2#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
2-11
The Problem
The Need
The Town Engineer of Hauptville, New York, has decided to conduct a structural evaluation of the Grant 
Road Bridge, to ensure that it can safely carry the required highway loads.  Before he can begin analyzing the 
structure, he will need to obtain information about the strengths of the various structural members used in the 
main trusses.  He decides to hire a materials testing laboratory to design and conduct an experimental testing 
program to provide the necessary information.
Your Job
Your materials testing company, Universal Structural Materials Assessment, Inc., has been hired by the 
Hauptville Town Engineer to provide experimental data in support of his structural evaluation of the Grant Road 
Bridge.  Your job is to design and conduct a program of experimentation to determine the strengths of all 
structural members used in the main trusses of the bridge.  As a technical specialist, you are responsible for 
providing your client with complete, accurate data and presenting that data in a manner that is both under-
standable and usable.
The Solution
The Plan
Our plan to provide the Hauptville Engineer with the information he needs is as follows:
Familiarize with the testing machine that we will use for our experiments.
Design a testing program.
Make the test specimens.
Conduct tension and compression strength tests.
Analyze and graph the experimental data.
The product of our work will be a series of graphs that the Hauptville Engineer can use as the basis for his 
structural evaluation.
The Testing Machine
Description
This simple lever-based testing machine will allow you to apply a controlled tension or compression force to 
a test specimen and measure that force with reasonable accuracy.  Though you do not need to build the 
machine, you should understand how it works, in order to use it properly and to achieve accurate results.  
The configuration and component parts of the testing machine are illustrated in the drawing below.  The 
loading arm is fastened to the posts with a steel bolt, which serves as a pivot.  The T-Line and C-Line are vertical 
marks on the loading arm, indicating the points where the tension and compression specimens will be fastened 
for testing.  Felt pads are fastened to the underside of the loading arm and the top side of the base at the C-Line.  
These pads will ensure that compression test specimens are uniformly loaded.  The temporary support is a 
wooden post that is used to support the loading arm while a tension specimen is being clamped into position.  
The Learning Activity
Convert from pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
changing pdf file to jpg; advanced pdf to jpg converter
Convert from pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change pdf to jpg image; convert pdf to high quality jpg
2-12
Component parts of the testing machine.
The photo below shows everything you will need to conduct the tensile and compressive strength experiments.  
Pivot
Loading Arm
Notch
Temporary
Support
Base
Post
C-Line
T-Line
Felt
Pads
Pivot
Loading Arm
Notch
Temporary
Support
Base
Post
C-Line
T-Line
Felt
Pads
The testing machine.
Two small clamps 
(6” Quick-Grip® clamps are 
recommended).
One additional clamp to attach 
the machine to a tabletop.
A plastic bucket (with handle).
About 5 kg of sand 
(shown here in a second bucket).
A scoop  (a small gardening 
shovel works well).
A metric scale capable of 
measuring the mass of an object 
accurately, to the nearest gram.  
The scale should have a capacity 
of at least 5000 grams.
A small sheet of 1/16”- 
thick balsa wood.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
changing pdf to jpg on; batch pdf to jpg converter online
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF files to JPG.
bulk pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg batch
2#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
2-13
How the Machine Works
When you test the tensile strength of a cardboard structural member, you will clamp the top of the test 
specimen to the loading arm at the T-Line.  The bottom of the specimen will be clamped to the base.  You will 
hang the plastic bucket from the notch at the end of the loading arm, then slowly fill it with sand until the 
specimen ruptures.  After the failure, you will weigh the bucket and sand, and apply the principle of the lever to 
determine the internal force in the specimen at the instant of failure.  The principle of the lever says that:
In this equation, T is the internal force in the test specimen and W is the weight of the bucket and sand.  
Since L
1
and L
2
can be measured directly from your testing machine, and W is determined experimentally, we can 
solve this equation for the unknown internal force T.  The result is:
The procedure for testing compression members is the same, except that the specimen will be placed at the 
C-Line instead of the T-Line.  When we apply the principle of the lever to find the unknown internal compres-
sion force C in the specimen, we get:
Note that the principle of the lever applies even when both forces are on the same side of the fulcrum.
Design the Testing Program
Now that the testing machine is ready to go, you are probably anxious to start doing some experiments.  But 
before we can start testing, we first need to design the testing program.  The objectives of this planning process 
are to:
Ensure that we get accurate data;
Ensure that we get the right kinds of data to support the projects we will be doing later; and
Ensure that we do not waste time or material by doing unnecessary tests.  
To accomplish these objectives, we must apply some of the observations we made earlier about the tensile 
strength and compressive strength of structural members.  Specifically, we need to look at each of the factors 
on which the tensile and compressive strength depend, and vary these factors systematically in our tests.  As a 
minimum, the range of values for each factor must be adequate to analyze every member in the Grant Road 
Bridge.  
The logical thought process leading to the design of our testing program is as follows:
Tensile strength depends on the cross-sectional area of a member.  Therefore, we must create test speci-
mens with a variety of different cross-sectional areas.  The cross-sectional area of a rectangular member is 
simply its width times its thickness.  Since all of our specimens will have the same thickness (the thickness 
of the cardboard), we need to create test specimens with a variety of different widths.  
Tensile strength does not depend on the length of a member.  Therefore, all of our tension test specimens 
can be the same length.  We will use 20 centimeters, because this length fits the testing machine nicely.  
Tensile strength does not depend on the shape of the cross-section.  Therefore, all of our tension test 
specimens can have the same type of cross-section.  We will use a simple rectangular “bar.”  
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
convert multiple pdf to jpg; change file from pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
reader convert pdf to jpg; convert multipage pdf to jpg
2-14
3 cm
20 cm
3 cm
width
3 cm
20 cm
3 cm
width
Compressive strength depends of the shape and size of the cross-section.  Therefore, we must create 
compression test specimens for each of the different cross-sections we plan to use in our structure.  We will 
test rectangular tubes with the same dimensions as the tubes used in the Grant Road Bridge model.
Compressive strength depends of the length of the member.  Therefore, we must create test specimens 
with the full range of different lengths we plan to use in our structure.  We will use lengths from 5 to 16 
centimeters.
n
Tensile and compressive strength both depend on the material the member is made of.  Therefore, to do a 
truly comprehensive testing program, we would need to create test specimens of various different materi-
als.  Since our projects will all use the same type of cardboard, however, we will only test this one material. 
In designing the testing program, we must also consider the effects of experimental error and the natural 
variability of the properties we are attempting to measure.  There are many possible sources of experimental 
error in our test setup.  (We will discuss them in detail later.)  Some of these can be controlled by conducting 
the tests very carefully; but no matter how careful we are, our experimental data will exhibit some natural 
variability.  For this reason, we should repeat each of our experiments several times and average the results.  
Repeating each experiment several times is especially important for the compression tests, which are inherently 
more variable than the tension tests.
Taking all of these factors into account, our testing program will consist of the following experiments:
Make the Test Specimens
The configuration of a typical tension test specimen is shown below.  The member itself is a strip of card-
board 20 centimeters long, sliced from a file folder just as we did in Learning Activity #1.  Glued onto each end 
of the member is a 3-centimeter square of cardboard, which provides a surface for the clamps to grip when the 
specimen is placed in the testing machine. 
Test 
#
Cross-Section  
Length  Number of  
Specimens
T1 
4 mm-wide bar 
20 cm 
T2 
6 mm-wide bar 
20 cm 
T3 
8 mm-wide bar 
20 cm 
C1 
10 mm x 10 mm tube 
5 cm 
C2 
10 mm x 10 mm tube 
10 cm 
C3 
10 mm x 10 mm tube 
16 cm 
C4 
6 mm x 10 mm tube 
5 cm 
C5 
6 mm x 10 mm tube 
10 cm 
C6 
6 mm x 10 mm tube 
16 cm 
Tension test specimen.
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
c# convert pdf to jpg; pdf to jpeg converter
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
best pdf to jpg converter; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
2#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
2-15
Making a tension test specimen.
Reinforcing the ends of a compression test specimen.
To make a tension test specimen, apply glue to 
one of the cardboard squares.  Place the member onto 
the glue, and hold it in position until the glue sets.  
Repeat for the opposite end of the member, as shown 
at right.
To make the compression test specimens, start by 
laying out and fabricating cardboard tubes of the 
required sizes, exactly as we did in Learning Activity 
#1.  Then reinforce the ends of each member by 
coating a 6mm-wide strip of cardboard with glue, and 
wrapping the strip around the entire perimeter of the 
member at each end.  This procedure is illustrated in 
the photo at right.  The purpose of this reinforcement 
is to ensure that the ends of the member do not crush 
when they are compressed by the testing machine.  
The picture at right shows one complete set of test 
specimens—three bars of different widths and two 
tubular cross-sections, each in three different lengths. 
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
convert pdf picture to jpg; change pdf to jpg online
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from PDF Images on Windows. Features and Benefits. Powerful image converter to convert images of JPG, JPEG formats to PDF files;
.net convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf photo to jpg
2-16
Conduct the Tension Tests
Use the following procedure to test each of your 
tension specimens:
1) 
To prepare for your first test, clamp the testing 
machine to the edge of a table, with the long end 
of the loading arm overhanging as shown.  Place 
the temporary support under the loading arm, and 
hang a bucket from the notch at the end of the 
loading arm.  Put a chair or stool below the bucket 
and, if necessary, stack books on the chair so that 
the space between the top of the stack and the 
bottom of the bucket is only about two inches.  
When a test specimen breaks, the bucket will fall; 
we don’t want it to fall very far.
2) 
Place one of the 4mm tension specimens (Test T1) 
into position, centered on the T-Line.
3) 
Clamp the top of the specimen to the loading arm 
and the bottom of the specimen to the base.  
Ensure that the specimen remains straight and 
vertical.  The clamps must be tight, so the speci-
men won’t slip. 
2
3
1
2#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
2-17
Q
Q
5
Is cardboard ductile or brittle?
Did your test specimen fail in a ductile or brittle manner?  What does 
this characteristic tell you about the suitability of cardboard as a 
structural material? 
4) 
Remove the temporary support, and gently allow 
the weight of the bucket to pull the specimen 
tight.  Now begin the loading process.  Fill the 
scoop with sand, then slowly pour the sand from 
the scoop into the bucket.  Wait 5 seconds, then 
add a second scoop of sand.  Wait 5 seconds, and 
add a third scoop.  Continue this process, always 
waiting 5 seconds between scoops, until the 
specimen breaks.  
5) 
The failure of the specimen will happen suddenly, 
without warning—often during one of the 5-sec-
ond pauses in the loading process.  However, if 
the failure does occur while you are adding sand, 
stop immediately.  The sand in the bucket should 
be the exact amount that caused the failure to 
occur. 
4
5
6)
Lift the bucket off of the testing machine, place it 
on the scale, and record the mass. 
Now empty the bucket, and repeat the process for 
each of your tension specimens.  For each test, keep 
careful records of the specimen size and the mass of 
the bucket and sand.
6
2-18
Q
Q
6
Why is it necessary for the loading arm to be balanced?
When the testing machine was built, the loading arm was balanced 
on the pivot (see Appendix C).  If the loading arm had not been 
balanced, how would it affect your experimental results? 
Analyze and Graph the Tension Data
To analyze our experimental data, we need to calculate the actual tensile strength that we measured in each 
test, then create a graph of tensile strength vs. member width.  This graph will give us the capability to deter-
mine the tensile strength for any member width, not just the specific widths we tested.  The analysis and graph-
ing can be performed most easily and accurately by using a computer spreadsheet.
Calculate the Tensile Strength
For each tension test, you determined the mass of the bucket and sand that caused the specimen to fail.  In 
order to determine the tensile strength, you must:
(1)
Convert the mass to weight, using the equation:
where g is 9.81 meters/second
2
and m must be expressed in kilograms.
(2)
Apply the principle of the lever to determine the force in the specimen at failure, using the equation:
Because these calculations must be performed for each individual test, the analysis can be done very effi-
ciently with a spreadsheet.  The results should look something like this:
Test
Member
Mass of
Weight of
Tensile 
Number
Width
Bucket & Sand
Bucket & Sand
Strength
(mm)
(g)
(N)
(N)
T1
4
942
9.2
25.7
T1
4
996
9.8
27.2
T1
4
928
9.1
25.3
T2
6
1497
14.7
40.8
T2
6
1424
14.0
38.8
T2
6
1398
13.7
38.1
T3
8
1880
18.4
51.3
T3
8
1909
18.7
52.1
T3
8
1832
18.0
50.0
2#LEARNING ACTIVITY  
2-19
In this spreadsheet, the black cells are headings, the white cells are for entry of experimental data, and the 
gray cells are calculated automatically.  The cell formulas required to create this spreadsheet with Microsoft 
Excel look like this:  
Note that the spreadsheet is set up to allow any values of L
1
and L
2
to be entered.  This is important, because 
the actual measurements L
1
and L
2
for your testing machine are likely to be different from these values.  Note 
also that the mass was recorded in grams, so it had to be converted to kilograms (divided by 1000) as part of the 
weight calculation.
Q
Q
7
Can you verify these spreadsheet calculations?
Whenever you use a computer to solve a numerical problem, you 
should verify that the calculations are being done correctly.  One way 
to verify computer results is to perform one complete set of calcula-
tions by hand and compare your answer with the one the computer 
calculated.  Select any one of the tension test results above, calculate 
the tensile strength by hand, and compare your results to the com-
puter solution.  Are the computer results correct?
Create a Graph of Tensile Strength vs. Member Width
Once the spreadsheet is set up, it is a relatively simple task to create a graph of tensile strength vs. member 
width.  The best type of graph for this type of data is an “x-y scatter plot,” with no line connecting the data 
points.  Use member width for the x-axis and tensile strength for the y-axis.  The procedure for creating this 
graph depends of the spreadsheet software you are using.  Check the program’s “Help” menu for instructions.  
The result should look something like the graph on the following page  .  Each “+” symbol represents one test.
2-20
Tensile Strength vs. Member Length for cardboard members (experimental data).
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Member Width (mm)
Tensile Strength (newtons)
0.0
10.0
20.0
30.0
40.0
50.0
60.0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Member Width (mm)
Tensile Strength (newtons)
Trend Line
Tensile Strength vs. Member Length for cardboard members (experimental data with trend line).  
As you might expect, there is some “scatter” in our experimental data—a clear indication of both experi-
mental error and natural variability in the tensile strength of a material.  Nonetheless, the data points all appear 
to lie along a straight line.  This observation suggests that there is a linear relationship between member width 
and tensile strength.  We can represent this linear relationship by drawing a “best fit” straight line directly on 
the x-y scatter plot.  Many spreadsheet programs can do this automatically, using a function called “trend line” 
or “linear regression.”  Again, check the “Help” menu of your spreadsheet program to see if either of these 
functions is available.  If not, you can print a copy of the graph you just created, then use a pencil and ruler to 
draw a straight line that best fits your data.  Whether you draw the line yourself or use the spreadsheet to do it, 
you must ensure that the trend line passes through the point (0,0).  We know that a member with zero width 
must have zero strength, so the point (0,0) must lie on the trend line.  In a spreadsheet program, this is normally 
accomplished by setting the y-intercept of the trend line to zero.  The result should look like this:
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested