Page |  
21 
1. Purpose of the Review 
The export standards review was undertaken to provide a snapshot of current compliance standards 
against GA‘s Required Standards for Countries Seeking to Import Australian Greyhounds. While this 
review is by no means conclusive, it has provided GA with a high-level understanding of problems 
associated with export destinations which will then be used to focus GA‘s compliance efforts over 
the short to medium term. 
While the compliance statistics themselves will be of interest, it should be noted that they have been 
provided to GA on a self-assessment basis. Results may need to be independently verified to gain a 
comprehensive understanding of the statistics provided, and will also need to be matched against 
export numbers so the size of the current export market and, indeed, the market for Australian 
greyhounds in each host country, can be determined. 
This section provides an overview of the: 
 Export market for Australian greyhounds  
 Process for assessing current levels of compliance with the required standards  
 Current compliance levels against the standards  
 Short to medium term approach to exporting greyhounds to each host country. 
1.1  The overseas market for Australian greyhounds 
It is GA‘s understanding that the export of Australian greyhounds dates back at least 40 years and 
has predominantly focused on racing, with the vast majority of greyhounds introduced to the host 
country‘s racing population. It is mandatory that every greyhound exported from Australia must meet 
the Department of Agriculture's Biosecurity Unit regulations as well as the requirements of local laws 
that may exist in the host country.  The Department makes available information on these 
requirements via its website and also provides country-specific information upon request. 
The Department of Agriculture's Biosecurity Unit does not assess host countries for compliance 
against greyhound welfare standards through its regulatory process, nor does it have different 
procedures in place to cover the different reasons for export (racing purposes, breeding purposes or 
as a pet). A lack of government information on the welfare standards of overseas jurisdictions has 
made it difficult for GA to control welfare outcomes and made it important that the industry to 
undertake its best endeavours to ensure exporters notify GA of their intention to export, for exporters 
to obtain GA's approval for export, and for GA to assess the suitability of jurisdictions for export..   
As a first step in attempting to regulate the export of racing greyhounds, all member bodies of GA 
implemented a Greyhound Passport Scheme under GAR 124 in July 2004.
3
The purpose of this rule 
was to allow GA jurisdictional members to better oversee the exportation of greyhounds and provide 
a process for the appropriate tracking of exports, with ultimate responsibility for declaring the 
purpose for export resting with owners. While providing GA with extremely useful data on greyhound 
export numbers, this rule has not been as effective in regulating greyhound exports as GA had 
expected because: 
 Any greyhound can be legally exported without a GA passport 
 The suitability of potential export destinations had not been adequately assessed from an 
greyhound welfare perspective. 
3
Greyhound Australasia Rules (GAR), effective 1 January 2013, 
http://www.galtd.org.au/greyhoundsaustralasia/files/GA%20Rules%202013.pdf
Changing pdf to jpg on - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
batch pdf to jpg converter online; changing pdf to jpg
Changing pdf to jpg on - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg file; best pdf to jpg converter
Page |  
22 
While the first two points will be further addressed in Part E, this section aims to assess the animal 
welfare report card of each current export destination. 
Based on available statistics from the Department of Agriculture's Biosecurity Unit, GA believes 
Australian greyhounds have been exported to the following countries between the years 2010 to 
2011: 
Host Country 
2010 
2011 
Argentina  
13 
Austria 
Belgium 
Canada 
China 
24 
19 
Czech Republic 
Fiji 
Finland 
Germany 
Hawaii 
Hong Kong 
135 
65 
India 
Italy 
Macau 
280 
309 
New Caledonia 
New Zealand  
330 
272 
Pakistan 
Russia 
Singapore 
Thailand 
United Kingdom 
United States 
TOTAL 
797 
703 
While the Department has advised Australian greyhounds have been exported to over 20 countries 
since 2010, the vast majority of greyhounds go to two host jurisdictions: New Zealand and Macau 
(special administrative region of the People's Republic of China). 
Although New Zealand is a member of GA, greyhounds exported to this country are still required to 
comply with Biosecurity processes. Prior to 1 January 2010, New Zealand importers were also 
required to obtain a greyhound passport prior to export under GAR 124. This rule was changed 
because New Zealand was a member of GA, however, it is a recommendation of this review that 
New Zealand again be required to comply with this rule to ensure consistency with GA‘s Required 
Standards for Countries Seeking to Import Australian Greyhounds.  
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
combine various scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif PDF together and save as new PDF, without changing the previous two PDF documents at
convert pdf file to jpg file; convert multi page pdf to jpg
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images. C#
convert pdf pages to jpg; convert pdf into jpg format
Page |  
23 
Summary of Export Numbers via GA’s Passport System 
Year 
New Zealand 
Macau 
Other 
Countries 
Total 
(GA Passport) 
Total 
(Department)  
2008 
491 
244 
86 
821 
N/A 
2009 
355 
376 
75 
806 
N/A 
2010 
306
4
269 
26 
601 
777 
2011 
247 
348 
27 
622 
703 
2012 
198 
369 
571 
N/A 
2013 
272 
29 
307 
N/A 
2. Source Country Analysis 
2.1 Consultation plan and process 
The review consultation process was undertaken by GA‘s CEO between May and December 2012 
following the initial stage of development which involved the formulation of GA‘s Required Standards 
for Countries Seeking to Import Australian Greyhounds. The export country self-assessment 
questionnaire was then drawn directly from the standards and was designed to assess jurisdictional 
compliance in an efficient and credible manner.  
Despite the reasonable number of recorded jurisdictions where Australian greyhounds are exported, 
GA consulted initially only with those countries that had a body responsible for the regulation of 
greyhound racing and that it had established a direct relationship with, this provided credibility to the 
self-assessment questionnaire. All other jurisdictions where then dealt with prospectively on a case-
by-case basis, with a welfare standard review occurring once an application for a greyhound 
passport is received.  
It was determined in the early planning stages of the review that the only way to effectively assess 
current compliance rates against the standards was via self-assessment. Whilst GA fully 
acknowledges that these responses may need to be independently verified over time, the 
questionnaire was an extremely effective way of identifying potential compliance issues and 
determining GA‘s response. The reliability of responses was supported by withholding GA's 
Required Standards for Countries Seeking to Import Australian Greyhounds from respondents, 
ensuring they were unaware of the expected levels of compliance.  
The GA questionnaire covered all areas of both on and off-track welfare standards, providing GA 
with a good benchmark of compliance across the entire export market. Specifically, the 
questionnaire covered: 
 Housing 
o Location of kennels 
o Construction and general requirements of kennels 
o Kennel size 
 Health and Veterinary Care 
o Health checks 
o Veterinary care 
o Euthanasia 
4
Data on all exports from 1 January 2010 is provided by New Zealand Greyhound Racing Association (Inc.); unnamed greyhounds 
are not recorded, which affects the accuracy of results from New Zealand. 
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
used commonly in daily life (like tiff, jpg, png, bitmap format in VB programming code, like changing "tif" to users are also allowed to convert PDF to other
convert pdf to jpg converter; batch convert pdf to jpg
C# Tiff Convert: How to Convert Raster Images (Jpeg/Png/Bmp/Gif)
Give You Sample Codes for Changing and Converting Jpeg, Png RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.jpg"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output
best program to convert pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg online
Page |  
24 
 General Welfare 
o Identification 
o Exercise 
o Hygiene, cleaning and disinfection 
o Pest control 
o Waste disposal 
o Transport 
o Food and water 
o Feeding 
 Clubs/Tracks/Racing 
o Track maintenance 
o First aid resources and facilities 
o Injury treatment 
o Live animal baiting for training 
o Race rules, policies and operating standards  
o Race training care 
o Licensing and education 
 Accountability/Responsibility 
o Life cycle tracking 
o Extension of racing life 
o Greyhound adoption programs 
o Record keeping 
o Greyhound retirement 
o Responsible breeding initiatives 
The questionnaire was sent out to export host country industry administrators in June 2012 for initial 
response within six weeks. As was anticipated, most jurisdictions required more time to submit 
responses and requested further advice on what information was sought by GA. Once the responses 
were received, GA then followed up on items which were either incomplete or not addressed.  
Further information was also sought by GA as evidence of standard compliance where necessary. 
The questionnaire and response process was finalised in early December 2012. 
Overall, the receptiveness and response rate to GA‘s request for information was positive. It did 
however, alert GA to some cultural differences between countries which will assist in the process of 
tailoring future questionnaires to ensure they are meaningful to all jurisdictions surveyed.   
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
PowerPoint: PPT, PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document Raster Image Files: BMP, GIF, JPG, PNG, JBIG2PDF in or zoom out functions, and changing file rotation
changing pdf file to jpg; change pdf to jpg online
Page |  
25 
2.2  Export Self-Assessment Questionnaire Summary 
For the purposes of GA‘s review, a regulated country is that which has a central body that supports 
regulation of the industry and its participants. This body can either be government owned or 
regulated, or in some cases, a private organisation. 
An unregulated country is one where greyhound racing is an amateur sport, illegal, non-existent, or 
where GA is unable to communicate with a governing body about the host country‘s standard of 
animal welfare. For the purposes of the review, an unregulated country is also a foreign destination 
where Australian exporters have applied for a greyhound passport within the last 12 months.  
Regulated Countries  
1. United Kingdom 
The Greyhound Board of Great Britain (GBGB) is the governing body of licensed greyhound 
racing sport in England, Scotland and Wales. Upon its recent establishment in January 2009, 
GBGB was tasked with the combined functions of the British Greyhound Racing Board and the 
National Greyhound Racing Club and has responsibility for greyhound racing industry welfare, 
regulation, finance, administration and management. While the industry sector remains self-
regulated, the creation of this single body arose as a result of the Independent Review of the 
Greyhound Industry in Great Britain undertaken in 2007. The outcome of this review was the 
result of a raft of recommendations aimed at improving the efficiency and effectiveness of 
sectoral regulation, and raising welfare standards within Britain‘s greyhound industry. 
While the GBGB‘s structure enables ultimate authority over the sport, support is given by an 
independent Greyhound Regulatory Board and several committees which assist with issues in the 
areas of welfare, racing, finance, disciplinary matters, and industry appeals. 
According to the GBGB, annual attendance at Britain‘s 26 racing tracks is more than 2 million, 
with approximately £2.5 billion wagered both on and off the track
5
. Although one of the UK‘s most 
popular spectator sports, the Department of Agriculture Biosecurity Unit‘s export data indicates 
that only six greyhounds were exported to the region in 2010 and three in 2011, while GA‘s 
passport scheme shows that no greyhounds were exported to this jurisdiction in either of these 
years. 
The GBGB‘s self-regulatory framework, Rules of Racing and support by government regulation 
ensures participants in the sport adhere to stringent welfare and integrity standards. Millions of 
dollars are said to be spent by the GBGB on greyhound welfare each year.  
The UK‘s completed self-assessment questionnaire indicates that the industry operates similarly 
to Australia, with a mix of hobby and professional trainers. The wellbeing of all greyhounds is the 
intended priority in each process and practice undertaken by the GBGB, and the questionnaire 
results indicate full compliance with GA‘s export welfare standards. 
2. Ireland 
The Irish Greyhound Board (IGB) is a commercial semi-state body with responsibility under the 
Greyhound Industry Act 1958 for the regulation and development of the greyhound industry in the 
Republic of Ireland. This includes matters relating to track licensing, official, trainer and 
bookmaker permits, and the implementation of the racing rules. 
5
Greyhound Board of Great Britain, http://www.thedogs.co.uk/Default.aspx
Page |  
26 
The IGB owns and manages nine out of the 17 licensed greyhound stadia located in the Republic 
of Ireland, with the remaining operating under private ownership. Two further privately owned 
stadia also exist in Northern Ireland. 
The Irish Coursing Club (ICC) was established in 1916 and chartered with responsibility for 
greyhounds under the Greyhound Industry Act 1958. The ICC is a recognised controlling 
authority over matters relating to the breeding of racing greyhounds and greyhound coursing 
(including registration and identification), and has operative functions relating to greyhound racing 
and training for reward in accordance with local laws. 
The primary objectives of the ICC is the promotion of responsible greyhound breeding (including 
maintaining the Irish Greyhound Stud Book), encouragement and regulation of greyhound 
coursing (including provision for ICC affiliation of local coursing clubs), contribution to the 
regulation of greyhound racing and training for reward, and the provision of input into the 
development of Ireland‘s greyhound industry (including providing for ICC affiliation to persons 
owning or exercising control over greyhound race tracks). 
Notably, coursing operates within a highly regulated environment in Ireland under a licence 
administered by the Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht. The ICC‘s comprehensive 
industry rules are directly applied in parallel to government regulation. 
Owners, trainers and breeders in Ireland are governed by the Welfare of Greyhounds Act 2011, 
which sets out clear provisions relating to the welfare of greyhounds. The IGB and ICC, together 
with local authorities, are responsible for enforcement of this Act. Further, the IGB is also obliged 
to publish a Code of Practice as part of the Act‘s compliance measures.  
Despite the results of Ireland‘s self-assessment questionnaire indicating a vigorously regulated 
industry that operates similarly to Australia, as well as a high standard of compliance to ensure 
the welfare of greyhounds, GA is unable to fully endorse the host country due, primarily, to a lack 
of detail particularly around the practical application of their Greyhound Code of Practice‘s 
minimum dimensions for greyhound kennel sizes. 
The Department of Agriculture Biosecurity Unit‘s export data indicates that for the calendar years 
2010 and 2011, no Australian greyhounds were exported to Ireland and therefore, full compliance 
with the Australian Export Standards is not a priority concern. However, GA will continue to work 
with IGB to resolve areas of potential non-compliance and is hopeful that full compliance with the 
Australian Export Standards will be achieved in the short to medium term. 
3. United States 
The National Greyhound Association (NGA) is the racing greyhound registry body for track 
operators and individual racing jurisdictions on the North American continent. A not-for-profit 
association, the NGA‘s aim is to uphold the sport‘s credible reputation and promote the wellbeing 
of greyhounds. In assisting to meet this purpose, the NGA together with the Greyhound Track 
Operators Association (AGTOA) established the American Greyhound Council (AGC) to develop, 
fund and oversee programs to ensure the welfare of racing greyhounds on the farm, at the track 
and upon retirement. 
6
While close to fully compliant with GA‘s export standards, it is clear from the self-assessment 
questionnaire results that the industry in the US operates slightly differently to Australia. Most 
significantly, any greyhound that is kenneled at a track is regulated by state legislation and the 
6
The National Greyhound Association, http://ngagreyhounds.com/page/welfare 
Page |  
27 
NGA is only responsible for setting and enforcing guidelines for greyhound farms. As an industry 
driven for commercial profit, a larger percentage of kennels are aligned to racing tracks. It is 
worth noting however, that greyhound farms in all US states fall under the regulation of animal 
welfare laws and requirements. A few states additionally need to adhere to guidelines set by the 
state racing commission or the state department of agriculture.  
While highly regulated, GA will follow up this jurisdiction on several compliance issues including 
kennel sizes. 
The Department of Agriculture Biosecurity Unit‘s export data indicates that two greyhounds were 
exported to the region in 2010 and seven in 2011, while GA‘s Greyhound Passport Scheme did 
not record that any greyhounds were exported to the region during either year. 
4. Czech Republic 
Although only a small industry which operates with approximately 50-100 competing greyhounds, 
the Czech Greyhound Racing Federation (CGRF) is the principal regulatory body for racing 
greyhounds in the Czech Republic.  
An extremely professional and fully compliant jurisdiction, the welfare of racing greyhounds is of 
upmost importance to the CGRF, which is reflected in an industry guided by mandated rules that 
are largely based on Australia‘s code of conduct. 
5. Vietnam 
A 25 year licence was granted to Sports and Entertainment Services Ltd (SES) to operate 
greyhound racing in Vietnam in 1999, which included the rights to conduct totalisator betting.  
SES originally imported greyhounds from Australia but as it now has its own breeding program, 
has not imported Australian greyhounds since 2009.  
Vietnam did not complete GA‘s self-assessment questionnaire and is therefore, a non-compliant 
jurisdiction. Vietnam indicated that it has no future need to import greyhounds from Australia. 
6. Macau 
The Macau Canidrome is managed by an independent board of directors who are regulated by 
the Macau Government‘s Gaming Inspections and Coordination Bureau based on site at the 
Canidrome.  
Macau is currently not fully compliant with GA‘s export standards based on the results of its self-
assessment questionnaire. Appropriate regulatory rules, policies and procedures must be put in 
place to support the ongoing welfare of all greyhounds in Macau during and post-racing career. 
Particular areas of concern to GA include: 
 Track maintenance processes and procedures  
 Provision and maintenance of a safe racing environment to minimise the risk of injury 
 Injury rates and seriousness to minimise the need for euthanasia  
 Kennels  
 Policies and initiatives to extend the racing life of a greyhound 
A comprehensive in depth analysis into Macau can be found in Part D - Macau Site Visit. 
Page |  
28 
7. New Zealand 
The New Zealand Greyhound Racing Association (NZGRA) is one of GA‘s nine independent 
industry control bodies and is hence, subject to GA‘s governing code of conduct. 
The results of NZ‘s self-assessment questionnaire indicate that it is close to fully compliant and 
the following welfare issues are currently being considered by the NZGRA‘s racing committee:  
 Policies and initiatives to extend the racing life of a greyhound  
 Kennels  
 Euthanasia. 
Unregulated Countries  
Australian exporters have applied for greyhound passports during the past six months for the 
following four unregulated countries:   
1. China 
2. United Arab Emirates 
3. Japan 
4. South Africa 
Until the review is finalised and recommendations are endorsed by the GA Board, it has been 
agreed that a process of assessment to best manage the export of greyhounds to these countries 
will occur on a case-by-case basis. Specifically, when a greyhound passport application for an 
unregulated country is received, GA issues the Australian exporter with a standard letter outlining 
further required information to assist with determining approval or not. Provision of a passport is then 
subject to the comfort derived from the exporter‘s response.  
Of the four countries listed above, only one passport has been issued in response to a request to 
export a greyhound to Japan during this period. In stating this, it must be noted that anecdotally the 
information provided by the exporters requesting passports for the other three countries – which 
included pictures – exhibited good welfare standards. Without direct connection to a regulatory body 
or government department however, it makes validation by GA for compliance purposes difficult. 
3. Industry Compliance Requirements 
A number of important export host countries remain non-compliant. While GA is likely to withhold 
passports for greyhounds destined for these countries, it acknowledges that this alone will not 
ensure that greyhound exports are suspended to these jurisdictions. While GA continues to work 
with the Federal Government to strengthen compliance with the Greyhound Passport Scheme, it will 
also work with non-compliant countries on achieving acceptable welfare standards. 
Part of the problem with the compliance rates in a number of jurisdictions stems from the inadequate 
regulatory status of racing in those countries. Generally, countries which possess a centrally 
regulated industry have a higher compliance rate than those that do not.  GA has more confidence 
that agreed welfare standards will be effectively enforced in countries where greyhound racing is 
regulated. In countries where this framework does not exist, the onus will be firmly on the racing 
institutions within the country to prove to GA that compliance standards are being met.  Such 
Page |  
29 
compliance will need to be rigorously assessed on a case-by-case basis and may involve 
reassessment for each passport application. 
Given the lack of a centrally organised industry in the presently unregulated jurisdictions of China, 
United Arab Emirates, South Africa and Japan, GA has found reviewing their compliance levels 
against required export standards challenging. Although anecdotal evidence shows that some of the 
major racing facilities in these unregulated countries are well maintained and still operate in the 
absence of an effective program of compliance, passports are not likely to be issued by GA for 
Australian greyhounds targeted for export to these jurisdictions. 
3.1 Macau 
The regulated region with the lowest adherence to compliance is Macau which has been assessed 
by GA as not fully compliant against its export welfare standards. GA suspended the receiving and 
processing of passport applications to Macau in March 2013 after an assessment of Macau's 
responses to GA's self assessment questionnaire. GA intends to work with Macau administrators 
on a program aimed at reaching full compliance.  
Macau visit to Australia 
The Macau Canidrome‘s General Manager and Chief Veterinarian visited Australia in July 2012 to 
share information with GA‘s CEO and GRV‘s Animal Welfare Manager regarding the 
establishment of a Greyhound Adoption Program (GAP) for retired racing greyhounds. Macau 
delegates wanted to demonstrate to GA what processes and financial commitment the 
Canidrome and Macau Government had in place to progress such a program.  
GA took the opportunity to discuss Macau‘s response to GA's self-assessment questionnaire in 
detail. The Canidrome representatives indicated they were committed to enhancing its animal 
welfare standards with both parties agreeing to a program of rectification measures with the aim 
of bringing the Canidrome up to an acceptable level of compliance.  
Macau delegates also took part in a tour of Victoria‘s GAP facility in Seymour where they spent 
several hours discussing adoption policy and practices with the State Program Coordinator - 
knowledge that would assist in the development of an external adoption program in Macau.  
Australia visit to Macau 
Following the Macau Canidrome personnel visit to Australia, a delegation of industry experts from 
Australia  visited the Canidrome during October 2013. The delegation included GA‘s CEO and the 
Animal Welfare Manager of GRV. 
The purpose of the visit was to validate the welfare standards enforced at the Canidrome against 
Australia‘s documented standards for countries seeking to import Australian greyhounds, as well 
as to authenticate Macau‘s responses to GA‘s export self-assessment questionnaire.  
GA believes that a system of allowing Macau to reach near full compliance before allowing 
passports to be issued is the most appropriate way forward. This would involve Macau 
demonstrating close to full compliance and implementing a credible program of activities to reach 
full compliance before passports would be issued. Such compliance will also need to be 
independently verified at that jurisdiction's cost. 
Page |  
30 
3.2 New Zealand, Ireland, United States 
For countries which are assessed as being close to fully compliant, GA will continue to issue 
passports to owners seeking to export greyhounds to these host countries.  GA does however, 
reserve the right to withdraw passports should the meeting of full compliance appear problematic.   
For these jurisdictions, GA does not believe it is appropriate or necessary to perform site visits at this 
time in order to verify compliance but will continue to monitor their compliance by way of an annual 
self-assessment questionnaire. 
3.3 Vietnam 
Vietnam remains non-compliant as it has refused to engage in the self-assessment questionnaire 
process. GA will not be investing resources in assisting Vietnam to reach a state of compliance, as it 
has indicated it will not be sourcing any greyhounds from Australia. Passports will therefore, not be 
issued for greyhounds destined for Vietnam. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested