determinate trusses can be analyzed with 
the Method of Joints.
Statically Indeterminate—A structural configuration that 
cannot be analyzed using the equations of equilibrium 
alone.  Statically indeterminate trusses cannot be ana-
lyzed with the Method of Joints.
Steel Fabricator—A company that specializes in 
prefabricating steel structural members and con-
nections before they are delivered to the construc-
tion site. The steel fabricator cuts all structural 
components to size, drills or punches holes for 
bolts, and bolts or welds some of the components 
together to form subassemblies.  The steel fabrica-
tor is a member of the Construction Team.
Strength—The largest internal force that a structural 
component can experience before it fails.  
Structural Analysis—A mathematical examination of a 
structure to determine its reactions, internal 
member forces, and deflections. 
Structural Engineer—A civil engineer with special 
expertise in structural analysis and design.
Structural Model—A mathematical idealization of a 
structure, including a series of simplifying assump-
tions about the structure’s configuration and 
loading that allow us to predict its behavior math-
ematically.  
Strut—A structural member that connects the two 
main trusses together on a truss bridge.  The struts 
work together with the lateral bracing to resist 
lateral loads, like wind, and to prevent the top 
chords of a truss bridge from buckling sideways.  
(See diagram on page 1-3.)
Subcontractor—A company hired by a construction 
contractor to perform a specialized part of a con-
struction project.
Subsystem—A part of a larger system.  If a truss 
bridge is considered to be a system, then its sub-
systems include the deck, the main trusses, the 
lateral bracing, the foundations, the approaches, 
and others. 
Support—A point at which a structure is physically in 
contact with its surroundings.
Tensile Strength—The maximum tension force a 
member can carry before it fails.  
Tension—An internal force that tends to make a 
structural member longer.
DAPPENDIX 
Appendix D-5
Through Truss—A truss configuration for which the deck 
is located at the level of the bottom chord.  A through 
truss looks very similar to a pony truss, except it is higher 
and has struts and lateral bracing connecting the top 
chords together. 
Trigonometry—The mathematical study of the properties 
of triangles.   
Truss—A structure composed of members connected 
together to form a rigid framework.
Top Chord—A type of structural member used in a truss.  
(See diagram on page 1-3.)
Type Study—A report that describes the alternative 
configurations considered in a bridge design and 
explains the advantages and disadvantages of each one.  
The Design Professional prepares the type study for the 
Owner.
Unstable—A structural configuration that cannot carry 
load because one or more members can move or rotate 
without restraint.  A truss is generally unstable when it is 
not made up entirely of interconnected triangles.
Ultimate Strength—The absolute maximum internal 
force a member can carry in tension before it fails.
Vector—A quantity that has both magnitude and 
direction.
Vertical—A type of structural member used in a 
truss.  (See diagram on page 1-3.)
West Point Bridge Designer—A computer aided design 
program that will introduce you to the engineering 
design process and demonstrate how engineers use 
the computer as a problem-solving tool.  
Yielding—The phenomenon that occurs when a 
ductile material undergoes very large plastic defor-
mations with little change in load.
Yield Point—The point on a load-deformation curve 
at which yielding begins.
Yield Strength—The internal member force at which 
yielding occurs.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested